List of ecclesiastical works by E. G. Paley

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For details of the works by the practice during its different phases (including the non-ecclesiastical works by E. G. Paley), see Lists of works by Sharpe, Paley and Austin.
A stone church seen from the west, with a tall pinnacled tower
St Peter's Church, Bolton, which replaced the medieval parish church of the town

Edward Graham Paley (1823–95) (usually known as E. G. Paley) was an English architect who practised for the whole of his career from an office in Lancaster, Lancashire. He was born in Easingwold, North Yorkshire, and moved to Lancaster in 1838, when he was aged 15, to join Edmund Sharpe as a pupil.[1] Sharpe had established an architectural practice in 1835, and in 1845 he took Paley into partnership.[2] During the following years, Sharpe developed outside interests, and from 1847 Paley was responsible for most of the firm's work, carrying out commissions independently from at least 1849.[3] Sharpe withdrew from the practice in 1851, although it continued to trade as Sharpe and Paley until 1856.[4] Sharpe formally retired from the partnership that year, leaving Paley as sole principal. Paley continued to work without a partner until he was joined by Hubert Austin in 1868, when the practice became known as Paley and Austin. In 1886 Paley's son, Henry Paley (who was usually known as Harry) joined the partnership, and the name was changed to Paley, Austin and Paley, a title it retained until Edward Paley's death in 1895.[5] This list contains the ecclesiastical works Paley undertook during the time he was the sole principal in the practice, between 1856 and 1868. There are 30 new or rebuilt churches or chapels in the list, and 18 churches that underwent restoration or alteration.

During the time Paley was being trained by Sharpe the practice was involved mainly with ecclesiastical work, although it also undertook commissions for country houses and smaller projects.[6] When Paley became sole principal, he continued to work mainly on churches,[7] designing new ones and restoring, rebuilding, and making additions and alterations to existing churches. In almost all his designs, Paley used the Gothic Revival style, initially with Early English or Decorated features. During the early 1860s he introduced Perpendicular features.[8] One church was built in Neo-Norman style, All Saints, Lupton,[9] and one in Transitional style, St Matthew, Little Lever.[10] Paley also used the Neo-Norman style for St Michael's Chapel at Lancaster Moor Hospital.[11]

Brandwood et al.[a] consider that Paley's finest church design was that of St Peter, Lancaster, (later Lancaster Cathedral) with its spire rising to 240 feet (73 m).[13] Of his other churches, St James in Barrow-in-Furness, was described by Nikolaus Pevsner as the best church in the town.[14] Hartwell, Hyde and Pevsner comment that St Peter, Bolton, is "formidable".[15] Paley was an Anglican and most of his ecclesiastical work was carried out on Church of England churches:[16] exceptions include St Mary and St Michael, Bonds, and St Peter, Lancaster, both Roman Catholic, and Clark Street Congregational Church, Morecambe.[7] Most of the churches and chapels were built for local congregations, but Paley also designed chapels for Rossall School,[17] and Lancaster Moor Hospital.[18] Being based in Lancaster, Paley's commissions were mainly for works in the northwest of England, particularly in the former historical counties of Westmorland and Cumberland (later part of Cumbria), and Lancashire (parts of which were later incorporated into Greater Manchester and Merseyside). Further afield he restored St Cuthbert's Church, Crayke, in North Yorkshire,[19] and designed Holy Trinity Church, Bradford, in West Yorkshire,[20] and St Thomas' Church, Stockton Heath, in Cheshire.[18] He also restored one church in Wales, St Garmon in Capel Garmon.[19]

Key[edit]

Denotes a new church designed by Paley, or one completely rebuilt.
