List of city nicknames in Alabama

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

This partial list of city nicknames in Alabama compiles the aliases, sobriquets and slogans that cities in Alabama are known by (or have been known by historically), officially and unofficially, to locals, outsiders or their tourism boards. City nicknames can help in establishing a civic identity, helping outsiders recognize a community or attracting people to a community because of its nickname; promote civic pride; and build community unity.[1] Nicknames and slogans that successfully create a new community "ideology or myth"[2] are also believed to have economic value.[1] Their economic value is difficult to measure,[1] but there are anecdotal reports of cities that have achieved substantial economic benefits by "branding" themselves by adopting new slogans.[2]

Some unofficial nicknames are positive, while others are derisive. The unofficial nicknames listed here have been in use for a long time or have gained wide currency.

Birmingham's nickname "The Pittsburgh of the South" recalls the historical importance of the steel industry in both cities. This history is the focus of the Sloss Furnaces historical site in Birmingham.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Muench, David (December 1993). "Wisconsin Community Slogans: Their Use and Local Impacts". University of Wisconsin Extension. Archived from the original on March 9, 2013. Retrieved April 10, 2007. 
  2. ^ a b Alfredo Andia, Branding the Generic City :), MU.DOT magazine, September 10, 2007
  3. ^ Alabaster, Alabama, accessed March 28, 2007.
  4. ^ Greetings From America's Secret Capitals, Time (magazine), July 13, 1998.
  5. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Products, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  6. ^ Maney, Kevin. "Claims to fame", USA Today, May 20, 2005. Accessed June 3, 2009.
  7. ^ The Model City of the New South: Anniston, Alabama, 1872-1900, accessed March 28, 2007.
  8. ^ “Loveliest Village” Inspiration Award, accessed March 27, 2007.
  9. ^ The World Capital of Whatever, The New York Times by Harold Faber, September 12, 1993.
  10. ^ Bessemer Area Chamber of Commerce, accessed March 28, 2007.
  11. ^ Birmingham: The Magic City, accessed March 28, 2007.
  12. ^ Birmingham: Introduction, accessed March 28, 2007.
  13. ^ U.S. City Monikers, Tagline Guru website, accessed January 5, 2008
  14. ^ [1], accessed May 12, 2011.
  15. ^ a b Claims to Fame - Fish, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  16. ^ City of Daphne, Alabama website, accessed October 5, 2010. The "Jubilee" nickname refers to a phenomenon in Mobile Bay in "blue crabs, shrimp, and fish swimming from the depths of the bay [are brought] into the shallow waters of the shoreline."
  17. ^ Decatur - The River City Review, accessed March 28, 2007.
  18. ^ Railroad keyed Decatur's growth, The Decatur Daily, February 27, 2007.
  19. ^ Alabama Jubilee Hot-Air Balloon Classic, accessed March 28, 2007. Archived February 3, 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  20. ^ Decatur History, accessed March 28, 2007. Archived February 3, 2007 at the Wayback Machine
  21. ^ [2], accessed April 14, 2010.
  22. ^ City of Dothan, accessed March 28, 2007.
  23. ^ Claims to Fame - Agriculture, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  24. ^ [3]
  25. ^ Douglas, Alabama profile, accessed March 28, 2007.
  26. ^ Greenville, Alabama city profile, Epodunk, accessed March 28, 2007.
  27. ^ Claims to Fame - Plants, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  28. ^ CONGRATULATING THE CITY OF HALEYVILLE, ALABAMA AS THE HOME OF 911, accessed March 28, 2007.
  29. ^ City of Hartselle, accessed March 28, 2007.
  30. ^ The Alabama Gang, Alabama Live, accessed March 29, 2007. "The Alabama Gang was especially forceful during the formative years of NASCAR as brothers Bobby and Donnie Allison and Red Farmer set up shop in Hueytown, Ala., putting that town on the sports map."
