List of large optical telescopes

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List of large optical reflecting telescopes. For telescopes larger than 3 meters in aperture see List of largest optical reflecting telescopes. This list combines large or expensive reflecting telescopes from any era, as what constitutes famous reflector has changed over time. In 1900 a 1-meter reflector would be among the largest in the world, but by 2000, would be relatively common for professional observatories.

Large reflectors and catadiotropic[edit]

See List of largest optical reflecting telescopes for continuation of list to larger scopes

Name Image Aperture Mirror
type
Nationality / Sponsors Site Built
Harlan J. Smith Telescope 107-inch at dusk.JPG 2.72 m (107 in) Single USA McDonald Observatory, Texas, USA 1969
UBC-Laval LMT 2.65 m (104 in) Liquid Canada Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 1992–
Shajn 2.6m
"Crimean 102 in."[1]
CraO main telescope.jpg 2.64 m (104 in) Single Crimean Astrophysical Obs., Ukraine 1961
VLT Survey Telescope (VST)[2] Tel view1.jpg 2.61 m (102.8 in) Single Italy + ESO countries Paranal Observatory, Antofagasta Region, Chile 2007
BAO 2.6 2.6 m (102 in) Single Byurakan Astrophysical Obs., Mt. Aragatz, Armenia 1976
Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Nordic Optical Telescope La Palma.jpg 2.56 m (101 in) Single Denmark, Sweden, Iceland, Norway, Finland ORM, Canary Islands, Spain 1988
Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma, Spain.jpg 2.54 m (100 in) Single UK ORM, Canary Islands, Spain (RGO, England, UK until '79) 1984
Irenee du Pont Telescope Du Pont Las Campanas.jpg 2.54 m (100 in) Single USA Las Campanas Observatory, Coquimbo Region, Chile 1976
Hooker 100-Inch Telescope 100inchHooker.jpg 2.54 m (100 in) Single USA Mt. Wilson Observatory, California, USA 1917
SOFIA SOFIA in air.jpg 2.5 m (98.4 in) Single USA + Germany Boeing 747SP (mobile, USA) 2007
Sloan DSS 2.5 m (98.4 in) Single USA Apache Point Observatory, New Mexico, USA 1997
Hiltner Telescope MDM Hiltner Telescope.jpg 2.4 m (94.5 in) Single USA MDM Observatory (Kitt Peak), Arizona, USA 1986
Thai National Telescope (TNT) 2.4 m (94.5 in) Single Thailand + SEAAN Thai National Observatory, Doi Inthanon, Thailand 2013
Lijiang[3] 2.4 m (94.5 in) Single China Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, China 2008
Hubble (HST) HST-SM4.jpeg 2.4 m (94.5 in) Single NASA+ESA Low Earth orbit 1990
2.4-meter SINGLE Telescope Magdalena Observatory.JPG 2.4 m (94.5 in) Single USA Magdalena Ridge Observatory, New Mexico, USA 2006/2008
Automated Planet Finder Automated Planet Finder Dome.JPG 2.4 m (94.5 in) Single USA Lick Observatory, California, USA 2010
Vainu Bappu[4][5] 2.34 m (92.1 in) Single India Vainu Bappu Observatory, India 1986
Aristarchos 2.3 m (90.6 in) Single ESO Countries+ Greece National Observatory of Athens, Mt. Helmos, Greece 2004
