List of clergy educated at Jesus College, Oxford

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The crest of Jesus College above the entrance on Ship Street

Jesus College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. The college was founded in 1571 by Queen Elizabeth I at the request of Hugh Price, a Welsh clergyman, who was Treasurer of St David's Cathedral in Pembrokeshire. The college still has strong links with Wales, and about 15% of students are Welsh.[1] There are 340 undergraduates and 190 students carrying out postgraduate studies.[2] Women have been admitted since 1974, when the college was one of the first five men's colleges to become co-educational.[3] Old members of Jesus College are sometimes known as "Jesubites".[4]

Three Archbishops of Wales have studied at Jesus College. Alfred Edwards, the first archbishop of the Church in Wales after its disestablishment, read Literae Humaniores from 1871 to 1874, and was archbishop from 1920 to 1934. Glyn Simon, a student from 1922 to 1926, was Archbishop of Wales from 1968 to 1971. He was succeeded by Gwilym Williams, who was archbishop from 1971 to 1982. Other bishops to have held office in Wales include Francis Davies, Roy Davies, John Harris and Morgan Owen (who were all Bishops of Llandaff), Humphrey Humphreys, Lewis Lloyd and Humphrey Lloyd (who were Bishops of Bangor), William Lloyd and John Wynne (who were Bishops of St Asaph), and John Owen and William Thomas (who were Bishops of St David's). William Havard was a Welsh rugby international before becoming Bishop of St Asaph, then Bishop of St David's.

Several former students have been appointed as cathedral deans; many others became parish priests in Wales and elsewhere in the Anglican church, some also finding time for other activities such as writing poetry or pursuing antiquarian interests. At least five have been Dean of Bangor: Henry Thomas Edwards, Henry James, Evan Lewis, John Pryce and James Vincent Vincent. Llewelyn Hughes was Dean of Ripon from 1951 to 1967, Alex Wedderspoon was Dean of Guildford from 1987 to 2001, and Wesley Carr was Dean of Westminster Abbey from 1997 to 2006. Edmund Meyrick, who studied at the college between 1656 and 1659, became Treasurer of St David's Cathedral; he left money in his will to the college to fund scholarships for Welsh students, which are still awarded.[5] The lexicographer John Davies of Mallwyd, who translated the Bible into Welsh, studied at the college. In the mid-19th century, some Anglican priests were influenced by John Henry Newman and converted to Roman Catholicism, including David Lewis; Edmund Ffoulkes also converted, but later returned to Anglicanism, becoming vicar of the University Church of St Mary the Virgin in Oxford. John David Jenkins, who was Canon of Pietermaritzburg for a time, was later nicknamed the "Rail men's Apostle" for his ministry to railway workers in Oxford. David Thomas, a priest in Gwynedd, was instrumental in the foundation of a Welsh church in the Welsh settlement in Argentina.

Some students became ministers in other denominations of Christianity. Methodists include David Charles and Christopher Bassett; Baptists include Gwilym Davies (the first person to broadcast on the radio in Welsh, in 1923); Welsh Presbyterians include William David Davies and Gwilym Edwards; Unitarians include John Islan Jones; and Catholics include John Hugh Jones and the Benedictine monk and poet Sylvester Houédard.

Alumni[edit]

The chapel of Jesus College
Abbreviations used in the following table
  • M – Year of matriculation at Jesus College (a dash indicates that the individual did not matriculate at the college)
  • G – Year of graduation / conclusion of study at Jesus College (a dash indicates that the individual moved to another college before graduating or concluding studies)
  • DNG – Did not graduate: left the college without obtaining a degree
  • ? – Year unknown; approximate year used for table-sorting purposes
  • (F/P) – later became a Fellow or Principal of Jesus College, and included on the list of Principals and Fellows
  • (HF) – later became an Honorary Fellow of Jesus College, and included on the list of Honorary Fellows
Degree abbreviations

The subject studied and the degree classification are included, where known. Until the early 19th century, undergraduates read for a Bachelor of Arts degree that included study of Latin and Greek texts, mathematics, geometry, philosophy and theology. Individual subjects at undergraduate level were only introduced later: for example, Mathematics (1805), Natural Science (1850), Jurisprudence (1851, although it had been available before this to students who obtained special permission), Modern History (1851) and Theology (1871). Geography and Modern Languages were introduced in the 20th century. Music had been taught as a specialist subject, rather than being part of the BA course, before these changes; medicine was studied as a postgraduate subject.[6]

Archbishops and bishops[edit]

Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Coke, ThomasThomas Coke 1764 1775 BA (1768), MA (1770), DCL Methodist bishop [7]
Cragg, KennethKenneth Cragg (HF) 1931 1934 BA Modern History (2nd) (1934), DPhil (1950) Assistant Bishop of Jerusalem (1970–1973) and writer on Muslim–Christian relations [8][9][10]
Davies, FrancisFrancis Davies (F) 1621 1628 BA (1625), MA (1628), BD (1640), DD (1661) Bishop of Llandaff (1667–1675) [11]
Davies, RoyRoy Davies 1955? 1959 BLitt Bishop of Llandaff (1985–1999) [12]
Dickinson, JohnJohn Dickinson 1920 1923 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd) Assistant Bishop of Melanesia (1931–1937) [13][14][15]
Edwards, AlfredAlfred Edwards (HF) 1871 1874 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd) First Archbishop of the disestablished Church in Wales (1920–1934) [16][17][18]
Ellis, RowlandRowland Ellis 1860 1863 BA Natural Science (honorary 4th) Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney (1906–1911) [19][20][21]
Harris, JohnJohn Harris 1697 1701 BA (1701), MA (1714) Bishop of Llandaff (1729–1738), also Dean of Hereford (1729–1736) and of Wells (1736–1738) [22]
Havard, WilliamWilliam Havard 1919 1921 BA Modern History College chaplain (1919–1921) who won his "Blue" for rugby and represented Wales against New Zealand Services in 1919 (his only international) before becoming Bishop of St Asaph (1934–1950) and Bishop of St David's (1950–1956) [14][23]
Howell, ThomasThomas Howell 1607 1612 BA (1609), MA (1612), BD and DD (1630) Bishop of Bristol (1644–1645), who was ejected during the English Civil War [24]
Humphreys, HumphreyHumphrey Humphreys (F) 1666 1672 BA (1669), MA (1672), BD (1679), DD (1682) Bishop of Bangor (1689–1701) and Bishop of Hereford (1701–1712) [25][26]
Joscelyne, AlbertAlbert Joscelyne 1884 1888 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd) Bishop Coadjutor of Jamaica (1905–1913) [27][28]
Lloyd, Lewis Lewis Lloyd 1862 1867 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) (1867), MA (1871) Headmaster of Dolgelley Grammar School, Friars School, Bangor and Christ College, Brecon; later Bishop of Bangor [19][29]
Lloyd, HumphreyHumphrey Lloyd 1628 Graduated from Oriel College; Bishop of Bangor (1674–1689) [30]
Lloyd, WilliamWilliam Lloyd (F) 1640 1642 BA (1642), MA (1646), BD and DD (1667) Bishop of St Asaph (1680–1692), Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry (1692–1699) and Bishop of Worcester (1699–1717) [31]
Meredith, RichardRichard Meredith 1575 BA (1573), MA (1575) Matriculated in 1568, later moving to Jesus College; Bishop of Leighlin (1579–1597) [32]
Owen, JohnJohn Owen 1872 1876 BA Mathematics (2nd) (2nd in Mods in Classics and in Mathematics) Professor of Welsh (1879–1889) and Principal (1892–1897) at St David's College, Lampeter before becoming Bishop of St David's (1897–1926) [33]
Owen, MorganMorgan Owen 1608 Graduated BA from New College and MA from Hart Hall, later becoming Bishop of Llandaff (1639–c.1644) [34]
Peploe, SamuelSamuel Peploe 1689 1693 BA (1691), MA (1693) Bishop of Chester (1726–1752) [35]
Parry, BenjaminBenjamin Parry 1652 BA Matriculated at Trinity College, Dublin in 1648 before moving to Oxford; Bishop of Ossory (January to October 1678) [36]
Rider, JohnJohn Rider 1578? 1583 BA (1581), MA Lexicographer and Bishop of Killaloe (1612–1632) [37]
Roe, GordonGordon Roe 1950 1962 BA French and German (2nd, 1953), DipTh, DPhil (1962) Bishop of Huntingdon (1980–1997) [13][38][39][40]
Simon, GlynGlyn Simon (HF) 1922 1926 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) Archbishop of Wales (1968–1971) [41]
Thomas, WilliamWilliam Thomas (F) 1635 BA (1632), MA (1635), DD (1660) Matriculated from St John's College in 1629 but later moved to Jesus College; Bishop of St David's (1677–1683) and Bishop of Worcester (1683–1689) [42]
Williams, AlwynAlwyn Williams (HF) 1906 1911 BA Literae Humaniores (1st) (1910) (1st in Mods in Classics), BA Modern History (1st) (1911) President of the JCR and Captain of Boats whilst at college; Fellow of All Souls (1911–1918); Bishop of Durham (1939–1952) and Bishop of Winchester (1952–1961) [43][44]
Williams, GwilymGwilym Williams (HF) 1930 1933 BA English (1st) Bishop of Bangor (1957–1982) and Archbishop of Wales (1971–1982) [45]
Woodward, CliffordClifford Woodward (HF) 1897 1901 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) Bishop of Bristol (1933–1946) and Bishop of Gloucester (1946–1953) [46][47]
Wynne, JohnJohn Wynne (F/P) 1682 1685 BA (1685), BD (1696), DD (1706) Bishop of St Asaph (1715–1727) and Bishop of Bath and Wells (1727–1743) [48]