Grade Criteria[21]
I Buildings of exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important
II* Particularly important buildings of more than special interest
II Buildings of national importance and special interest
U Not listed

Works[edit]

Name Location Photograph Date[b] Notes Grade
Capernwray Chapel Over Kellet, Lancaster, Lancashire
54°08′38″N 2°42′10″W / 54.1440°N 2.7029°W / 54.1440; -2.7029 (Capernwray Chapel)
A stone chapel with a small tower surmounted by a pyramidal roof 1856–57 The chapel had been built for Capernwray Hall in 1840, and was designed by Sharpe. Paley added the southwest tower and the chancel. He also replaced the west window with a new one containing Geometric tracery.[22][23][24] II
Lancaster Priory Lancaster, Lancashire
54°03′03″N 2°48′21″W / 54.0507°N 2.8057°W / 54.0507; -2.8057 (Lancaster Priory)
A church with a west tower surmounted by battlements and pinnacles 1856–58 The priory had been established in 1094, and was extended and altered in the following centuries. Paley restored the chancel, removed the galleries, and added a new west organ gallery and a vestry.[25][26][27][28] I
Church of St Mary and St Michael † Bonds, Lancashire
53°53′51″N 2°46′16″W / 53.8974°N 2.7710°W / 53.8974; -2.7710 (Church of St Mary and St Michael, Bonds)
A stone church with a west tower surmounted by battlements and a small spirelet 1857–58 This Roman Catholic church replaced a small chapel in the centre of Garstang. It consists of a nave and chancel under a continuous roof, a north aisle, a north porch, and a west tower. The tower has an embattled parapet. Attached to the tower is an octagonal stair turret with a small spirelet that rises to a greater height than the tower. The church provided seating for 600 people.[29][30][31][32] II
St Peter's Church (later Lancaster Cathedral) † Lancaster, Lancashire
54°02′49″N 2°47′36″W / 54.04690°N 2.79335°W / 54.04690; -2.79335 (Lancaster Cathedral)
A stone church dominated by a large, tall steeple
1857–59 Originally known as St Peter's Church, this originated as a Roman Catholic parish church that contained 600 seats. It consists of a five-bay nave with a clerestory, aisles and transepts, a two-bay chancel with aisles, side chapels, and a semi-octagonal apse. At the northeast is a steeple rising to a height of 240 feet (73 m). In 1860 Paley added a font. Considered to be Paley's finest work, the church became a cathedral in 1924.[25][33][34][35] II*
St George's Church † Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria
54°06′30″N 3°13′15″W / 54.1084°N 3.2209°W / 54.1084; -3.2209 (Church of St George, Barrow-in-Furness)
The west end of a red sandstone church with two gables and a battlemented tower
1859–60 St George's Church is constructed in slate with sandstone dressings. Its main benefactors were the Duke of Buccleuch and the Duke of Devonshire. Paley added a north aisle in 1867, thereby increasing the seating to almost 1,000. The church consists of a five-bay nave with north and south aisles, south and west porches, a two-bay chancel with a chapel to the south, an organ chamber and a vestry to the north, and an embattled tower at the west end of the south aisle.[36][37][38][39] II
St Anne's Church † Singleton, Lancashire
53°50′16″N 2°56′10″W / 53.8379°N 2.9360°W / 53.8379; -2.9360 (Church of St Anne, Singleton)
A stone church from the south showing the transept and the braoch spire beyond 1859–60 The church was built for Thomas Miller of Singleton Hall to replace an earlier church that was demolished in 1859. It is in Early English style, and consists of a nave, a chancel, a south transept and a northeast tower with a broach spire.[40][41][42][43] II
Holy Trinity Church Blackburn, Lancashire
53°45′04″N 2°28′29″W / 53.7511°N 2.4746°W / 53.7511; -2.4746 (Holy Trinity Church, Blackburn)
A large stone church from the south with a large transept and a west tower 1860 Holy Trinity was built in 1837–45 to a design by Sharpe. Paley reconstructed the galleries, adding 200 extra seats, introduced new stalls, and moved the organ to a new position behind the pulpit.[41][44][45] II
St Peter's Church † Quernmore, Lancashire
54°02′12″N 2°44′16″W / 54.0366°N 2.7377°W / 54.0366; -2.7377 (St Peter's Church, Quernmore)
A small stone church from the north with a west tower and higher stair turret 1860 The church was built to replace a chapel of 1834. It was paid for by William Garnett of Quernmore Park, and cost about £3,000. The church is designed in the style of the 13th century, and consists of a three-bay nave, a north aisle, a north porch, a chancel, and a west tower. On the tower's northeast corner is an octagonal stair turret rising to a greater height. It was the first church designed by Paley to have a bare brick interior.[46][47][48][49] II
St Mary's Church Knowsley, Merseyside
53°27′22″N 2°51′10″W / 53.4562°N 2.8528°W / 53.4562; -2.8528 (Church of St Mary, Knowsley)
