List of human deities

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For deities of human religions outside the Dungeons & Dragons universe, see Category: Lists of deities.

This is a list of human deities in the Dungeons & Dragons universe.

Greyhawk[edit]

Al'Akbar[edit]

Main article: Al'Akbar

In the World of Greyhawk campaign setting, Al'Akbar is the Baklunish demigod of dignity, duty, faithfulness, and guardianship.[1]

Azor'alq[edit]

Main article: Azor'alq

Azor'alq is the Baklunish hero-deity of light, purity, courage, and strength from the Greyhawk campaign setting.[1]

Forgotten Realms[edit]

Amaunator[edit]

Main article: Amaunator
Amaunator
Game background
Title(s) The Yellow God, The Keeper of the Eternal Sun, Keeper of Law
Home plane Keep of the Eternal Sun (Mechanus)
Power level Greater deity
Alignment Lawful Neutral
Portfolio Bureaucracy, contracts, law, order, the sun, rulership
Domains Law, Nobility, Planning, Sun, Time
Superior None
Design details

Amaunator /əˈmɔːnətɔər/ is a fictional solar deity of the Forgotten Realms Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting devised by Ed Greenwood. An ancient Netherese deity of order and the sun, Amaunator was also revered as the patron of law and time. Amaunator appeared as a lanky man with silver-white hair, a short, week-long growth of white beard, and skin that glowed with a quiet golden radiance. His symbol is a sun with a face on the solar disk. He was long considered to be a dead deity, but was revealed to be Lathander in the 4th edition Forgotten Realms campaign setting.

At'ar the Merciless, the "Yellow Goddess," is introduced in the Anauroch supplement. She is described as chief among the Bedine gods, and to them she is the sun, and seen as a spiteful, faithless woman who tends to ignore the Bedine completely. The book reveals that in the days ancient Netheril, "At'ar" was called "Amaunator", and was the male sun deity.[2] Amaunator was later described fully in Faiths & Avatars (1996),[3] and his role in the ancient history of the Realms was detailed in Netheril: Empire of Magic (1996).[4] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[5] Amaunator and his continued worship was discussed in Lost Empires of Faerûn (2005).[6]

In the 4th edition Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide, Amauntator returns. In the chaos following Mystra's murder by Cyric, Shar restored Netheril, which prompted the revelation that Amaunator did not die, but rather, became Lathander. Amaunator has reclaimed his full suite of powers and his original mission, effectively ending Lathander's stint as a deity. He fondly remembers his time as Lathander, however, and encourages some of his clergy, the Morninglords, to keep Lathander's message of hope and optimism alive. Although he was originally a Netherese deity, Amaunator has inherited Lathander's church and is worshipped all over Faerun - ironically, he, like Selune, is now despised in Netheril itself, as that nation worships Shar exclusively.[7] Amaunator took Mystra's place as the timekeeper of the gods. As a Greater God, Amaunator rules the astral dominion, Eternal Sun, from the Palace of the Four Suns. He is assisted by his exarch Siamorphe and his associate Waukeen. Although originally Lawful Neutral, Amaunator's time as Lathander has changed his worldview to the extent he is now Lawful Good.[8]

Auril[edit]

Main article: Auril
Auril
Game background
Title(s) Frostmaiden
Icedawn
The Cold Goddess
Home plane 2E: Winter's Hall (Pandemonium)
3E: Fury's Heart
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Neutral Evil
Portfolio Cold, Ice, Winter
Superior Talos
Design details

Auril (/ˈɔːrɪl/ AW-ril),[9] the Frostmaiden, is the goddess of cold and winter in the Forgotten Realms, for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Auril is most powerful in those regions that are affected by deep winters or crouch at the edges of the Great Glacier. She is a native of the extradimensional plane of Pandemonium. Her symbol is a white snowflake on a grey diamond. Much of Auril's power has been absorbed by Talos in recent times, weakening the minor deity. Despite this, or perhaps as a result of, Auril has quietly been siphoning power from the slumbering deity Ulutiu who is in stasis under the Great Glacier. Kossuth and Auril are mortal enemies, but their followers seldom come across each other. Sune opposes Auril, as she blames her for the destruction of much that is beautiful. Uthgar hates Auril as she has turned the Elk Tribe away from his worship. As a denizen of the Deep Wilds, Auril is technically a subject of Silvanus, the dominion's ruler, although Auril does not consider herself accountable to the greater god.

