List of mayors of Richmond, Virginia

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Mayor of Richmond
Richmondseal.png
Seal of the City of Richmond
Incumbent
Dwight C. Jones

since January 1, 2009
Style The Honorable
Term length Four years (since 2005)
Inaugural holder William Foushee, Sr.
Formation July 2, 1782
Website Office of the Mayor

The Mayor of Richmond is the chief executive of the government of Richmond, Virginia, as stipulated by the city's charter.

This list includes mayors who were appointed by the Richmond City Council as well as those who were elected by popular vote.

The current Mayor of Richmond, (and 79th in the sequence of regular mayors), is Democrat Dwight C. Jones, a Baptist pastor and former member of the Virginia House of Delegates. First elected in 2008, he won a second term in November 2012.[1]

History[edit]

Richmond's original City Hall building, used from 1814 to 1874

The City of Richmond was founded in 1737 by William Byrd II.

In May of 1782, Virginia General Assembly expressed desire to move inland, to a place less exposed to British incursions than Williamsburg. Richmond had been made the temporary capital after urging from Thomas Jefferson years earlier, and it was soon decided to make the move permanent.

Two months later, on July 2nd, a charter was written up, and the city was incorporated. Twelve men were to be elected from the City at-large and were to select one of their own to act as Mayor, another to serve as Recorder and four to serve as Aldermen. The remaining six were to serve as members of the Common Council. All positions had term limits of three years, with the exception of the mayor who could only serve one year consecutively. A vote was held at a meeting the following day, and Dr. William Foushee, Sr. was chosen as the first mayor.

In March 1851, the decision was made to replace the original Richmond City Charter. It was decided that all city officials were to be popularly elected. After the twelve year tenure of William Lambert and his short-term replacement by recorder Samuel C. Pulliam, elections were held, with Joseph C. Mayo coming out on top.

Mayo was deposed in April of 1865, weeks before the end of the American Civil War, when Union forces captured the city.

The system set forth by the Second City Charter worked as long as the City was small and most voters knew personally, the qualifications of the men for whom they were voting and the requirements for the jobs to which they were elected.

List of mayors[edit]

Appointed mayors (1782-1853)[edit]

Picture Name Political Party Term start Term end
1 William Foushee crop.jpg William Foushee, Sr. No party July 3, 1782 June 30, 1783
2 No image.svg John J. Beckley No party July 1, 1783 July 6, 1784
3 No image.svg Robert Mitchell No party July 7, 1784 1785
4 No image.svg John Harvie No party 1785 1786
5 No image.svg William Pennock No party December 10, 1786 1786
6 No image.svg Richard Adams, Jr. No party 1786 February 21, 1788
7 No image.svg John J. Beckley No party February 22, 1788 March 9, 1789
8 No image.svg Alexander McRobert No party March 10, 1789 March 9, 1790
9 No image.svg Robert Boyd March 10, 1790 1790
10 No image.svg George Nicolson 1790 December 12, 1790
11 No image.svg Robert Mitchell December 13, 1790 1791
12 No image.svg John Barrett 1791 1792
13 No image.svg Robert Mitchell 1792 1793
14 No image.svg John Barrett 1793 1794
15 No image.svg Robert Mitchell 1794 1795
16 No image.svg Andrew Dunscomb 1795 1796
17 No image.svg Robert Mitchell 1796 1797
18 No image.svg James McClurg 1797 1798
19 No image.svg John Barrett 1798 1799
20 No image.svg George Nicholson 1799 1800
21 No image.svg James McClurg 1800 1801
22 No image.svg William Richardson 1801 1802
23 No image.svg John Foster 1802 1803
24 No image.svg James McClurg 1803 1804
25 No image.svg Robert Mitchell 1804 1805
26 No image.svg William DuVal 1805 1806
27 No image.svg Edward Carrington 1806 1810
28 No image.svg David Bullock 1810 1811
29 No image.svg Benjamin Tate 1811 1812
30 No image.svg Thomas Wilson 1812 1813
31 No image.svg John Greenhow 1813 1814
32 No image.svg Thomas Wilson 1814 1815
33 No image.svg Robert Gamble 1815 1816
34 No image.svg Thomas Wilson 1816 1817
35 No image.svg William H. Fitzwhylson 1817 1818
36 No image.svg Thomas Wilson 1818 May 4, 1818
37 No image.svg Francis Wicker (acting) May 5, 1818 1819
38 No image.svg John Adams 1819 1826
39 No image.svg Joseph Tate 1826 1839
40 No image.svg Francis Wicker 1839 1840
41 No image.svg William Lambert Democratic 1840 March 24, 1852
42 No image.svg Samuel C. Pulliam Democratic March 25, 1852 1853