  31. ^ "National Affairs: Rocket City, U.S.A.". Time. February 17, 1958. Retrieved March 16, 2010. 
  32. ^ Huntsville: Rocket City, About.com, accessed March 29, 2007.
  33. ^ A Brief History of Huntsville, Marshall Space Flight Center, accessed March 29, 2007. "During these years Huntsville was famed as the "Watercress Capital of the World," and Madison County was Alabama's leader in cotton production."
  34. ^ Jacksonville, Alabama profile, accessed March 29, 2007.
  35. ^ Talladega County: Quality of Life, accessed March 29, 2007. "The City adopted the nickname "Motorsports City" due to its proximity next to the Talladega Superspeedway. "
  36. ^ Madison, Alabama city profile, accessed March 29, 2007.
  37. ^ [4], accessed April 14, 2010.
  38. ^ "Encyclopedia of Alabama: Steamboats in Alabama", Encyclopedia of Alabama, September 2008. Accessed March 22, 2011. "The state's most important towns developed along...navigable rivers, and Mobile, the largest metropolis, became known as the Port City."
  39. ^ Public Television Features Mobile's Azalea Trail, University of Alabama Center for Public Television & Radio press release. Accessed May 17, 2007. "MOBILE--This town is known as The Azalea City, and the evergreen azaleas for which it is famous are an indispensable part of the city’s character."
  40. ^ Sheboygan Press, The Sheboygan Press May 20, 1932. "Q. What city is called The city Of Six Flags? MN a Mobile, Alabama. It has been under French, Spanish, British, American, Alabama, and Confederate Flags."
  41. ^ The Mother of All Mardi Gras, accessed March 29, 2007.
  42. ^ [5], accessed April 10, 2010.
  43. ^ "Today, we are more than just the Capital of Alabama--we are the Capital of the South!", accessed September 16, 2007.
  44. ^ Newfield, Jack. "Marching to Montgomery: The Cradle Did Rock", The Village Voice, April 1, 1965. Accessed May 17, 2007. "It was the Ecumenical Council, a hootenanny, a happening, and a revolution all rolled into one. And it happened in Montgomery, 'Cradle of the Confederacy.'"
  45. ^ "Muscle Shoals Music - Shoals Chamber of Commerce", shoalschamber.com, accessed 2011-02-22. "By the close of the 1980s, the music business no longer regarded Muscle Shoals as "The Hit Recording Capital of the World."
  46. ^ a b Visiting or Staying?, Prattville, Alabama. Accessed May 17, 2007. "Long before Prattville became "The Preferred Community," it was known as "The Fountain City" because of its numerous artesian wells."
  47. ^ "Freedom March Begins at Selma; Troops on Guard". New York Times. March 22, 1965. "Selma, which calls itself queen of the Alabama Black Belt -- the swath of rich, dark soil and heavy Negro population across south-central Alabama." 
  48. ^ [6], accessed April 14, 2010
  49. ^ Slocomb Tomato Festival at WTVY.com, accessed August 9, 2007
  50. ^ South Baldwin Chamber of Commerce, accessed March 29, 2007. "Just north of Foley lies Summerdale, which offers a picturesque view of rural farm life and lives up to its slogan, 'The Sunshine City.'"
  51. ^ Claims to Fame - Rocks, Epodunk, accessed April 16, 2007.
  52. ^ Frequently Asked Questions, DCH Health System website, accessed May 29, 2011. "In the late 1800s, the city fathers of Tuscaloosa planted oak trees along downtown streets. Just as the City of Birmingham was known as the Magic City because of its amazing growth, the City of Tuscaloosa became known as the Oak City, or, in recognition of the ancient British tribe that worshipped oaks, the Druid City."
  53. ^ Welcome to Tuskegee University, accessed March 29, 2007.
  54. ^ [7]
  55. ^ Vestavia Hills, Alabama, RelocateAmerica website
  56. ^ About Wetumpka, accessed March 29, 2007. "Abundant in lore and legend, Wetumpka (an Indian term meaning rumbling waters) is rich in aboriginal history. "
  57. ^ Motto ought to be boffo, Irvine World News, February 22, 2004

External links[edit]