List of land mines

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Yugoslav MURD anti-personnel mine (front, accessories fitted).

This is hopefully a complete list of land mines.

Mines by type[edit]

Anti-vehicle mines[edit]

Blast mines[edit]

A Chinese metal cased Type 59 anti-tank blast mine. Its design is typical of many post World War II anti-tank blast mines, circular with a central fuze well (fitted with a plug in this case).
An Italian, plastic cased blast resistant VS-2.2 mine. Capable of being deployed from the air, as well as being resistant to explosive clearance techniques.

Shaped charge/Misznay Schardin effect[edit]

Full width mines[edit]

A German Riegelmine 43 full width mine.

Side attack mines[edit]

Wide area mines[edit]


Anti-personnel mines[edit]

Fragmentation and stake mines[edit]

A Yugoslavian PMR-2A stake mine, in a typical deployed configuration. Note the externally serrated fragmentation jacket.

Shaped charge mines[edit]

Directional mines[edit]

The M18A1 Claymore mine.

Blast mines[edit]

A German World War II era Schu-mine 42 anti-personnel mine. Its extremely simple design and use of wooden components allowed it to be produced in great numbers.

Bounding mines[edit]

A World War II German S-mine, perhaps not the first bounding mine, but possibly the most well known. Its design was copied by several countries after the war including the United States who produced the M16 mine to replace their relatively ineffective M2 mine.

Flame mines[edit]

Chemical mines[edit]

British troops load a Livens gas projector.

Anti-helicopter mines[edit]


Nuclear land mines[edit]

Three scientists pose with a Medium Atomic Demolition Munition, the warhead is the smaller cylinder to the left, its casing is to the right.

Mines by country of origin[edit]

Austria[edit]

Bulgaria[edit]

Canada[edit]

People's Republic of China[edit]

Cuba[edit]

Former Czechoslovakia[edit]

Sweden[edit]

France[edit]

Germany[edit]

Italy[edit]

Japan[edit]

Myanmar[edit]

South Africa[edit]

Serbia[edit]

former Soviet Union/Russia[edit]

Sri Lanka[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

United States[edit]

Former Asia[edit]

Vietnam[edit]

A Yugoslav MURD anti-personnel mine (line drawing).
A cutaway of an MD-82 mine.
An M14 mine, showing a cutaway view. The absence of a safety clip and the location of the arrow on the pressure plate clearly shows that this mine has been armed.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b The Livens Projector is more of a mortar than a land mine but it is described as "arguably the first chemical mine" in The Origins of Military Mines: Part I, Major William C. Schneck and is consequently included here.
  • Jane's Mines and Mine Clearance 2005-2006
  • Brassey's Essential Guide to Anti-Personnel Landmines, Eddie Banks
  • Foreign Mine Warfare Equipment, TM 5-223