A large stone church with a clerestory and west steeple 1860 St Mary's was built in 1843–44 to a design by Sharpe for the 13th Earl of Derby, mainly in Early English style. Paley added transepts with windows in Decorated style, a pulpit and a desk.[25][41][50][51] II
Holy Trinity Church Casterton, Cumbria
54°12′41″N 2°34′38″W / 54.2115°N 2.5771°W / 54.2115; -2.5771 (Church of the Holy Trinity, Casterton)
A low church from the southeast with a higher chancel and a small west tower c. 1860 The church was built in 1831–33 for Rev William Carus Wilson; the architect was probably George Webster. Paley replaced the chancel with a larger and more elaborate one in Early English style, containing lancet windows.[41][52][53][54] II
St Mary's Church † Lowton, Golborne, Greater Manchester
53°28′35″N 2°33′04″W / 53.4763°N 2.5512°W / 53.4763; -2.5512 (Church of St Mary, Lowton)
A small stone church with a west bellcote and a lower chancel and vestry 1860–61 St Mary's is a modest church without aisles that provided 345 seats at an estimated cost of £1,215. The west front contains a three-light window, framed by an arch carrying a double bellcote.[41][46][55] U
All Saints Church Wigan,
Greater Manchester
53°32′46″N 2°37′58″W / 53.5460°N 2.6328°W / 53.5460; -2.6328 (Church of All Saints, Wigan)
An impressive stone church with a central pinnacled tower 1861 Between 1854 and 1850 the church had been largely rebuilt by Sharpe and Paley. In 1861 Paley added another stage to the tower, which included clock faces and pinnacles.[40][41][56][57] II*
All Saints Church † Higher Walton, Lancashire
53°44′27″N 2°38′27″W / 53.7408°N 2.6407°W / 53.7408; -2.6407 (All Saints Church, Higher Walton)
A stone church with an apsidal chancel and a broach spire 1861–62 All Saints was designed in the style of about 1300. Its estimated cost was £4,300, and it provided seating for 604 people. The church consists of a nave and a chancel in one range, a south aisle with a porch, a north transept, and a chancel with a polygonal apse. At the west end is a tower with a stair turret and a broach spire.[40][58][59][60] II
St Paul's Church † Hoddlesden, Lancashire
53°42′01″N 2°26′03″W / 53.7002°N 2.4341°W / 53.7002; -2.4341 (St Paul's Church, Hoddlesden)
1861–62 St Paul's is designed in Geometric style. It cost about £4,000 and seated 650 people. The church had a four-bay nave with a north aisle, a chancel, and a west tower with a stair turret rising to a greater height. It was demolished in 1975.[41][61][62][63] U
Rossall School Chapel † Rossall, Fleetwood, Lancashire
53°53′45″N 3°02′41″W / 53.8957°N 3.0448°W / 53.8957; -3.0448 (Rossall School Chapel)
A stone chapel with a transept and an octagonal bell turret 1861–62 This is a chapel for Rossall School, built at an estimated cost of £4,400. It consists of a narrow nave, transepts, and a two-bay chancel. At the northwest is a slim bell turret with a short spire. The windows contain Geometric tracery.[46][64][65][66] II
St John the Evangelist's Church Gressingham, Lancashire
54°07′24″N 2°39′20″W / 54.1233°N 2.6556°W / 54.1233; -2.6556 (Church of St John, Gressingham)
A plain stone church with a small west tower 1862 The church contains fabric from the 12th century, and was rebuilt in 1734. Paley's restoration included removing the porch, rebuilding the south wall, adding buttresses and windows, installing a new east window in Perpendicular style, inserting new windows in the clerestory, restoring the chancel arch, removing the ceiling, tiling the chancel, and reseating the church, all of which cost about £300.[41][52][67][68] I
St John the Baptist's Church † Blawith, Cumbria
54°17′09″N 3°05′38″W / 54.2857°N 3.0940°W / 54.2857; -3.0940 (Church of St John the Baptist, Blawith)
A small stone church with a lower chancel and a double west bellcote 1862–63 This replaced an older church that is in ruins nearby. It cost £1,600 and contained about 170 seats. It consists of a nave and a short chancel, with lancet windows containing plate tracery. The church was declared redundant in 1988, and is in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust.[19][29][69][70] U
St Garmon's Church Capel Garmon, Conwy County Borough, Wales
53°04′59″N 3°46′11″W / 53.0830°N 3.7698°W / 53.0830; -3.7698 (Church of St Garmon, Capel Garmon)
A small church with a rendered nave and west single bellcote 1862–63 The church was restored at a cost of £800. The work included rebuilding the south wall, renewing the windows, adding a new porch and a north vestry, and reseating the church, increasing the seating from 145 to 150. The church has been closed.[19][52][71][72] U
Clark Street Congregational Church † Morecambe, Lancashire
54°04′28″N 2°51′42″W / 54.0744°N 2.8618°W / 54.0744; -2.8618 (Clark Street Congregational Church, Morecambe)
1862–63 This originated as a Congregational chapel providing seating for 350 people. It has a truncated northwest tower, a southwest porch, and windows containing plate tracery. The chapel has been closed, and converted into offices.[46][73][74] U
St Mark's Church † Preston, Lancashire