Deans[edit]

At least five former students of Jesus College have become Dean of Bangor Cathedral.
Guildford Cathedral, where Alex Wedderspoon was Dean from 1987 to 2001
Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Carr , WesleyWesley Carr 1960 1964 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) Dean of Westminster Abbey (1997–2006) [38][49][50]
Edwards, Henry ThomasHenry Thomas Edwards 1857 1860 BA Dean of Bangor (1876–1884) [51]
Hughes, Llewelyn Llewelyn Hughes 1913 1921 BA Modern History Dean of Ripon (1951–1967) [13][14][52]
Jacob, Ungoed Ungoed Jacob 1929 1932 BA Modern History (2nd) Dean of Brecon (1967–1978) [13][46]
James, HenryHenry James 1882 1886 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) (1886), MA (1891), BD and DD (1924) Dean of Bangor (1934–1940) [13][27][53]
Jones, David JohnDavid John Jones 1889 1893 BA Theology (3rd) Dean of Llandaff (1931–1948) [27][54]
Jones, WilliamWilliam Jones 1919 1922 BA Dean of Brecon (1950–1964) [13][46]
Le Marinel, MatthewMatthew Le Marinel 1902 1904? ? Dean of Jersey (1937–1959) [46][55]
Lewellin, LlewelynLlewelyn Lewellin 1818 1827 BA Literae Humaniores (1st, 1822), MA (1824), BCL (1827), DCL (1829) First Principal of St David's College, Lampeter (1828–1878), also Dean of St David's (1843–1878) [19][56][57]
Lewis, EvanEvan Lewis 1838 1841 BA (1841), MA (1863) Dean of Bangor (1884–1901), and younger brother of David Lewis [58]
Lewis, JohnJohn Lewis 1966? 1970 BA Mathematics (1969), Diploma in Applied Statistics (1970) Dean of Llandaff since 2000 [8][59]
Pryce, JohnJohn Pryce 1847 1851 BA Dean of Bangor (1902–1903) [60]
Roberts, EdwardEdward Roberts 1896 1899? BA Dean of Brecon (1939–1949) [13][46]
Stradling, GeorgeGeorge Stradling 1638 1640 BA Dean of Chichester (1672–1688) [61]
Vincent, James VincentJames Vincent Vincent (F) 1811 1815 BA (1815), MA (1817) Dean of Bangor (1862–1876) [19][62]
Wedderspoon, AlexAlex Wedderspoon 1951 1955? BA Modern History (2nd, 1954), BD Dean of Guildford (1987–2001) [8][46]

Other cathedral clergy[edit]

Thomas Pardo, Principal of Jesus College (1727–1763), was also Chancellor of St David's Cathedral (1749–1753).
Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Briscoe, ThomasThomas Briscoe (F) 1830 1833 BA (1833), MA (1836), BD (1843), DD (1868) Vicar of Holyhead for 37 years, chancellor of Bangor Cathedral and translator of the New Testament into Welsh [19][63]
Farrington, RichardRichard Farrington 1720 1724 BA Welsh priest and antiquarian, with a particular interest in Caernarfonshire; Chancellor of Bangor Cathedral [64]
Harris, WilliamWilliam Harris 1910 1913 BA Theology (1913, 2nd), BLitt (1913) Precentor, Canon and Treasurer of St David's Cathedral; also Professor of Theology (then Professor of Welsh) at St David's College, Lampeter [14][65]
Hoare, JosephJoseph Hoare (F/P) 1727 1733 BA (1730), MA Prebend of Westminster Abbey; died after being scratched by his cat [19][66][67]
Jones, JohnJohn Jones (F) 1662 1666 BA (1666), MA (1670), BCL (1673), DCL (1677) Chancellor of Llandaff Cathedral, physician and inventor [68][69]
Lucas, RichardRichard Lucas (F) 1665 1668 BA (1668), MA (1672) Clergyman and writer of devotional works, who was Prebend of Westminster Abbey and President of Sion College [70]
Maurice, DavidDavid Maurice 1651 1655 BA Welsh clergyman and translator, who was canon of St Asaph; also obtained an MA from New College, Oxford [68][71]
Maurice, HenryHenry Maurice (F) 1664 1668 BA (1668), MA (1671), BD (1679), DD (1683) Treasurer of Chichester Cathedral, who was elected Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity at Oxford shortly before his death in 1691 [72]
Matthews, NormanNorman Matthews 1922 1926 BA Theology (2nd) Chancellor of Llandaff Cathedral (1952–1964) and one of the panellists on the BBC television programme "The Brains Trust" [13][73]
Meyrick, EdmundEdmund Meyrick (F) 1656 1659 BA Treasurer of St David's Cathedral and a benefactor of Bala Grammar School and Jesus College – his bequest founded the college's Meyrick scholarships for students from North Wales [74]
Middleton, RichardRichard Middleton 1583? 1586 BA Prebend of Brecon, Archdeacon of Cardigan and chaplain to Charles, Prince of Wales (later King Charles I) [75]
Nanney, RichardRichard Nanney 1710 1714 BA Evangelical Anglican cleric in north Wales and a canon of Bangor [76]
Owen, JohnJohn Owen 1719 DNG Chancellor of Bangor Cathedral and strong opponent of Methodism [77]
Pardo, ThomasThomas Pardo (F/P) 1707 1711 BA (1708), MA (1711), BD (1719), DD (1727) Chancellor of St David's (1749–1753) [68][78]
Powell, GabrielGabriel Powell 1592 1596 BA Son of the clergyman and historian David Powel; prebend of St Paul's Cathedral, London and prominent anti-Catholic writer [79]
Price, TheodoreTheodore Price (F) 1586? 1591 BA (1588), MA (1591) Prebend of Westminster Abbey and Principal of Hart Hall, Oxford [80]
Prichard, WilliamWilliam Prichard (F) 1581 Graduated from Christ Church before becoming vicar of Abergavenny, rector of Ewelme, Oxfordshire and canon of Sarum and St Pauls; named as one of the founding fellows in the college's third charter (1622) [81]
Richards, ThomasThomas Richards 1708 1711 BA Canon of St Asaph's Cathedral, who was also a writer and satirist [68][82]
Rogers, HenryHenry Rogers 1602 1608 BA (1605), MA (1608), BD (1616), DD (1637) Prebend of Hereford Cathedral, who preached against the Roundheads during the English Civil War [83]
Thomas, WilliamWilliam Thomas 1751 Graduated from Oriel College before becoming a Fellow of Pembroke College and chancellor of Llandaff Cathedral [84]
Williams, JamesJames Williams (F) 1807 1810 BA (1810), BD (1820) Chancellor of Bangor Cathedral, who introduced John Rhys to Charles Williams, leading to Rhys winning a scholarship at the college [85]
Wynne, RobertRobert Wynne (F) 1677 1680 BA (1680), MA (1691), BD (1691), DD (1695) Chancellor of St Asaph (1690–1743), and elder brother of the historian William Wynne [86]

