List of galaxies named after people

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A small number of galaxies or galaxy groups have been named after individual people. In most cases, the named individual was the person who discovered the object, who first brought attention to it, or who first studied it scientifically.

Many of the brighter galaxies visible from the Northern Hemisphere have Messier numbers, named after Charles Messier. For instance, the Andromeda Galaxy is Messier 31 and the Whirlpool Galaxy is Messier 51. There are a few other comprehensive catalogs that assign the cataloguer's name to galaxies. For instance, Markarian galaxies, named after Benjamin Markarian, are galaxies with excess blue and ultraviolet emission;[1] galaxies in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies are assigned an Arp number after Halton Arp who produced the catalog; etc. Objects in these catalogs are excluded below, except in cases where they carry the name of an additional person.

Named galaxies[edit]

Holmberg II is a dwarf irregular galaxy dominated by huge bubbles of glowing gas.[2]
  • Bode's Galaxy is Messier 81, a spiral galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major.
  • Hanny's Voorwerp ("Hanny's object") is a galaxy of unknown nature.
  • Hoag's Object is a peculiar galaxy in the shape of a ring.
  • Holmberg II is a dwarf irregular galaxy about 9.8 million light-years away in the M81 Group.
  • Holmberg IX is a dwarf irregular galaxy and a satellite galaxy of Messier 81.
  • Huchra's Lens is a lensed galaxy.
  • Komossa'a object is a galaxy in which the supermassive black hole disrupted a star.
  • Maffei 1 is an elliptical galaxy in the constellation Cassiopeia and the closest giant elliptical galaxy to the Milky Way.
  • Maffei 2 is a spiral galaxy about 10 million light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia.
  • Mayall's Object
  • Willman 1 is an ultra low-mass dwarf galaxy.
  • The Wolf-Lundmark-Melotte galaxy is an irregular galaxy on the outer edges of the Local Group. It is in the constellation Cetus.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ B. E. Markarian (1967), A catalog of Markarian galaxies, Astrofizika 3, 55
  2. ^ "Galaxy Caught Blowing Bubbles". ESA/Hubble Photo Release. 29 September 2011. Retrieved 29 September 2011.