Ed Greenwood created Auril for his home Dungeons & Dragons game set in the Forgotten Realms.[10] Auril first appeared within Dungeons & Dragons as one of the deities featured in Ed Greenwood's article "Down-to-earth Divinity" in Dragon #54 (October 1981). Here she is described as the Frostmaiden, goddess of cold, a neutral evil demigoddess from the plane of Pandemonium with a connection to Talos. Auril is described as one of “The Gods of Fury,” which is what these four gods are known as collectively: "Talos is served by Auril, Umberlee, and Malar." Auril is commonly worshipped by neutral evil magic-users, thieves, and clerics; Greenwood notes, "If a DM is partial to variant “specialist” NPC magic-users ... A worshipper of Auril would have ice and cold-related spells doubled in power, while spells related to the other elements would be half-strength."[10] Auril later officially appeared as one of the major deities for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987).[9] Auril was described in the hardback Forgotten Realms Adventures (1990),[11] the revised Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (1993) in the "Running the Realms" booklet,[12] and Faiths & Avatars (1996).[13] Her clergy was further detailed in Warriors and Priests of the Realms (1996),[14] and Prayers from the Faithful (1997).[15] Her role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[16] Her relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms was covered in Demihuman Deities (1998).[17]


Auril appears as one of the major deities of the Forgotten Realms setting again, in Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001),[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19] Auril is one of the deities described as appropriate for a cold-based campaign in Frostburn (2004).

Azuth[edit]

Main article: Azuth
Azuth
Game background
Title(s) The High One
Patron of Mages
Lord of Spells
Home plane 2E: Azuth (Arcadia)
3E: Dweomerheart
Power level Lesser
Alignment Lawful Neutral
Portfolio Wizards, Mages, Spellcasters in general, Monks (Shining Hand)
Domains Illusion, Knowledge, Magic, Law, Spell
Superior Mystra
Design details

Azuth (/ˈɑːzθ/ A-zooth)[9] is a fictional deity in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. He is the god of mages. His alignment is lawful neutral. The appearance of Azuth seems to be somewhat indistinct, he often manifests simply as an elderly voice or shimmering blue luminescence. Azuth is known as the god of all mages and wizards in the realms. This would seem to make his portfolio conflict with that of Mystra, however she is the goddess of all magic, while Azuth specializes on practitioners of magic. Azuth is one of Mystra's subordinates but he is also known to be a friend and advisor to her. During the Time of Troubles in 1358DR he spent much of his time caring for part of Mystra's power and guarding a statue of her at the Pool of Yeven in Battledale.

Ed Greenwood created Azuth for his home Dungeons & Dragons game, inspired by the version of the Nehwon deity Aarth found in the original Deities & Demigods book.[20] Azuth first appeared within Dungeons & Dragons as one of the deities featured in Ed Greenwood's article "Down-to-earth Divinity" in Dragon #54 (October 1981). Azuth is introduced as the High One, patron of magic users, a lawful neutral demigod from the plane of Arcadia. The article notes that "Azuth serves Mystra." Azuth is most commonly worshipped by magic-users of any alignment.[10] Azuth later officially appeared as one of the major deities for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987).[9]

Azuth was described in the hardback Forgotten Realms Adventures (1990),[11] the revised Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (1993) in the "Running the Realms" booklet,[12] and Faiths & Avatars (1996).[21] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[22] Azuth is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[23] Azuth appears as one of the major deities of the Forgotten Realms setting again, in Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001),[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19] Azuth is mentioned as having been destroyed in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide (2009). When Dweomerheart exploded with the death of Mystra, Azuth fell through the cosmos into the Nine Hells, where Asmodeus consumed his essence to become a fully-fledged god.

