List of fishes of the Coral Sea

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Coral Sea map

This is a list of fishes recorded from the Coral Sea, bordering Australia, Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and New Caledonia. This list comprises locally used common names, scientific names with author citation and recorded ranges. Ranges specified may not be the entire known range for the species, but should include the known range within the waters surrounding of the bordering land masses.

List ordering and taxonomy complies where possible with the current usage in Fishbase, and may differ from the cited source, as listed citations are primarily for range or existence of records for the region. Sub-taxa within any given family are arranged alphabetically as a general rule. Details of each species may be available through the relevant internal links. Synonyms may be listed where useful.


Geographical scope[edit]

The International Hydrographic Organization defines the limits of the Coral Sea as follows:[1]

On the North. The South coast of New Guinea from the entrance to the Bensbak River (141°01'E) to Gado-Gadoa Island near its Southeastern extreme (10°38′S 150°34′E / 10.633°S 150.567°E / -10.633; 150.567), down this meridian to the 100 fathom line and thence along the Southern edges of Uluma (Suckling) Reef and those extending to the Eastward as far as the Southeast point of Lawik Reef (11°43.5′S 153°56.5′E / 11.7250°S 153.9417°E / -11.7250; 153.9417) off Tagula Island [Vanatinai], thence a line to the Southern extreme of Rennell Island and from its Eastern point to Cape Surville, the Eastern extreme of San Cristobal Island [Makira], Solomons; thence through Nupani, the Northwestern of the Santa Cruz Islands (10°04.5′S 165°40.5′E / 10.0750°S 165.6750°E / -10.0750; 165.6750) to the Northernmost Island of the Duff or Wilson Group (9°48.5′S 167°06′E / 9.8083°S 167.100°E / -9.8083; 167.100).

On the Northeast. From the Northernmost island of the Duff or Wilson Group through these islands to their Southeastern extreme, thence a line to Mera Lava, New Hebrides Islands [Vanuatu] (14°25′S 163°03′E / 14.417°S 163.050°E / -14.417; 163.050) and down the Eastern coasts of the islands of this Group to Aneityum Island (20°11′S 169°51′E / 20.183°S 169.850°E / -20.183; 169.850) in such a way that all the islands of these Groups, and the straits separating them, are included in the Coral Sea.

On the Southeast. A line from the Southeastern extreme of Aneityum Island to Southeast (Nokanhui) Islets (22°46′S 167°34′E / 22.767°S 167.567°E / -22.767; 167.567) off the Southeast extreme of New Caledonia, thence through the East point of Middleton Reef to the Eastern extreme of Elizabeth Reef (29°55′S 159°02′E / 29.917°S 159.033°E / -29.917; 159.033) and down this meridian to Latitude 30° South.

On the South. The parallel of 30° South to the Australian coast.

On the West. The Eastern limit of the Arafura Sea [The entrance to the Bensbak River (141°01'E), and thence a line to the Northwest extreme of York Peninsula, Australia (11°05′S 142°03′E / 11.083°S 142.050°E / -11.083; 142.050)] and the East Coast of Australia as far South as Latitude 30° South.

Class Chondrichthyes[edit]

Order Hexanchiformes[edit]

Family Hexanchidae - Sixgill and sevengill sharks

  • Bluntnose sixgill shark Hexanchus griseus (Bonnaterre, 1788) (Worldwide in tropical and tepmperate seas)[2]

Order Heterodontiformes[edit]

Family Heterodontidae – Hornsharks, Port Jackson sharks, bullhead sharks.

Order Orectolobiformes[edit]

Family Orectolobidae – Wobbegongs

Family Hemiscylliidae - Bamboo sharks

Family Stegostomatidae - Leopard sharks

  • Leopard shark Stegostoma fasciatum (Hermann, 1783) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Australia and New Caledonia)[2]

Family Ginglymostomatidae - Nurse sharks

  • Tawny nurse shark Nebrius ferrugineus (Lesson, 1830) (Indo-West Pacific from East Africa and the Red Sea to the Society Islands)[2]

Family Rhincodontidae - Whale sharks

Order Lamniformes[edit]

Family Odontaspididae - Sand tiger sharks

  • Grey nurse shark Carcharias taurus Rafinesque, 1810 syn. Eugomphodus taurus (Around the Australian mainland, also widespread overseas)[3] (Tropical and temperate waters of most seas but absent from eastern and cantral Pacific Ocean)[2]

Family Alopiidae - Thresher sharks

Family Lamnidae – Makos, Mackerel sharks

Order Carcharhiniformes[edit]

Family Scyliorhinidae - Catsharks

Family Carcharhinidae – Whaler sharks, requiem sharks

Family Hemigaleidae - Weasel sharks

  • Whitetip reef shark Triaenodon obesus (Rueppell, 1837) (Indo-Pacific and tropical eastern Pacific)[2]

Family Sphyrnidae - Hammerhead sharks

Order Torpediniformes[edit]

Family Hypnidae – Coffin rays, electric rays

  • Coffin ray Hypnos monopterygium (Shaw and Nodder, 1795) (Broome, Western Australia to Caloundra, Queensland)[3](Western Australia, South Australia and southeastern Australia, including southern Queensland and adjacent Great Barrier Reef)[2]

Order Rajiformes[edit]

Family Rhinobatidae – Guitarfishes

  • Common shovelnose ray Glaucostegus typus (Anonymous [Bennett], 1830)[4] syn. Rhinobatos batillum Whitley, 1939 ((as R. batillum)Northern Australia between Shark Bay, Western Australia and the Capricorn Group, occasionally near sand cays on the Great Barrier Reef)[2]

Order Myliobatiformes[edit]

Family Dasyatidae – Stingrays

  • Kuhl's stingray Dasyatis kuhlii (Mueller and Henle, 1841) (East Africa and Red Sea to Samoa and north to Japan)[2]
  • Blue-spotted stingray Taeniura lymma (Forsskal, 1775) (East Africa to western Pacific and Great Barrier Reef) [2]
  • Black-blotched stingray Taeniura meyeni Mueller an Henle, 1841 (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Thorny ray Urogymnus africanus (Bloch and Schneider 1801) (East Africa to northern Australia and the Marshall Islands)[2]

Family Myliobatidae – Eagle rays

  • Spotted eagle ray Aetobatus narinari (Euphrasen, 1790) (Cosmopolitan in tropical to warm temperate seas)[2]

Family Mobulidae - Mantas and devil rays

Class Osteichthyes[edit]

Order Albuliformes[edit]

Family Albulidae - Bonefishes

  • Pacific bonefish Albula argentea (Forster and Bloch in Schneider, 1801) (Indo-Pacific)[2]

Order Anguilliformes[edit]

Family Moringuidae - Worm eels

  • Slender worm-eel Moringua ferruginea (Bliss, 1883) (East Africa to Easter Island and north to Ryukyu Islands)[2]