Other Anglican clergy[edit]

Mallwyd church, where John Davies was rector
Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Bandinel, JamesJames Bandinel (F) 1752 1758 BA (1755), MA (1758), BD (1767), DD (1777) University Proctor (1776) and Public Orator (1776–1784) [19]
Bassett, RichardRichard Bassett 1797 DNG Welsh cleric, thought to be the last Anglican clergyman to be associated with the Methodists [19][87]
Caldicott, JohnJohn Caldicott 1851 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd, 1851), BA Mathematics (3rd, 1851), BD and DD (1874) Matriculated from Pembroke College; Anglican priest and headmaster of Bristol Grammar School [56][88]
Cohu, J. R.J. R. Cohu (F) 1876 1880 BA Literae Humaniores (1st, 1880), MA (1883) Headmaster, clergyman and writer on biblical topics [27][89]
Collins, William LucasWilliam Lucas Collins 1833 1840 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd, 1838), MA (1840) Clergyman and contributor to Blackwood's Magazine [56][90]
Davies, DavidDavid Davies 1761 DNG Clergyman and author of The Case of Labourers in Husbandry, advocating a minimum wage for agricultural labourers [19][91]
Davies, HughHugh Davies 1757 1762 BA Welsh clergyman and botanist, whose main work, Welsh Botanology (1813), was the first to cross-reference the names of plants in Welsh with their scientific names [92]
Davies, JohnJohn Davies 1589 1594 BA Rector of Mallwyd, Gwynedd, who was also a lexicographer and translator of the Bible into Welsh (1620 edition); awarded further degrees of BD (1608) and DD as a member of Lincoln College [68][93]
Edwards, EdwardEdward Edwards (F) 1743 1747 BA Cleric, with a particular interest in Xenophon's Memorabilia [94]
Edwards, JohnJohn Edwards 1825 1830 BA Welsh cleric and composer, most notably of the hymn tune Rhosymedre (named after his parish) [19][95]
Edwards, JohnJohn Edwards 1624 1629 BA (1626), MA (1629) Welsh priest and translator, whose pseudonym was "Siôn Treredyn" [96]
Edwards, JonathanJonathan Edwards (F) 1633 1637 BA (1634), MA (1637), DD (1642) Archdeacon of Derry [97]
Ellis, DavidDavid Ellis 1794 DNG Welsh clergyman, poet and transcriber of manuscripts, who was at the college from March to June 1794 [98]
Ellis, JohnJohn Ellis (F) 1690 1696 BA (1693), MA (1696) Welsh cleric and antiquarian [99]
Ellis, PhilipPhilip Ellis 1840 1846 BA (1844), MA (1846) One of the earliest Tractarians in north Wales; Foster gives his BA date as 1844, but Ellis gave it as 1843. [19][100]
Ellis, ThomasThomas Ellis (F) 1728 1731 BA (1731), BD (1741) Welsh cleric, appointed to college livings in Holyhead and Nutfield, Surrey [101]
Evans, DavidDavid Evans 1725? 1731 BA (1728), MA (1731) Welsh priest, scholar and musician [102]
Evans, JohnJohn Evans 1722 1726? ? Welsh anti-Methodist cleric; a founder member of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion; whilst a "John Evans" from Jesus College graduated with a BA in 1726, it is unclear whether that was this individual [103]
Ffoulkes, EdmundEdmund Ffoulkes (F) 1837 1841 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) Anglican priest who converted to Roman Catholicism and back to Anglicanism, becoming vicar of the University Church of St Mary the Virgin; nephew of Principal Henry Foulkes [27][104]
Fogg, PeterPeter Fogg 1855 1859 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd) First Jesus man to become President of the Oxford Union; Archdeacon of George in the Cape of Good Hope (1871–1920) [13][19][105]
Foulkes, HumphreyHumphrey Foulkes 1691 1698 BA (1695), MA (1698), DD (1720) Vicar in parishes in Denbighshire and Merionethshire, who corresponded with Edward Lhuyd on antiquarian topics [68][106]
Foulkes, WilliamWilliam Foulkes 1650 1653 BA Vicar in parishes in Denbighshire and Montgomeryshire, and translator of theological works [107]
Fowler, William WeekesWilliam Weekes Fowler 1873 BA Matriculated at New College before transferring to Jesus with a scholarship; a clergyman, headmaster and entomologist who was President of the Incorporated Association of Head Masters and President of the Entomological Society of London [13][19]
Gilbertson, LewisLewis Gilbertson (F) 1833 1839 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd, 1836), MA (1839), BD (1847) Vicar in parishes in Cardiganshire, and also served as Vice-Principal [19][56][108]
Hughes, DavidDavid Hughes 1803 1806 BA Rector of Llanfyllin for over 35 years; made corrections to the 1809 version of the Welsh Bible published by Oxford University Press [19][109]
James, EdwardEdward James (F) 1592 BA (1589), MA (1592) Matriculated from St Edmund Hall before moving to Jesus College; a Welsh Anglican priest and translator [110]
James, Herbert ArmitageHerbert Armitage James 1863 Transferred to Lincoln College when he won a scholarship in 1864; priest, who later became headmaster of Rugby School and President of St John's College, Oxford [19][111]
Jenkins, John DavidJohn David Jenkins (F) 1846 1852 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd, 1850), MA (1852), BD (1859), DD (1871) Canon of Pietermaritzburg, later called the "Rail men's Apostle" for his ministry to railway workers in Oxford [19][56][112]
Jenkins, JohnJohn Jenkins 1787? Welsh priest and antiquarian, known as Ifor Ceri, who helped to establish eisteddfodau in Wales in the early nineteenth century; graduated from Merton College [113]
Jessop, ConstantineConstantine Jessop 1624 1632 MA Transferred to Trinity College, Dublin and obtained his BA there, incorporating his BA at Oxford on his return; a priest in Fyfield, Essex, Bristol and Wimborne Minster [114]
Jones, Griffith ArthurGriffith Arthur Jones 1847 1851 BA Welsh priest and supporter of the Oxford Movement [115]
Jones, HughHugh Jones (F) 1832 1839 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd, 1836), MA (1839) Later Archdeacon of St Asaph [19][56][116]
Jones, HughHugh Jones 1708 1716 BA (1712), MA (1716) Professor of Mathematics, College of William & Mary, Virginia (1717-21); Minister at Jamestown; Chaplain of The House of Burgesses; Author of The Present State of Virginia (1724); Rector of North Sassafras Parish, Cecil County, Maryland (1731-1760). [117] [118]
Jones, JohnJohn Jones 1795? 1798 BA Archdeacon of Merioneth; Bampton Lecturer at Oxford in 1821 [119]
Jones, JohnJohn Jones 1793? 1796 BA Welsh priest, scholar and literary patron, who supported John Blackwell ("Alun") and others in their work [120]
Jones, JohnJohn Jones 1804 1808 ? Cleric in Caernarfonshire and antiquarian; known as "Llef o'r Nant" [121]
Jones, JohnJohn Jones 1814 1818 BA Mathematics (2nd) Welsh clergyman and scholar (known as "Tegid), who transcribed the Red Book of Hergest for Lady Charlotte Guest [122]
Jones, MauriceMaurice Jones (F/HF) 1882 1886 BA Divinity (1st, 1886), BD (1907), DD (1914) Welsh clergyman and Principal of St David's College, Lampeter (1923–1938) [123][124]
Jones, RichardRichard Jones 1623? 1628 BA (1623), MA (1628) Welsh priest and writer; deprived of his living in Llanfair Caereinion during the English Commonwealth but continued to minister in the parish [125]
Jones, RichardRichard Jones 1775? 1778? BA Welsh priest and writer, who ministered in Ruthin and may also have taught at Ruthin School [126]
Jones, RobertRobert Jones 1833 1837 BA Vicar of All Saints, Rotherhithe, London for over 35 years; a promoter of Welsh culture in London [127]
Jones, ThomasThomas Jones 1641 Studies interrupted by the English Civil War and graduated from University College; a Welsh clergyman who had a long-running argument with Bishop George Morley about the conversion of the Duke of York's wife to Catholicism [128]
Jones, WilliamWilliam Jones 1773 1780 BA Studies interrupted by working as a tutor to the family of a government servant in Jamaica; vicar of Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, and friend and correspondent of his college contemporary Thomas Charles [129]
