List of ghost towns in the United States

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This is an incomplete list of ghost towns in the United States.

Contents: U.S. states (links in italic lead to a new page)
Alabama - Alaska - Arizona - Arkansas - California - Colorado - Connecticut - Delaware - Florida - Georgia - Hawaii - Idaho - Illinois - Indiana - Iowa - Kansas - Kentucky - Louisiana - Maine - Maryland - Massachusetts - Michigan - Minnesota - Mississippi - Missouri - Montana - Nebraska - Nevada - New Hampshire - New Jersey - New Mexico - New York - North Carolina - North Dakota - Ohio - Oklahoma - Oregon - Pennsylvania - Rhode Island - South Carolina - South Dakota - Tennessee - Texas - Utah - Vermont - Virginia - Washington - West Virginia - Wisconsin - Wyoming

Listing by state[edit]

Alabama[edit]

Alaska[edit]

The waterfront at Dyea, Alaska during the Klondike Gold Rush
Flat, Alaska, August 1, 1911
The abandoned copper mine complex at Kennecott, Alaska

Arizona[edit]

Arkansas[edit]

California[edit]

Colorado[edit]

Connecticut[edit]

An aerial view (from a kite) of Pleasure Beach, Connecticut

Delaware[edit]

A destroyed Glenville, Delaware home, two weeks after a storm destroyed the community (photo taken October 2, 2003)

Florida[edit]

Georgia[edit]

Hawaii[edit]

A house in Kaimu, Hawaii in 1888. Kaimu was completely destroyed by an eruptive flow of lava from the Kūpaʻianahā vent of the Kīlauea volcano in 1990.[1]

Idaho[edit]

Illinois[edit]

Indiana[edit]

the sole remaining house in Baltimore, Indiana
Abandoned grain elevators at Corwin, Indiana
An abandoned building and grain silos in Sloan, Indiana

Iowa[edit]

Donnan, Iowa memorial sign, showing the former location of the City of Donnan

Kansas[edit]

Kentucky[edit]

Main Street, Paradise, Kentucky in 1898

Louisiana[edit]

Maine[edit]

Main Street, Flagstaff, Maine, circa 1915

Maryland[edit]

Massachusetts[edit]

An example of a "Babson Boulder" at Dogtown, Massachusetts
"The end of Enfield." A photograph of downtown Enfield, Massachusetts, taken sometime after the town's disincorporation in 1938.

Michigan[edit]

Minnesota[edit]


Mississippi[edit]

Front of the former First Presbyterian Church in Rodney, Mississippi

Missouri[edit]

A street in Hamburg, Missouri, 1933

(Note: Hamburg, Howell, and Toonerville were all located in St. Charles County, Missouri. All three towns became part of the Weldon Spring Ordnance Works in 1941 for WWII, which later became part of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP)[3])

Montana[edit]

Nebraska[edit]

Rock Bluff School, formerly the Naomi Institute, Rock Bluff, Nebraska

Nevada[edit]

New Hampshire[edit]

New Jersey[edit]

New Mexico[edit]

New York[edit]

North Carolina[edit]

North Dakota[edit]

A sign along the railroad tracks in Petrel, North Dakota
The abandoned Falsen School in Verendrye, North Dakota
External links

Ohio[edit]

West entrance of the Moonville tunnel in Moonville, Ohio
Intersection of Black Run Road and Shady Glen Road in Knockemstiff, Ohio

Oklahoma[edit]

Oregon[edit]

Pennsylvania[edit]

Rhode Island[edit]

South Carolina[edit]

South Dakota[edit]

Tennessee[edit]

Texas[edit]

Utah[edit]

Vermont[edit]

Virginia[edit]

Washington[edit]

West Virginia[edit]

Wisconsin[edit]

Wyoming[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Summary of the Pu`u `Ō `ō-Kupaianaha Eruption, 1983-present
  2. ^ Packard, Aaron (May 22, 2011). "The Kendall Lumber Co. of Garrett County, Md". Nova Numismatics. Retrieved October 26, 2013. 
  3. ^ DOE Weldon Spring Site History (WSSRAP)
  4. ^ Livermore
  5. ^ a b New Milwaukee Towns, Mandan [North Dakota] Pioneer 4/8/1910
  6. ^ Brisbane, ND Postal Application 1910
  7. ^ Brisbane North Dakota
  8. ^ Where was Dogtooth North Dakota?
  9. ^ Tadmor, OH
  10. ^ Sprucevale on Dead Ohio web page
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Weis, Norman D. (1971). Ghost Towns of the Northwest. Caldwell, Idaho, USA: Caxton Press. ISBN 0-87004-358-7. 
  12. ^ a b Hafnor, John. Black Hills Believables: Strange-but-true Tales of the Old West. Fort Collins, Colorado: Lone Pine Productions, 2002. 54. Web. 8 Aug. 2013.

External links[edit]