List of reentering space debris

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List of large reentering space debris is a list of man made objects reentering Earth's atmosphere by mass (see space debris). They are typically destroyed by reentry heating, but some components can survive. Most of these objects are relatively small but larger objects have survived but usually break up into smaller pieces during reentry.[1][2][3]

Object Agency Mass Reentry Date
(age in years)
Reentry type Launch Date
Mir CIS 120,000 kg (260,000 lb) 23 March 2001 (&&&&&&&&&&&0547915 years) Controlled 20 February 1986
Skylab[3] USA 69,000 kg (152,000 lb) 11 July 1979 (&&&&&&&&&&&022496 years) Uncontrolled 14 May 1973
Salyut 7/Cosmos 1686 USSR 40,000 kg (88,000 lb) 7 February 1991 (&&&&&&&&&&&031928 years) Uncontrolled 13 May 1982
Salyut 6/Cosmos 1267 USSR 35,000 kg (77,000 lb) 29 July 1982 (&&&&&&&&&&&017644 years) Controlled 29 September 1977
Cosmos 557 USSR 19,400 kg (42,800 lb) 22 May 1973 (&&&&&&&&&&&&&01111 days) Uncontrolled 11 May 1973
Salyut 5 USSR 19,000 kg (42,000 lb) 8 August 1977 Controlled 2 June 1976
Salyut 1 USSR 18,900 kg (41,700 lb) 11 October 1971 Controlled 19 April 1971
Salyut 3 USSR 18,900 kg (41,700 lb) 24 January 1975 Controlled 25 June 1974
Salyut 4 USSR 18,900 kg (41,700 lb) 2 February 1977 Controlled 26 December 1974
Apollo SA-5 Nose Cone USA 17,100 kg (37,700 lb) 30 April 1966 Uncontrolled
Apollo SA-6 CSM BP-13 USA 16,900 kg (37,300 lb) 1 June 1964 Uncontrolled
Apollo SA-7 CSM BP-15 USA 16,650 kg (36,710 lb) 22 September 1964 Uncontrolled
Cosmos 929 USSR 15,000 kg (33,000 lb) 2 February 1978 Controlled 17 July 1977
Cosmos 1443 USSR 15,000 kg (33,000 lb) 19 September 1983 Controlled
CGRO[3] USA 14,910 kg (32,870 lb) 4 June 2000 Controlled
Phobos-Grunt[4] Russia 13,500 kg (29,800 lb) 15 January 2012 Uncontrolled 9 November 2011
Pegasus 1 USA 10,297 kg (22,701 lb) [5] 17 September 1978[6] Uncontrolled 16 February 1965.[7]
Pegasus 2 USA 9,058 kg (19,969 lb)[5] 3 November 1979[6] Uncontrolled 25 May 1965.[7]
UARS[8] NASA 5,900 kg (13,000 lb) 24 September 2011 (&&&&&&&&&&&0731720 years) Uncontrolled 12 September 1991
ROSAT[9] DLR 2,400 kg (5,300 lb) 23 October 2011 (&&&&&&&&&&&0781421 years) Uncontrolled 1 June 1990

Note: launch date is based on the launch of the first component.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Largest Objects to Reenter". Center for Orbital and Reentry Debris Studies. 
  2. ^ Orbiting Debris: A Space Environmental Problem-Background Paper (OTA-BP-ISC-72 ed.). U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment. October 1990. 
  3. ^ a b c Larsen, Francis Lyall, Paul B. (2009). Space law : a treatise ([Online-Ausg.]. ed.). Farnham, Surrey, England: Ashgate. pp. 114–121. ISBN 0-7546-4390-5. 
  4. ^ Amos, Jonathan (15 January 2012). "Phobos-Grunt: Failed probe 'falls over Pacific'". BBC. 
  5. ^ a b "World Civil Satellites 1957-2006". Space Security Index. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  6. ^ a b McDowell, Jonathan. "Satellite Catalog". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  7. ^ a b McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 20 December 2010. 
  8. ^ Justin Mullins, Paul Marks (20 September 2011). "Hardy 6-tonne satellite falls to Earth". New Scientist. Retrieved 25 September 2014. "This is the largest NASA satellite to come back uncontrolled for quite a while," says Nick Johnson, chief scientist for NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. 
  9. ^ Paul Marks (23 September 2011). "Second big satellite set to resist re-entry burn-up". New Scientist. Retrieved 25 September 2014.