Lewes, ErasmusErasmus Lewes 1684 1688 BA Vicar of Lampeter, Cardiganshire [130]
Lewis, DavidDavid Lewis 1782 DNG Clergyman in Carmarthenshire [131]
Lewis, DavidDavid Lewis (F) 1834 1837 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) Ordained as an Anglican priest, but converted to Catholicism with John Henry Newman; the elder brother of Evan Lewis [56][58]
Lewis, PiercePierce Lewis 1661 1664 BA Clergyman and "corrector" of his kinsman William Lloyd's Welsh Bible of 1690 [132]
Littler, HaroldHarold Littler 1907? 1910 BA Modern History (2nd) Anglican priest and headmaster of Sir William Turner's School, Coatham [13][133]
Lloyd, DavidDavid Lloyd 1707 1714 BA (1712) MA (1714) Cleric and translator [134]
Lloyd, JohnJohn Lloyd 1753 1757 BA Cleric (at Caerwys and Nannerch) and antiquarian [135]
Lloyd, JohnJohn Lloyd (F) 1758 1762 BA (1762), BD (1772) Vicar of Holywell and Cilcain [136]
Lloyd, ThomasThomas Lloyd 1689 1695 BA (1692), MA (1695) Welsh cleric and lexicographer [137]
Lloyd, ThomasThomas Lloyd 1839 1843 BA Welsh cleric and participant at eisteddfods (bardic name Yr Estyn) [138]
Lloyd, WilliamWilliam Lloyd 1819 1825 BA (1822), MA (1825) Later Archdeacon of Durban [19]
Maurice, PeterPeter Maurice 1822 1826 BA (1826), MA (1829), BD (1837), DD (1840) Welsh cleric and hymn writer, who was chaplain of New College (1828–1858) and of All Souls College (1837–1858) [139]
Morgan, JohnJohn Morgan 1704 1708 BA Clergyman (who was known as John Morgan Matchin after his appointment to a position in Matching, Essex) and author of Myfyrdodau bucheddol ar y pedwar peth diweddaf ('Devout musings on the four last things') (1714) [68][140]
Owen, CadwalladerCadwallader Owen 1581 1589 BA (1583), MA (1589) Clergyman and debator [141]
Owen, EdwardEdward Owen 1746 1752 BA (1749), MA (1752) Welsh priest and translator, who was headmaster of the grammar school in Warrington [142]
Owen, HenryHenry Owen 1736 1746 BA (1739), MA (1743), MB (1746), MD 1753 Clergyman, theologian and biblical scholar [143]
Owen, NicholasNicholas Owen 1769 1776 BA (1773), MA (1776) Welsh Anglican clergyman and antiquarian [144]
Owen, ThomasThomas Owen 1767 1770 BA Rector of Upton Scudamore, Wiltshire and translator of works on agriculture [145]
Parry, HenryHenry Parry 1786 1790 BA Welsh cleric and antiquarian [146]
Parry, WilliamWilliam Parry (F) 1706 1712 BA (1709), MA (1712), BD (1719) Antiquarian and rector of Shipston-on-Stour, Warwickshire [147]
Perry, HenryHenry Perry 1579 1583 MA (1583), BTh (1597) Initially a member of Balliol College; a Welsh priest and writer [148]
Pettingall, JohnJohn Pettingall 1725 1728 BA Antiquarian and priest [149]
Powell, GriffithGriffith Powell (F/P) 1581 1593 BA (1584), MA (1589), BCL Aristotelian philosopher [150]
Powell, ThomasThomas Powell 1628 1632 BA (1629), MA (1632), DD (1600) Welsh cleric who lost office during the English Commonwealth; said to have been nominated as Bishop of Bristol but died before being appointed [151]
Prichard, ThomasThomas Prichard (F) 1610 1615 BA (1612), MA (1615), BD and DD (1628) Held various benefices in Pembrokeshire and named as one of the founding fellows in the college's third charter (1622) [68][81]
Rees, DanielDaniel Rees 1815 DNG Welsh cleric and hymn writer [19][152]
Rees, WilliamWilliam Rees 1889 1892 BA Literae Humaniores (2nd) Welsh priest and writer [27][56]
Rider, WilliamWilliam Rider 1745 BA Matriculated from St Mary Hall before transferring to the college; a cleric and writer, whose 50-volume work A New History of England was later described as one of the vilest Grub Street compilations ever published [153]
Roberts, JohnJohn Roberts 1792 1796 BA Welsh cleric and writer [154]
Roberts, RobertRobert Roberts 1699 1702 BA Welsh cleric and theologian [155]
Saunders, ErasmusErasmus Saunders 1690 1696 BA (1693), MA (1696), BD (1705), DD (1712) Welsh priest and writer [156]
Symmons, CharlesCharles Symmons 1794 DD Welsh priest and writer; a graduate of the University of Cambridge who was incorporated at Oxford in order to take his DD after being involved in controversy at Cambridge [157]
Thomas, DavidDavid Thomas 1852 1856 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd) Canon of St Asaph and Archdeacon of Montgomery; wrote History of the Diocese of St Asaph, the first such history of a Welsh diocese [56][158]
Thomas, DavidDavid Thomas 1847 1851 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd) Parish priest in Gwynedd who was instrumental in the foundation of a Welsh church in the Welsh settlement in Argentina [159]
Thomas, JohnJohn Thomas 1755 1758 BA Welsh cleric and antiquarian, who collected and transcribed manuscripts, and wrote a History of the Island of Anglesey (1775); elder brother of Richard Thomas, who also attended the college [19][160]
Thomas, John Roland LloydJohn Roland Lloyd Thomas 1930 1932 BA Theology (2nd) Principal of St David's College, Lampeter (1953–1975) [13]
Thomas, LlewellynLlewellyn Thomas (F) 1860 1865 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd) Welsh cleric, poet and scholar, who was the College's Welsh Reader, Senior Tutor and Vice-Principal [161]
Thomas, RichardRichard Thomas 1771 1775 BA Welsh cleric and antiquarian, who collected and transcribed manuscripts; younger brother of John Thomas, who also attended the college [162]
Thomas, ThomasThomas Thomas 1824 1827 BA Welsh cleric ("Thomas of Caernarfon") who helped to found schools in Caernarfon; the father of Llewellyn Thomas [163]
Vane, ThomasThomas Vane 1616 DNG Transferred to Christ's College, Cambridge; later appointed Chaplain Extraordinary to King Charles I in 1626 before converting to Roman Catholicism [164]
Vincent, JamesJames Vincent 1735 1739 BA Welsh cleric and schoolteacher, who was Master of the Friars School, Bangor; grandfather of James Vincent Vincent, who also attended the college [19][62]
Wilkins, ThomasThomas Wilkins 1641 1661 ? (Law) Welsh cleric and antiquarian, from whose collection of manuscripts the Red Book of Hergest was donated to the college after his death [165]
Williams, CharlesCharles Williams 1925 1929 BA Theology (1st) Theologian and chaplain of Merton College, Oxford (1932–1962) [14][46][166]
Williams, DavidDavid Williams 1810 1814 BA Anglican priest in Bleadon, Somerset and geologist who wrote extensively of the geology of the west of England [167]
Williams, EliezerEliezer Williams 1775 1778 BA Welsh clergyman, ship's chaplain and genealogist [168]
Williams, HughHugh Williams 1740 1744 BA Welsh clergyman and writer [169]
Williams, JohnJohn Williams 1832 1838 BA Mathematics (4th, 1835), MA (1838) Priest and Welsh scholar (bardic name Ab Ithel), who edited Y Gododdin and completed Aneurin Owen's edition of Annales Cambriae [19][56][170]
Williams, JohnJohn Williams 1783 DNG Cleric in Pembrokeshire with Methodist sympathies [171]
Williams, JohnJohn Williams (F) 1777 1783 BA (1781), MA Cleric in north Wales and master of the Free school in Llanrwst (1790–1812) [172]
Williams, Peter BaileyPeter Bailey Williams 1785 Cleric in north Wales whose Sunday school in Llanrug was the first in the county; graduated from Christ Church in 1790 [19][173]
Williams, RowlandRowland Williams 1798 1802 BA Cleric in north Wales, father of the theologian Rowland Williams [174]
Williams, ThomasThomas Williams 1674 1680 BA (1677), MA (1680) Cleric in north Wales and translator of religious texts [175]
Worthington, WilliamWilliam Worthington 1722 1726 BA (1726), BD and DD (1738) Cleric in north Wales and writer on theological issues who delivered the Boyle Lectures (1766–68) [176]
Wynn, WilliamWilliam Wynn 1727 1735 BA (1730), MA (1735) Welsh cleric and poet [177]
Wynne, WilliamWilliam Wynne (F) 1688 1691 BA Welsh cleric who wrote a History of Wales (1697), a revised version of David Powel's history; younger brother of the cleric Robert Wynne [86]