Popularly-elected mayors (1853-1948)[edit]

Picture Name Political Party Term start Term end
43 No image.svg Joseph C. Mayo Democratic 1853 April 3, 1865
Fall of Richmond (April 3, 1865) - City under federal authority until appointment of David Saunders as mayor
44 No image.svg David J. Saunders, Sr. Democratic July 3, 1865 April 6, 1866
45 No image.svg Joseph C. Mayo Democratic April 7, 1866 May 4, 1868
46 No image.svg George Chahoon Republican May 6, 1868 March 15, 1870
47 No image.svg Henry K. Ellyson[note 1] Democratic March 16, 1870 June 30, 1871
48 No image.svg Anthony M. Keiley Democratic July 1, 1871 1876
49 No image.svg William C. Carrington Democratic 1876 1888
50 No image.svg James Taylor Ellyson Democratic 1888 1894
51 No image.svg Richard M. Taylor Democratic 1894 1904
52 No image.svg Carlton McCarthy Democratic September 1, 1904 August 31, 1908
53 No image.svg David C. Richardson Democratic September 1, 1908 September 3, 1912
54 No image.svg George Ainslie Democratic September 4, 1912 1924
55 No image.svg John Fulmer Bright Democratic 1924 1940
56 No image.svg Gordon Barbour Ambler Democratic 1940 1944
57 No image.svg William C. Herbert Democratic 1944 September 10, 1946
58 No image.svg Horace H. Edwards Democratic September 11, 1946 1948


City Council appointed mayors (1948-2005)[edit]

Picture Name Political Party Term start Term end
59 No image.svg W. Stirling King Democratic 1948 1950
60 No image.svg T. Nelson Parker Democratic 1950 1952
61 No image.svg Edward E. Haddock Democratic 1952 1954
62 No image.svg Thomas P. Bryan Democratic 1954 1956
63 No image.svg F. Henry Garber Democratic 1956 1958
64 No image.svg A. Scott Anderson Democratic 1958 1960
65 No image.svg Claude W. Woodward Democratic 1960 1962
66 No image.svg Eleanor P. Sheppard[note 2] Democratic July 1, 1962 June 30, 1964
67 No image.svg Morrill Martin Crowe Democratic July 1, 1964 June 30, 1968
68 No image.svg Philip J. Bagley, Jr. Democratic July 1, 1968 June 30, 1970
69 No image.svg Thomas J. Bliley, Jr. Democratic July 1, 1970 March 7, 1977[note 3]
70 No image.svg Henry L. Marsh, III[note 4] Democratic March 8, 1977 June 30, 1982
71 No image.svg Roy A. West Democratic July 1, 1982 June 30, 1988
72 No image.svg Geline B. Williams Republican July 1, 1988 June 30, 1990
73 No image.svg Walter T. Kenney, Sr. Democratic July 1, 1990 June 30, 1994
74 No image.svg Leonidas B. Young, II Democratic July 1, 1994 June 30, 1996
75 No image.svg Larry E. Chavis Democratic July 1, 1996 June 30, 1998
76 No image.svg Timothy M. Kaine Democratic July 1, 1998 September 10, 2001
77 No image.svg Rudolph C. McCollum, Jr. Democratic September 11, 2001 January 1, 2005


Popularly-elected mayors (since 2005)[edit]

Picture Name Political Party Term start Term end
78 No image.svg L. Douglas Wilder Democratic January 2, 2005 January 1, 2009
79 No image.svg Dwight C. Jones Democratic January 1, 2009 Incumbent


Notes[edit]

  1. ^ After Ellyson was elected, Mayor Chahoon challenged the new administration's legitimacy and refused to step down. The courts ruled in Ellyson's favor. See The Bloody Interregnum.
  2. ^ Sheppard was the first female City Council member in Richmond as well as the first female mayor.
  3. ^ Between 1972 and 1976, city council elections were not held by order of the United States Department of Justice. See City of Richmond v. United States.
  4. ^ Marsh was the first African-American mayor of Richmond.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Voters re-elect mayor, shake up Richmond's City Council". NBC12. November 16, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2013. 

External links[edit]