List of governors of Badakhshan

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The Governor of Badakhshan (Persian: حاکم بدخشان, hākim-i badakhshān) is the head of the government of Badakhshan. In the late 19th century Badakhshan was joined with Qataghan into a single province and there were governors of Qataghan-Badakhshan Province and Badakhshan District. In 1963 the province was dissolved and Badakhshan became one of the 34 provinces of Afghanistan. Badakhshan province is located in the north-east of the country, between the Hindu Kush and the Amu Darya. The capital of Badakhshan and the seat of the provincial governor is the town of Fayzabad.

Traditionally, Badakhshan was ruled by a mir. In 1849 Badakhshan came under control of the Amir of Afghanistan. The mirs continued to wield power, but the Amir of Afghanistan appointed a hakim (حاکم), or governor, to rule the province. The title of Hakim was applied to numerous administrative positions in Afghanistan and several positions with different administrative responsibilities could all be called hakim. An example of this is in 1873, when administrative of Badakhshan was placed under the rule of the Hakim of Afghan Turkestan, who in turn appointed a Hakim of Badakhshan. Thus at times the Hakim of Badakhshan has been subservient to the hakim of another region. In 1873 the Mir of Afghanistan also became a pensioner of the Kabul and ceased to hold power in Badakhshan.[1]

In the late 19th century Badakhshan was joined with Qataghan Province into a single province named Qataghan-Badakhshan Province that had a single governor. The capital of Qataghan-Badakhshan Province and seat of the provincial governor was the town of Khan Abad, currently located in Kunduz province.[2] Qataghan and Badakhshan were again divided in 1963 and the capital of Badakhshan reverted to Fayzabad. Some sources indicate that there may have been more than one governor appointed at a time.[3]

List[edit]