Clergy from other denominations[edit]

Name M G Degree Notes Ref
Bassett, ChristopherChristopher Bassett 1768 1775 BA (1772), MA (1775) Welsh Methodist cleric [19][178]
Charles, DavidDavid Charles 1831 1835 BA Grandson of Thomas Charles and lodged in his rooms in college; Welsh Methodist cleric, who was Principal of Trevecca College for 20 years and helped to establish the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth [179]
Charles, ThomasThomas Charles 1775 1779 BA Welsh nonconformist clergyman; grandfather of David Charles [19][180]
Davies, GwilymGwilym Davies 1903 1906? ? Baptist minister and promoter of world peace; the first person to broadcast in Welsh (on St David's Day 1923) [46][181]
Davies, William DavidWilliam David Davies 1915 1923? BA Literae Humaniores (2nd, 1921), BA Theology (1st, 1922), BD Welsh Presbyterian minister who was the first Welsh non-conformist to obtain a BD from Oxford, and who turned down a university tutorship in theology since it required membership of the Church of England; Professor of the history of religions and the philosophy of religion at the United Theological College Aberystwyth (1928–1933) [14][46][182]
Edwards, CharlesCharles Edwards 1649 BA Originally a Bible clerk at All Souls College, Oxford; a Welsh Puritan cleric and writer [183]
Edwards, GwilymGwilym Edwards 1903 1908 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd, 1907), BA Theology (1st, 1908) Welsh Presbyterian minister; Principal of the United Theological College Aberystwyth (1939–1949) [14][46][184]
Evans, Walter JenkinWalter Jenkin Evans 1875? 1878 BA Principal of Carmarthen Presbyterian College (1888–1927) [185]
Griffith, GriffithGriffith Griffith 1909 1910? ? Welsh Presbyterian minister and writer [186]
Houédard, SylvesterSylvester Houédard 1941 1949 ? Studies interrupted by war service; a Benedictine monk and poet (known as "dom silvester houédard" or "dsh") [187][188]
Jones, John HughJohn Hugh Jones 1862 DNG Became a Roman Catholic in 1865 and did not complete his degree; later became a Catholic priest and tutor in north Wales [189]
Jones, John IslanJohn Islan Jones 1898 1901 ? Welsh Unitarian minister and writer, who was Principal of Carmarthen Presbyterian College from 1945 to 1948 [190]
Jones, SamuelSamuel Jones (F) 1648 1652 BA (1652), MA (1654) Non-conformist clergyman who established an academy in Wales for dissenting ministers [191]
Lloyd, SimonSimon Lloyd 1775 1779 BA Welsh Anglican clergyman who became a Methodist preacher; a respected biblical scholar and writer [192]
Lloyd, WilliamWilliam Lloyd 1789? 1792? ? Welsh Anglican clergyman who became a Methodist preacher [193]
Maurice, HenryHenry Maurice 1660? 1663? ? Welsh Anglican clergyman who became a zealous dissenting preacher [194]
Meredith, J. E.J. E. Meredith 1928 1931 BA Theology (1st) Welsh Presbyterian minister, preacher and writer, who had been the first Welsh President of the National Union of Students [195][196]
Owen, HuwHuw Owen 1944 1949 BA Theology (2nd) Welsh Presbyterian minister, who was Professor of Christian Doctrine at King's College London (1971–1983) [195][197][198]
Owen, HughHugh Owen 1736 DNG Welsh Independent minister [19][199]
Powell, VavasorVavasor Powell 1634 1637? ? Welsh Nonconformist preacher and writer, who is reputed to have attended the college but is not found in the records [200]
Roberts, JohnJohn Roberts 1899 1904 BA Literae Humaniores (3rd, 1903), BA Theology (2nd, 1904) Welsh Presbyterian minister and historian of his denomination [14][46][201]
Walter, HenryHenry Walter 1633 1633 BCL Welsh Anglican priest who was ejected from his parish for his non-conformist beliefs; an associate of William Wroth [202]
Williams, DavidDavid Williams 1898? 1903? BA Literae Humaniores, BA Theology Welsh Calvinistic Methodist minister and professor at the United Theological College Aberystwyth [203]
Williams, JohnJohn Williams 1647 DNG Said to have introduced non-conformism to Caernarfonshire and to have had a preaching voice that carried for a quarter of a mile; also worked as a physician [204]
Williams, John TudnoJohn Tudno Williams 1957 1960 BA Theology (2nd) Lecturer, then Principal (1998–2003) of the United Theological College Aberystwyth, and Moderator of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church of Wales (2006–2007) [8][38][205]
Williams, Thomas CharlesThomas Charles Williams 1894? 1897 BA Welsh Calvinistic Methodist minister, based in Menai Bridge throughout his ministry; also served as Moderator of the Calvinistic Methodist General Assembly [206]
Wroth, WilliamWilliam Wroth 1605 MA Welsh cleric credited with founding the first non-conformist chapel in Wales, in Llanvaches (1639); matriculated from New Inn Hall in 1590 and obtained his BA from Christ Church in 1596 [68][207]