53°45′47″N 2°43′08″W / 53.7630°N 2.7190°W / 53.7630; -2.7190 (Former Church of St Mark, Preston)
A stone church from the southeast with a south transept and a pinnacled tower 1862–63 St Mark's cost £6,594. It is in Decorated style, and consists of a four-bay nave, north and south transepts, a chancel terminating in a three-sided apse, and a west porch (the tower was added later). The church was declared redundant in 1982, and has been converted into flats.[46][75][76][77][78] II*
Christ Church † Ince-in-Makerfield, Greater Manchester
53°32′19″N 2°36′41″W / 53.5386°N 2.6115°W / 53.5386; -2.6115 (Christ Church, Ince-in-Makerfield)
A small stone church with a transept and an octagonal bell turret with a conical roof 1862–64 This church is in Decorated style. It consists of a five-bay nave, north and south transepts, a chancel ending in a polygonal apse, north and south vestries, and a porch at the west end. To the east of the north transept is a turret.[25][79][80][81] II
St Peter's Church Heysham, Lancashire
54°02′51″N 2°54′07″W / 54.0474°N 2.9019°W / 54.0474; -2.9019 (St Peter, Heysham)
A broad stone church with three gables and a complex bellcote 1863 Most of the fabric of St Peter's dates from the 14th and 15th centuries. Paley restored the church and added a north aisle. In the course of these alterations an Anglo-Saxon doorway was dismantled and rebuilt in the churchyard, and two galleries were removed.[19][82][83][84] I
St Wilfrid's Church Melling, Lancashire
54°08′05″N 2°36′59″W / 54.1347°N 2.6165°W / 54.1347; -2.6165 (Church of St Wilfrid, Melling)
A plain stone church with a clerestory and a battlemented west tower 1863 The church dates mainly from the later part of the 15th century, with the clerestory added in 1763. Paley designed a new organ case.[19][46][85][86] I
St Cuthbert's Church Over Kellet, Lancashire
54°07′10″N 2°43′55″W / 54.1195°N 2.7319°W / 54.1195; -2.7319 (Church of St Cuthbert, Over Kellet)
A rendered low church with a battlemented tower 1863–64 Although some of the fabric of the church dates from about 1200, most of it is from the 16th century. Paley's restoration included removing the ceiling, reinstating the chancel arch, and rebuilding the east end of the church, all at a cost of £330. The seating was increased by 35 to 295, retaining the older pews of 1816.[19][25][87][88] II*
St Mary's Church † Allithwaite, Cumbria
54°10′59″N 2°56′34″W / 54.1830°N 2.9429°W / 54.1830; -2.9429 (Church of St Mary, Lower Allithwaite)
A small church with a lower chancel and an octagonal bell turret 1863–65 St Mary's was designed in Decorated style. At the same time Paley designed the associated parsonage and schools. The church consists of a nave and south aisle, a south porch, and a chancel with a north chapel. At the west end is an octagonal bell turret with a spire.[19][89][90][91] II
Holy Trinity Church † Bury,
Greater Manchester
53°35′20″N 2°17′20″W / 53.5890°N 2.2888°W / 53.5890; -2.2888 (Church of the Holy Trinity, Bury)
A small stone church with no visible tower or bellcote 1863–65 Paley designed this church in Decorated style. The site was donated by the 14th Earl of Derby, who also provided £1,000 towards its total cost of about £5,500. The planned south aisle and a north tower with a spire were never built. The church provided seating for 627 people. In 2010 it became redundant.[29][92][93][94][95][96] II
St Peter's Church † Hindley,
Greater Manchester
53°32′00″N 2°34′52″W / 53.5334°N 2.5812°W / 53.5334; -2.5812 (Church of St Peter, Hindley)
The east part of a stone church having a tower with a broach spire
1863–66 This is a church in Decorated style providing seating for 689 people. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, north and south aisles, a chancel with a southwest vestry, and a northeast tower with a broach spire.[19][52][97][98] II
St James' Church † Poolstock, Wigan, Greater Manchester
53°32′09″N 2°38′16″W / 53.5358°N 2.6379°W / 53.5358; -2.6379 (Church of St James, Poolstock)
A large stone church with a battlemented clerestory and a pinnacled tower 1863–66 This church was paid for by Nathaniel Eckersley of Standish Hall. It is in Decorated style and consists of a nave with a clerestory, north and south aisles, a chancel with a south chapel and north vestry, and a west tower.[40][99][100][101] II*
St Saviour's Church † Aughton, Lancashire
54°06′09″N 2°41′21″W / 54.1025°N 2.6892°W / 54.1025; -2.6892 (Church of St Saviour, Aughton)
The east end of a stone which with a triple lancet window 1864 St Saviour's is a small church the cost £590 and provided seating for 100 people. It has lancet windows, and a bellcote at the west end.[19][36][102] U
St Cuthbert's Church Crayke, North Yorkshire
54°07′43″N 1°08′38″W / 54.1287°N 1.1440°W / 54.1287; -1.1440 (Church of St Cuthbert, Crayke)
Part of a battlemented church and tower seen through an archway
1864 The church originated in the 15th century. Paley carried out a restoration and added the north aisle at a cost of £1,000.[19][52][103] II
St John the Evangelist's Church † Turncroft, Over Darwen, Lancashire
