List of foods and drinks named after places

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Lists of foods named after places have been compiled by writers, sometimes on travel websites or food-oriented websites, as well as in books.

Since all of these names are words derived from place names, they are all toponyms. This article covers English language food toponyms which may have originated in English or other languages.

According to Delish.com, "[T]here's a rich history of naming foods after cities, towns, countries, and even the moon."[1]

Foods[edit]

The following foods and drinks were named after places. This list does not include cheeses, which are also separately listed. Food names are listed by country of the origin of the word, not necessarily where the food originated or was thought to have originated:

Australia[edit]

  • Australian meat pie, essentially identical to New Zealand meat pie and similar to steak pie of the United Kingdom; a hand-sized meat pie filled with largely diced or minced meat, gravy, sometimes onion, mushrooms, or cheese.
  • Boston bun — the name's origin is unknown; nor is it known which city the "large round yeast bun with pink or white icing"[2] is named after:[3] Boston, Massachusetts, in the United States, Boston in the United Kingdom, or some other Boston (there appears to be no place named "Boston" in Australia, and the nearest place of that name is Boston, Davao Oriental, in the Philippines. The name may not be a toponym at all if it originated from something else named "Boston" (see Boston (disambiguation))
  • Monte Carlo — the brand name of an Australian cookie (or "biscuit") named after Monte Carlo
  • Sydney rock oyster — an edible oyster found in Australia and New Zealand; known as the New Zealand rock oyster in that country.

New Zealand[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

British brands named after places[edit]

  • Jaffa Cakes — a brand of snack food in the United Kingdom introduced by McVitie and Price in 1927 and named after Jaffa oranges.
  • Worcestershire Sauce — Created in the early 19th century, when Lord Sandys asked John Lea and William Perrins to attempt to recreate a sauce Sandys had tasted during his travels in Bengal. They failed, but after storing the jars, they found they'd hit upon their own sauce, and it turned out to be a success of a different kind ever since.[5]
  • Buxton - a British brand of mineral water from the spring in Buxton, Derbyshire.

United States[edit]

American brands named after places[edit]

  • Blenheim Ginger Ale — bottled by Blenheim Bottlers originally in Blenheim, South Carolina.
  • MoonPie — created in 1917 by the Chattanooga Bakery. One of the company's salesmen spoke with coal miners who said they needed a filling snack when they couldn't stop for lunch, and when asked how big the snack should be, a miner is said to have framed the moon with his hands.[17]
  • Fig Newton — named after the nearby town of Newton by the company that first created it in Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.[4]

Barbecue named after American places[edit]

Pizza named after American places[edit]

France[edit]

English-language names derived from French names:

  • Anjou PearAnjou
  • Bavarian cream — also known as bavarois in French, may have originated in Switzerland or in France in the early 19th century. "The connection with Bavaria is obscure," according to The Food Timeline website[19]
  • Hollandaise sauce — a French name for sauce said to be from Holland
  • Dijon Mustard — named after the French place where it was first concocted in 1856.[4]
  • Mayonaisse — a French name for a condiment, perhaps originally from Mahón, Menorca, Spain

Italy[edit]

English-language names derived from Italian names:

From elsewhere[edit]

Where known, nations where these names originated are noted:

Cheese names[edit]

Main article: List of cheeses

Cheese names from France[edit]

Cheese names from Italy[edit]

Parmesan cheese.

Cheese names from Spain[edit]

Cheese names from Switzerland[edit]

Cheese names from the United Kingdom[edit]

Cheese names from the United States[edit]

Cheese names from elsewhere[edit]

Drinks[edit]

Cocktails[edit]

Wines[edit]

Wines from France[edit]

Wines from elsewhere[edit]

Beers[edit]

Brands of alcoholic beverages[edit]

Other alcoholic beverages[edit]

Non-alcoholic beverages[edit]

Nations or national groups[edit]

