List of current longest ruling non-royal national leaders

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This list of current longest ruling non-royal national leaders is a list of the current longest ruling heads of nation-states or national governments, who are not royalty, sorted by length of tenure.

The individuals on the list were not necessarily the most powerful figure in their country's national government throughout the listed timespan. Some of them have held more than one national leadership level office: presidency, prime ministership, or some other title implying or widely believed to confer national leadership. When more than one such office exists in a country, there may be uncertainty as to which member of the national government actually has the greatest power. This list combines all national leader level offices held concurrently or consecutively by each individual.

Rank Name Country Office Tenure Began Length of Tenure
1. Paul Biya  Cameroon Prime Minister, then President 30 June 1975 39 years, 11 days
2. Mohamed Abdelaziz  Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic General Secretary and President 30 August 1976 37 years, 315 days
3. Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo  Equatorial Guinea President[1] 3 August 1979 34 years, 342 days
4. José Eduardo dos Santos  Angola President 10 September 1979 34 years, 304 days
5. Robert Mugabe  Zimbabwe Prime Minister, then President 18 April 1980 34 years, 84 days
6. Ali Khamenei  Iran President, then Supreme Leader 13 October 1981 32 years, 271 days
7. Hun Sen  Cambodia Prime Minister[2] 14 January 1985 29 years, 178 days
8. Yoweri Museveni  Uganda President 29 January 1986 28 years, 163 days
9. Blaise Compaoré  Burkina Faso President[3] 15 October 1987 26 years, 269 days
10. Nursultan Nazarbayev  Kazakhstan First Secretary, then President 22 June 1989 25 years, 19 days
11. Islam Karimov  Uzbekistan First Secretary, then President 23 June 1989 25 years, 18 days
12. Omar al-Bashir  Sudan President[4] 30 June 1989 25 years, 11 days
13. Idriss Déby  Chad President[5] 2 December 1990 23 years, 221 days
14. Isaias Afewerki  Eritrea President[6] 27 April 1991 23 years, 75 days
15. Emomalii Rahmon  Tajikistan President[7] 19 November 1992 21 years, 234 days
16. Alexander Lukashenko  Belarus President 20 July 1994 19 years, 356 days
17. Yahya Jammeh  The Gambia President[8] 22 July 1994 19 years, 354 days
18. Denzil Douglas  Saint Kitts and Nevis Prime Minister 7 July 1995 19 years, 4 days
19. Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson  Iceland President 1 August 1996 17 years, 344 days
20. Denis Sassou Nguesso  Republic of the Congo President[9] 25 October 1997 16 years, 259 days
21. Kim Yong-nam  North Korea Chairman of the Presidium
of the Supreme People's Assembly[10]
5 September 1998 15 years, 309 days
22. Tuilaepa Aiono Sailele Malielegaoi  Samoa Prime Minister 23 November 1998 15 years, 230 days
23. Abdelaziz Bouteflika  Algeria President 27 April 1999 15 years, 75 days
24. Ismaïl Omar Guelleh  Djibouti President 8 May 1999 15 years, 64 days
25. Vladimir Putin  Russia President[11] 9 August 1999 14 years, 336 days
26. Sam Hinds  Guyana Prime Minister[12] 11 August 1999 14 years, 334 days
27. Paul Kagame  Rwanda President 24 March 2000 14 years, 109 days
28. Bashar al-Assad  Syria President 17 July 2000 13 years, 359 days
29. Joseph Kabila  Democratic Republic of the Congo President 17 January 2001 13 years, 175 days
30. José Maria Neves  Cabo Verde Prime Minister 1 February 2001 13 years, 160 days
31. Ralph Gonsalves  Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Prime Minister 29 March 2001 13 years, 104 days
32. Hamid Karzai  Afghanistan President[13] 22 December 2001 12 years, 201 days
33. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan  Turkey Prime Minister 14 March 2003 11 years, 119 days
34. Filip Vujanović  Montenegro President[14] 22 May 2003 11 years, 50 days
35. Anote Tong  Kiribati President 10 July 2003 11 years, 1 day
36. Ilham Aliyev  Azerbaijan Prime Minister, then President[15] 4 August 2003 10 years, 341 days
37. Artur Rasizade  Azerbaijan Prime Minister[16] 6 August 2003 10 years, 339 days
38. Abdelkader Taleb Omar  Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic Prime Minister 29 October 2003 10 years, 255 days
39. Shavkat Mirziyoyev  Uzbekistan Prime Minister 11 December 2003 10 years, 212 days
40. Roosevelt Skerrit  Dominica Prime Minister 8 January 2004 10 years, 184 days
41. Mahinda Rajapaksa  Sri Lanka Prime Minister, then President[17] 6 April 2004 10 years, 96 days
42. James Michel  Seychelles President 14 April 2004 10 years, 88 days
43. Heinz Fischer  Austria President 8 July 2004 10 years, 3 days
44. Lee Hsien Loong  Singapore Prime Minister 12 August 2004 9 years, 333 days
45. Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono  Indonesia President 20 October 2004 9 years, 264 days
46. Traian Băsescu  Romania President[18] 20 December 2004 9 years, 203 days
47. Mahmoud Abbas  Palestine President[19] 15 January 2005 9 years, 177 days
48. Armando Guebuza  Mozambique President[20] 2 February 2005 9 years, 159 days
49. Karolos Papoulias  Greece President 12 March 2005 9 years, 121 days
50. Hifikepunye Pohamba  Namibia President 21 March 2005 9 years, 112 days