WIRO 2.3[6] WyomingInfraRedObservatory.jpg 2.3 m (90.6 in) Single IR USA Wyoming Infrared Observatory, Wyoming, USA 1977
ANU 2.3m ATT[7] 2.3 m (90.6 in) Single Siding Spring Observatory, New South Wales, Australia 1984
Bok Telescope (90-inch) Bokscope.jpg 2.3 m (90.6 in) Single USA Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona, USA 1969
University of Hawaii 2.2 m (UH88) UH88 at sunset.jpg 2.24 m (88.2 in) Single USA Mauna Kea Observatories, Hawaii, USA 1970
MPIA-ESO (ESO-MPI) 2.2 m (86.6 in) Single West Germany La Silla Observatory, Coquimbo Region, Chile 1984[8]
MPIA-CAHA 2.2m[8][9] Calar alto.JPG 2.2 m (86.6 in) Single West Germany Calar Alto Observatory, Almería, Spain 1979
Xinglong 2.16m[10] 2.16 m (85.0 in) Single PRC (China) Xinglong, China 1989
Jorge Sahade 2.15m[11] Telescopio del Complejo astronomico el Leoncito-San Juan-ARG.JPG 2.15 m (84.6 in) Single Leoncito Astronomical Complex, San Juan Province, Argentina 1987
INAOE 2.12 (OAGH)[12] 2.12 m (83.5 in) Single Mexico + USA Guillermo Haro Observatory, Sonora, Mexico 1987
UNAM 2.12 2.12m Telescope-SanPedroMartir Observatory-BajaCalifornia-Mexico.jpg 2.12 m (83.5 in) Single National Astronomical Observatory, Baja California, Mexico 1979
Kitt Peak 2.1-meter 2.1 m (82.7 in) Single USA Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona, USA 1964
Otto Struve Telescope Otto Struve Telescope.jpg 2.08 m (81.9 in) Single USA McDonald Observatory, Texas, USA 1939
T13 Automated Spectroscopic Telescope[13] 2.06 m (81.1 in) Single USA (NASA, NSF, & TSU) Fairborn Observatory, Arizona, USA 2003
Himalayan Chandra Telescope (HCT)[14] Hanle observatory.jpg 2.01 m (79.1 in) Single Indian Astronomical Observatory, India 2000
Alfred Jensch Teleskop Karl-Schwarzschild-Observatorium.jpg 2 m (78.7 in) Single Karl Schwarzschild Observatory, Germany 1960
Carl Zeiss Jena 2 m (78.7 in) Single Shamakhi Astrophysical Obs., Azerbaijan 1966
Ondřejov 2-m[15] 2-m Telescope3, Ondřejov Astronomical.jpg 2 m (78.7 in) Single USSR + Czechoslovakia Ondřejov Observatory, Czech 1967
Ritchey-Chretien-Coude (RCC)[16] Rozhen dome.jpg 2 m (78.7 in) Single Bulgaria Rozhen Observatory, Bulgaria 1984
Carl Zeiss Jena 2 m (78.7 in) Single Main Ukraine Obs., Ukraine
Bernard Lyot Telescope Téléscope Bernard Lyot.jpg 2 m (78.7 in) Single France Pic du Midi Obs., France 1980
Liverpool Telescope[17] Liverpool Telescope facility exterior.jpg 2 m (78.7 in) Single UK ORM, Canary Islands, Spain 2003
Faulkes Telescope North EZL-Faulkes.jpg 2 m (78.7 in) Single UK Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, USA 2003[18]
Faulkes Telescope South 2 m (78.7 in) Single UK Siding Spring Observatory, New South Wales, Australia 2001
MAGNUM[19] 2 m (78.7 in) Single IR Japan Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, USA 2001–2008

Selected telescopes below about 2 meters aperture[edit]

A non-comprehensive non-exclusionary list of telescopes one yard to less than 2 metres in aperture.

Name Aperture
m
Aper.
