List of U.S. counties bordering eight or more counties

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A map of the counties and county equivalents of the United States. The counties which border 8 or more adjacent counties or county equivalents are highlighted.

Of the 3,143 counties and county equivalents in the United States, only around 250 border more than seven other counties.

Within the United States, "county equivalents" includes Louisiana parishes, Alaskan boroughs and census areas, and independent cities. The latter are found primarily in Virginia but three are located elsewhere. (Of the many Virginia counties on this list all but one share boundaries with at least one independent city—many of which are enclaved within that single county. Of the three independent cities outside of Virginia, only one--Baltimore, Maryland--does not appear in this list.) Mexican municipios are administrative divisions immediately below the level of the estados, as counties and county equivalents are immediately below the states in the U.S. In Canada, county-level administrative units are known by various names depending on the province and other factors; these include counties, regional county municipalities, districts, metropolitan municipalities, municipal districts, specialized municipalities, special areas, regional municipalities, improvement districts, regional districts and rural municipalities. No attempt has been made to differentiate between these various divisions as to whether or not they "count" toward the total of county boundaries.

This incomplete[1] list is based on the "adjacent counties" section found in most articles on individual U.S. counties insofar as whether it considers contact with or between single points of territory as representing a boundary of "zero" length.

Approximately 180 U.S. counties border eight other counties (nearly 6% of the total); nearly fifty border nine others (1.5%), and nearly twenty border ten or more. Only five of the fifty states (Connecticut, Hawaii, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Vermont), along with Washington, D.C., are not represented here.

The situation of counties that border a very small number of other counties is often (though certainly not always) the result of physical geography and, specifically, water. Coastal locations, peninsulas and islands often border open water on one or more sides rather than another county. By contrast, counties that border a large number of other counties seem primarily to be a coincidence of political geography. Some are located in eastern states where many smaller counties exist in a relatively small area and where boundaries are often determined by mountains, rivers and other natural features, while others are to be found among the largest counties of the west, whose boundaries are often based on a highly rectilinear geometry.

Eight counties[edit]

The following counties share boundaries with eight other counties or county equivalents. Those counties may lie in adjacent states, in Canada, or in Mexico.

Nine counties[edit]

The following counties share boundaries with nine other counties or county equivalents. Those counties may lie in adjacent states, in Canada, or in Mexico.

Alaska[edit]

Arizona[edit]

California[edit]

Colorado[edit]

Florida[edit]

Georgia[edit]

Idaho[edit]

Illinois[edit]

Indiana[edit]

Kentucky[edit]

Louisiana[edit]

Michigan[edit]

Minnesota[edit]

Montana[edit]

Nevada[edit]

New Hampshire[edit]

New Mexico[edit]

North Carolina[edit]

North Dakota[edit]

Oregon[edit]

Pennsylvania[edit]

South Carolina[edit]

South Dakota[edit]

Texas[edit]

Utah[edit]

Virginia[edit]

Washington[edit]

West Virginia[edit]

Ten counties[edit]

The following counties share boundaries with ten other counties or county equivalents. Those counties may lie in adjacent states, in Canada, or in Mexico.

Arizona[edit]

Colorado[edit]

Florida[edit]

Georgia[edit]

Maine[edit]

Massachusetts[edit]

Montana[edit]

New Mexico[edit]

North Dakota[edit]

South Carolina[edit]

Tennessee[edit]

Virginia[edit]

Washington[edit]

Eleven counties[edit]

The following counties share boundaries with eleven other counties. Those counties may lie in adjacent states or in Mexican estados.

Georgia[edit]

Nebraska[edit]

Texas[edit]

Twelve counties[edit]

One county shares boundaries with twelve other counties or county equivalents.

Thirteen counties[edit]

One county shares boundaries with thirteen other counties.

Fourteen counties[edit]

One county shares boundaries with fourteen other counties.

References[edit]

  1. ^ A very few individual county articles do not include lists or diagrams of adjacent counties. In those cases a count was made based on available maps. Even where lists or diagrams have been included they may not be accurate or exhaustive. Some lists may omit boundaries that exist entirely in water or at only a single point.
  2. ^ Mohave County and its adjacent counties form the largest such block of counties outside of Alaska. Their combined land area is 231,978.34 km² (89,567.34 sq mi), or larger than that of the state of Idaho. They include the #1 (San Bernardino), #2 (Coconino), #5 (Mohave), and #7 (Lincoln) largest counties outside of Alaska.
  3. ^ Bordering counties include one or more Mexican municipios.
  4. ^ a b c d e f One or more borders lies entirely in water.
  5. ^ a b c Includes at least one boundary of "zero" length.
  6. ^ a b c d e Adjoining counties include county equivalents in Canada.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Adjacent municipalities include at least one independent city.
  8. ^ a b c d boundary of "zero" length
  9. ^ a b c d e f This independent city is enclaved within the county.
  10. ^ In 1969 Ormsby County was officially dissolved and Carson City took over all municipal services with an independent city status.