Family Chlopsidae - False morays

Family Muraenidae – Moray eels

Family Ophichthidae – Snake eels, worm eels

Family Congridae – Conger eels

  • Speckled garden eel Gorgasia sp. (Western Pacific including Coral Sea, Guam and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Black edged conger Conger cinereus Rueppell, 1830 (East Africa and Red Sea to Easter Island)[2]
  • Spotted garden eel Heteroconger hassi (Klausewitz and Eibl-Ebesfeldt, 1959) (Red Sea to Samoa and Line Islands, north to Ryukyu Islands)[2]

Order Clupeiformes[edit]

Family Clupeidae – Herrings, pilchards, sardines

Order Gonorhynchiformes[edit]

Family Chanidae - Milkfish

Order Siluriformes[edit]

Family Plotosidae - Eeltail catfishes

Order Aulopiformes[edit]

Family Synodontidae – Lizardfishes

  • Slender lizardfish Saurida gracilis (Quoy and Gaimard, 1824) (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Two-spot lizardfish Synodus binotatus Schultz, 1953 (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Clearfin lizardfish Synodus dermatogenys Fowler, 1912 (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Arrowtooth lizardfish Synodus doaki Russell and Cressey, 1979 (Hawaii, New Zealand, eastern Australia, Japan and East Africa)[2]
  • Javelinfish Synodus jaculum Russell and Cressey, 1979 (Scattered records from the Line Islands in the central Pacific to Natal and the Comoro Islands)[2]
  • Redmarbled lizardfish Synodus rubromarmoratus Russell and Cressey, 1979 (Only known from Taiwan, Philippines and the Great Barrier Reef)[2]
  • Reef lizardfish, variegated lizardfish Synodus variegatus (Lacepede, 1803) (Tropical Australia south to Jutten Bay, Western Australia and Merimbula, New South Wales. Also Lord Howe Island and widespread in the Indo-Pacific region)[3] (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Snakefish Trachinocephalus myops (Forster in Bloch and Schneider, 1801) (Indo-Pacific and Atlantic, tropical to warm temperate)[2]

Order Ophidiiformes[edit]

Family Ophidiidae – Cusk eels (?), lings, brotulas

Family Carapidae - Pearlfishes

Family Bythitidae - Cuskeels

Order Batrachoidiformes[edit]

Family Batrachoididae – Frogfishes, toadfishes

  • Banded toadfish Halophryne diemensis (Lesueur, 1824) (Northern Australia from Shark Bay, Western Australia to Heron Island, Queensland and throughout the Indo-Malayan Archipelago)[2]

Order Lophiiformes[edit]

Family Antennariidae – Anglerfishes

  • Freckled anglerfish Antennarius coccineus (Cuvier in Lesson, 1831) (Indo-Pacific eastward to the Americas)[2]
  • White-finger anglerfish Antennarius nummifer (Cuvier, 1817) (East Africa and the Red Sea to the Society Islans, and north to Japan)[2]
  • Painted anglerfish Antennarius pictus (Shaw and Nodder, 1794) (East Africa to the Society and Hawaiian Islands)[2]
  • Striate anglerfish, striped anglerfish Antennarius striatus (Shaw and Nodder 1794) (Tropical Australia south to Wollagong, New South Wales and Geraldton Western Australia)[3]
  • Tuberculated anglerfish Antennarius tuberosus (Cuvier, 1817) (East Africa to Samoa and the Hawaiian Islands)[2]
  • Sargassum fish Histrio histrio (Linnaeus, 1758) (Indo-West Pacific and tropical Atlantic)[2]

Order Gobiesociformes[edit]

Family Gobiesocidae – Clingfishes, shore eels

Order Beloniformes[edit]

Family Exocoetidae - Flying fishes

Family Hemiramphidae - Garfishes, halfbeaks

Family Belonidae - Longtoms or needlefishes

Order Atheriniformes[edit]

Family Atherinidae – Hardyheads, silversides

Order Beryciformes[edit]

Family Monocentridae – Pineapplefishes

  • Australian pineapplefish, knightfish Cleidopus gloriamaris De Vis, 1882 (Shark Bay, Western Australia to Great Australian Bight, Western Australia and Eden, New South Wales to Capricorn Group, Queensland.)[3] (East and west coasts of Australia)[2]

Family Holocentridae - Squirrelfishes and soldierfishes

Order Syngnathiformes[edit]

Family Aulostomidae - Trumpetfishes

Family Fistulariidae - Flutemouths

Family Centriscidae - Razorfishes and shrimpfishes

Family Solenostomidae - Ghost pipefishes

Family Syngnathidae – Pipefishes, pipehorses, seahorses, seadragons

Order Scorpaeniformes[edit]

Family Dactylopteridae - Helmet gurnards

Family Scorpaenidae – Scorpionfishes

Family Caracanthidae - Crouchers, orbicular velvetfishes

Family Aploactinidae – Velvetfishes

  • Threefin velvetfish Neoaploactis tridorsalis Eschmeyer and Allen, 1978 (Known only from Rottnest Island and Shark Bay in Western Australia and One Tree Island in the Capricorn Group of the southern Great Barrier Reef)[2]

Family Platycephalidae – Flatheads

Order Perciformes[edit]

Family Centropomidae - Barramundi

Family Serranidae – Rockcods, seaperches, groupers

Subfamily Anthiinae - Anthias

Subfamily Epinephelinae - Rockcods

Subfamily Grammistinae

Tribe Liopropomini

Tribe Diploprioni

Tribe Grammistini

Tribe Pseudogrammini

Family Pseudochromidae – Dottybacks and eel blennies

Subfamily Congrogadinae

Subfamily Pseudochromidae

Family Plesiopidae – Prettyfins, blue devilfishes, hulafishes, longfins

Subfamily Acanthoclininae

  • Banded spiny basslet Belonepterygion fasciolatum (Ogilby, 1889) (West and east coasts of Australia in tropical and subtropical seas, and Lord Howe Island)[2]

Family Teraponidae - Grunters

  • Crescent grunter Terapon jarbua (Forsskal, 1775) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Samoa)[2]

Family Kuhliidae - Flagtails

  • Fiveband flagtail Kuhlia mugil (Forster in Bloch and Scneider, 1801) (Indo-Pacific and tropical eastern Pacific)[2]

