List of fictional worms

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a list of fictional worms, categorized by the media they appear in. For the purpose of this list, "worm" does not simply refer to earthworms, but also to mythological and fantastic creatures whose description as a "worm" descends from the Old English word wyrm, a poetic term for a legless serpent or dragon. For a comprehensive account of worms in fiction, please see Fictional depictions of worms.

Mythology and legends[edit]

Literature[edit]

Television, music and film[edit]

Role-playing games[edit]

Video games[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Christine Rauer (2000). Beowulf and the dragon: parallels and analogues. Boydell & Brewer. pp. 32–33. ISBN 978-0-85991-592-2. 
  2. ^ Carlson, Eric (1996). A companion to Poe studies. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 92. ISBN 978-0-313-26506-8. 
  3. ^ a b c d Trent Walters (2005), "Snakes and Worms", The Greenwood encyclopedia of science fiction and fantasy 2, p. 729, ISBN 978-0-313-32950-0 
  4. ^ William Morris (1911). The collected works of William Morris, Volume 7. Longmans, Green and company. p. 328. 
  5. ^ Drout, Michael D. C. (2007). J.R.R. Tolkien encyclopedia: scholarship and critical assessment. CRC Press. p. 636. ISBN 978-0-415-96942-0. 
  6. ^ Rick Lehtinen, Deborah Russell, G. T. Gangemi (2006). Computer security basics. O'Reilly. p. 85. ISBN 978-0-596-00669-3. 
  7. ^ Dilys Evans (2008). Show & tell: exploring the fine art of children's book illustration. Chronicle Books. p. 86. ISBN 978-0-8118-4971-5. 
  8. ^ Angier, Natalie (28 April 1998). "AFICIONADO OF SCIENCE: Gary Larson; An Amateur of Biology Returns to His Easel". New York Times. Retrieved 16 June 2010. 
  9. ^ Marc Okrand (1992). The Klingon dictionary: English-Klingon, Klingon-English, Volume 1992, Part 2. Simon and Schuster. p. 149. ISBN 978-0-671-74559-2. 
  10. ^ http://everything2.com/title/Turner+the+Worm