53°41′24″N 2°27′28″W / 53.6899°N 2.4577°W / 53.6899; -2.4577 (Church of St John, Turncroft)
An engraving of a church with an apsidal chancel and a west steeple 1864 This church had a polygonal apse, and at the west end was a spire 146 feet (45 m) high. It has been demolished.[52][104] U
St Leonard's Church Walton-le-Dale, Lancashire
53°44′51″N 2°39′59″W / 53.7476°N 2.6665°W / 53.7476; -2.6665 (Church of St Leonard, Walton-le-Dale)
A stone church with a west battlemented tower 1864 The oldest part of the church, the chancel and the tower, date from the 16th century; the nave was built in 1795–98, and the transepts in 1816–17. The church had been restored in 1856. Paley carried out a further restoration, which included re-roofing, re-flooring and refitting the church, and adding a reredos in Bath stone.[20][105][106][107] II*
St Thomas' Church † Blackburn, Lancashire
1864–65 This was a church in Decorated style. The first design in 1859 had been for a brick church, but the patrons insisted on stone. Building was then delayed because of concern over the impending cotton famine. When eventually built, it cost £4,469, and provided seating for 1,054 (originally planned for 766). It has since been demolished.[20][108] U
Holy Trinity Church † Leeds Road, Bradford, West Yorkshire
1864–65 Holy Trinity was designed in Decorated style. It was built in stone with five bays, north and south aisles, and a tower at the southeast. The estimated cost was £3,565, with seating for 638 people. The church was demolished in 1966.[29][109] U
St Mary's Church Penny Bridge, Egton, Cumbria
54°14′04″N 3°03′33″W / 54.2345°N 3.0593°W / 54.2345; -3.0593 (Church of St Mary, Egton)
1864–65 Built before 1786, the church was rebuilt in 1831, and the chancel was added in 1855–56. Paley rebuilt the nave and added the south aisle at a cost of £1,000, paid for by the Countess Blucher von Wahlstadt.[52][110][111] U
St John the Evangelist's Church † Woodland, Cumbria
54°17′31″N 3°09′29″W / 54.2920°N 3.1580°W / 54.2920; -3.1580 (Church of St John the Evangelist, Egton)
The west part of a stone church with a bellcote
1864–65 This was the third church to be built on the site, replacing churches of 1698 and 1822. Like many others in the area it is small, consisting only of a nave and an apse, with a bellcote. It cost almost £1,000, and has 150 seats.[20][112] U
St Mary's Church Ulverston, Cumbria
54°11′56″N 3°05′29″W / 54.1989°N 3.0915°W / 54.1989; -3.0915 (Church of St Mary, Ulverston)
The battlemented tower and west part of a stone church
1864–66 Other than the medieval tower with its Norman doorway, the church had been rebuilt in 1804. The tower was again retained, and Paley rebuilt the rest of the church, providing about 1,400 seats, and introducing Perpendicular tracery in the west window.[20][40][113][114] II*
St Matthew's Church † Little Lever, Bolton, Greater Manchester
53°33′46″N 2°22′25″W / 53.5628°N 2.3735°W / 53.5628; -2.3735 (Church of St Matthew, Little Lever)
A stone church with a transept, a rose window and a pinnacled thower 1865 St Matthew's replaced a church of 1791 on a different site nearby. It is a wide church without aisles, but with transepts. Above the west porch is a large rose window. At this time the tower was only built up to the level of the eaves. Paley used a Transitional style of architecture in the design.[10][20][29][115] II
St Paul's Church Brookhouse, Caton, Lancashire
54°04′31″N 2°42′04″W / 54.0753°N 2.7011°W / 54.0753; -2.7011 (Church of St Paul, Brookhouse)
A stone church with a clerestory and a broad battlemented tower 1865–67 A church has been present on the site since before 1230. Paley rebuilt the church, other than its Perpendicular tower, again using the Perpendicular style. The work cost an estimated £4,000, and provided a church with aisles and a clerestory. Paley lived nearby and worshipped in this church.[29][116][117][118] II*
St Mary's Church Kirkby Lonsdale, Cumbria
54°12′13″N 2°35′51″W / 54.2037°N 2.5975°W / 54.2037; -2.5975 (Church of St Mary, Kirkby Lonsdale)
The west end of a stone church with an embraced battlemented tower 1866 The earliest parts of the church are Norman, dating from the 11th or 12th century. The church was restored by Paley, at the expense of the Earl of Bective. The restoration included re-roofing and reseating the church, re-flooring the chancel, adding a south porch, and installing a screen and a font.[20][119][120] I
St Michael's Chapel † Moor Hospital, Lancaster, Lancashire
1866 This originated as a chapel for Lancaster Moor Hospital. It is in Neo-Norman style, and has a cruciform plan. Since becoming redundant, it has been converted into flats.[11][18][25][121] II
Holy Trinity Church Morecambe, Lancashire
54°04′29″N 2°51′27″W / 54.0746°N 2.8575°W / 54.0746; -2.8575 (Holy Trinity Church, Morecambe)
1866 Holy Trinity had been rebuilt in 1840–41 by Edmund Sharpe, replacing an earlier chapel. Paley added a south aisle with seven Decorated windows, each with a gable rising higher than the parapet.[122][123][124] II