References[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ "Jesus College and Wales". Jesus College, Oxford. Retrieved 6 September 2012. 
  2. ^ Krebs, Lord. "Welcome to Jesus College". Jesus College, Oxford. Retrieved 6 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "Jesus College Oxford – The Modern Day". Jesus College, Oxford. Retrieved 6 September 2012. 
  4. ^ Orringe, Natalie (Trinity Term 2005). "Jesubites go forth!" (PDF). The Jesus College Newsletter (Jesus College, Oxford): 2–3. Archived from the original on 26 March 2009. Retrieved 28 March 2007. 
  5. ^ "Scholarships and Exhibitions (Undergraduates)". Jesus College, Oxford. 20 September 2005. Retrieved 25 April 2008. 
  6. ^ "College Archives – FAQs". Oxford Archivists’ Consortium. Retrieved 30 October 2008. 
  7. ^ Vickers, John A. "Coke, Thomas (1747–1814)". ODNB. Retrieved 15 July 2007. 
  8. ^ a b c d Who's Who, sub nom.
  9. ^ De'Ath, John (1999). "Fellows' News". JCR: 13. 
  10. ^ 1999 "Jesus College – To Honorary Fellowships". Oxford University Gazette. University of Oxford. 28 October 1999. Retrieved 30 July 2008. 
  11. ^ Roberts, Stephen K. "Davies, Francis (1605–1675), bishop of Llandaff". ODNB. Retrieved 17 September 2008. 
  12. ^ "Davies, The Rt Revd Roy Thomas" (subscription access). Crockford's Clerical Directory. Church House Publishing. October 2008. Retrieved 22 November 2008. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Who Was Who, sub nom.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h Honours Supplement 1930
  15. ^ "Old Members' Notes and News". JCR: 74. 1993/1994. 
  16. ^ "Obituary: Archbishop Edwards – The first Welsh Primate". The Times. 23 July 1937. p. 18. 
  17. ^ Duncan-Jones, A. S.; Jones, O. W. "Edwards, Alfred George (1848–1937)". ODNB. Retrieved 14 July 2007. 
  18. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Edwards, Alfred George (1848–1937), first archbishop of Wales". WBO. Retrieved 16 July 2007. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa Foster, 1715–1886, sub nom.
  20. ^ Morgan, Walter Thomas. "Ellis, Rowland (1841–1911), bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney". WBO. Retrieved 14 March 2008. 
  21. ^ "Ecclesiastical Intelligence". The Times. 18 January 1906. p. 7. 
  22. ^ Thomas, Lawrence. "Harris, John (1680–1738), bishop of Llandaff". WBO. Retrieved 26 September 2008. 
  23. ^ Ellis, Mary Gwendoline. "Havard, William Thomas (1889–1956), bishop". WBO. Retrieved 7 April 2008. 
  24. ^ Browell, Geoffrey. "Howell, Thomas (1588–1650)". ODNB. Retrieved 5 February 2008. 
  25. ^ Wright, Rev. Canon Evan Gilbert. "Humphreys, Humphrey (1648–1712), bishop, antiquary, historian, and genealogist". WBO. Retrieved 2 February 2008. 
  26. ^ Handley, Stuart. "Humphreys, Humphrey (1648–1712)". ODNB. Retrieved 2 February 2008. 
  27. ^ a b c d e f Oxford Men
  28. ^ "Rt. Rev. Dr. A. E. Joscelyne". The Times. 8 May 1945. p. 8. 
  29. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Lloyd, Daniel Lewis (1843–1899)". WBO. Retrieved 29 July 2008. 
  30. ^ Handley, Stuart. "Lloyd, Humphrey (1610–1689)". ODNB. Retrieved 15 November 2008. 
  31. ^ Mullett, Michael. "Lloyd, William (1627–1717)". ODNB. Retrieved 14 July 2007. 
  32. ^ Coburn Walshe, Helen. "Meredith, Richard (d. 1597)". ODNB. Retrieved 9 October 2008. 
  33. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Owen, John (1854–1926), bishop". WBO. Retrieved 16 July 2007. 
  34. ^ Roberts, Stephen K. "Owen, Morgan (1584/5–1645)". ODNB. Retrieved 10 April 2008. 
  35. ^ Baskerville, Stephen W. "Peploe, Samuel (bap. 1667, d. 1752)". ODNB. Retrieved 7 April 2008. 
  36. ^ Welch, H. T. "Parry, Benjamin (1634–1678)". ODNB. Retrieved 18 November 2008. 
  37. ^ Williams, N. J. A. "Rider, John (1562–1632)". ODNB. Retrieved 15 July 2007. 
  38. ^ a b c Honours Supplement 1965
  39. ^ Townley, Peter (22 July 1999). "Obituary: The Right Rev Gordon Roe". The Independent. HighBeam Research. Retrieved 5 September 2012.  (subscription required)
  40. ^ "Old Members' Obituaries". JCR: 81. 1999. 
  41. ^ Williams, Rowan. "Simon, (William) Glyn Hughes (1903–1972)". ODNB. Retrieved 15 July 2007. 
  42. ^ Roberts, Stephen K. "Thomas, William (1613–1689)". ODNB. Retrieved 16 March 2008. 
  43. ^ Baker, p. 108
  44. ^ Norrington, A. L. P. "Williams, Alwyn Terrell Petre (1888–1968)". ODNB. Retrieved 8 February 2008. 
  45. ^ "Old Members: News and Notes". JCR: 53–54. 1992. 
  46. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Members List, sub nom.
  47. ^ "Rt. Rev. Dr. C. S. Woodward – A well remembered bishop". The Times. 15 April 1959. p. 15. 
  48. ^ Taylor, Stephen. "Wynne, John (1665/6–1743)". ODNB. Retrieved 25 July 2007. 
  49. ^ De'Ath, John (1998/1999). "Old Members' News". JCR: 55–58. 
  50. ^ "The Very Reverend Dr Wesley Carr, Dean of Westminster Abbey". Westminster Abbey. 2009. Retrieved 1 May 2009. 
  51. ^ Boase, G. C. "Edwards, Henry Thomas (1837–1884)". ODNB. Retrieved 18 July 2007. 
  52. ^ Baker, p. 121
  53. ^ "The Very Rev. H. L. James". The Times. 19 January 1949. p. 7. 
  54. ^ "The Very Rev. D. J. Jones". The Times. 16 March 1949. p. 7. 
  55. ^ "Canon M. Le Marinel". The Times. 23 January 1963. p. 15. 
  56. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Honours
  57. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Lewellin, Llewelyn (1798–1878), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 14 July 2007. 
  58. ^ a b Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Lewis, Evan (1818–1901), dean of Bangor". WBO. Retrieved 26 April 2008. 
  59. ^ "Jesus College, Oxford: Preachers Trinity Term 2009". Jesus College, Oxford. 20 April 2009. Retrieved 6 May 2009. 
  60. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Pryce, John (1828–1903), dean of Bangor". WBO. Retrieved 14 May 2008. 
  61. ^ Marshall, William. "Stradling, George (1620/21–1688)". ODNB. Retrieved 9 October 2008. 
  62. ^ a b Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Vincent family". WBO. Retrieved 2 May 2008. 
  63. ^ Williams James, John. "Briscoe, Thomas (1813–1895), cleric and scholar". WBO. Retrieved 20 April 2008. 
  64. ^ Williams, William Gilbert. "Farrington, Richard (1702–1772), cleric and antiquary". WBO. Retrieved 2 March 2009. 
  65. ^ Ellis, Mary Gwendoline. "Harris, William Henry (1884–1956), priest, Professor of Welsh, St. David's College, Lampeter". WBO. Retrieved 18 February 2009. 
  66. ^ Baker, p. 40
  67. ^ North, Sir Peter (2004). "And Finally...". JCR: 13. 
  68. ^ a b c d e f g h i Foster, 1500–1714, sub nom.
  69. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Jones, John (1645–1709)". WBO. Retrieved 1 May 2008. 
  70. ^ Vallance, Edward. "Lucas, Richard (1648/9–1715)". ODNB. Retrieved 8 May 2008. 
  71. ^ Jones, John James. "Maurice, David (1626-1702), cleric and translator". WBO. Retrieved 16 March 2009. 
  72. ^ Vallance, Edward. "Maurice, Henry (1647?–1691)". ODNB. Retrieved 13 May 2008. 
  73. ^ Ellis, Mary Gwendoline. "Matthews, Norman Gregory (1904–1964), Chancellor". WBO. Retrieved 31 August 2008. 
  74. ^ Baker, p. 61
  75. ^ Wright, Stephen. "Middleton, Richard (d. 1641)". ODNB. Retrieved 1 February 2009. 
  76. ^ Richards, Thomas. "Nanney, Richard (1691–1767), Evangelical cleric". WBO. Retrieved 11 February 2009. 
  77. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Owen, John (1698–1755), chancellor of Bangor". WBO. Retrieved 18 February 2009. 
  78. ^ Baker, p. 26
