List of magical weapons

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

This is a list of magical weapons from fiction and folklore. A magical weapon is one that is directly described as such in the work; or one that has obvious fantastic or supernatural qualities.

In folklore[edit]

Islamic mythology[edit]

Norse mythology[edit]

Irish mythology[edit]

  • Fragarach – Sword of the god of the seas Manannan mac Lir and later Lugh in Irish legend; it was said to be a weapon that no armour could stop.
  • Caladbolg – Two-handed sword of Fergus mac Róich in Irish legend; said to make a circle like an arc of rainbow when swung, and to have the power to cleave the tops from the hills.
  • Moralltach (Great Fury) – a highly lethal sword belonging to Aengus, which left no stroke or blow unfinished at the first trial. Aoegus eventually gave to his foster-son Diarmuid Ua Duibhne along with a second sword of less power, the Beagalltach (Little Fury).
  • Gáe Buide and Gáe Derg – Spears of Diarmuid Ua Duibhne, given to him by Aengus. The yellow spear Gáe Buide was said to inflict wounds from which none could recover; the red spear Gáe Derg can destroy any magic that touches its head.
  • Claíomh Solais – Sword of Nuada, the king of the gods in Irish mythology; in legend, the sword glowed with the light of the sun and was irresistible in battle, having the power to cut his enemies in half.
  • Gáe Bulg – Spear of Cúchulainn; made from the bones of a sea monster.
  • Spear of Lugh – Spear of Lugh, the champion of the gods in Irish mythology.

Arthurian legend[edit]

The Song of Roland[edit]

Japanese folklore[edit]

  • Ame-no-nuboko – Japanese halberd which formed the first island.
  • Kusanagi – Legendary Japanese sword.
  • Tonbogiri – One of three legendary spears created by the famed swordsmith Masazane. It is said to be so sharp that a dragonfly landing on the edge would be instantly cut in half. This is the origin of the name.
  • Honjo Masamune - A legendary and very real Japanese sword (with alleged mythical abilities), created by Japan's greatest swordsmith, Goro Nyudo Masamune. The Masamune sword is by far the most referenced Japanese sword in popular fiction, ranging through books, movies and computer games.

Spanish folklore[edit]

In novels[edit]

The works of J. R. R. Tolkien[edit]

  • Anglachel – One of the two swords forged by Eöl the Dark Elf out of a black iron meteorite. It is said to be able to cleave any iron from within the earth. Anglachel appears to be a sentient sword that speaks on occasion and has some will of its own.[4]
  • Glamdring, Orcrist and Sting – High-Elven swords; glow with a blue or white flame when Orcs are near. These are obtained during the events of The Hobbit and are carried respectively by Gandalf, Thorin Oakenshield and Bilbo Baggins. Sting is later passed onto the latter's nephew Frodo Baggins.[5]
  • Morgul-blade – Magical poisoned dagger wielded by Nazgûl.[5]
  • Caudimordax – This sword cannot be sheathed when a dragon comes within five miles of its bearer's presence.[6]
  • Andúril/Narsil – The sword of Elendil used to cut the One Ring from Sauron (Narsil) reforged several ages later by Elrond (Andúril); the reforging of the shards was foretold as a sign of the coming of the true King of Gondor.
  • Aiglos – The spear with which the Elven king Gil-galad went to war.

The works of Michael Moorcock[edit]

In comics and graphic novels[edit]

While Homestuck features innumerable magical weapons, three stand out:

  • Caledfwlch, Dave Strider's white longsword. Said to be the only weapon capable of hurting main antagonist Lord English.
  • The Warhammer of Zillyhoo, an immensely powerful hammer wielded by main protagonist John Egbert.
  • Thorns of Oglogoth, a pair of magic wands, channeling the power of the Horrorterrors (monstrous gods strongly resembling those of H. P. Lovecraft), wielded by Rose Lalonde. The exact power of the Thorns is unknown, but they were once used to blow up a computer located in another universe.

In role-playing games[edit]

Dungeons & Dragons[edit]

Dungeons & Dragons is a fantasy role-playing game with many unique magical weapons.

In video and computer games[edit]

Magic weapons are a staple of fantasy video games.

  • Sword of Aeons - Fable.
  • Avo's Tear - Fable. An ancient sword said to be as powerful as the legendary Sword of Aeons. This Sword was imbued with extraordinary power when the Guild Mage Solcius used it in a spell to close a large vortex.
  • Arondight - Fate/Zero Lancelot's sword, counterpart to Excalibur, crafted by the fairies (妖精 Yousei?).
  • Umbra - The Elder Scrolls. An immensely powerful, black-bladed sword that is occasionally given to mortals by the immortal Daedric prankster, Clavicus Vile. It can only pass from one mortal to another if the inheritor kills the former owner in single combat.
  • Sword of Hisou (Sword of Scarlet Perceptions) - Touhou Project Tenshi Hinanai's sword, one that only Celestials can use. When paired with a keystone, she can manipulate the sky, people, and the earth.

In cartoons[edit]

Magical weapons by type[edit]

Other legendary weapons[edit]

Some weapons in fiction do not, strictly speaking, have magical properties, but are forged with materials or methods that are unique in the context of the story.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Cantar de mio Cid. Edition of Alberto Montaner. Ed. Galaxia Gutenberg, 2007.
  2. ^ Florus. Epitomae, II.
  3. ^ Charles Kingsley (2007). "How Hereward was Outlawed". Hereward the Wake (Vol I). Wildside Press. p. 67. ISBN 978-1-4344-9091-9. ...one of those magic weapons, brought, men know not how, out of the magic East, which were hereditary in many a Norse family, and sung of in many a Norse saga. 
  4. ^ The Silmarillion, J. R. R. Tolkien
  5. ^ a b The Lord of the Rings, J. R. R. Tolkien
  6. ^ Farmer Giles of Ham, J. R. R. Tolkien
  7. ^ Lopez, Miguel (Jun 17, 2000). "Crystalis Review for Game Boy Color". Gamespot. 
  8. ^ Rossi, Matthew (Mar 14, 2008). "Behold Frostmourne!". Joystiq. 
  9. ^ Ziebart, Alex (Aug 14, 2008). "Know Your Lore: The Ashbringer". joystiq. 
  10. ^ Navarro, Alex (Mar 21, 2005). "God of War Review for PlayStation 2". Gamespot. 
  11. ^ Hendershot, Heather (1998). "Toys, TV and Toaster Pictures". Saturday morning censors: television regulation before the V-chip. Duke University Press. p. 97. 
  12. ^ "Did Guan Yu Actually Use the Green Dragon Crescent Blade?". Cultural China. Retrieved 2010-02-22.