Family Priacanthidae - Bigeyes

Family Apogonidae – Cardinalfishes

  • Ring-tailed cardinalfish Apogon aureus (Lacepede, 1802) (East Africa to western Pacific)[2]
  • Ruby cardinalfish Apogon crassiceps Garman, 1903 (Western Pacific to islands of Oceania except Hawaii) [2]
  • Split-banded cardinalfish Apogon compressus (Smith and Radcliffe, 1911) (East Indies to Solomon Islands and North to Ryukyu Islands) [2]
  • Yellow-striped cardinalfish Apogon cyanosoma Bleeker, 1853 (East Africa and Red Sea to Australia and the Marshall Islands) [2]
  • Doederlein’s cardinalfish Apogon doederleini Jordan and Snyder, 1901 (Western Pacific antitropical: Southern Japan to Taiwan in the north, subtropical Australia to New Caledonia and the Kermadec Islands in the south) [2]
  • Fragile cardinalfish Apogon fragilis Smith, 1961 (East Africa to Samoa) [2]
  • Frostfin cardunalfish Apogon hoeveni Bleeker, 1854 (East Indies and northern Australia to Japan) [2]
  • Longspine cardinalfish Apogon leptacanthus Bleeker, 1856 (East Africa and the Red Sea to Samoa) [2]
  • Moluccan cardinalfish Apogon moluccensis Valenciennes, 1832 (East Indies and northern Australia) [2]
  • Blackstripe cardinalfish Apogon nigrofasciatus Lachner, 1953 (Red Sea to the Taumotus) [2]
  • Spotnape cardinalfish Apogon notatus (Houttuyn, 1782) (Coral Sea to southern Japan) [2]
  • Sangi cardinalfish Apogon sangiensis Bleeker, 1857 (East Indies to Vanuatu and north to Japan) [2]
  • Oblique banded cardinalfish Apogon semiornatus Peters, 1876 (East Africa to northern Australia and north to Japan) [2]
  • Three-spot cardinalfish Apogon trimaculatus Cuvier, 1828 (East Indies to Samoa, north to the Ryukyu Islands) [2]
  • Three saddle cardinalfish Apogon sp. (French Polynesia and Marshall Islands to northern Indian Ocean) [2]
  • Timor cardinalfish Apogonichthyoides timorensis (Bleeker, 1854)[6] syn. Apogon timorensis ((as A. timorensis) East Africa and the Red Sea to northern Australia and north to Japan) [2]
  • Ocellated cardinalfish Apogonichthys ocellatus (Weber,1913) (East Africa to the Marquesas and Taumotus) [2]
  • Narrow-lined cardinalfish Archamia fucata (Cantor, 1850) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Samoa) [2]
  • Lea’s cardinalfish Archamia leai Waite, 1916 (Coral Sea and southern Great Barrier Reef) [2]
  • Two-spot cardinalfish Archamia biguttata Lachner, 1951 (Northern Australia and New Guinea) [2]
  • Girdled cardinalfish Archamia zosterophora (Bleeker, 1856) (Indonesia and Philippines to New Caledonia and north to the Ryukyu Islands) [2]
  • Tiger cardinalfish Cheilodipterus macrodon (Lacepede, 1802) (Indo-Pacific) [2]
  • Wolf cardinalfish Cheilodipterus artus Smith, 1961 (East Africa to the Taumotu Archipelago, In the western Pacific from Ryukyu Islands to the Great Barrier Reef) [2]
  • Five-lined cardinalfish Cheilodipterus quinquelineatus Cuvier, 1828 (East Africa and the Red Sea to southeastern Polynesia) [2]
  • Mimic cardinalfish Cheilodipterus parazonatus Gon, 1993 (Indonesia, Phlippines, New Guinea and Queensland) [2]
  • Weed cardinalfish Foa brachygramma (Jenkins, 1903) (East Africa to Hawaiian Islands) [2]
  • Dwarf cardinalfish Fowleria vaiulae (Jordan and Seale, 1906) (Red Sea to western Pacific) [2]
  • Aurita cardinalfish Fowleria aurita (Valenciennes, 1831) (East Africa and the Red Sea to the western Pacific) [2]
  • Eared cardinalfish Fowleria marmorata (Alleyne and Macleay, 1877) (Red Sea to southeastern Polynesia) [2]
  • Peppered cardinalfish Fowleria punctulata (Rueppell, 1838) ( Red Sea to central and south Pacific) [2]
  • Variegated cardinalfish Fowleria variegata (Valenciennes, 1832) (Red Sea to Samoa and north to Ryukyu Islands) [2]
  • Eightspine cardinalfish Neamia octospina Smith and Radcliffe, 1912 (East Africa and the Red Sea to Australia and Philippine Islands) [2]
  • Guam cardinalfish Nectamia fusca (Quoy & Gaimard, 1825)[7] syn. Apogon guamensis Valenciennes, 1832 ((as A. guamensis) East Africa and Red Sea to Samoa) [2]
  • Samoan cardinalfish Nectamia savayensis (Günther, 1872) syn. Apogon savayensis ((as A. savayensis)Indo-Pacific from East Africa to French Polynesia) [2]
  • Striped cardinalfish Ostorhinchus angustatus (Smith & Radcliffe, 1911) syn. Apogon angustatus ((as A. angustatus)East Africa and the Red Sea to Melanesia and Micronesia)[2]
  • Goldbelly cardinalfish Ostorhinchus apogonoides (Bleeker, 1856) syn. Apogon apogonides ((as A. apogonides) East Africa to East Indies and Australia)[2]
  • Cook’s cardinalfish Ostorhinchus cookii (MacLeay, 1881) syn. Apogon cookii ((as A. cookii)East Africa to Australia, north to Japan) [2]
  • Rifle cardinalfish Ostorhinchus kiensis (Jordan & Snyder, 1901) syn. Apogon kiensis ((as A. kiensis)East Africa and Red Sea north to Japan) [2]
  • Nine-banded cardinalfish Ostorhinchus novemfasciatus (Cuvier, 1828)[8] syn. Apogon novemfasciatus ((as A. novemfasciatus) Cocos-Keeling Islands to Samoa and north to the Izu Islands) [2]
  • Coral cardinalfish Ostorhinchus properuptus (Whitley, 1964)[9] syn. Apogon properupta ((as A. properupta) Queensland and the northern section of the Great Barrier Reef south to Montague Island, New South Wales) [2]
  • Reef-flat cardinalfish Ostorhinchus taeniophorus (Regan, 1908)[10] syn. Apogon taeniophorus ((as A. taeniophorus) Mauritius to Polynesia) [2]
  • Flame cardinalfish Ostorhinchus talboti (Smith, 1961)[11] syn. Apogon talboti Smith, 1961 ((as A. talboti)Indo-Pacific) [2]
  • Narrowstripe cardinalfish Pristiapogon exostigma (Jordan & Starks, 1906) syn. Apogon exostigma ((as A. exostigma)Red Sea to south-eastern Polynesia) [2]
  • Spur-cheek cardinalfish Pristiapogon fraenatus (Valenciennes, 1832) syn. Apogon fraenatus ((as A. fraenatus)East Africa and Red Sea to the Line Islands and Taumotu Archipelago) [2]
  • Iridescent cardinalfish Pristiapogon kallopterus (Bleeker, 1856)[12] syn.Apogon kallopterus Bleeker, 1856 ((as A. kallopterus) East Africa and Red Sea to Polynesia) [2]
  • Gelatinous cardinalfish Pseudamia gelatinosa Smith, 1954 (East Africa and the Red Sea to the Society Islands and north to Japan) [2]
  • Slender cardinalfish Rhabdamia gracilis (Bleeker, 1856) (East Africa to the Marshall Islands) [2]
  • Striped siphonfish Siphamia majimai Matsubara and Iwai, 1958 (Northern Australia to Japan) [2]
  • Threadfin cardinalfish Sphaeramia nematoptera (Bleeker, 1856) (East Indies and northern Australia to Micronesia and north to Japan) [2]