St Helen's Church Churchtown, Lancashire
53°52′44″N 2°47′24″W / 53.8788°N 2.7900°W / 53.8788; -2.7900 (Church of St Helen, Churchtown)
A long church with a clerestory, battlemented tower, and a stair turret with a small spire 1866–69 The church dates from the 13th century, and was rebuilt in the 15th and 16th centuries. Paley restored the church at a cost of £1,372; the work included removal of the west gallery and reseating the church.[18][52][125][126] I
Cartmel Priory Cartmel, Cumbria
54°12′04″N 2°57′08″W / 54.2011°N 2.9523°W / 54.2011; -2.9523 (Cartmel Priory)
A complex stone church with a large west window and a central tower 1867 Founded by the Augustinian order in about 1190, the priory church was completed by 1233. Alterations and additions were made during the following centuries. Paley carried out a restoration, which included reseating the church, stripping the plaster from the walls, removing the galleries, adding an organ, a font, a pulpit and reading desk, and re-glazing the windows.[18][127][128][129] I
St Thomas' Church † Stockton Heath, Warrington, Cheshire
53°22′20″N 2°34′57″W / 53.3723°N 2.5824°W / 53.3723; -2.5824 (St Thomas' Church, Stockton Heath)
A stone church from the southeast with a northwest tower and stair turret 1867–68 This church replaced an earlier one; its main benefactor was Sir Gilbert Greenall. Its estimated cost was £5,395, to provide seating for 650 people. This large church is constructed in red sandstone, and is in Decorated style, with a west tower and a southeast turret. It consists of a nave, a south aisle, a chancel, a north transept and a north vestry and organ loft.[18][130][131] II
St James' Church † Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria
54°07′08″N 3°14′01″W / 54.1190°N 3.2337°W / 54.1190; -3.2337 (Church of St James, Barrow-in-Furness)
A red brick church with stone dressings, having a clerestory and a steeple
1867–69 Sited in an elevated position, the church is built mainly in red brick, with blue brick decoration, and with dressings and a spire in yellow stone. The steeple is placed on the south side of the chancel, which has a polygonal east end. There is also a six-bay nave with a clerestory and aisles. The church cost about £7,650, and provided 950 seats. It was considered by Nikolaus Pevsner to be "the best church in Barrow".[14][132][133][134] II*
St Peter's Church † Churchgate, Bolton, Greater Manchester
53°34′46″N 2°25′25″W / 53.5794°N 2.4237°W / 53.5794; -2.4237 (Church of St Peter, Bolton)
A stone church seen from the west, with a tall pinnacled tower
1867–71 St Peter's replaced the medieval parish church of Bolton. It was paid for by Peter Ormrod, a local cotton manufacturer, and eventually cost £45,000. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, aisles, transepts, a chancel with north and south chapels, and a northwest tower. The tower, at 180 feet (55 m), is the highest in the historic county of Lancashire.[29][135][136][137] II*
All Saints Church † Lupton, Cumbria
54°13′18″N 2°39′54″W / 54.2218°N 2.6649°W / 54.2218; -2.6649 (All Saints Church, Lupton)
A small church with an apse and a bellcote 1867
(or 1868)
The church is very small, consisting of a three-bay nave with an apse, a north vestry, and a south porch. It is in Neo-Norman style, with a large south doorway. On the west gable is a bellcote.[9][18][138] II

Notes and references[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ Brandwood et al. is the most comprehensive published account of the Sharpe, Paley and Austin practice.[12]
  2. ^ The dates given in this column are the years in which the work was carried out. Sources vary in the dates they provide; the dates used are those given in Brandwood et al.

Citations

  1. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 49–50
  2. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 2
  3. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 55
  4. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 2, 55
  5. ^ Price (1998), pp. 4–5
  6. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 38
  7. ^ a b Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 56
  8. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 56–58
  9. ^ a b Hyde & Pevsner (2010), p. 510
  10. ^ a b Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 248
  11. ^ a b Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 411
  12. ^ The Architecture of Sharpe, Paley and Austin, English Heritage, retrieved 2 September 2013 
  13. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 59–61
  14. ^ a b Pevsner (2002), p. 56
  15. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 137
  16. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 52, 56
  17. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 68
  18. ^ a b c d e f g Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 222
  19. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 220
  20. ^ a b c d e f g Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 221