Beshaba[edit]

Main article: Beshaba
Beshaba
Game background
Title(s) The Maid of Misfortune, Lady Doom
Home plane 2E: Blood Tor (Abyss, layer 13)
3E: Barrens of Doom and Despair
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Portfolio Random mischief, misfortune, bad luck, accidents
Design details

Beshaba (/bəˈʃɑːbə/ bə-SHAH-bə[9]), also called The Maid of the Misfortune, is the Faerûnian deity of bad luck, misfortune, random mischief, and accidents. Lady Doom, as she is also known, demands worship to keep her bad luck at bay. She is a Chaotic Evil Intermediate Power, whose symbol is black antlers on a red field, divine realm is Blood Tor on the 13th layer of the Abyss or in the Barrens of Doom and Despair in the 3rd edition Forgotten Realms cosmology, and Third Edition domains are Chaos, Evil, Fate, Luck, and Trickery. Her weapon is a "barbed" scourge, aptly named "Ill Fortune".

Ed Greenwood created Beshaba for his home Dungeons & Dragons game set in the Forgotten Realms.[10] Beshaba first appeared within Dungeons & Dragons as one of the deities featured in Ed Greenwood's article "Down-to-earth Divinity" in Dragon #54 (October 1981). Beshaba is introduced as the Maid of Misfortune, Black Bess, and Lady Doom; she is the goddess of mischief, misfortune, ill luck, accidents, (treachery, betrayal), a chaotic evil lesser goddess from the Abyss. She is described as "a beautiful white-haired face, laughing hysterically. Ill fortune ... falls on those who behold her. Often, sure fire plans go awry, stout weapons or walls suddenly give way, and freak accidents occur to man and beast where Beshaba has been."[10] Beshaba later officially appeared as one of the major deities for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987).[9] Beshaba was described in the hardback Forgotten Realms Adventures (1990),[11] the revised Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (1993) in the "Running the Realms" booklet,[12] and Faiths & Avatars (1996).[21] Her clergy was further detailed in Warriors and Priests of the Realms (1996),[14] and Prayers from the Faithful (1997).[15] Her role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[5] Her relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms were covered in Demihuman Deities (1998).[17] Beshaba appears as one of the major deities of the Forgotten Realms setting again, in Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001),[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19] In Baldur's Gate 2: Shadows of Amn, a mob in the Government District of Athkatla is preparing to burn Viconia, a runaway drow elf, as a sacrifice to Beshaba. This is most likely due to the mob wanting to dissuade the misfortune of a drow invasion on the city.

Chauntea[edit]

Main article: Chauntea
Chauntea
Game background
Title(s) The Great Mother, the Grain Goddess, Earthmother
Home plane 2E: Great Mother's Garden (Elysium)
3E:
Power level Greater
Alignment Neutral Good
Portfolio Agriculture, plants cultivated by humans, farmers, gardeners, summer
Domains Animal, Earth, Good, Plant, Protection, Renewal
Design details

Chauntea (/ɔːnˈtə/ chawn-TEE),[9] The Grain Goddess, The Great Mother or Earthmother, is a fictional deity of the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, for the Dungeons and Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Chauntea is a parallel deity to Silvanus, who is considered the god of wild nature, whilst Chauntea herself is seen as being the embodiment of all things agrarian or agricultural. She is goddess of agriculture, plants cultivated by humans, farmers, gardeners, and summer.

Ed Greenwood created Chauntea for his home Dungeons & Dragons game, loosely inspired by the Greek deity Demeter.[24] Chauntea first appeared within Dungeons & Dragons as one of the deities featured in Ed Greenwood's article "Down-to-earth Divinity" in Dragon #54 (October 1981). Chauntea is introduced as the Great Mother, goddess of agriculture, a neutral good greater goddess from the plane of Elysium. Chauntea's alliances among the gods are detailed: "Chauntea and Lathander work together, and often do so in alliance with Silvanus and his gods ... against The Gods of Fury." Chauntea is commonly worshipped by neutral good thieves and clerics, and characters working as farmers.[10] Chauntea later officially appeared as one of the major deities for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987).[9] Chauntea was described in the hardback Forgotten Realms Adventures (1990),[11] the revised Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (1993) in the "Running the Realms" booklet,[12] and Faiths & Avatars (1996).[21] Her clergy was further detailed in Warriors and Priests of the Realms (1996),[14] and Prayers from the Faithful (1997).[15] Her role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[5] Chantea is introduced as once having been known as Jannath in the ancient history of the Realms, in Netheril: Empire of Magic (1996). Her relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms was covered in Demihuman Deities (1998).[17] Chauntea is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[23] Chauntea appears as one of the major deities of the Forgotten Realms setting again, in Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001),[25] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19] Chauntea is described in both the Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide and the Forgotten Realms Player's Guide for fourth edition. Her portfolio and commandments are similar to those given in previous editions.