Governor Period Extra Note
Ameer Abdurahman Khan.jpg
Sardar Abdur Rahman Khan 1863-64 Abdur Rahman Khan, the future ruler of Afghanistan, is mentioned as the "Governor of Qataghan and Badakhshan" in Siraj al-Tawarikh, which was commissioned during his reign as Amir of Afghanistan. Holding the position of a sardar, or general, Abdur Rahman Khan ruled over Qataghan and Badakhshan while he waged a military campaign in the region.[4][5]
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Faiz Muhammad Khan[6] 1865-?
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Hafizullah Khan 1873–1874 From 1873 to 1874 Badakhshan was directly administered by the governor of Afghan Turkestan, Naib Muhammad Alam Khan. Alam Khan appointed Hafizullah Khan as governor of Badakhshan[1]
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Faiz Muhammad 1874 In May 1874 Faiz Muhammad was appointed to relieve Hafizullah Khan as Governor of Badakhshan, but he was relieved of his appointment in September 1874.[7]
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Sayyid Muhammad Khan 1874-? In September 1874 Colonel Sayyid Muhammad Khan was appointed to relieve Faiz Muhammad as Governor of Badakhshan.[7]
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Mir Mahomed Omar 1880-? Abdur Rahman Khan mentions in his memoirs that Mir Mahomed Omar "Governor of Faizabad," which was then the capital of Badakhshan.[8]
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Sardar Abdulla Khan 1881/82-1888 The Siraj al-tawarıkh notes that in 1882 Sardar Abd Allah Khan Tukhi was the governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan.[9] British archival documents from 1884-85 mention a Sardar Abdulla Khan as governor of Badakhshan[10] Lee mentions Sardar Abdulla Khan as governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan in 1888 during the rebellion of Ishaq Khan.[11] Sardar Abdullah Khan was decisively defeated by Ishaq Khan in September 1888 and fled the battlefield.[12]
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Walidad Muhammad 1880s? Wali Muhammad served as Governor of the District of Badakhshan in the 1880s. He is a native of Qalat-i-Ghilzai[13]
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Mir Ahmad Shah 1887 At the beginning of 1887 Mir Ahmad Shah was appointed Governor of Badakhshan, but before he left Kabul to take up his appointment in Badakhshan he was demoted and Abdullah Jan took his place[14]
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Abdullah Jan 1887-? In 1887 Abdullah Jan was appointed governor of Badakhshan.[14]
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Abdul Ahad Wardak 1910s Wardak was the governor of Qataghan-Badakhshan Province.
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Azimullah Khan 1928 Served as Governor of Qataghan-Badakhshan Province in 1928.[15]
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Muhammad Sarwar 1928 In 1928 Muhammad Sarwar was appointed Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan, but he never took up the appointment.[16]
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Safarhan (also known as Nasir Safar)[17] November 1929-? Safarhan was appointed governor of Qataghan-Badakhshan Province following the fall of the government of Habibullāh Kalakāni. He remained in office at least through mid-1930.[17]
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Shir Muhammad Nasher 1932-? Shir Muhammad Nasher served as Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan from 1932 onwards [13]
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Shar Mohammed Khan  ?-1937-? American Ernest F. Fox reported meeting Shar Mohammed Khan, the Governor of Qataghan and Badakhshan, during his travels through Afghanistan in 1937.[18]
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Said Abbas Khan  ?-1937-? American Ernest F. Fox reported meeting Said Abbas Khan, the Governor of Badakhshan district, during his travels through Afghanistan in 1937.[18]
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Muhammad Ismail Mayar 1938-? Muhammad Ismail Mayar replaced Shir Muhammad Nasher as Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan in 1938[13]
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Ghulam Faruq 1939-? Ghulam Faruq replaced Muhammad Ismail Mayar as Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan in 1939[13]
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Muhammad Gul 1940-? General Muhammad Gul replaced Ghulam Faruq as Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan in 1940[13]
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Ghulam Faruq 1942-? Ghulam Faruq, who served as governor from 1939 until his replacement by Muhammad Gul, was again appointed Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan in place of Muhammad Gul in 1942[13]
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Muhammad Juma Siddiq 1945-? Muhammad Juma Siddiq was appointed governor of the District of Badakhshan in 1945[13]
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Muhammad Hakim Shah Alami 1946-? Muhammad Hakim Shah Alami replaced Ghulam Faruq as Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan in 1946[13]
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Muhammad Karim 1946-? Muhammad Karim replaced Muhammad Juma Siddiq as governor of the District of Badakhshan in 1946[13]
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Muhammad Sawar Khan 1948-? Muhammad Sawar Khan replaced Muhammad Karim as governor of the District of Badakhshan in 1948[13] Jean Bowie-Shor and Franc Shor reported meeting Khan in Faizabad in the summer of 1949 during their travels through Afghanistan.[19]
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Muhammad Ismail Mayar 1950-? Muhammad Ismail Mayar, who served as governor until his replacement by Ghulam Faruq, replaced Muhammad Hakim Shah Alami as Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan in 1950[13]
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Muhammad Juma Siddiq 1954–1956 Muhammad Juma Siddiq, who had previously served as Governor of the District of Badakhshan, replaced Muhammad Karim as governor of the District of Badakhshan in 1954[13]
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Muhammad Juma Siddiq 1956-? Muhammad Juma Siddiq was promoted from Governor of the District of Badakhshan to replaced Muhammad Ismail Mayar as Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan in 1956[13]
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Abdur Rahman Popal 1956-? Abdur Rahman Popal replaced Muhammad Juma Siddiq as governor of the District of Badakhshan in 1956[13]
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Khuda Dad Etemadi 1959-? Khuda Dad Etemadi replaced Abdur Rahman Popal as governor of the District of Badakhshan in 1959[13]
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Din Muhammad Delawar 1960-? Din Muhammad Delawar replaced Khuda Dad Etemadi as governor of the District of Badakhshan in 1960[13]
