List of members of the Irish Republican Army

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This article is about members of the Irish Republican Army since 1916/1917. For earlier groups such as the Irish Republican Brotherhood, see List of members of the Irish Republican Brotherhood.

This is a list of members of the Irish Republican Army.

Easter Rising and Irish War of Independence: 1916-1922

A

B

  • Richard Barrett (1899–1922), Irish Republican officer who was executed by the Free State during the following Civil War.
  • Kevin Barry (1902–1920)
  • Tom Barry (1897–1980), a prominent figure on the Irish Republican Army during the Irish War of Independence and the Irish Civil War. Although fighting with Anti-Treaty forces, he was briefly expelled from the organisation until the 1930s and was later involved in politics and writing.
  • Piaras Béaslaí (1881–1965), a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood who participated in the infiltration of the Gaelic League and fought in the Easter Rising and Irish War of Independence. He was later involved in the Sinn Féin political party and writing.
  • Dan Breen (1894–1969), an early member of the Irish Volunteers and served as leader of the Irish Republican Army during the Irish War of Independence. He would later become a prominent figure in Fianna Fáil.
  • George Brent (1899–1979), an American actor who acted as a courier during Irish War of Independence.
  • Eamon Broy (1887–1972), an officer in the Dublin Metropolitan Police acting as a double agent during Irish War of Independence. He later served as Garda Commissioner during the mid-1930s.
  • Cathal Brugha (1874–1922), former British soldier active in the Easter Rising, the Anglo-Irish War, and the Irish Civil War.

C

  • Charles Carrigan (1882–1916), a member of the Irish Republican Brotherhood and served as Chairman of Sinn Féin’s first cumann in Scotland before his death during the Easter Rising.
  • Robert Erskine Childers (1870–1922), British author involved in gunrunning and later member of Sinn Féin. Secretary-general of the Irish delegation during negotiation of the Anglo-Irish Treaty.
  • Joe Clarke (1882–1976), remained active in Sinn Féin until his death.
  • Michael Collins (1890–1922), Director of Intelligence for the IRA during the Irish War of Independence and served as Commander-In-Chief of the Irish National Army
  • Andy Cooney (d. 1968), a member of the Third Battalion of the Dublin Brigade and a suspected participant in the execution of the Cairo Gang
  • Timothy Coughlin (d. 1928), a member of the Dublin Brigade during the War of Independence who assassinated the Vice President of the Executive Council, Kevin O'Higgins.

D

F

  • Stephen Fuller (d. 1984), a member of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) during the Irish War of Independence and fought with Anti-Treaty forces during the Irish Civil War (1922–23). He would later serve as a member of Fianna Fáil during the 1930s.

G

  • Bill Gannon
  • George Gilmore
  • Joseph Guilfoyle [2] (1897–1973) Joined the Irish Volunteers in 1913 at The Rotunda. Fought during Easter Week 1916 at Boland's Mill under Commandant Éamonn de Valera's Third Battalion, "B" Company.

H

K

  • Sean P. Keating (1903–1976) Irish Republican Army member who fought for Anti-Treaty forces during Irish Civil War, later became Deputy Mayor of New York City.

L

M

O

P

Q

R

S

T

The Official Irish Republican Army & Post-Independence: 1922-present

This list includes members of the Provisional IRA as well as subsequent splinter groups including the Continuity IRA and the Real IRA.

A

B

C

D

F

G

H

J

K

L

M

O

P

Q

R

S

T

W

Irish Republican Army: 1969-present

A

B

  • John Bateson (1 October 1951 - 18 December 1971) [14]
  • Thomas Begley (1970–1993), member of the Belfast Brigade; blew himself up in the Shankill Road bombing which killed nine other people.
  • Ivor Bell
  • Christopher Black,[16] Supergrass (informer)
  • Peter Blake[14] Born 8 August 1952 at Benares Street, Belfast. Whilst returning from an IRA training camp, in October 1970, Blake's car was involved in an incident with a British Army vehicle near Dungannon, County Tyrone in which both Blake and fellow member/Volunteer, Tom McGoldrick were killed.
  • Patrick "Mooch" Blair, convicted bombmaker of the IRA South Armagh Brigade[17]
  • Stephen Blake [15]
  • Séanna Breathnach
  • Patrick Brennan, convicted of social welfare fraud.[18]
  • Charles Breslin
  • Rosena Brown (b. 1945), Belfast actress and IRA Intelligence Officer. Was named in 1990 murder trial of Maze prison officer John Hanna. Received a 20-year prison sentence in 1993 after a booby-trap bomb was found in her possession.[19]

C

D

E

F

G

H

J

K

  • Michael Kane[14] Born January 1935, Kane's grandfather Jack Coogan was a Volunteer in the Irish Republican Army during the Irish War of Independence who was killed in Valentine Street, Belfast in the 1920s. Kane joined the IRA in 1969 and was killed while of active service on 4 September 1970 near Newforge Lane, Belfast. Kane was the second member of the 3rd Battalion of the Belfast Brigade to be killed during The Troubles.
  • Brian Keenan
  • Gerry Kelly
  • Sean Kelly