in
Mirror type Nationality
of Sponsors
Site Built
OHP 1.93 1.93 m 76″ Single France Haute-Provence Observatory, France 1958
74 inch (1.9 m) Radcliffe Telescope[20] 1.88 m 74″ Single South African Astronomical Observatory
Sutherland (1974 – present)
Radcliffe Observatory, Pretoria, South Africa (1948– 1974)[21]
1950
1.88 m telescope[22] 1.88 m 74″ Single Japan Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, Japan 1960
DDO 1.88 m 1.88 m 74″ Single Canada David Dunlap Observatory, Ontario, Canada 1935
74" reflector[23] 1.88 m 74″ Single Australia Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australian Capital Territory, Australia 1955–2003
Kottamia telescope 1.88 m[24][25] 1.88 m 74″ Single Egypt Egypt 1960
SETI Optical Telescope 1.83 m 72″ Single USA Oak Ridge Observatory, Massachusetts, USA 2006[26]
Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope (VATT) 1.83 m 72″ Single Vatican City Mount Graham International Observatory, Arizona, USA 1993[27]
72-Inch Perkins Telescope 1.83 m 72″ Single USA Lowell Observatory, Arizona, USA 1964
Plaskett telescope[28] 1.83 m 72″ Single Great Britain Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, British Columbia, Canada 1918
Leviathan of Parsonstown 1.83 m 72″ Metal Great Britain Birr Castle; Ireland
Historical recreation
1845
Copernico 1.82 m[29] 1.82 m 72″ Single Italy Asiago Observatory, Italy 1976
1.8 meter telescope[30] 1.8 m 71″ Single China Gaomeigu site of Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, China 2009
Pan-STARRS PS1[31][32] 1.8 m 71″ Single Germany, Taiwan, US, UK Haleakala Observatory, Hawaii, USA 2007
VLT Auxiliary Telescopes (1.8 x 4) 1.8 m 71″ Single Europe Paranal Observatory, Antofagasta Region, Chile 2006
Spacewatch 1.8-meter Telescope[33] 1.8 m 71″ Single USA Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona, USA 2001
1.8m Ritchey Cretien reflector[34] 1.8 m 72″ Single Korea Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory, Korea 1996
Sandy Cross Telescope[35] 1.8 m 71″ Single Canada Rothney Astrophysical Observatory, Alberta, Canada 1996
Largest amateur telescope in 2013[36] 1.778 m 70″ Single USA Utah, USA (mobile) 2013
69-inch Perkins Telescope[37] 1.75 m 69″ Single USA Perkins Observatory, Ohio, USA 1931–1964
1.65 m telescope 1.65 m 65″ Single Moletai Astronomical Obs., Lithuania 1991
McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope 1.61 m 63″ Single USA Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona, USA 1962
BBO NST 1.6 m 63″ Solar USA Big Bear Solar Observatory, California, USA 2009
AZT-33[38] 1.6 m 63″ Single Sayan Solar Observatory, Siberia, Russia 1981
1.6 m Perkin Elmer[39] 1.6 m 63″ Single Brazil Pico dos Dias Observatory, Minas Gerais, Brazil 1981
Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic 1.6 m 63″ Single IR Canada Mont Mégantic Observatory, Québec, Canada 1978
1.56m optical telescope 1.56 m 62″ Single China Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, China 1988
Kaj Strand Telescope[40] 1.55 m 61″ Single USA USNO Flagstaff Station, Arizona, USA 1964
61" Kuiper Telescope 1.55 m 61″ Single USA Steward Observatory, Arizona, USA 1965[41]
Oak Ridge Observatory 61" reflector[42] 1.55 m 61″ Single USA Oak Ridge Observatory, Massachusetts, USA 1933
Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre[43] 1.54 m 60.6″ Single Argentina Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre, Argentina 1942
Toppo Telescope No.1 (TT1)[44] 1.537 m 60.5″ Single (R/C) Italy Astronomical Observatory of Castelgrande, Italy 2008
Harvard 60-inch Reflector[45] 1.524 m 60″ Single USA Harvard College Observatory, Massachusetts, USA 1905–1931
Hale 60-Inch Telescope 1.524 m 60″ Single USA Mt. Wilson Observatory, California, USA 1908
Dunn Solar Telescope ex-VTT 1.524 m 60″ Single USA National Solar Observatory, New Mexico, USA 1969
FLWO 1.5m Tillinghast[46] 1.52 m 60″ Single USA F. L. Whipple Observatory, Arizona 1994
Telescopio Carlos Sánchez (TCS) 1.52 m 60″ Single UK + Spain Teide Observatory, Canary Islands, Spain 1971
OHP 1.52 1.52 m 60″ Single France Haute-Provence Obs., France 1967
Mt. Lemmon 60" Dahl-Kirkham Telescope[47] 1.52 m 60″ Single IR USA Steward Obs. (Mt. Lemmon), Arizona, USA 1970
Steward Observatory 60" Cassegrain Telescope[48] 1.52 m 60″ Single USA Steward Obs. (Mt. Lemmon), Arizona, USA 1960s
OAN 1.52 m[49] 1.52 m 60″ Single Spain Calar Alto Observatory, Almería, Spain 1970s
1.52 m G.D. Cassini[50] 1.52 m 60″ Single Italy Mount Orzale, Italy 1976
TIRGO Gornergrat Infrared Telescope[51] 1.50 m 59″ Single IR Italy + Switzerland Hochalpine Forschungsstation Jungfraujoch und Gornergrat, Alps, Switzerland 1979–2005
AZT-22[52] 1.5 m 59″ Single Mount Maidanak, Uzbekistan 1972
RTT150 (ex-AZT-22)[53][54] 1.5 m 59″ Single Russia + Turkey TUBITAK National Obs., Turkey
AZT-20[55] 1.5 m 59″ Single Assy-Turgen Observatory, Kazakhstan[56]
AZT-12[57] 1.5 m 59″ Single USSR Tartu Observatory, Estonia 1976
Hexapod-Telescope (HPT)[58] 1.5 m 59″ Single Germany Cerro Armazones Observatory, Antofagasta Region, Chile 2005
OSN 1.5m (Nasmyth) 1.5 m 59″ Single Spain Sierra Nevada Observatory, Granada, Spain
Persona-1 (C.2441)[59] 1.5 m 59″ Korsch Russia Earth Orbit (SSO, terrestrial viewing) 2008
GREGOR solar/night telescope[60] 1.5 m 59″ Single Germany Teide Observatory, Tenerife, Spain 2012
SkyMapper 1.35 53.15″ Single Australia Siding Spring Observatory, New South Wales, Australia 2008
USNOFS 1.3m[61] 1.3 m 51″ Single USA USNO Flagstaff Station, Arizona, USA 1998
McGraw-Hill Telescope[62][63] 1.27 m 50″ Single USA MDM Observatory, Arizona, USA (1975 – present)
Dexter, Michigan, USA (1969–1975)
1969
1.26m infrared telescope 1.26 m 49.5" Single China Xinglong Station, China 1991
Herschel 40-foot(1.26 m d.)[64] 1.26 m 49.5″ Metal Great Britain + Ireland Observatory House; England 1789–1815
AZT-11[65] 1.25 m 49″ Single Abastumani Observatory, Rep. of Georgia 1976
AZT-11[66] 1.25 m 49″ Single Crimean Astrophysical Obs., Ukraine 1981
MPIA 1.2[67] 1.23 m 48.4″ Single West Germany+Spain Calar Alto Obs., Alemíra, Spain 1975
Schmidt–Cassegrain telescope 1.22 m 48″ Schmidt Turkey ÇOMÜ Ulupınar Observatory, Çanakkale, Turkey 2002
Babelsberg Zeiss[68] 1.22 m 48″ Single Germany Babelsberg Observatory, Berlin, Germany 1924–1947
Galileo 1.22 m[69] 1.22 m 48″ Single Italy Asiago Observatory, Italy 1942
Samuel Oschin telescope 1.22 m 48″ Schmidt USA Palomar Observatory, California, USA 1948
