List of collegiate churches in England

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This is a list of Collegiate churches in England

In Western Christianity, a collegiate church is one in which the daily office of worship is maintained by a college of canons, often with a body of non-monastic or "secular clergy", organised as a self-governing corporate body and may be presided over by a dean or a provost.

Most English collegiate churches were dissolved, by Edward VI in his Abolition of Chantries Acts of 1547. A few survived, such as those under the jurisdiction of the monarch and those that would give a portion of the church's endowments to several joint rectors, known as 'portioners'.

Present-day non-academic collegiate churches in England[edit]

Image Name & Dedication Diocese Information Established/Website
St Endellion Church-by-Ben-Nicholson.jpg St Endellion Church, Cornwall

Collegiate Church of Saint Endelienta

Diocese of Truro Founded with four prebends in the 13th century, and (due to legislative oversight) never subsequently dissolved, so prebends continued as sinecures until 1880. Current statutes provided in 1929 when the Bishop of Truro re-established the chapter before 1288

(re-established 1929)
Church Homepage

Westminster abbey west.jpg Westminster Abbey
Collegiate Church of St Peter at Westminster
Royal Peculiar Benedictine monastery, consecrated in 1065 during the reign of King Edward the Confessor.
It was a cathedral from 1540-1550.
Mary I reestablished it as a monastery until 1559.
Elizabeth I established it as a Collegiate church in 1579
1065

Abbey Homepage

St George's Chapel Garter Day.jpg St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle

The Queen’s Free Chapel of St George within her Castle at Windsor
The Chapel of the College of St George, Windsor Castle
The Chapel of the Most Honourable and Noble Order of the Garter

Royal Peculiar Founded by Edward III on 6 August 1348 1348

St. George's

Academic collegiate churches[edit]

Former collegiate churches in England[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • G. H. Cook, English Collegiate Churches of the Middle Ages (Phoenix House, 1959)
  • P. N. Jeffery, The Collegiate Churches of England and Wales (Robert Hale, 2004)