List of fictional religions

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Fictional religions are religions that exist only in works of fiction.

A[edit]

  • Arceusism - worshippers of Arceus, the creator of all Pokémon. See also Giratinism

B[edit]

C[edit]

D[edit]

E[edit]

F[edit]

G[edit]

H[edit]

I[edit]

  • IBM – from the "Deities" episode of the Max Headroom TV series
  • The Imperial Creed – From Warhammer 40,000. Also called the Imperial Cult
  • The Imperial Cult – The Elder Scrolls. The faith of The Empire of Tamriel that follows the Nine Divines; Akatosh, Stendarr, Mara, Dibella, Julianos, Zenithar, Kynareth, Arkay and Talos, the apotheosized founder of the Empire Tiber Septim.
  • Iridescent Tones – A religion practiced on the world Nalthis created by author Brandon Sanderson.
  • Ishbalan – Fullmetal Alchemist
  • Innos – Gothic God of Fire and Light, lord of the Order.

J[edit]

K[edit]

  • Kelx – Kelx is a religion that appears in Neal Stephenson's Anathem. The followers of Kelx believe that the whole world is in the mind of a man condemned to die. The "Condemned Man" is on trial in the "Magistrate's" court for the murder of the "Innocent" and her family. The Condemned Man argues that whole worlds can be created by any soul and therefore no one should be put to death. Each day the Condemned Man tells a story from the world in his mind, and the Magistrate judges the people in that story. The Condemned Man's life and therefore the very existence of the world hang on the Magistrate's judgment of each story.
  • Khala – StarCraft
  • Kinda – Doctor Who
  • Klingon religion – Star Trek
  • Konja Kyūsei Subarakikō – Key the Metal Idol

L[edit]

  • Lapine Theism – Original Lapine belief in one sun god, Frith, and rabbit prophet. Includes other minor deities/angels including Prince Rainbow who orders the world on behalf of Frith but is neither omnipotent nor infallible (and may represent humanity as seen by rabbits), and the Black Rabbit of Inlé (Inlé-Rah) who is the personification of Death. Also includes supposedly mortal folk heroes such as El-ahrairah (who may have taken up a quasi-religious role after death). – Watership Down
  • Lapine Christianity – Parody religion – Cross between Reform Christianity and Lapine Theism
  • The Light – Main religion of the Dwarves, Draenei and Humans in World of Warcraft.
  • The Lords of Kobol – While the official name of the religion is not known, the religion featured in Battlestar Galactica follows a belief in these beings and religious practices surrounding them.
  • Los Illuminado – Resident Evil 4
  • Laser Lotus Buddhist – Community

M[edit]

N[edit]

O[edit]

P[edit]

Q[edit]

R[edit]

S[edit]

T[edit]

  • Teleological Pantheism – The Starrigger series by John DeChancie
  • Third Islam – Dune series
  • Tribunal Temple – Cult of the three living gods known as Vivec, Almalexia and Sotha Sil who are worshipped by the Dunmer, or Dark Elves of Morrowind. – The Elder Scrolls series.
  • Trigonate Church – A worship of three principle gods, and several minor ones, in Tad Williams' Shadowmarch series.
  • Tritheism – alluded to but not described in "Prelude to Foundation" by Isaac Asimov
  • The Truth – A religion based on the belief that all apparent reality is actually a computer simulation – The Algebraist by Iain M. Banks.

U[edit]

V[edit]

W[edit]

Y[edit]

  • Yen Buddhism – Discworld. Yen Buddhists believe that money poisons the soul, so they collect as much as possible, to protect others from it. Basically a play on Zen/Yen.
  • Yevonism – Final Fantasy X
  • Yomeshta – the religion of the Orgota people in The Left Hand of Darkness who follow the teachings of a messianic figure called Yomesh
  • Young Men's Reformed Cultists of the Ichor God Bel-Shamaroth Association-religious organisation in Terry Pratchett's Discworld
  • Young Moneyism- worshipers of young money

Z[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Kifflom". Epsilonprogram.com. Retrieved 2012-11-09. 

External links[edit]