  21. ^ Listed Buildings, English Heritage, retrieved 2 September 2013
  22. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 38–39, 212, 218
  23. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 202
  24. ^ English Heritage, "Capernwray Church (1164650)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  25. ^ a b c d e f Price (1998), p. 75
  26. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 217
  27. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 364–369
  28. ^ English Heritage, "Priory and Parish Church of St Mary (1195068)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  29. ^ a b c d e f g Price (1998), p. 73
  30. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 56, 58–59, 218
  31. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 98
  32. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Mary and St Michael (1361910)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  33. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 59–61, 218, 219
  34. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 369–371
  35. ^ English Heritage, "Cathedral Church of St Peter (1214397)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  36. ^ a b Price (1998), p. 72
  37. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 59, 74, 218–219, 222
  38. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), pp. 131–132
  39. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St George (1201077)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  40. ^ a b c d e Price (1998), p. 77
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h Brandwood et al. (2012), p. 219
  42. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 613
  43. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Anne (1072038)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  44. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 125
  45. ^ English Heritage, "Holy Trinity Church (1223094)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  46. ^ a b c d e f Price (1998), p. 76
  47. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 62, 219
  48. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 551–552
  49. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Peter (1362497)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  50. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 223
  51. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Mary (1253329)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  52. ^ a b c d e f g h Price (1998), p. 74
  53. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), pp. 274–275
  54. ^ English Heritage, "Church of Holy Trinity (1335935)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  55. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 515
  56. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), pp. 660–661
  57. ^ English Heritage, "Church of All Saints (1384556)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  58. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 63, 219
  59. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 680
  60. ^ English Heritage, "Church of All Saints (1290187)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  61. ^ Price (1998), pp. 74–75
  62. ^ Pevsner (2002), p. 142
  63. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 337
  64. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 68, 219
  65. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 583
  66. ^ English Heritage, "Rossall School Chapel (1362162)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  67. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 313–314
  68. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St John the Evangelist (1164600)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  69. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), p. 156
  70. ^ Diocese of Carlisle, (PDF), (21 February 2011), p. 1, Church of England, retrieved 2 September 2013
  71. ^ Hubbard (1986), p. 115
  72. ^ Capel Garmon Parish Church, Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, retrieved 2 September 2013
  73. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 56, 220
  74. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 459
  75. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 62–63, 220
  76. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 531
  77. ^ English Heritage, "Former Church of St Mark (1291672)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  78. ^ Diocese of Blackburn, (PDF), (21 February 2011), p. 5, Church of England, retrieved 2 September 2013
  79. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 63, 220
  80. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 210
  81. ^ English Heritage, "Christ Church (1228324)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  82. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 332–334
  83. ^ English Heritage, "Parish Church of St Peter (1279836)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 May 2013. 