Great Melbourne Telescope[70] 1.22 m 48″ Metal Great Britain Melbourne Observatory, Victoria, Australia 1878–1889
William Lassell 48-inch[71] 1.22 m 48″ Metal Great Britain Malta 1861–1865
Barabarella (OMI 48 inch)[72][73] 1.22 m 48″ Single USA Lowrey Observatory, Texas, USA 2008
Oskar-Lühning Telescope[74] 1.2 m 47″ Single Germany Hamburg Observatory, Germany 1975
Leonhard Euler Telescope[75] 1.2 m 47″ Single Switzerland La Silla Observatory, Coquimbo Region, Chile 1998
Mercator Telescope 1.2 m 47″ Single Belgium+Switzerland ORM, Canary Islands, Spain 2001[76]
Hamburg Robotic Telescope (HRT)[77] 1.2 m 47″ Single Germany Hamburg-Bergdorf Obs., Germany 2002
UK Schmidt Telescope 1.2 m 47″ Schmidt UK Siding Spring Observatory, New South Wales, Australia 1973
GeoEye-1[78] 1.1 m 43.3″ Single USA Earth Orbit (terrestrial viewing) 2008
Hänssgen's reflector[79] 1.07 m 42″ Single Germany Mobile (~Germany) 2002
Nickel Telescope 1.02 m 40″ Single USA Lick Observatory, California, USA 1979
UTAS 40-inch 1.02 m 40" R/C Australia Mount Canopus, Tasmania, Australia 1973
George Ritchey 40-inch (1 m)[80] 1.02 m 40″ R/C USA USNO Flagstaff Station, Arizona, USA (Washington, D.C. until 1955) 1934
Yerkes "41-inch"[81] 1.02 m 40″ Single USA Yerkes Observatory, Wisconsin, USA 1968[82]
ZIMLAT[83] 1 m 39.4″ Single Switzerland Zimmerwald Obs., Switzerland 1997
Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT)[84] 1.00 m 39.4" Single Taiwan Lulin Observatory, Taiwan 2002
Wise one-meter telescope 1.00 m 39.4" single Israel Wise Observatory, Israel 1973
SAAO 1-meter Elizabeth Telescope 1.00m 40" Single South Africa South African Astronomical Observatory
Cape Town, South Africa (1962-c.1975)
Sutherland, South Africa (c.1975–present)
1962
Near-Earth Object Survey Telescope (NEOST)[85] 1.00 m 39.4" Single China Purple Mountain Observatory, China 2006
RT 1.00 m 1.00 m Tubitak National Observatory
OGS Telescope[86] 1 m 39.4″ Single European Space Agency countries Teide Observatory, Canary Islands, Spain 1995
Jacobus Kapteyn Telescope 1 m 39.4″ Single UK + Netherlands Isaac Newton Group, Canary Islands, Spain 1984
Lulin One-meter Telescope (LOT)[87] 1 m 39.4″ Single ROC (Taiwan) Lulin Observatory, Taiwan 2002
Zeiss di Merate (1m reflector) 1 m 39.4″ Single Kingdom of Italy Merate Obs., Merate, Italy 1926
Zeiss 1m reflector 1 m 39.4″ Single Belgium Royal Obs., Uccle, Belgium
Hamburg Spiegelteleskop (1m reflector)[88][89] 1 m 39.4″ Single Deutsches Reich (Germany) Hamburg-Bergdorf Obs., Germany 1911
Kepler Mission telescope 0.95 m 37.4″ Single USA Earth-trailing Orbit (Heliocentric) 2009
James Gregory Telescope 0.94 m 37" Single Great Britain University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK 1962
Kuiper Airborne Obs.(KAO) 0.914 m 36″ Single USA C-141 (mobile) 1974–1995
Crossley Reflector[90] 0.914 m 36″ Single US+UK Lick Observatory, California, USA 1896
A.A. Common Reflector 0.914 m 36″ Single Great Britain Great Britain 1880–1896
Rosse 36-inch Telescope 0.914 m 36″ Metal Great Britain Birr Castle; Ireland 1826
SMARTS 0.9m Telescope 0.914 m 36″ Single USA, SMARTS Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Coquimbo Region, Chile 1965

Selected telescopes below about 1 meter/yard aperture[edit]

Name Aperture
m
Aper.