Family Malacanthidae - Sand tilefishes

Family Echeneidae - Remoras, suckerfish

Family Carangidae – Trevallies

Family Coryphaenidae – Dolphinfishes

Family Lutjanidae – Snappers

Family Caesionidae – Fusiliers

  • Scissortail fusilier Caesio caerulaurea Lacepede, 1801 (East Africa to Samoa) [2]
  • Red-bellied fusilier Caesio cuning (Bloch, 1791) (Sri Lanka to New Caledonia, north to the Ryukyu Islands) [2]
  • Lunar fusilier Caesio lunaris Cuvier, 1830 (East Africa to Melanesia) [2]
  • Blue and gold fusilier Caesio teres Seale, 1906 (East Africa to the Line Islands and north to Japan) [2]
  • Marr’s fusilier Pterocaesio marri Schultz, 1953 (East Africa to the Marquesas and north to Japan) [2]
  • Neon fusilier Pterocaesio tile (Cuvier, 1830) (East Africa to southeastern Oceania and north to Japan) [2]
  • Three lined fusilier Pterocaesio trilineata Carpenter, 1987 (Western and Central Pacific) [2]

Family Lobotidae - Tripletails

Family Gerreidae – Silverbiddies, silverbellies

  • Oceanic silver biddy Gerres longirostris (Lacepède, 1801)[14] syn. Gerres acinaces Bleeker, 1854 ((as G. acinaces)East Africa and Red Sea to Samoa) [2]

Family Haemulidae – Sweetlips, grunts, grunter breams

  • Painted sweetlips Diagramma pictum (Thunberg,1792) (East Africa and the Red Sea to New Caledonia, and north to Japan) [2]
  • Goldstriped sweetlips Plectorhinchus chrysotaenia (Bleeker,1855) (Indonesi to New Caledonis and north to the Ryukyu Islands) [2]
  • Many-spotted sweetlips Plectorhinchus chaetodonoides (Lacepède, 1800) (Cocos-Keeling Islands to Samoa) [2]
  • Striped sweetlips Plectorhinchus lessonii (Cuvier, 1830) (Malaysia to Melanesia and north to Japan) [2]
  • Goldspotted sweetlips, netted sweetlips, netted morwong Plectorhinchus flavomaculatus (Ehrenberg, 1830) (Tropical Australia south to Geographe Bay, Western Australia, and to Moruya, New South Wales. Also widespread in the Indo-West Pacific region.)[3] (Cuvier, 1830) (East Africa and the Red Sea to western Pacific) [2]
  • Brown sweetlips, blubber-lip bream Plectorhinchus gibbosus (Lacepède, 1802) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Samoa, and north to the Ryukyu Islands) [2]
  • Diagonal banded sweetlips Plectorhinchus lineatus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Western Pacific from Australia to the Ryukyu Islands) [2]
  • Giant sweetlips Plectorhinchus albovittatus (Rueppell, 1838) (Red Sea to Fiji) [2]
  • Dotted sweetlips Plectorhinchus picus (Cuvier, 1830) (Seychelles to society Islands and north to Japan) [2]
  • Somber sweetlips Plectorhinchus unicolor (Macleay, 1883) (Papua New Guinea to Queensland and the Great Barrier Reef) [2]

Family Sparidae – Breams

  • Yellowfin bream, bream, silver bream Acanthopagrus australis (Owen, 1853) (Lakes Entrance, Victoria, to Townsville, Queensland.)[3]
  • Tarwhine Rhabdosargus sarba (Forsskål, 1775) (Coral Bay to Albany, Western Australia, and Lakes Entrance, Victoria, to Queensland. Also widespread overseas.)[3]
  • Snapper, cockney bream, red bream, squire, old man Pagrus auratus (Schneider, 1801) (Barrow Island, Western Australia, to Hinchinbrook Island, Queensland, and northern Tasmania. Also New Zealand, Japan and the Indo-Malayan region.)[3](Bloch and Schneider, 1801) (New Zealand and southern Australia north to the Capricorns) [2]

Family Lethrinidae – Emperors

Family Nemipteridae – Coral breams

Family Mullidae – Goatfishes, red mullet

Family Pempheridae – Bullseyes, sweepers

  • Golden sweeper Parapriacanthus ransonneti Steindachner, 1870 (Western Pacific east to New Caledonia and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Bronze sweeper Pempheris analis Waite, 1910 (Kermadec Islands, Lord Howe Island, southern Great Barrier Reef and Western Australia)[2]
  • Copper sweeper Pempheris otaitensis Lesson, 1830 (Islands of Oceania and western Pacific to Western Australia and Christmas Island in the Indian Ocean)[2]
  • Silver sweeper Pempheris schwenkii Bleeker, 1855 (Fiji and Vanuatu through Australia and Indonesia to East Africa)[2]

Family Kyphosidae – Drummers, rudderfishes

  • Topsail drummer Kyphosus cinerascens Forsskal, 1775 (East Africa and the Red Sea to Polynesia)[2]
  • Long finned drummer Kyphosis vaigiensis (Quoy and Gaimard 1825) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Polynesia)[2]
  • Stripey Microcanthus strigatus (Cuvier, 1831) (Antiequatorial, Isolated populations in western and eastern Australia, and in the Hawaiian Island and Taiwan to Japan)[2]

Family Ephippidae - Batfishes

  • Hump-headed batfish Platax batavianus Cuvier, 1831 (Malay Peninsula to northern Australia)[2]
  • Orbicular batfish Platax orbicularis (Forsskal, 1775) (East Africa and the Red Sea to the Taumotus)[2]
  • Pinnate batfish Platax pinnatus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Western Pacific from the Ryukyu Islands to Australia)[2]
  • Teira batfish Platax teira (Forsskal, 1775) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Melanesia)[2]
  • Short-finned batfish Zabidius novemaculeatus (McCulloch, 1916)[19] syn. Platax novemaculatus ((as P. novemaculatus)Northern Australia and southern New Guinea)[2]