  79. ^ Todd, Margo. "Powell, Gabriel (bap. 1576, d. 1611)". ODNB. Retrieved 26 March 2009. 
  80. ^ Merritt, J. F. "Price, Theodore (c.1570–1631)". ODNB. Retrieved 5 September 2008. 
  81. ^ a b Allen, Brigid (1998). "The Early History of Jesus College, Oxford 1571–1603" (PDF). Oxoniensia. LXIII: 117. Retrieved 16 August 2010. 
  82. ^ Davies, Sir William Llewelyn. "Richards, Thomas (1687?–1760), cleric and author". WBO. Retrieved 23 March 2009. 
  83. ^ Atherton, Ian. "Rogers, Henry (1583/4–1658)". ODNB. Retrieved 5 March 2009. 
  84. ^ Emanuel, Hywel David. "Thomas, William 1734–1799), cleric and antiquary". WBO. Retrieved 26 January 2009. 
  85. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Williams, James (1790–1872), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 29 April 2008. 
  86. ^ a b Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Wynne, William (1671?–1704), historian". WBO. Retrieved 6 May 2008. 
  87. ^ Roberts, Gomer Morgan. "Bassett, Richard (1777–1852), Methodist cleric;". WBO. Retrieved 22 April 2008. 
  88. ^ "Rev. J. W. Caldicott, D.D.". The Times. 7 November 1895. p. 6. 
  89. ^ "The Rev. J. R. Cohu". The Times. 11 June 1935. p. 14. 
  90. ^ Curthoys, M. C. "Collins, William Lucas (1815–1887)". ODNB. Retrieved 24 February 2008. 
  91. ^ Rees, Sir James Frederick. "Davies, David (1741–1819), author". WBO. Retrieved 2 February 2008. 
  92. ^ Davies, Raymond B. "Davies, Hugh (1739–1821), botanist and Church of England clergyman". ODNB. Retrieved 17 September 2008. 
  93. ^ Evans, Mihail Dafydd. "Davies, John (c.1570–1644)". ODNB. Retrieved 14 July 2007. 
  94. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Edwards, Edward (1726?–1783?), cleric and scholar". WBO. Retrieved 27 May 2008. 
  95. ^ Griffith, Robert David. "Edwards, John David (1805–1885), cleric and musician". WBO. Retrieved 9 October 2008. 
  96. ^ Speight, Martin E. "Edwards, John (1605/6–1656)". ODNB. Retrieved 5 March 2009. 
  97. ^ Dodd, Arthur Herbert. "Edwards family, of Stansty, Denbs". WBO. Retrieved 24 April 2008. 
  98. ^ Jenkins, David. "Ellis, David (1736–1795), cleric, poet, translator, and transcriber of manuscripts". WBO. Retrieved 29 October 2008. 
  99. ^ Tibbott, Gildas. "Ellis, John (1674–1735), cleric and antiquary". WBO. Retrieved 25 April 2008. 
  100. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Ellis, Philip Constable (1822–1900), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 14 October 2008. 
  101. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Ellis, Thomas (1711/12–1792), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 1 May 2008. 
  102. ^ Griffith, Robert David. "Evans, David (1705–1788), cleric, author, and musician". WBO. Retrieved 2 March 2009. 
  103. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Evans, John (1702–1782), cleric and anti-Methodist". WBO. Retrieved 5 March 2009. 
  104. ^ "Rev. Edmund Salisbury Foulkes". The Times. 21 April 1894. p. 12. 
  105. ^ Baker, p. 66
  106. ^ Griffiths, Griffith Milwyn. "Foulkes, Humphrey (1673–1737), cleric and antiquary". WBO. Retrieved 21 April 2008. 
  107. ^ Griffiths, Griffith Milwyn. "Foulkes, William (d. 1691), cleric and translator". WBO. Retrieved 20 August 2008. 
  108. ^ Griffiths, Griffith Milwyn. "Gilbertson, Lewis (1815–1896), cleric, vice-principal of Jesus College, Oxford". WBO. Retrieved 15 April 2008. 
  109. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth (2007). "Hughes, David (1785–1850), cleric and author". WBO. Retrieved 5 March 2009. 
  110. ^ Williams, Sir Glanmor. "James, Edward (1569–1610?)". ODNB. Retrieved 2 March 2009. 
  111. ^ "The Rev. Dr. James, President Of St. John's College, Oxford". The Times. 16 November 1931. p. 17. 
  112. ^ Price, Watkin William. "Jenkins, John David (1828–1876), cleric, philanthropist". WBO. Retrieved 15 May 2008. 
  113. ^ Stephens, Meic. "Jenkins, John (1770–1829)". ODNB. Retrieved 28 January 2009. 
  114. ^ Gordon, Alexander; Bell, Mark Robert. "Jessop, Constantine (1601/2–1658)". ODNB. Retrieved 30 October 2008. 
  115. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Jones, Griffith Arthur (1827–1906), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 5 March 2009. 
  116. ^ "Obituary". The Times. 19 June 1897. p. 11. 
  117. ^ "The Reverend Hugh Jones: Lord Baltimore's Mathematician". 
  118. ^ "Hugh Jones and Octave Computation". 
  119. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Jones, John (1775–1834), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 2 March 2009. 
  120. ^ Lloyd, David Tecwyn. "Jones, John (1773–1853), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 2 March 2009. 
  121. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Jones, John (1786?–1863), cleric and antiquary". WBO. Retrieved 17 February 2009. 
  122. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Jones, John (Tegid – less usually Ioan Tegid; 1792–1852), cleric and man of letters". WBO. Retrieved 24 July 2007. 
  123. ^ Ellis, Mary Gwendoline. "Jones, Maurice (1863–1957), priest and college principal". WBO. Retrieved 19 July 2007. 
  124. ^ "University Intelligence – Oxford, June 21". The Times. 22 June 1882. p. 5. 
  125. ^ Griffiths, Griffith Milwyn. "Jones, Richard (1603–1655/6?), cleric and author". WBO. Retrieved 2 March 2009. 
  126. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Jones, Richard (1757?–1814), cleric and writer". WBO. Retrieved 2 March 2009. 
  127. ^ Johnston, Dafydd. "Jones, Robert (1810–1879)". ODNB. Retrieved 5 March 2009. 
  128. ^ Jones, J. Gwynfor. "Jones, Thomas (d. 1682)". ODNB. Retrieved 5 March 2009. 
  129. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Jones, William (1755–1821), Evangelical cleric". WBO. Retrieved 5 March 2009. 
  130. ^ Davies, Sir William Llewelyn. "Lewes, Erasmus (1663?–1745), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  131. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Lewis, David (1760-1850), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 16 March 2009. 
  132. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Lewis, Pierce (1664–1699), cleric, and ‘corrector’ of the Welsh Bible of 1690". WBO. Retrieved 21 April 2008. 
  133. ^ "Canon H. D. Littler". The Times. 6 January 1948. p. 6. 
  134. ^ Griffiths, Griffith Milwyn. "Lloyd, David (d. 1747?), cleric and translator". WBO. Retrieved 5 September 2008. 
  135. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Lloyd, John (1733–1793)". WBO. Retrieved 1 May 2008. 
  136. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "John Lloyd (1754–1807?)". WBO. Retrieved 1 May 2008. 
  137. ^ Jones, Evan David. "Lloyd, Thomas (1673?–1734), cleric and lexicologist". WBO. Retrieved 14 May 2008. 
  138. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Lloyd, Thomas Richard (Yr Estyn; 1820–1891), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 14 October 2008. 
  139. ^ Jones, Evan David. "Maurice, Hugh (1775–1825), skinner, and transcriber of Welsh MSS". WBO. Retrieved 31 August 2008. 
  140. ^ Edwards, Huw M. "Morgan, John (1688–1733/4)". ODNB. Retrieved 10 April 2008. 
  141. ^ Porter, Bertha. "Cadwallader Owen (c.1562–1617)". ODNB. Retrieved 28 April 2008. 
  142. ^ Sutton, C. W.; Brown, Sarah Annes. "Owen, Edward (1728/9–1807)". ODNB. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  143. ^ Young, B. W. "Owen, Henry (1716–1795)". ODNB. Retrieved 15 July 2007. 
  144. ^ Pollard, Albert; Walters, Huw. "Owen, Nicholas (1752–1811)". ODNB. Retrieved 16 March 2009. 