  • Afghan biscuit — a cookie (or "biscuit") in New Zealand
  • American Cheese
  • Belgian waffles
  • Belgian bun
  • Brazil nut
  • Canadian bacon — a U.S. name for two different pork products - back bacon and a smoked ham
  • Danish pastry—a particular pastry (as opposed to a type of pastry) often called simply "Danish".
  • English muffins—a name used outside of the United Kingdom (in the UK, they're known simply as "muffins").
  • French Fries
  • French Toast[22]
  • German Chocolate Cake was not actually named after Germany at all. It was named after "Baker's German's Sweet Chocolate Bar," first created in the United States in 1852 by Sam German. More than a century later, in 1957, a Dallas, Texas, newspaper printed a recipe from a reader which used the candy and named the resulting cake "German's Chocolate Cake". Other newspapers printed the recipe, and the name eventually lost the "'s".[23]
  • Greek Yogurt
  • Irish Breakfast tea
  • Irish soda bread
  • Irish stew
  • Jamaican patty — a pastry containing various meat fillings and spices baked inside a flaky shell; commonly found in Jamaica, but also elsewhere in the Caribbean.
  • Scotch bonnet — a hot pepper originating in the Caribbean and named for its resemblance to a Tam o' Shanter hat.[24]
  • Swedish meatballs—an American name for "köttbullar", a Swedish dish, and the many American recipe variations of the dish, originally brought to the United States by Swedish immigrants.[25]
  • Swedish turnip — a name used mainly in America for a root vegetable, also called Rutabaga meaning root bag in Swedish. In Britain, Australia and New Zealand, the name is usually shortened to "Swede".

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Web page titled "On the Map: Why Some Foods Are Named After Places", retrieved August 30, 2011
  2. ^ Lambert, James, "Additions to the Australian lexicographical record III" Web page at the Australian National Dictionary Centre website, retrieved September 5, 2011
  3. ^ Web page titled "From the Centre" at the Australian National Dictionary Centre website, retrieved September 5, 2011
  4. ^ a b c d Locker, Robin, "Seven Popular Foods Named After Places", September 17, 2010, Bootsnall website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  5. ^ Web page titled "Worcestershire Sauce", page 16 of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  6. ^ Web page titled "Baked Alaska", page two of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  7. ^ Web page titled "Boston Baked Beans", page four of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  8. ^ Web page titled "Boston Cream Pie", page five of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  9. ^ Tennis, Joe (1 September 2007). [— http://books.google.com/books?id=m1_NLi-uSAgC&pg=PA46#v=onepage&q&f=false Beach to Bluegrass: Places to Brake on Virginia's Longest Road], The Overmountain Press, p 46, ISBN 978-1-57072-323-0, retrieved September 4, 2011
  10. ^ Web page titled "Buffalo Wings", page six of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  11. ^ Web page titled "California Roll", page seven of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  12. ^ Harper, Douglas. "frankfurter". Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved 2009-10-17. 
  13. ^ Jane & Michael Stern (2009-11-15). "In Search of American Food". 
  14. ^ Web page titled "London Broil", page 11 of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  15. ^ Web page titled "Philadelphia Cheesesteak", page 12 of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  16. ^ Web page titled "Texas Toast", page 15 of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  17. ^ Web page titled "MoonPie", page 12 of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  18. ^ Web page titled "Chicago Deep Dish Pizza", page eight of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  19. ^ Web page titled "Food Timeline FAQs: puddings, custards, & creams" at The Food Timeline website, retrieved September 3, 2011
  20. ^ "Sardine". The Good Food Glossary. BBC Worldwide. 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-01. 
  21. ^ Smith, James Edward, An introduction to physiological and systematical botany, London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1807, Chapter 12, p 108, footnote 1: "A corruption, as I presume, of the Italian name Girasole Articiocco, sun-flower Artichoke, as the plant was first brought from Peru to Italy, and thence propagated throughout Europe."
  22. ^ Web page titled "French Toast", page nine of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  23. ^ Web page titled "German Chocolate Cake", page 10 of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011
  24. ^ Andrews, Jean, "The Pepper Lady's pocket pepper primer", p 149, University of Texas Press, 1998, from Google Books, retrieved September 5, 2011
  25. ^ Web page titled "Swedish Meatballs", page 14 of "Can you name the types of food named after American places?" by Lauren Donaldson on the "Delish" website, retrieved August 30, 2011