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Abdul Qayyum Atai 1962-? Abdul Qayyum Atai replaced Din Muhammad Delawar as governor of the District of Badakhshan in 1962[13]
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Abdul Karim Seraj 1963 General Abdul Karim Seraj (alternatively spelled Siraj) replaced Muhammad Ismail Mayar as Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan in 1963. He was the last Governor of Badakhshan and Qataghan, which was dissolved and divided into four provinces in 1963.[13] He then served as governor Kunduz from 1963-1965 following the division of Qattaghan and Badakhshan Province.[20] Seraj was the son of Habibullah Khan, Amir of Afghanistan from 1901-1919. He was born in 1912.
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Nisar Ahmad Sherzai 1963-? Nisar Ahmad Sherzai was appointed Governor of the newly created Badakhshan Province in 1963[13]
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Roshandil Roshan 1967-? Roshandil Roshan replaced Nisar Ahmad Sherzai as Governor of Badakhshan Province in 1967[13]
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Sultan Aziz Zikria 1970[21]
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Roshandel Wardak (also spelled Roshandil Wardak) [22][23] 1960s-1970s
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Sayyid Kasim 1971-? Sayyid Kasim was appointed Governor of Badakhshan Province in 1971[13]
Taj Mohammad Wardak 1970s -
-
In addition, in the mid-1960s Wardak held the position of Deputy Governor of Badakhshan Province.[24]
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Abdul Basir Salangi 1970s[3]
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Habibullah Korur 1970s-May 1979[3]
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Muhammad Usman Rasikh 1970s[3]
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Abdul Aziz Azim[25] 1960s-July 1978[3]
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Ghulam Mohammed Arianpur -
-
Ghulam Mohammed Arianpur died in a chopper crash in 1993.[26]
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Mawlawi Qiamoddin Khairatmand -
-
He was killed by the fighters of Ahmad Shah Masood's Shura-e Nezar in 1999.[27][28]
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Mohammad Amin Hamimi -
-
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Sayed Ikramuddin Masoomi -
-
Former Governor of Takhar. Became minister of Work and Social Affairs after his time as Governor of Badakshan
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Sayyed Mohammad Akram 21 February 2005
 ?
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Sayed Amin Tariq  ?
 ?
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Abdul Munshi Majid 2006
2009
Was replaced after demonstrations which accused Majid of involvement in misusing power .[29]
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Baz Mohammad Ahmadi 2 May 2009
2010
Was former Gover of Ghor
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Shah Waliullah Adeeb 2010
present
Member of Jamiat Islami Party, formerly a professor at Kabul University and spokesman for Ministry of Education. Survived attack on 20 June 2011 in Ordoj District.[30]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Christine Noelle. State and tribe in nineteenth-century Afghanistan: the reign of Amir Dost Muhammad Khan (1826-1863). Richmond: Routledge, 1997. pp. 101, 320
  2. ^ Ludwig W. Adamec. Historical and political gazetteer of Afghanistan Vol. 1. Badakhshan Province and northeastern Afghanistan. Graz : Akad. Druck- und Verl.-Anst., 1972.p. 98.
  3. ^ a b c d e Ludwig W. Adamec. First Supplement to the Who's Who of Afghanistan: Democratic Republic of Afghanistan. Graz: Akademische Druck - u. Verlagsanstalt, 1979. p. 48.
  4. ^ Faiz Mohammad Katib Hazara and R.D. McChesney (translator). Siraj al-Tawarikh, Vol. 2. Publisher. Afghanistan Digital Library. page 105. (no longer available online).
  5. ^ Mohammad, Faiz. Siraj al-Tawarikh, Vol. 2. p. 262. Retrieved 2011-10-15. 
  6. ^ Imperial gazetteer of India: provincial series, Volume 1. Calcutta: Superintendent of Government Printing, 1908
  7. ^ a b Adamec, Ludwig W. (1975). Historical and Political Who's Who of Afghanistan. Graz: Akad. Druck- und Verl.-Anst. p. 135. 
  8. ^ ʻAbd al-Raḥmān Khān (1900). The life of Abdur Rahman, amir of Afghanistan, Volume 1. London: John Murray. p. 189. 
  9. ^ Faiz Mohammad Katib Hazara and R.D. McChesney (translator). Siraj al-Tawarikh, Vol. 3. Publisher. Afghanistan Digital Library. pages 31, 34, 215, 228. (no longer available online).
  10. ^ Kandahar Newsletters For The Year 1884-85. Volume-Ii. Quetta: Directorate Of Archives Department. Government of Balochistan, Quetta (Pakistan), 1990. p. 190
  11. ^ Jonathan L. Lee. The "ancient Supremacy": Bukhara, Afghanistan, and the Battle for Balkh, 1731-1901. New York: E.J. Brill, 1996. p. 507.
  12. ^ Jonathan L. Lee. The "ancient Supremacy": Bukhara, Afghanistan, and the Battle for Balkh, 1731-1901. New York: E.J. Brill, 1996. p. 511.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Adamec, Ludwig W. (1975). Historical and Political Who's Who of Afghanistan. Graz: Akad. Druck- und Verl.-Anst. p. 345. 
  14. ^ a b Adamec, Ludwig W. (1975). Historical and Political Who's Who of Afghanistan. Graz: Akad. Druck- und Verl.-Anst. p. 189. 
  15. ^ Adamec, Ludwig W. (1975). Historical and Political Who's Who of Afghanistan. Graz: Akad. Druck- und Verl.-Anst. p. 129. 
  16. ^ Adamec, Ludwig W. (1975). Historical and Political Who's Who of Afghanistan. Graz: Akad. Druck- und Verl.-Anst. p. 200. 
  17. ^ a b Abdullaev, Kamoludin Nazhmudinovich (2009). Ot Sin’tsziania do Khorasana : iz istorii sredneaziatskoi emigratsii XX veka. Dushanbe: Irfon. ISBN 978-99947-55-55-4. 
  18. ^ a b Ernest F. Fox. Travels in Afghanistan 1937-1938. New York: The Macmillian Company, 1943. p. 43
  19. ^ Jean and Franc Shor. "We took the highroad in Afghanistan." National Geographic. November, 1950. Vol. 98, no. 5. pp. 673-706.
  20. ^ Christopher Buyers. The Barakzai Dynasty.
  21. ^ Ludwig W. Adamec. Historical and political gazetteer of Afghanistan Vol. 1. Badakhshan Province and northeastern Afghanistan. Graz : Akad. Druck- und Verl.-Anst., 1972.p. 27.
  22. ^ Home Brief. Kabul Times. vol. vi. no. 159. October 9, 1967.
  23. ^ "Royal audience." Kabul Times. vol. ix. no. 17. April 2, 1970
  24. ^ Royal Audience. Kabul Times. vol. iv. no. 71. June 19, 1965
  25. ^ "Saur seven victory celebrated." Kabul Times. May 16, 1978
  26. ^ "Overloading Caused Chopper to Crash, Afghanistan Says". Pqasb.pqarchiver.com. 1993-02-21. Retrieved 2009-11-10. 
  27. ^ "NewsLibrary.com — newspaper archive, clipping service — newspapers and other news sources". Nl.newsbank.com. 1999-04-21. Retrieved 2009-11-10. 
  28. ^ http://news.google.ca/archivesearch?um=1&cf=all&ned=ca&hl=en&q=governor+of+badakhshan&cf=all&sugg=d&sa=N&lnav=d4&as_ldate=1990&as_hdate=1999&hdrange=2000%2C2009
  29. ^ Governor replaced in Afghanistan after protest
  30. ^ [1]