in
Type Nationality of Sponsors Site Built/Used
Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope 0.90 m 35.4″ Single UV USA Earth Orbit 1990, 1995
Pine Mountain Observatory 32"[91] 0.82 m 32" Single USA Pine Mountain Observatory, Pine Mountain, Oregon. 6300 feet elevation. 1970
Astron[92] 0.80 m 31.5″ Single UV CCCP + France Earth orbit 1983–1989[92]
Ruisinger[93] 0.762 m 30″ Single-Newtonian USA – ASKC Powell Observatory; Louisburg, Kansas 1985
Obsession Telescopes #102[94] 0.762 m 30″ Single USA Omaha, Nebraska (mobile) 1993
AKARI (ASTRO-F)[95] 0.685 m 27″ Single IR Japan + Misc. Earth Orbit 2006-2011
William Lassell 24-inch[96] 0.61 m 24″ Metal Great Britain Liverpool, England 1845
Infrared Space Observatory 0.60 m 23.5″ Single IR (2.4 to 240) European Space Agency Earth orbit (GEO) 1995–1998
TRAPPIST[97] 0.60 m 23.5″ Single Belgium La Silla Observatory, Coquimbo Region, Chile 2010[98]
IRAS[99] 0.57 m 22.44″ Single IR USA + UK + The Netherlands Earth orbit 1983
Antarctica Schmidt telescopes (AST3-1) [100] 0.50 m 19.7″ Single China Antarctic Kunlun Station 2012
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter—HiRISE 0.50 m 19.7″ R/C USA Mars orbit 2005
TacSat-2[101] 0.50 m 19.7″ R/C USA Earth orbit (terrestrial viewing) 2006-2011
Ege University- A48 Reflecting Cassegrain telescope 0.48 m 18.9″ Single Turkey Ege University Observatory, Izmir, Turkey 1968
Herschel 20-foot (0.475 m d.)[102][103] 0.475 m 18.5″ Metal Great Britain Observatory House; England 1782
Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) 0.45 m 17.7″ Solar Denmark ORM, Canary Islands 1997
Explorer 57 (IUE) 0.45 m 17.7″ UV US+UK+ESA Countries Earth orbit (GEO) 1978–1996
University of Rochester Telescope Project[104] 0.40 m 16″ R/C USA Rochester NY (mobile) 2011
Armagh 15- inch Grubb Reflector[105] 0.38 m 15″ Metal Great Britain Armagh Observatory, Northern Ireland 1835[106]
TacSat-3 0.35 m 14″ R/C USA Earth orbit (terrestrial viewing) 2009-2012
Mars Global Surveyor—MOC[107] 0.35 m 13.8″ R/C USA Mars Orbit 1996–2006
XMM-Newton—UV camera 0.30 m 11.9″ Single UV ESA Countries Earth orbit 1998
SWIFT UVOT 0.30 m 11.9″ Single UV US+ UK+Italy Earth orbit 2004
Hipparcos 0.29 m 11.4″ Schmidt European Space Agency Earth orbit (GTO) 1989–1993
COROT 0.27 m 10.6″ afocal France + ESA Earth orbit 2007
Centre for Basic Space Science Optical Telescopes [108] 0.25 m 9.84″ Single Nigeria NASRDA-CBSS Observatory, Nsukka 2006
Astronomical Netherlands Satellite 0.22 m 8.7″ Single UV The Netherlands & USA Earth Orbit 1974–1976
New Horizons—LORRI 0.208 m 8.2″ R/C USA Space (33+ AU from Earth) 2006
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter LROC-NAC[109] 0.195 m 7.68″ Reflector USA Lunar orbit 2009
Hadley's Reflector[110] 0.15 m 6″ Metal Great Britain England (mobile) 1721
Chinese Small Telescope Array (CSTAR) 0.145 m 6″ Single China Antarctic Kunlun Station 2008
University of Tokyo PRISM[111] 0.10  m 3.9″ Single Japan Earth Orbit (terrestrial viewing) 2009
Newton's Reflector[112][113] 0.033 m 1.3″ Metal Great Britain England (mobile) 1669
MESSENGER MDIS-WAC[114] 0.03 m 1.18″ Lens USA Space (Mercury orbit) 2004
MESSENGER MDIS-NAC[114] 0.025 m 0.98″ R/C USA Space (Mercury orbit) 2004
Dawn Framing Camera (FC1/FC2)[115] 0.02 m 0.8″ Lens Germany + USA Space (Asteroid belt) 2007

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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