Deneir[edit]

Main article: Deneir
Deneir
Game background
Title(s) Lord of All Glyphs and Images
The Scribe of Oghma
Home plane 2E: Library of All Knowledge (Beastlands)
3E: House of Knowledge
Power level Lesser
Alignment Neutral Good
Portfolio Literature, Art, Knowledge, Glyphs, Images, Cartography, Scholars
Superior Oghma
Design details

Deneir (/dəˈnɪər/ də-NEER)[9] is a fictional minor deity on Faerûn, a fictional sub-continent in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting of the Dungeons and Dragons fantasy role-playing game.

Ed Greenwood created Deneir for his home Dungeons & Dragons game, set in the Forgotten Realms.[10] Deneir first appeared within Dungeons & Dragons as one of the deities featured in Ed Greenwood's article "Down-to-earth Divinity" in Dragon #54 (October 1981). Deneir is introduced as Lord of All Glyphs and Images, god of literature and art, a neutral good demigod from the plane of the Happy Hunting Grounds. He is described as being connected to Oghma, and depicted as an old, balding sage with a flaming white beard, said to have manufactured the artifact Kuroth's Quill, and ascribed by his priests to have written most magical books and tomes. Deneir's alliances among the gods are also described: "Oghma is served by Gond on one hand, and by Milil and Deneir on the other." Deneir is commonly worshipped by magic-users, illusionists, thieves, clerics, as well as characters employed as poets, artists, scribes, and sages.[10] Deneir later officially appeared as one of the major deities for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987).[9] Deneir was described in the hardback Forgotten Realms Adventures (1990),[11] the revised Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (1993) in the "Running the Realms" booklet,[12] and Faiths & Avatars (1996).[26] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[22] Deneir is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[23] Deneir appears as one of the major deities of the Forgotten Realms setting again, in Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001),[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19]

Gargauth[edit]

Main article: Gargauth
Gargauth
Game background
Title(s) The Tenth Lord of Nine
The Lost Lord of the Pit
The Hidden Lord
Home plane Material Plane
Power level Demipower/Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Portfolio Betrayal, cruelty, political corruption, powerbrokers
Design details

Gargauth is a fictional Faerûnian demipower deity in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game. He is the deity of betrayal, cruelty, political corruption and powerbrokers.

Gargauth first appeared in 1984 in Dragon #91 (as "Gargoth") in an article written by Ed Greenwood.[27] The description given shows many similarities to that of Astaroth, a devil described in an article by Alexander von Thorn in Dragon #28[28] Gargauth later officially appeared in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, mentioned in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987) as a "Loosed Devil" walking the realms in person.[9] Gargauth was described fully in Powers & Pantheons (1997),[29] and his relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms was covered in Demihuman Deities (1998).[17] Gargauth appears in 3rd edition in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting book (2001),[30] and was further described in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[31]

Eshowdow[edit]

Main article: Eshowdow
Eshowdow
Game background
Title(s) The Shadow Giant
Devourer of Honor, Courage and Nobility
Betrayer of the Eshowe
Ravager of the Tabaxi
Home plane Material Plane
Power level Demipower (Dead)
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Portfolio Shadows, destruction, revenge, cowardice, ignominy, fear[32]
Superior None
Design details

Eshowdow is a fictional god in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Eshowdow was born out of a fragment of the consciousness and being of Ubtao when he created the myriad nature spirits of Chult from such pieces of himself. His name came from the Eshowe tribe, who freed the entity they called the Shadow Giant, hoping to destroy the city of Mezro. When the Shadow Giant was repelled from the city by the Tabaxi People, he turned on his summoners, nearly wiping them out. Thus, the victorious Tabaxi named him Eshowdow, "the Shadow of the Eshowe".