  84. ^ St Peter's History (PDF), St Peter's, Heysham, retrieved 2 September 2013
  85. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 451–452
  86. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Wilfrid (1165114)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  87. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 485
  88. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Cuthbert (1071877)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  89. ^ Price (1998), pp. 71–72
  90. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), p. 92
  91. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Mary (1335764)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  92. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 66, 220
  93. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), p. 178
  94. ^ English Heritage, "Holy Trinity Church (1391180)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 6 June 2011. 
  95. ^ English Heritage, "Former Church of St Mark (1291672)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  96. ^ Diocese of Manchester, (PDF), (21 February 2011), p. 3, Church of England, retrieved 2 September 2013
  97. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 198
  98. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Peter (1287248)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  99. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 63–65, 220
  100. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), p. 663
  101. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St James with St Thomas (1384468)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  102. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), p. 88
  103. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Cuthbert (1314955)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  104. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 66, 220–221
  105. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 679–680
  106. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Leonard (1074102)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 8 June 2012. 
  107. ^ Farrar, William; Brownbill, J., eds. (1911), "Townships: Walton-le-Dale – Church", A History of the County of Lancaster, Victoria County History (University of London & History of Parliament Trust) 6: 289–300, retrieved 10 May 2013 
  108. ^ Price (1998), pp. 72–73
  109. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 62–63, 221
  110. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 62, 221
  111. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), p. 341
  112. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), p. 697
  113. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), pp. 647–649
  114. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Mary (1374977)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  115. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Matthew (1391096)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 5 June 2011. 
  116. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 52, 58, 221
  117. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 204–205
  118. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Paul (1163957)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  119. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), pp. 458–462
  120. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Mary (1145774)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 16 August 2012. 
  121. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Michael, Moor Hospital (1289454)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  122. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 212, 222
  123. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 456–457
  124. ^ English Heritage, "Parish Church of the Holy Trinity (1207210)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 9 December 2011. 
  125. ^ Hartwell & Pevsner (2009), pp. 358–359
  126. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Helen (1072874)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  127. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), pp. 267–272
  128. ^ English Heritage, "Priory Church of St Mary (1335798)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  129. ^ Cartmel Priory, Cumbria, The Heritage Trail, retrieved 2 September 2013
  130. ^ Pollard & Pevsner (2006), pp. 629–630
  131. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St Thomas (1135939)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 7 December 2011. 
  132. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 74–75, 222
  133. ^ Hyde & Pevsner (2010), p. 132
  134. ^ English Heritage, "Church of St James (1197881)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  135. ^ Brandwood et al. (2012), pp. 66–68, 222
  136. ^ Hartwell, Hyde & Pevsner (2004), pp. 137–138
  137. ^ English Heritage, "Parish Church of St Peter (1387979)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 22 May 2011. 
  138. ^ English Heritage, "Church of All Saints (1335929)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 11 June 2012. 

Sources

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  • Hartwell, Clare; Hyde, Matthew; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2004), Lancashire: Manchester and the South-East, The Buildings of England, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, ISBN 0-300-10583-5 
  • Hartwell, Clare; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2009) [1969], Lancashire: North, The Buildings of England, New Haven and London: Yale University Press, ISBN 978-0-300-12667-9 
  • Hubbard, Edward (1986), Clwyd, The Buildings of Wales, London: Penguin, ISBN 0-14-071052-3 
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