Family Chaetodontidae – Butterflyfishes

Family Pomacanthidae - Angelfishes

Family Pomacentridae – Damselfishes

  • Bengal sergeant Abudefduf bengalensis (Bloch, 1787) (Northeastern Indian Ocean and western Pacific)[2]
  • Banded sergeant Abudefduf septemfasciatus (Cuvier, 1830) (East Africa to Tuamotu Archipelago and Line Islands)[2]
  • Scissor-tail sergeant Abudefduf sexfasciatus (Lacepede, 1802) (East Africa and the Red Sea to the Tuamotus)[2]
  • Blackspot sergeant Abudefduf sordidus (Forsskal, 1775) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Polynesia)[2]
  • Indo-Pacific sergeant Abudefduf vaigiensis (Quoy and Gaimard, 1825) (East Africa and the Red Sea to the Marquesas)[2]
  • Whitley's sergeant Abudefduf whitleyi Allen and Robertson, 1974 (Great Barrier Reef, Coral Sea and New Caledonia)[2]
  • Spiny chromis Acanthochromis polyacanthus (Bleeker, 1855) (Indonesia and the Philippines to northeastern Australia and Melanesia)[2]
  • Golden damsel Amblyglyphidodon aureus (Cuvier, 1830) (Eastern Indian Ocean and western Pacific)[2]
  • Staghorn damsel Amblyglyphidodon curacao (Bloch, 1787) (Eastern Indian Ocean and western Pacific)[2]
  • White-belly damsel Amblyglyphidodon leucogaster (Bleeker, 1847) (Red Sea to Samoa)[2]
  • Black banded demoiselle Amblypomacentrus breviceps (Schlegel and Mueller, 1839)[2]
  • Barrier reef anemonefish Amphiprion akindynos (Allen, 1972) (Southwestern Pacific, including Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea, northern New South Wales, New Caledonia and Loyalty Islands)[2]
  • Orange-fin anemonefish Amphiprion chrysopterus Cuvier, 1830 (Queensland and New Guinea to Tuamotus and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Clark's anemone fish Amphiprion clarkii (Bennett, 1830) (Persian Gulf to Vanuatu and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Red and black anemonefish Amphiprion melanopus Bleeker, 1852 (Indonesia to the Society and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Clown anemonefish Amphiprion percula (Lacepede, 1802) (Queensland and Melanesia)[2]
  • Pink anemonefish Amphiprion perideraion Bleeker, 1855 (Western Pacific including Melanesia and Micronesia ranging north to Japan)[2]
  • Big-lip damsel Cheiloprion labiatus (Day, 1877) (Andaman Sea to northern Australia and Melanesia)[2]
  • Midget chromis Chromis acares Randall and Swerdloff, 1973 (Coral Sea to Society islands and Johnston Island)[2]
  • Agile chromis Chromis agilis Smith, 1960 (East Africa to the Hawaiian Islands and Pitcairn group)[2]
  • Yellow speckled chromis Chromis alpha Randall, 1988 (Christmas Island (Indian Ocean) to Society Islands)[2]
  • Ambon chromis Chromis amboinensis (Bleeker, 1873) (Cocos-Keeling Islands to Samoa and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Yellow chromis Chromis analis (Cuvier, 1830) (Indonesia to Fiji and Mariana Islands)[2]
  • Black-axil chromis Chromis atripectoralis Welander and Schultz, 1951 (Seychelles to Tuamotus)[2]
  • Dark-fin chromis Chromis atripes Fowler and Bean, 1928 (Cocos-Keeling Islands to Kiribati)[2]
  • Stout body chromis Chromis chrysura (Bliss, 1883) (Three isolated antitropical populations at Southwestern Pacific, Japan to Taiwan and Mauritius to Reunion)[2]
  • Deep reef chromis Chromis delta Randall, 1988 (Cocos Keeling Islands to Fiji)[2]
  • Twin-spot chromis Chromis elerae Fowler and Bean, 1928 (Maldive Islands to Fiji and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Yellow-spotted chromis Chromis flavomaculata Kamohara, 1960 (Antiequatorial distribution with two isolated populations: Lord Howe Island, Coral Sea New Caledonia and Loyalty Islands, and Japan to Taiwan)[2]
  • Half and half chromis Chromis iomelas Jordan and Seale, 1906 (Great Barrier Reef and northern New Guinea to Samoa and the Society Islands)[2]
  • Scaly chromis Chromis lepidolepis Bleeker, 1877 (Rast Africa and the Red Sea to Fuji and the Line Islands)[2]
  • Bicolour chromis Chromis margaritifer Fowler, 1946 (Cocos-Keeling Islands to the Tuamotus)[2]
  • Barrier Reef chromis Chromis nitida (Whitley, 1928) (Southern and central Great Barrier Reef, Rare or absent in other parts of the Coral Sea)[2]
  • Black-bar chromis Chromis retrofasciata Weber, 1913 (Indonesia and the Philippines to Fiji)[2]
  • Ternate chromis Chromis ternatensis (Bleeker, 1856) (East Africa to Fiji and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Vanderbilt's chromis Chromis vanderbilti (Fowler, 1941) (Scattered localities in the western and central Pacific)[2]
  • Blue-green chromis Chromis viridis (Cuvier, 1830) (East Africa and the Red Sea to the Tuamotu Archipelago and Line Islands)[2]
  • Weber's chromis Chromis weberi Fowler and Bean, 1928 (East Africa and the Red Sea to the Line Islands and Pitcairn group)[2]
  • Yellow-axil chromis Chromis xanthochira (Bleeker, 1851) (Indonesia and Philippines to northeastern Australia and Melanesia)[2]
  • Pale-tail chromis Chromis xanthura (Bleeker, 1854) (Cocos-Keeling Islands to southeastern Oceania)[2]
  • Two-spot demoiselle Chrysiptera biocellata (Quoy and Gaimard, 1824) (East Africa to Samoa and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Blueline demoiselle Chrysiptera caeruleolineata (Allen, 1973) (Coral Sea to Samoa and Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Blue devil Chrysiptera cyanea (Quoy and Gaimard, 1824) (Indonesia to Vanuatu and Palau and north to the Ryukyu Islands. Fairly common on the Great Barrier Reef but absent from other parts of the Coral Sea)[2]
  • Yellowfin damsel Chrysiptera flavipinnis (Allen and Robertson, 1974) (Southwestern Pacific including New Guinea, eastern Australia and the Coral Sea)[2]
  • Grey damsel Chrysiptera glauca (Cuvier, 1830) (East Africa to the Pitcairn group and Line Islands)[2]
  • Surge demoiselle Chrysiptera brownriggii (Bennett, 1828) (East Africa to the Marquesas and Line Islands)[2]
  • King demoiselle Chrysiptera rex (Snyder, 1909) (Indonesia and the Philippines to northeastern Australia and Melanesia)[2]
  • Rolland's demoiselle Chrysiptera rollandi (Whitley, 1961) (Malay Peninsula to northeastern Australia and Melanesia)[2]
  • Starck's demoiselle Chrysiptera starcki (Allen, 1973) (Antiequatorial distribution in the western Pacific: New Caledonia to Queensland, and Taiwan to the Ryukyu Islands)[2]
  • Talbot's demoiselle Chrysiptera talboti (Allen, 1975) (Malay Peninsula to northeastern Australia and Melanesia)[2]
  • South seas demoiselle Chrysiptera taupou (Jordan and Seale, 1906) (Southwestern Pacific, including Australia, to Fiji and Samoa)[2]
  • Threeband demoiselle Chrysiptera tricincta (Allen and Randall, 1974) (Antiequatorial distribution in western Pacific: Coral Sea to Samoa, and Ryukyu Islands)[2]
  • Onespot demoiselle Chrysiptera unimaculata (Cuvier, 1830) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Fiji)[2]
  • Humbug dascyllus Dascyllus aruanus (Linnaeus, 1758) (East Africa and the Red Sea to the Line Islands and southeastern Polynesia)[2]
  • Black tailed dascyllus Dascyllus melanurus Bleeker, 1854 (Malay Peninsula to northeastern Australia and Melanesia)[2]
  • Reticulated dascyllus Dascyllus reticulatus (Richardson, 1846) (Cocos-Keeling Islands to Samoa)[2]
  • Three-spot dascyllus Dascyllus trimaculatus (Rueppell, 1828) (East Africa and the Red Sea to the Line Islands and Pitcairn group)[2]
  • Black vent damsel Dischistodus melanotus (Bleeker, 1853) syn. D. notopthalmus (Indonesia and the Philippines to northern Australia and the Solomon Islands)[2]
  • White damsel Dischistodus perspicillatus (Cuvier 1830) (Eastern Indian Ocean and western Pacific)[2]
  • Honey-head damsel Dischistodus prosopotaenia (Bleeker, 1852) (Andaman Sea to northern Australia and Melanesia)[2]
  • Monarch damsel Dischistodus pseudochrysopoecilus (Allen and Robertson, 1974) (Philippines to northern Australia and Melanesia)[2]
  • Lagoon damsel Hemiglyphidodon plagiometopon (Bleeker, 1852) (Andaman Sea to Queensland and the Solomon Islands, and north to China. Northern Great barrier Reef, apparently absent from the rest of the Coral Sea)[2]
  • Fusilier damsel Lepidozygus tapeinosoma (Bleeker, 1856) (East Africa to the Tuamotus, Marquesas and Line Islands)[2]