This entity is first described as a "shadow giant" in the 2nd edition book Jungles of Chult (1993).[33] Eshowdow is named and further detailed in Powers & Pantheons (1997).[32] It was revealed in the book Races of Faerûn (2003), that Eshowdow was killed and his guise taken up by the dark goddess Shar in uncertain circumstances.[34]

Gond[edit]

Gond
Game background
Title(s) Wonderbringer, Lord of All Smiths
Home plane 2E: Wonderhome (Outlands)
3E: Home of Knowledge
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Neutral
Portfolio Artifice, craft, construction, smithwork
Superior Oghma
Design details

Gond is a fictional deity in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Gond is the deity of invention and cares only for the act of creation and pays no heed to the consequences of his inventions. While humans know him as Gond, some gnomes who worship him know him as Nebelun. Gond sometimes appears as a short, slight man with straw-blond hair, other times as a burly, red-faced smith, and other times as a gnome. In all his avatars he has sharp, dark eyes, a forge-scarred face, and alert, inquisitive features. He wears a scorched smith's smock over leather clothes. He wields a mighty hammer called Craftmaster, which he uses for smith work and as a weapon. Gond's faith is the state religion of Lantan, the center being at a monastery in the city of Illul called the High Holy Crafthouse of Inspiration. The church of Gond is tolerated across Faerûn.

Ed Greenwood created Gond for his home Dungeons & Dragons game, inspired by the Greek deity Hephaestus.[35] Gond first appeared within Dungeons & Dragons as one of the deities featured in Ed Greenwood's article "Down-to-earth Divinity" in Dragon #54 (October 1981). Gond is introduced as Wonderbringer, god of blacksmiths, artificers, crafts, and construction, a neutral lesser god from the plane of Concordant Opposition. Gond is described as an inventor and artisan, as well as a smith. Gond's alliances among the gods are also described: "Oghma is served by Gond on one hand, and by Milil and Deneir on the other." Gond is commonly worshipped by characters working as sages, artisans, smiths, alchemists.[10] Gond later officially appeared as one of the major deities for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987).[9] Gond was described in the hardback Forgotten Realms Adventures (1990),[11] the revised Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (1993) in the "Running the Realms" booklet,[12] and Faiths & Avatars (1996).[21] His clergy was further detailed in Warriors and Priests of the Realms (1996),[14] and Prayers from the Faithful (1997).[15] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[5] Her relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms was covered in Demihuman Deities (1998),[17] were he was described as having assumed the aspect of the Gnome deity Nebelun in Faerûn. Gond is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[23] Gond appears as one of the major deities of the Forgotten Realms setting again, in Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001),[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[36]

Helm[edit]

Helm
Game background
Title(s) The Watcher, the Vigilant One
Home plane 2E: Everwatch (Mechanus)
3E: House of the Triad
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Neutral
Portfolio Law, Planning, Protection, and Strength
Superior Lord Ao
Design details

Helm (/ˈhɛlm/ HELM),[9] The Watcher, is a fictional deity in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. He is the God of guardians, protection and protectors, and worshiped by guards and paladins. His symbol is a staring eye with blue iris on an upright war gauntlet, his divine realm is Everwatch in the House of the Triad, and his 3.5 Edition D&D domains are Law, Planning, Protection, and Strength.

