Lieutenant Governor of New Mexico

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Lt. Governor of the State of New Mexico
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Incumbent
John Sanchez

since January 1, 2011
Term length Four years
Formation 1912
First holder Ezequiel Cabeza De Baca
Website Lieutenant Governor of New Mexico
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This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
New Mexico

The Lieutenant Governor of New Mexico is an elected official in the state of New Mexico that ranks just below the Governor of New Mexico. The Lieutenant Governor is the first person in the order of succession of New Mexico's executive branch, thus serving as Governor in the event of the death, resignation, removal, impeachment, absence from the state, or incapacity due to illness of the Governor of New Mexico. The lieutenant governor is elected on a ticket with the governor for a four-year term. This position was first filled by Ezequiel Cabeza De Baca on January 6, 1912, the year that New Mexico became a state.

The current Lieutenant Governor is John Sanchez, who was elected in 2010 with Governor Susana Martinez. His term is scheduled to last until 2015.

While governor and lieutenant governor are elected on the same ticket in the general election, the offices run separately in primary elections. The last lieutenant governor to succeed the governorship was Tom Bolack, following the resignation of Edwin L. Mechem on November 30, 1962. Ezequiel Cabeza De Baca is the only lieutenant governor to successfully be elected as governor in a later term.

Previously, the New Mexico State Constitution did not allow for the nomination of a replacement for Lieutenant Governor after the Governor's office was succeeded; this is the reason the Governor number is higher than the Lieutenant Governor. Section 16 of Article VI of the New Mexico State Constitution (added on November 4, 2008) gives the Governor the power to nominate a replacement for Lieutenant Governor upon confirmation of the nominee by a majority of the New Mexico State Senate.

List of Lieutenant Governors of New Mexico[edit]

Since admission into the Union, New Mexico has had 27 lieutenant governors, two of whom have served non-consecutive terms.[1]

      Democratic       Republican

# Name Took office Left office Party Governor Years in office
1 Ezequiel Cabeza De Baca January 6, 1912 January 1, 1917 Democrat William C. McDonald 5[note 1]
2 Washington E. Lindsey January 1, 1917 February 18, 1917 Republican Ezequiel Cabeza De Baca 1 16[note 2]
vacant February 18, 1917 January 1, 1919 Washington E. Lindsey
3 Benjamin F. Pankey January 1, 1919 January 1, 1921 Republican Octaviano Ambrosio Larrazolo 2
4 William H. Duckworth January 1, 1921 January 1, 1923 Republican Merritt C. Mechem 2
5 José A. Baca January 1, 1923 May 1924 Democrat James F. Hinkle 1 13[note 3]
vacant May 1924 January 1, 1925 James F. Hinkle
6 Edward G. Sargent January 1, 1925 January 1, 1929 Republican Arthur T. Hannett 4
Richard C. Dillon
7 Hugh B. Woodward January 1, 1929 July 1929 Republican Richard C. Dillon 12[note 4]
vacant July 1929 January 1, 1931 Richard C. Dillon
8 Andrew W. Hockenhull January 1, 1931 September 25, 1933 Democrat Arthur Seligman 2 34[note 5]
vacant September 25, 1933 January 1, 1935 Andrew W. Hockenhull
9 Louis Cabeza de Baca January 1, 1935 January 1, 1937 Democrat Clyde Tingley 2
10 Hiram M. Dow January 1, 1937 January 1, 1939 Democrat Clyde Tingley 2
11 James Murray, Sr. January 1, 1939 January 1, 1941 Democrat John E. Miles 2
12 Ceferino Quintana January 1, 1941 January 1, 1943 Democrat John E. Miles 2
13 James B. Jones January 1, 1943 January 1, 1947 Democrat John J. Dempsey 4
14 Joseph Montoya January 1, 1947 January 1, 1951 Democrat Thomas J. Mabry 4
15 Tibo J. Chávez January 1, 1951 January 1, 1955 Democrat Edwin L. Mechem 4
16 Joseph Montoya January 1, 1955 April 1957 Democrat John F. Simms 2 13[note 6]
Edwin L. Mechem
vacant April 1957 January 1, 1959 Edwin L. Mechem
17 Ed V. Mead January 1, 1959 January 1, 1961 Democrat John Burroughs 2
18 Tom Bolack January 1, 1961 November 30, 1962 Democrat Edwin L. Mechem 1 56[note 7]
vacant November 30, 1962 January 1, 1963 Tom Bolack
19 Mack Easley January 1, 1963 January 1, 1967 Democrat Jack M. Campbell 4
20 Elias Lee Francis III January 1, 1967 January 1, 1971 Republican David Cargo 4
21 Roberto Mondragón January 1, 1971 January 1, 1975 Democrat Bruce King 4
22 Robert E. Ferguson January 1, 1975 January 1, 1979 Democrat Jerry Apodaca 4
23 Roberto Mondragón January 1, 1979 January 1, 1983 Democrat Bruce King 4
24 Mike Runnels January 1, 1983 January 1, 1987 Democrat Toney Anaya 4
25 Jack L. Stahl January 1, 1987 January 1, 1991 Republican Garrey Carruthers 4
26 Casey Luna January 1, 1991 January 1, 1995 Democrat Bruce King 4
27 Walter D. Bradley January 1, 1995 January 1, 2003 Republican Gary Johnson 8
28 Diane D. Denish January 1, 2003 January 1, 2011 Democrat Bill Richardson 8[note 8]
29 John A. Sanchez January 1, 2011 Incumbent Republican Susana Martinez

Living former lieutenant governors[edit]

As of October 2013, seven former lieutenant governors were alive. The most recent death of a former lieutenant governor was that of Mack Easley (1963–1967), on March 1, 2006.

Lt. Governor Lt. Gubernatorial term Date of birth
Robert E. Ferguson 1975–1979
Roberto Mondragón 1971–1975, 1979–1983 (1940-07-27) July 27, 1940 (age 74)
Mike Runnels 1983–1987
Jack L. Stahl 1987–1991
Casey Luna 1991–1995
Walter D. Bradley 1995–2003 (1946-10-30) October 30, 1946 (age 67)
Diane D. Denish 2003–2011 (1949-03-07) March 7, 1949 (age 65)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Since the first state election was in an odd-numbered year (1911), the term lasted five years.
  2. ^ Succeeded Governor Ca. de Baca on February 18, 1917 after the Governor's death.
  3. ^ Died in office in May 1924.
  4. ^ Resigned in July 1929 to accept a U.S. Attorneyship.
  5. ^ Succeeded Governor Seligman on September 25, 1933 after the Governor's death.
  6. ^ Resigned in April 1957 to serve as U.S. Representative.
  7. ^ Succeeded Governor Mechem on November 30, 1962 after the Governor's resignation.
  8. ^ First female Lieutenant Governor of New Mexico.

References[edit]

  1. ^ State of New Mexico (July 2012). Kathryn A. Flynn, ed. 2012 Centennial Blue Book. Diana J. Duran. Office of the New Mexico Secretary of State. pp. 218–219.