  145. ^ Pollard, A. F. "Owen, Thomas (1749–1812)". ODNB. Retrieved 24 April 2008. 
  146. ^ Davies, Sir William Llewelyn. "Parry, Henry (1766?–1854), cleric and antiquary". WBO. Retrieved 14 October 2008. 
  147. ^ Cooper, Thompson. "Parry, William (bap. 1687, d. 1756)". ODNB. Retrieved 24 April 2008. 
  148. ^ Williams, Barrie. "Perry, Henry (1560/61–1617)". ODNB. Retrieved 19 March 2009. 
  149. ^ Norgate, G. Le G.; Mercer, M. J. "Pettingall, John (1707/8–1781)". ODNB. Retrieved 25 February 2008. 
  150. ^ Williams, Barrie. "Powell, Griffith (1560/61–1620)". ODNB. Retrieved 17 August 2007. 
  151. ^ Hughes, Garfield Hopkin. "Powell, Thomas (1608?–1660), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 4 September 2008. 
  152. ^ Roberts, Gomer Morgan. "Rees, Daniel (1793–1857), cleric and hymnwriter". WBO. Retrieved 20 August 2008. 
  153. ^ Pollard, A. F.; O'Brien, Karen (2004). "Rider, William (1723–1785)". ODNB. Retrieved 13 February 2009. 
  154. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Roberts, John (1775–1829), cleric and author". WBO. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  155. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Roberts, Robert (1680–1741), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 27 May 2008. 
  156. ^ Jones, Rev. Robert Tudur. "Saunders, Erasmus (1670–1724), divine". WBO. Retrieved 2 February 2008. 
  157. ^ Aston, Nigel. "Symmons, Charles (1749–1826)". ODNB. Retrieved 29 October 2008. 
  158. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Thomas, David Richard (1833–1916), cleric and historian". WBO. Retrieved 5 November 2008. 
  159. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Thomas, David Walter (1829–1905), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 6 November 2008. 
  160. ^ Ramage, Helen Myfanwy. "Thomas, John (1736–1769), cleric and antiquary". WBO. Retrieved 31 March 2009. 
  161. ^ Jones, Gwilym Arthur; Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Thomas, Thomas Llewelyn (1840–1897), scholar, teacher and linguist". WBO. Retrieved 28 May 2008.  [dead link]
  162. ^ Davies, Sir William Llewelyn. "Thomas, Richard (1753–1780), cleric, transcriber and collector of manuscripts, and genealogist". WBO. Retrieved 31 March 2009. 
  163. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Thomas, Thomas (1804–1877), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 28 May 2008. 
  164. ^ Mullett, Michael. "Vane, Thomas (b. 1599/1600)". ODNB. Retrieved 10 April 2008. 
  165. ^ Thomas, Richard. "Wilkins". WBO. Retrieved 6 November 2008. 
  166. ^ "The Rev. C. S. C. Williams – Chaplain of Merton". The Times. 3 May 1962. p. 19. 
  167. ^ Woolrich, A. P. "Williams, David (1792–1850)". ODNB. Retrieved 26 January 2009. 
  168. ^ Cooper, Thompson; Foster Evans, Dylan. "Williams, Eliezer (1754–1820)". ODNB. Retrieved 26 February 2008. 
  169. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Williams, Hugh (1722?-1779), cleric and author". WBO. Retrieved 3 April 2009. 
  170. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Williams, John (Ab Ithel; 1811–1862), cleric and antiquary". WBO. Retrieved 22 July 2007. 
  171. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Williams, John (1762–1802), Evangelical cleric". WBO. Retrieved 3 April 2009. 
  172. ^ Davies, Sir William Llewelyn. "Williams, John (1760–1826), cleric and schoolmaster". WBO. Retrieved 25 April 2008. 
  173. ^ Jones, R. Tudur. "Williams, Peter Bailey (1763–1836)". ODNB. Retrieved 1 April 2009. 
  174. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Williams, Rowland (1779–1854), cleric". WBO. Retrieved 2 February 2009. 
  175. ^ Ellis, Thomas Iorwerth. "Williams, Thomas (1658–1726), cleric and translator". WBO. Retrieved 2 April 2009. 
  176. ^ Cooper, Thompson; Major, Emma (January 2008). "Worthington, William (1703–1778)". ODNB. Retrieved 28 January 2009. 
  177. ^ Wiliam, Dafydd Wyn. "Wynn, William (bap. 1709, d. 1760)". ODNB. Retrieved 10 March 2009. 
  178. ^ Roberts, Gomer Morgan. "Bassett, Christopher (1753–1784), Methodist cleric". WBO. Retrieved 22 April 2008. 
  179. ^ Evans, W. Gareth. "Charles, David (1812–1878), Calvinistic Methodist minister and educationist". ODNB. Retrieved 19 September 2008. 
  180. ^ Welch, Edwin. "Charles, Thomas (1755–1814)". ODNB. Retrieved 14 July 2007. 
  181. ^ James, Mary Auronwy. "Davies, Gwilym (1879–1955), minister (B), promoter of international understanding, founder of the annual Goodwill Message from the Youth of Wales". WBO. Retrieved 12 November 2008. 
  182. ^ Roberts, Gomer Morgan. "Davies, William David [P.] (1897–1969), minister (Presb.), college tutor and author". WBO. Retrieved 1 November 2008. 
  183. ^ Morgan, Derec Llwyd. "Edwards, Charles (b. 1628?, d. in or after 1691)". ODNB. Retrieved 18 February 2009. 
  184. ^ Roberts, Gomer Morgan. "Edwards, Gwilym Arthur (1881–1963), minister (Presb.), principal of the Theological College, Aberystwyth, and author". WBO. Retrieved 21 January 2009. 
  185. ^ Williams, Thomas Oswald. "Evans, Walter Jenkin (1856–1927), principal of Carmarthen Presbyterian College". WBO. Retrieved 19 January 2009. 
  186. ^ Roberts, Gomer Morgan. "Griffith, Griffith Wynne (1883–1967), minister (Presb.) and author". WBO. Retrieved 27 May 2008. 
  187. ^ "Old Members News and Notes". JCR: 47. 1992/1993. 
  188. ^ "dom silvester houédard Papers". Archives Hub. Retrieved 17 March 2009. 
  189. ^ Humphreys, Edward Morgan. "Jones, John Hugh (1843–1910), Roman Catholic priest". WBO. Retrieved 12 February 2009. 
  190. ^ James, Mary Auronwy. "Jones, John Islan (1874–1968), minister (U) and author". WBO. Retrieved 12 February 2009. 
  191. ^ Jones, D. R. L. "Jones, Samuel (1628–1697)". ODNB. Retrieved 13 May 2008. 
  192. ^ Thomas, D. L.; Evans, Dylan Foster. "Lloyd, Simon (1756–1836)". ODNB. Retrieved 16 March 2009. 
  193. ^ Roberts, Gomer Morgan. "Lloyd, William (1771-1841), Methodist cleric". WBO. Retrieved 16 March 2009. 
  194. ^ Richard, Thomas. "Maurice, Henry (1634-1682), Independent minister". WBO. Retrieved 16 March 2009. 
  195. ^ a b Honours Supplement 1950
  196. ^ "Rev. J. E. Meredith". The Times. 22 May 1981. p. 16. 
  197. ^ Knibb, Michael (2 December 1996). "Obituary: The Rev Professor Huw Parri Owen". The Independent. HighBeam Research. Retrieved 5 September 2012.  (subscription required)
  198. ^ "Deaths". JCR: 96. 1996/1997. 
  199. ^ Lloyd, J. E.; rev. Wright, Stephen. "Owen, Hugh (1639/40–1700)". ODNB. Retrieved 28 April 2008. 
  200. ^ Jones, Rev. Robert Tudur. "Powel, Vavasor (1617–1670), Puritan divine". WBO. Retrieved 22 July 2007. 
  201. ^ Rees, D. Ben. "Roberts, John (1880–1959)". ODNB. Retrieved 11 March 2009. 
  202. ^ Roberts, Stephen K. "Walter, Henry (1611–1678?)". ODNB. Retrieved 2 April 2009. 
  203. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Williams, David (1877–1927), Calvinistic Methodist minister and college tutor". WBO. Retrieved 11 February 2009. 
  204. ^ Jenkins, Robert Thomas. "Williams, John (1627–1673), early Nonconformist preacher, and physician". WBO. Retrieved 3 April 2009. 
  205. ^ "Old Members' News". JCR: 100. 2006. 
  206. ^ Hughes, John Edward. "Williams, Thomas Charles (1868–1927), Calvinistic Methodist minister". WBO. Retrieved 2 April 2009. 
  207. ^ Richards, Thomas. "Wroth, William (1576–1641), Puritan cleric, and founder of the first Independent church in Wales". WBO. Retrieved 13 October 2008. 
Bibliography

External links[edit]