Ed Greenwood created Helm for his home Dungeons & Dragons game, in his Forgotten Realms world.[10] Helm first appeared within Dungeons & Dragons as one of the deities featured in Ed Greenwood's article "Down-to-earth Divinity" in Dragon #54 (October 1981). Helm is introduced as He of the Unsleeping Eyes, the god of guardians, a lawful neutral lesser god from the plane of Nirvana. He is described as "always vigilant, watchful. He is never surprised, and anticipates most events by intelligence and observation. He can never be borne off his feet, rarely can he be tricked, and he will never betray or neglect that which he guards. In short, he is the ideal of guardians, and is worshiped so that some of his qualities will come to, or be borne out in, the worshiper." The article also notes that "In certain situations Torm and Helm will work together." Helm is commonly worshiped by lawful neutral thieves, monks, and clerics, as well as any characters employed as guards.[10] Helm later officially appeared as one of the major deities for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987).[9] Helm was described in the hardback Forgotten Realms Adventures (1990),[11] the revised Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (1993) in the "Running the Realms" booklet,[12] and Faiths & Avatars (1996).[21] His clergy was further detailed in Warriors and Priests of the Realms (1996),[14] and Prayers from the Faithful (1997).[15] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[5] His relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms was covered in Demihuman Deities (1998).[17] Helm is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[23] Helm appears as one of the major deities of the Forgotten Realms setting again, in Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001),[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19]

According to The Grand History of the Realms, released by Wizards of the Coast, Helm is eventually killed by Tyr in 1384 DR, though the other gods suspect Cyric is somehow behind it. Erik Scott de Bie's book, Downshadow, speaks of Helm and his mythical weapon.[37] Helm makes numerous appearances in video games. In Baldur's Gate there are temples of Helm in Nashkel and Baldur's Gate. In Baldur's Gate II: Shadows of Amn there is a temple of Helm in the 'Temple District' of Athkatla, in which you are sent to discover the truth about the 'Cult of the Unseeing Eye,' unless the main character is a cleric of Lathander or Talos, in which case you will be sent to the corresponding temple. The NPC Anomen Delryn is an aspiring warrior-priest of Helm. In Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal a huge dungeon called Watcher's Keep is available. The dungeon was built by the order of Helm to imprison dangerous creatures, most notably an avatar of Demogorgon. In Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal a major quest is offered to the player if their character class is 'Priest of Helm'. In Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance II one of the playable characters, Allessia Faithhammer, is a human cleric of Helm. In Neverwinter Nights towards the end of the first chapter, the player must battle through Helm's Hold, where the Cult of the Eye has slaughtered all the followers of Helm and suppressed the guardian spirit with a demon. The player has the option of destroying the demon and resummoning the guardian spirit of Helm. In Strahd's Possession, after completing the main quest, the player's party is summoned before Helm for a hearty thank you.

Ilmater[edit]

Main article: Ilmater
Ilmater
Game background
Title(s) The Crying God, the Broken God
Home plane 2E: Martyrdomain (Bytopia)
3E: House of the Triad
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Good
Portfolio Endurance, suffering, martyrdom, perseverance
Domains Good, Healing, Law, Strength
Superior Tyr
Design details

Ilmater (/ɨlˈmtər/ il-MAY-tər)[9] is a fictional deity in the Forgotten Realms campaign setting of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game.

Ed Greenwood created Ilmater for his home Dungeons & Dragons game, created with similarities to the fictional deity Issek of the Jug,[38] created by Fritz Leiber for the short story Lean Times in Lankhmar. His name, though, bears a resemblance to that of Ilmatar, the mother of Väinämöinen, from the Finnish Kalevala (and it would not be his first or only borrowing from Finnish mythology). Ilmater first appeared within Dungeons & Dragons as one of the deities featured in Ed Greenwood's article "Down-to-earth Divinity" in Dragon #54 (October 1981). Ilmater is introduced as the god of endurance, suffering, martyrdom, and perseverance, a lawful good lesser god from the plane of the Twin Paradises. He is described as having the appearance of "a broken man, with smashed hands which he constantly uses. He is the willing sufferer," and that he has the "power to manifest himself in creatures being tortured, but only if such creatures are of good alignment and have not done anything to deserve such treatment." Ilmater's role within the cosmology is also defined: "Torm and Ilmater serve Tyr, and worshippers and priests do the will of this Triad willingly." Ilmater is commonly worshipped by lawful good thieves, clerics, and characters employed as guards.[10] Ilmater later officially appeared as one of the major deities for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting, in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987).[9] Ilmater was described in the hardback Forgotten Realms Adventures (1990),[11] the revised Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (1993) in the "Running the Realms" booklet,[12] and Faiths & Avatars (1996).[21] His clergy was further detailed in Warriors and Priests of the Realms (1996),[14] and Prayers from the Faithful (1997).[15] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[5] His relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms was covered in Demihuman Deities (1998).[17] Ilmater is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[23] Ilmater appears as one of the major deities of the Forgotten Realms setting again, in Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001),[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19]

