List of important publications in concurrent, parallel, and distributed computing

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This is a list of important publications in concurrent, parallel, and distributed computing, organized by field.

Some reasons why a particular publication might be regarded as important:

  • Topic creator – A publication that created a new topic
  • Breakthrough – A publication that changed scientific knowledge significantly
  • Influence – A publication which has significantly influenced the world or has had a massive impact on the teaching of concurrent, parallel, and distributed computing.

Consensus, synchronisation, and mutual exclusion[edit]

Synchronising concurrent processes. Achieving consensus in a distributed system in the presence of faulty nodes, or in a wait-free manner. Mutual exclusion in concurrent systems.

Dijkstra: “Solution of a problem in concurrent programming control”

Dijkstra, E. W. (1965). "Solution of a problem in concurrent programming control". Communications of the ACM 8 (9): 569. doi:10.1145/365559.365617.  edit
This paper presented the first solution to the mutual exclusion problem. Leslie Lamport writes that this work “started the field of concurrent and distributed algorithms”.[1]

Pease, Shostak, Lamport: “Reaching agreement in the presence of faults”
Lamport, Shostak, Pease: “The Byzantine generals problem”

Pease, Marshall; Shostak, Robert; Lamport, Leslie (1980), "Reaching agreement in the presence of faults", Journal of the ACM 27 (1): 228–234, doi:10.1145/322186.322188 .
Lamport, Leslie; Shostak, Robert; Pease, Marshall (1982), "The Byzantine generals problem", ACM Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems 4 (3): 382–401, doi:10.1145/357172.357176 .
These two papers introduced and studied the problem that is nowadays known as Byzantine fault tolerance. The 1980 paper presented the classical lower bound that agreement is impossible if at least 1/3 of the nodes are faulty; it received the Edsger W. Dijkstra Prize in Distributed Computing in 2005.[2] The highly cited 1982 paper gave the problem its present name, and also presented algorithms for solving the problem.[3]

Herlihy, Shavit: “The topological structure of asynchronous computation”
Saks, Zaharoglou: “Wait-free k-set agreement is impossible …”

Herlihy, Maurice; Shavit, Nir (1999), "The topological structure of asynchronous computation", Journal of the ACM 46 (6): 858–923, doi:10.1145/331524.331529 . Gödel prize lecture.
Saks, Michael; Zaharoglou, Fotios (2000), "Wait-free k-set agreement is impossible: The topology of public knowledge"", SIAM Journal on Computing 29 (5): 1449–1483, doi:10.1137/S0097539796307698 .
These two papers study wait-free algorithms for generalisations of the consensus problem, and showed that these problems can be analysed by using topological properties and arguments. Both papers received the Gödel Prize in 2004.[4]

Foundations of distributed systems[edit]

Fundamental concepts such as time and knowledge in distributed systems.

Halpern, Moses: “Knowledge and common knowledge in a distributed environment”

Halpern, Joseph; Moses, Yoram (1990), "Knowledge and common knowledge in a distributed environment", Journal of the ACM 37 (3): 549–587, doi:10.1145/79147.79161 .
This paper formalised the notion of “knowledge” in distributed systems, demonstrated the importance of the concept of “common knowledge” in distributed systems, and also proved that common knowledge cannot be achieved if communication is not guaranteed. The paper received the Gödel Prize in 1997 and the Edsger W. Dijkstra Prize in Distributed Computing in 2009.[5][6]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "PODC Influential Paper Award: 2002", ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing, retrieved 2009-08-24  Dijkstra (1965) did not receive the PODC Award or Dijkstra Prize but was nevertheless mentioned twice in the descriptions of the winning papers, in 2002 and in 2006.
  2. ^ "Edsger W. Dijkstra Prize in Distributed Computing: 2005", ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing, retrieved 2009-08-24 
  3. ^ "Lamport: The Byzantine generals problem – 2133 citations", Google Scholar, retrieved 2009-08-29 
  4. ^ "2004 Gödel Prize", ACM SIGACT, retrieved 2009-08-29 
  5. ^ "1997 Gödel Prize", ACM SIGACT, retrieved 2009-08-24 
  6. ^ "Edsger W. Dijkstra Prize in Distributed Computing: 2009", ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing, retrieved 2009-08-24 

External links[edit]