Family Cirrhitidae – Hawkfishes

Family Sphyraenidae – Pikes, barracudas

  • Great barracuda Sphyraena barracuda (Walbaum, 1792) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Hawaiian Islands and the Tuamotu archipelago)[2]
  • Yellowtail barracuda Sphyraena flavicauda Rueppell, 1838 (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Bigeye barracuda Sphyraena forsteri Cuvier, 1829 (East Africa to the Society Islands)[2]
  • Heller's barracuda Sphyraena helleri Jenkins, 1901 (Western Pacific including the Coral Sea to Hawaiian Islands)[2]
  • Pickhandle barracuda Sphyraena jello Cuvier, 1829 (East Africa and the Red Sea to western Pacific)[2]
  • Chevron barracuda Sphyraena qenie Klunzinger, 1870 (East Africa and the Red Sea to western Pacific)[2]

Family Polynemidae - Threadfins

  • Six-fingered threadfin Polydactylus sexfilis (Valenciennes, 1831) (India to Hawaiian Islands and Tuamotu archipelago)[2]

Family Labridae - Wrasses

Family Scaridae - Parrotfishes

  • Bumphead parrotfish Bolbometopon muricatum (Valenciennes, 1840) (East Africa and the Red Sea to Samoa and the Line Islands in the central Pacific)[2]
  • Stareye parrotfish Calotomus carolinus (Valenciennes, 1840) syn. C. sandwicensis (Indo-Pacific and tropical east Pacific)[2]
  • Raggedtooth parrotfish Calotomus spinidens (Quoy and Gaimard, 1824) (East Africa to Tonga and the Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Bicolour parrotfish Cetoscarus bicolor (Rueppell, 1829) syn. Scarus pulchellus (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Bleeker's parrotfish Chlorurus bleekeri (de Beaufort, 1940)[24] syn. S. bleekeri ((as S. bleekeri) Western Pacific to Fiji and the islands of Micronesia)[2]
  • Reefcrest parrotfish Chlorurus frontalis (Valenciennes, 1840) (Western Pacific to Islands of Oceania)[2]
  • Redtail parrotfish Chlorurus japanensis (Bloch, 1789) syn. Scarus pyrrhurus (Western Pacific to Samoa)[2]
  • Steephead parrotfish Chlorurus microrhinos (Bleeker, 1854) (Western Pacific and Islands of Oceania)[2]
  • Bullethead parrotfish Chlorurus sordidus (Forsskal, 1775) (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Pacific longnose parrotfish Hipposcarus longiceps (Valenciennes. 1840) (Western Pacific to French Polynesia)[2]
  • Slender parrotfish, marbled parrotfish Leptoscarus vaigiensis (Quoy and Gaimard, 1824) (Scattered localities in the Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Minifin parrotfish Scarus altipinnis (Steindachner, 1879) syn. S. brevifilis (Great Barrier Reef and Islands of Oceania)[2]
  • Chameleon parrotfish Scarus chameleon Choat and Randall, 1986 (Western Australia to western Pacific and Fiji)[2]
  • Bridled parrotfish Scarus frenatus (Lacepede, 1802) syn. S. sexvittatus (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Bluebarred parrotfish Scarus ghobban Forsskal, 1775 (Indo-Pacific and tropical eastern Pacific)[2]
  • Globehead parrotfish Scarus globiceps Valenciennes, 1840 (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Highfin parrotfish Scarus longipinnis Randall and Choat, 1980 (Southern subtropical Pacific from the Great Barrier Reef to Pitcairn Islands)[2]
  • Swarthy parrotfish Scarus niger Forsskal, 1775 (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Egghead parrotfish Scarus oviceps Valenciennes, 1840 (Western Pacific and Islands of Oceania)[2]
  • Whitespot parrotfish, Palenose parrotfish Scarus psittacus Forsskål, 1775[25] syn. Scarus forsteri (Bleeker, 1861) ((as S. forsteri) Western Pacific to Micronesia and Pitcairn Group)[2] ((as S. psittacus) Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Surf parrotfish Scarus rivulatus Valenciennes, 1840 syn. S. fasciatus (Western Pacific to the Caroline Islands and New Caledonia)[2]
  • Ember parrotfish Scarus rubroviolaceus Bleeker, 1847 (Indo-Pacific and tropical eastern Pacific)[2]
  • Schlegel's parrotfish Scarus schlegeli (Bleeker, 1861) (Western Pacific and Islands of Oceania)[2]
  • Greensnout parrotfish Scarus spinus (Kner, 1868) (Western Pacific to Micronesia and Samoa)[2]