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ was Chairman of the Revolutionary Military Council / Supreme Military Council of Equatorial Guinea from August 3, 1979 to October 12, 1982
  2. ^ Was Prime Minister of the Vietnam-occupation one-party state called the People's Republic of Kampuchea from January 14, 1985 to May 1, 1989. Was also Prime Minister during the entire existence of the State of Cambodia from May 1, 1989 to September 24, 1993.
  3. ^ was President of the Popular Front of Burkina Faso from October 15, 1987 to December 24, 1991
  4. ^ was Chairman of the Sudanese Revolutionary Command Council for National Salvation from June 30, 1989 to October 16, 1993
  5. ^ was President of the Council of State of Chad from December 2, 1990 to March 4, 1991
  6. ^ Was Secretary-General of the Provisional Government of Eritrea from April 27, 1991 to May 24, 1993, when Eritrea declared independence from Ethiopia.
  7. ^ was Chairman of the Supreme Assembly (Speaker of Parliament) of Tajikistan – de facto head of state – from November 19, 1992 to November 16, 1994
  8. ^ was Chairman of the Armed Forces Provisional Ruling Council of the Gambia from July 22, 1994 to September 28, 1996
  9. ^ was previously President from February 8, 1979 to August 31, 1992, when the country was a one-party state known as the People's Republic of the Congo
  10. ^ Kim Yong-nam is the "head of state for foreign affairs". The position of president (formerly head of state) was written out of the constitution in 1998. Kim Il-sung, who died in 1994, was given the appellation "Eternal President" in its preamble.
  11. ^ Was Prime Minister of Russia from August 16, 1999 to May 7, 2000 and Acting President from December 31, 1999 to May 7, 2000; then President of Russia from May 7, 2000 to May 7, 2008; then Prime Minister again from May 8, 2008 to May 7, 2012.
  12. ^ Was Prime Minister of Guyana from October 9, 1992 to March 17, 1997 and December 22, 1997 to August 9, 1999; and Interim President from March 6, 1997 to December 19, 1997.
  13. ^ was Chairman of the Afghan Transitional Authority from December 22, 2001 to June 19, 2002
  14. ^ President of Montenegro since May 22, 2003, but the country only became independent on June 3, 2006. He was previously Acting President from November 25, 2002 to May 19, 2003.
  15. ^ was Acting President of Azerbaijan from August 6, 2003 to October 31, 2003
  16. ^ Was previously Prime Minister of Azerbaijan from July 20, 1996 to August 4, 2003; and Interim Prime Minister from August 6, 2003 to November 4, 2003.
  17. ^ was both President and Prime Minister of Sri Lanka from November 19, 2005 to November 21, 2005
  18. ^ Nicolae Văcăroiu was Acting President from April 20, 2007 to May 23, 2007 and Crin Antonescu was Acting President from July 6, 2012 to August 28, 2012.
  19. ^ was previously Prime Minister from March 19, 2003 to September 6, 2003
  20. ^ Was previously a member of the Acting Political Bureau of the Central Committee (the collective head of state) from October 19, 1986 to November 6, 1986, when the country was a one-party state known as the People's Republic of Mozambique.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

  • Rulers.org List of rulers throughout time and places