Ibrandul[edit]

Main article: Ibrandul
Ibrandul
Game background
Home plane 2E: Ibrandyllaran (Pandemonium)
Power level Dead
Alignment Chaotic Neutral
Portfolio Caverns, dungeons, skulks
Domains Cavern, Darkness, Scalykind, Travel
Design details

Within the fictional world of the Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, Ibrandul is a fictional deity. Ibrandul was worshiped as a deity with power over the underground, darkness and stealth by the Calishites. He is now considered a "Dead" Deity due to the actions of Shar during the Time of Troubles, but this is not widely known and churches of Ibrandul still operate in the mistaken belief their God's power still holds. Shar has been known to impersonate Ibrandul, subverting Ibranduls' followers for her own dark deeds.

Ibrandul is first mentioned in the 2nd edition boxed Ruins of Undermountain (1991) by Ed Greenwood.[39] Ibrandul is further detailed in Faiths & Avatars (1996).[21] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[22] His relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms was covered in Demihuman Deities (1998).[17] Ibrandul's ongoing worship is described in Lost Empires of Faerûn (2005).[40]

Iyachtu Xvim[edit]

Main article: Iyachtu Xvim
Iyachtu Xvim
Game background
Title(s) The Godson, The Son of Bane, The New Darkness
Home plane Bastion of Hate (Gehenna, Chamada)
Power level Lesser
Alignment Lawful Evil
Portfolio Fear, Hatred, Tyranny
Superior Bane
Design details

In the Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, Iyachtu Xvim (/ˈjəxt zəˈvɪm/ EE-yəkh-too z(ə)-VIM)[9] was the half-demonic son of the god Bane and temporary holder of his portfolio. Iyachtu Xvim was a Lawful Evil lesser deity. During the Time of Troubles, the then-demigod Xvim was imprisoned within the depths of Zhentil Keep. After the end of the Time of Troubles and his father's demise, Iyachtu Xvim was granted his father's command of hatred, and tyranny, and elevated to godhood. For little over a decade, Xvim reigned as a minor god, a feeble successor to his fearsome sire. During his existence, Xvim was petty, power-hungry, and ruthless, in some ways like his father. However, he was not nearly as strong, especially in comparison with the other "new" deity in the Faerûnian Pantheon, Cyric. In Tymora's Luck, Xvim impersonated Sirrion in a bid to seize the portfolios of Tymora and Beshaba, when Lathander attempted to re-create Tyche by reuniting the two goddesses. (Tyche became Tymora and Beshaba after becoming corrupted by Moander during the Dawn Cataclysm.) His plan was foiled by Finder Wyvernspur and his priest Joel, who threw the two halves of the Finder's Stone into the fusion chamber. Xvim fled, but his realm, the Bastion of Hate, was already destroyed by Beshaba.[41] Then, on Midwinter night of 1372 DR, the young god was consumed by a blazing green fire, from which emerged a resurrected Bane.