Family Opistognathidae - Jawfishes, smilers

Family Uranoscopidae – Stargazers

  • Whitemargin stargazer Uranoscopus sulphureus Valenciennes, 1831 syn U. fuscomaculatus (Tonga, Fiji, Samoa, Indonesia and the Red Sea)[2]

Family Trichonotidae - Sand-divers

  • Spotted sand-diver Trichonotus setiger (Bloch and Schneider, 1801) (Persian Gulf to Queensland and Melanesia)[2]
  • Threadfin sand-diver Trichonotus sp. (Coral sea, Marians and Marshall Islands)[2]

Family Creediidae - Sand burrowers

Family Pinguipedidae – Grubfishes, weevers, sandperches

Family Tripterygiidae – Triplefins, threefins

Family Blenniidae – Blennies

Tribe Nemophini -Sabretooth blennies, fangblennies

Subfamily Blenniinae[27]

  • Black blenny Enchelyurus ater (Guenther, 1877) (Southern Oceania from the Coral Sea to the Tuamotu Archipelago, but not the Great Barrier Reef)[2]
  • Krauss's blenny Enchelyurus kraussii (Klunzinger, 171) (Comores, Seychelles and Red Sea to the western Pacific and Mariana Islands)[2]
  • Oyster blenny Omobranchus anolius (Valenciennes, 1836) (Spencer gulf, South Australia to the Queensland coast of the Gulf of Carpentaria)[2]
  • Hepburn's blenny Parenchelyurus hepburni (Snyder, 1908) (Western Pacific to Samoa and the Marshall Islands)[2]
  • Deceiver fangblenny Petroscirtes fallax Smith-Vaniz, 1976 (Great Barrier Reef south of 17°S to New South Wales)[2]
  • Wolf fangblenny, Brown sabretooth blenny Petroscirtes lupus (De Vis, 1886) (Queensland, New South Wales, Lord Howe Island and New Caledonia)[2] (Merimbula, New South Wales, to southern Queensland. Also New Caledonia.)[3]
  • Highfin fangblenny Petroscirtes mitratus Rueppell, 1830 (East Africa and the Red Sea to Samoa, Tonga and the islands of Micronesia)[2]
  • Variable fangblenny Petroscirtes variabilis Cantor, 1850 (Sri Lanka to the western Pacific)[2]
  • Smooth fangblenny Petroscirtes xestus Jordan and Seale, 1906 (Indo-Pacific)[2]
  • Bicolour fangblenny Plagiotremus laudandus (Whitley, 1961) (Western Australia and western Pacific to Samoa and the islands of Micronesia)[2]
  • Bluestriped fangblenny, blue-lined sabretooth blenny Plagiotremus rhinorhynchos (Bleeker, 1852) (Indo-Pacific except Hawaii)[2] (Tropical Australia south to Walpole, Western Australia, and to Merimbula, New South Wales. Also widespread in the Indo-West Pacific region.)[3]
  • Piano fangblenny, hit and run blenny, yellow sabretooth blenny Plagiotremus tapeinosoma (Bleeker, 1857) (Tropical Australia south to Rottnest Island, Western Australia, and to Merimbula, New South Wales. Also widespread in the Indo-West Pacific region.)[3] (Indo-Pacific except Hawaii)[2]
  • Hairtail blenny Xiphasia setifer Swainson, 1839 (East Africa and the Red Sea to western Pacific including New Caledonia and Vanuatu)[2]

Subfamily Salariinae[28]

Family Callionymidae - Dragonets

Family Eleotridae - Gudgeons, sleepers

Family Xenisthmidae - Wrigglers

Family Gobiidae – Gobies

Family Microdesmidae - Wormfishes, dartfishes

Family Acanthuridae - Surgeonfishes

Subfamily Acanthurinae

Subfamily Nasinae

Binomials checked to here[edit]

Entered to here[edit]
End of working area[edit]

Family Zanclidae - Moorish idol

Family Siganidae – Rabbitfishes, spinefeet

Family Istiophoridae - Billfishes

Family Scombridae – Mackerels, tunas

  • [2]
  • Southern bluefin tuna Thunnus maccoyi Castelnau, 1872 (Western Australia to southern Queensland and around Tasmania. Also widespread in the southern hemisphere.)[3]

Order Mugiliformes[edit]

Family Mugilidae – Mullets

  • Fringelip mullet Crenimugil crenilabis (Forsskal, 1775) (East Africa to Line and Tuamotu Islands)[2]
  • Diamond-scale mullet Liza vaigiensis (Quoy & Gaimard, 1825)[34] syn. Ellochelon vaigensis ((as E. vaigensis) East Africa and the Red Sea to the Tuamotus)[2]

Order Pleuronectiformes[edit]

Family Bothidae - Lefteye flounders

Family Pleuronectidae – Righteye flounders

Order Tetraodontiformes[edit]

Family Balistidae

Family Monacanthidae – Leatherjackets, filefishes

  • Fanbelly leatherjacket Monacanthus chinensis (Osbeck, 1765) (Tropical Australia south to Geographe Bay, Western Australia, and to Western Port, Victoria. Also widespread in the Indo-West Pacific region.)[3]

Family Ostraciidae – Boxfishes, cowfishes, trunkfishes

  • Humpback turretfish Tetrasomus gibbosus (Linnaeus, 1758) (Tropical Australia south to Albany, Western Australia, and to Cape Conran, Victoria. Also widespread in the Indo-West Pacific region.)[3]

Family Tetraodontidae – Toadfishes, pufferfishes

Family Diodontidae – Porcupine fishes

Unallocated species[edit]

(Perciformes) Family Chironemidae

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Limits of Oceans and Seas, 3rd edition". International Hydrographic Organization. 1953. Retrieved 7 February 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co cp cq cr cs ct cu cv cw cx cy cz da db dc dd de df dg dh di dj dk dl dm dn do dp dq dr ds dt du dv dw dx dy dz ea eb ec ed ee ef eg eh ei ej ek el em en eo ep eq er es et eu ev ew ex ey ez fa fb fc fd fe ff fg fh fi fj fk fl fm fn fo fp fq fr fs ft fu fv fw fx fy fz ga gb gc gd ge gf gg gh gi gj gk gl gm gn go gp gq gr gs gt gu gv gw gx gy gz ha hb hc hd he hf hg hh hi hj hk hl hm hn ho hp hq hr hs ht hu hv hw hx hy hz ia ib ic id ie if ig ih ii ij ik il im in io ip iq ir is it iu iv iw ix iy iz ja jb jc jd je jf jg jh ji jj jk jl jm jn jo jp jq jr js jt ju jv jw jx jy jz ka kb kc kd ke kf kg kh ki kj kk kl km kn ko kp kq kr ks kt ku kv kw kx ky kz la lb lc ld le lf lg lh li lj lk ll lm ln lo lp lq lr ls lt lu lv lw lx ly lz ma mb mc md me mf mg mh mi mj mk ml mm mn mo mp mq mr ms mt mu mv mw mx my mz na nb nc nd ne nf ng nh ni nj nk nl nm nn no np nq nr ns nt nu nv nw nx ny nz oa ob oc od oe of og oh oi oj ok ol om on oo op oq or os ot ou ov ow ox oy oz pa pb pc pd pe pf pg ph pi pj pk pl pm pn po pp pq pr ps pt pu pv pw px py pz qa qb qc qd qe qf qg qh qi qj qk ql qm qn qo qp qq qr qs qt qu qv qw qx qy qz ra rb rc rd re rf rg rh ri rj rk rl rm rn ro rp rq rr rs rt ru rv rw rx ry rz sa sb sc sd se sf sg sh si sj sk sl sm sn so sp sq sr ss st su sv sw sx sy sz ta tb tc td te tf tg th ti tj tk tl tm tn to tp tq tr ts tt tu tv tw tx ty tz ua ub uc ud ue uf ug uh ui uj uk ul um un uo up uq ur us ut uu uv uw ux uy uz va vb vc vd ve vf vg vh vi vj vk vl vm vn vo vp vq vr vs vt vu vv vw vx vy vz wa wb wc wd we wf wg wh wi wj wk wl wm wn wo wp wq wr ws wt wu wv ww wx wy wz xa xb xc xd xe xf xg xh xi xj xk xl xm xn xo xp xq xr xs xt xu xv xw xx xy xz ya yb yc yd ye yf yg yh yi yj yk yl ym yn yo yp yq yr ys yt yu yv yw yx yy yz za zb zc zd ze zf zg zh zi zj zk zl zm zn zo zp zq zr zs zt zu zv zw zx zy zz aaa aab aac aad aae aaf aag aah aai aaj aak aal aam aan aao aap aaq aar aas aat aau aav aaw aax aay aaz aba abb abc abd abe abf abg abh abi abj abk abl abm abo abp abq abr abs abt abu abv abw abx aby abz aca acb acc acd ace acf acg ach aci acj ack acl acm acn aco acp acq acr acs act acu acv acw acx acy acz ada adb adc add ade adf adg adh adi adj adk adl adm adn ado adp adq adr ads adt adu adv adw adx ady adz aea aeb aec aed aee aef aeg aeh aei aej aek ael aem aen aeo aep aeq aer aes aet aeu aev aew aex aey aez afa afb afc afd afe aff afg afh afi afj afk afl afm afn afo afp afq afr afs aft afu afv afw afx afy afz aga agb agc agd age agf agg agh agi agj agk agl agm agn ago agp agq agr ags agt agu agv agw agx agy agz aha ahb ahc ahd ahe ahf ahg ahh ahi ahj ahk ahl ahm ahn aho ahp ahq ahr ahs aht ahu ahv ahw ahx ahy ahz aia aib aic aid aie aif aig aih aii aij aik ail aim ain aio aip aiq air ais ait aiu aiv aiw aix aiy aiz aja ajb ajc ajd aje ajf ajg ajh aji ajj ajk ajl ajm ajn ajo ajp ajq ajr ajs ajt aju ajv ajw ajx ajy ajz aka akb akc akd ake akf akg akh aki akj akk akl akm akn ako akp akq akr aks akt aku akv akw akx aky akz ala alb alc ald ale alf alg alh ali alj alk all alm aln alo alp alq alr als Randall, John E.; Allen, Gerald R.; Steene, Roger C. (1997). Fishes of the Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea (second ed.). Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press. ISBN 0 8248 1895 4. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Edgar, Graham J. (2008). Australian Marine Life: The plants and animals of temperate waters (Second ed.). Sydney: New Holland. ISBN 9781921517174. 
  4. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Glaucostegus typus (Anonymous [Bennett], 1830). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=280875 on 2014-03-10
  5. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Gymnothorax thyrsoideus (Richardson, 1845). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=271889 on 2014-03-10
  6. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Apogonichthyoides timorensis. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=475093 on 2014-03-11
  7. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Nectamia fusca (Quoy & Gaimard, 1825). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=398505 on 2014-03-11
  8. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Ostorhinchus novemfasciatus. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=319881 on 2014-03-11
  9. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Ostorhinchus properuptus (Whitley, 1964). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=712684 on 2014-03-11
  10. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Ostorhinchus taeniophorus (Regan, 1908). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=712689 on 2014-03-11
  11. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Ostorhinchus talboti. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=712690 on 2014-03-11
  12. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Pristiapogon kallopterus (Bleeker, 1856). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=712696 on 2014-03-11
  13. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Pantolabus radiatus (Macleay, 1881). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=281991 on 2014-03-11
  14. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Gerres longirostris (Lacepède, 1801). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=367242 on 2014-03-11
  15. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Scolopsis lineata Quoy & Gaimard, 1824. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=276786 on 2014-03-12
  16. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Scolopsis margaritifera (Cuvier, 1830). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=276787 on 2014-03-12
  17. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Scolopsis trilineata Kner, 1868. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=276791 on 2014-03-12
  18. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Parupeneus trifasciatus (Lacepède, 1801). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=277826 on 2014-03-12
  19. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Zabidius novemaculeatus (McCulloch, 1916). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=283201 on 2014-03-12
  20. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Centropyge aurantia Randall & Wass, 1974. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=278828 on 2014-03-12
  21. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Centropyge flavissima (Cuvier, 1831). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=278836 on 2014-03-12
  22. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Centropyge loricula (Günther, 1874). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=278841 on 2014-03-12
  23. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Paracentropyge multifasciata (Smith & Radcliffe, 1911). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=320012 on 2014-03-12
  24. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Chlorurus bleekeri (de Beaufort, 1940). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=277504 on 2014-03-14
  25. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Scarus psittacus Forsskål, 1775. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=219125 on 2014-03-14
  26. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Limnichthys nitidus. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=219164 on 2014-03-15
  27. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Blenniinae. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=710669 on 2014-03-17
  28. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Salariinae. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=710670 on 2014-03-17
  29. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Cirripectes stigmaticus Strasburg & Schultz, 1953. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=219265 on 2014-03-17
  30. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Asterropteryx semipunctata Rüppell, 1830. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=277497 on 2014-03-17
  31. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Fusigobius neophytus. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=219467 on 2014-03-17
  32. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Gnatholepis cauerensis (Bleeker, 1853). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=219476 on 2014-03-17
  33. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Gunnellichthys monostigma Smith, 1958. In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=219607 on 2014-03-17
  34. ^ Bailly, N. (2013). Liza vaigiensis (Quoy & Gaimard, 1825). In: Froese, R. and D. Pauly. Editors. (2013) FishBase. Accessed through: World Register of Marine Species at http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=218879 on 2014-03-14