Iyachtu Xvim was first described in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987), which states that he "is called "the Godson" and the son of Bane, and serves as Bane's instrument in the Realms, directly carrying out his "father's" will".[42] Iyachtu Xvim is fully detailed in Faiths & Avatars (1996),[26] and his clergy is further described in Warriors and Priests of the Realms (1996).[14] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[22] His relationships with the nonhuman deities in the Forgotten Realms was covered in Demihuman Deities (1998).[17] Iyachtu Xvim's demise is described in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001).[18]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Conforti, Steven, ed. Living Greyhawk Official Listing of Deities for Use in the Campaign, version 2.0. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2005. Available online:[1] Archived June 5, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Greenwood, Ed. Anauroch (TSR, 1991)
  3. ^ Martin, Julia, and Eric L Boyd. Faiths & Avatars (TSR, 1996)
  4. ^ Slade and Jim Butler. Netheril: Empire of Magic (TSR, 1996)
  5. ^ a b c d e f McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  6. ^ Baker, Richard, Ed Bonny, and Travis Stout. Lost Empires of Faerûn (Wizards of the Coast, 2005)
  7. ^ Heinsoo, Rob, Logan Bonner, and Robert J. Schwalb. Forgotten Realms Player's Guide. (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  8. ^ Cordell, Bruce R., Ed Greenwood and Chris Sims. Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Ed Greenwood, Jeff Grubb and Karen S. Martin (1987). Forgotten Realms Campaign Set. Wizard of the Coast. ISBN 978-0-88038-472-8. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981)
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Grubb, Jeff and Ed Greenwood. Forgotten Realms Adventures (TSR, 1990)
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h Ed Greenwood (1993). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. ASIN B000K06S2E. 
  13. ^ Martin, Julia, and Eric L. Boyd. Faiths & Avatars (TSR, 1996)
  14. ^ a b c d e f g Terra, John. Warriors and Priests of the Realms (TSR, 1996)
  15. ^ a b c d e f Greenwood, Ed and Stewart, Doug. Prayers from the Faithful (TSR, 1997)
  16. ^ McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i Boyd, Eric L. Demihuman Deities (TSR, 1998)
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h Ed Greenwood et al. (2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. Wizard of the Coast. ISBN 978-0-7869-1836-2. 
  19. ^ a b c d e f g Boyd, Eric L, and Erik Mona. Faiths and Pantheons (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  20. ^ Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981), p. 52: "Azuth is merely a renamed Aarth."
  21. ^ a b c d e f g Martin, Julia, and Eric L Boyd. Faiths & Avatars (TSR, 1996)
  22. ^ a b c d McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  23. ^ a b c d e f Perkins, Christopher. Warriors of Heaven (TSR, 1999)
  24. ^ Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981), p. 52: "Chauntea is a rewritten Demeter."
  25. ^ Ed Greenwood, Sean K Reynolds, Skip Williams, and Rob Heinsoo (2001). Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting. Wizard of the Coast. ISBN 978-0-7869-1836-2. 
  26. ^ a b Martin, Julia, and Eric L Boyd. Faiths & Avatars (TSR, 1996)
  27. ^ Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Revisited." Dragon #91 (TSR, 1984)
  28. ^ Von Thorn, Alexander. "The Politics of Hell." Dragon #28 (TSR, 1979)
  29. ^ Boyd, Eric L. Powers & Pantheons (TSR, 1997)
  30. ^ Greenwood, Ed; Reynolds, Sean K.; Williams, Skip (2001). Forgotten Realms: Campaign Setting. Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 978-0-7869-1836-2. 
  31. ^ Boyd, Eric L, and Erik Mona. Faiths and Pantheons (Wizards of the Coast, 2002).
  32. ^ a b Boyd, Eric L. (1997). Powers & Pantheons. Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 978-0-7869-0657-4. 
  33. ^ Lowder, James and Jean Rabe. Jungles of Chult (TSR, 1993) ISBN 978-0-88038-593-0
  34. ^ Boyd, Eric L.; Matt Forbeck, and James Jacobs (2003). Races of Faerûn. Wizards of the Coast. ISBN 978-0-7869-2875-0. 
  35. ^ Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981), p. 52: "Gond is Hephaestus renamed."
  36. ^ Boyd, Eric L, and Erik Mona. Faiths and Pantheons Wizards of the Coast, 2002 ISBN 978-0-7869-2759-3.
  37. ^ Dungeons & Dragons Roleplaying Game Official Home Page - Story Archived April 5, 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  38. ^ Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981), p. 52: "[Ilmater] is the willing sufferer, similar to Issek of the Jug".
  39. ^ Greenwood, Ed. Ruins of Undermountain (TSR, 1991)
  40. ^ Baker, Richard, Ed Bonny and Travis Scott. Lost Empires of Faerûn (Wizards of the Coast, 2005)
  41. ^ Kate Novak & Jeff Grubb, Tymora's Luck (TSR, 1997)
  42. ^ Ed Greenwood, Jeff Grubb and Karen S. Martin (1987). Forgotten Realms Campaign Set. TSR, Inc. ISBN 978-0-88038-472-8.