L

M

N

O

P

Q

R

S

  • Bobby Sands (1954–1981), a member of the Provisional IRA later elected as a Member of Parliament during the 1981 Irish Hunger Strike at Long Kesh.
  • Seán Savage (1965–1988), a member of the Provisional IRA killed by members of the British Special Air Service (SAS) during Operation Flavius.
  • Freddie Scappaticci (b. 1946), an alleged member of the Provisional IRA who is supposed to have acted as double agent under the alias Stakeknife.
  • Gerald Small [15]
  • Neil Smith, convicted of IRA membership in 2012, was one of five men arrested after gardaí stopped a cars near Dundalk, Co Louth, on August 8, 2010. In a search, they found a sawn-off shotgun loaded with two cartridges, a balaclava and a Hallowe’en mask.[44]
  • Frank Stagg (1948–1976), a member of the Provisional Irish Republican Army who participated in several hunger strikes after his imprisonment in 1973 and later died during a hunger strike at Wakefield Prison.
  • Kathy Stanton, a former member of the Provisional IRA, she was formerly imprisoned as a political prisoner and later served as a member of the Sinn Féin of the Northern Ireland Assembly in North Belfast from 2003 until 2007.
  • Jimmy Steele (b. 1907-1970), fought during the Irish War of Independence as a member of the Fianna and remained active with the republican movement until his death in August 1970
  • Bobby Storey, recruiter of the Provisional IRA in Belfast and suspected head of intelligence to the IRA Army Council.

T

  • Seamus Twomey (1911–1989), served twice as Chief of Staff for the Provisional IRA.
  • Gerard Tuite, senior IRA figure in the late 1970s/early 1980s.

Y

References

  1. ^ "Four To Be Hanged For Irish Ambush; Fifth Prisoner Convicted by Court-Martial Gets Life Sentence on Account of His Age". New York Times. 12 March 1921
  2. ^ Caulfield, Max. The Easter Rebellion. ISBN 0-7171-2293
  3. ^ Laffan, Michael. The Resurrection of Ireland: The Sinn Féin Party, 1916-1923. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. ISBN 0-521-65073-9
  4. ^ Hopkinson, Michael. The Irish War of Independence. Dublin: McGill-Queen's Press-MQUP, 2002. ISBN 0-7735-2840-7
  5. ^ Bew, Paul. Conflict and Conciliation in Ireland, 1890-1910: Parnellites and Radical Agrarians. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987. ISBN 0-19-822758-2
  6. ^ Neligan, David. The Spy in the Castle. London: MacGibbon & Kee, 1968.
  7. ^ Campbell, Joseph and Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin. As I Was Among Captives': Joseph Campbell's Prison Diary, 1922-1923. Cork: Cork University Press, 2001. ISBN 1-85918-271-2
  8. ^ Hart, Peter. The I.R.A. at War 1916-1923. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.
  9. ^ Harrington, Sean. Reminiscences of Sean Harrington: War of Independence Veteran. CBL Services Ltd, 2006.
  10. ^ Coogan, Tim Pat. The IRA. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002. ISBN 0-312-29416-6
  11. ^ Maguire, John (2004). "Internment, the IRA and the Lawless Case in Ireland: 1957-61." (pdf). Journal of the Oxford History Society. Retrieved 2007-05-17. [dead link]
  12. ^ Staunton, Enda. The Nationalists of Northern Ireland 1918-1973. Dublin: Columba Press, 2001. ISBN 1-85607-328-9
  13. ^ Geraghty, Tony. The Irish War: The Hidden Conflict Between the IRA and British Intelligence. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. ISBN 0-8018-7117-4
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Tírghrá, National Commemoration Centre, 2002. PB ISBN 0-9542946-0-2
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i Don Malhi (2004-11-21). "Brum's IRA Bombers". Birmingham Metro. Retrieved 2007-07-21. 
  16. ^ "1983: IRA members jailed for 4,000 years". BBC. Retrieved 2011-12-27. 
  17. ^ "IRA bomb-maker offers to take lie-detector test at tribunal". The Irish Times. 30 November 2011. Retrieved 30 November 2011. 
  18. ^ "Dad of six previously convicted of IRA membership avoids jail sentence for social welfare fraud". The Irish Independent. 5 June 2014. Retrieved 7 June 2014. 
  19. ^ CAIN: Peter Heathwood Collection of Television Programmes - 1993 - BBC Northern Ireland News 10 September 1993
  20. ^ http://www.southarmaghmemorialgarden.com/fergalcaraher.htm
  21. ^ http://www.anphoblacht.com/news/detail/22942
  22. ^ a b Sutton, Malcolm (2003-12-08). "CAIN: Sutton Index of Deaths". CAIN Web Service. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
  23. ^ "Former IRA bomb-maker testifies of his guilt over Bloody Sunday". Associated Press. 2003-12-08. Retrieved 2007-04-11. 
  24. ^ Eamonn McCann (23 October 2005). "Herrema's kidnapper explains motive". The Sunday Tribune. Retrieved 2007-04-20. 
  25. ^ "1975: IRA kidnappers release industrialist". BBC. 7 November 1975. Retrieved 2007-04-20. 
  26. ^ "Last vote from dying IRA chief; he backs Adams in election". The Mirror (London). Maurice Fitzmaurice. 2 March 2011
  27. ^ a b Toolis, Kevin. Rebel Hearts: Journeys Within the IRA's Soul. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1995. ISBN 0-312-15632-4
  28. ^ "Female assassin gets life for murder of innocent van driver". The Irish Times. 2013-04-10. Retrieved 2013-04-13. 
  29. ^ a b c "Irish Republican Army Roll of Honour 1969-2003". Burns Moley Cumann. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
  30. ^ O'Rawe, Richard (2005). Blanketmen. New Island. pp. 103–104. ISBN 1-904301-67-3. 
  31. ^ "Mystery behind how IRA hunger striker built his property empire". Irish Independent. 20 October 2011. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  32. ^ "Priory Hall developer wins reprieve". The Irish Times. 17 November 2011. Retrieved 24 November 2011. 
  33. ^ "Dublin City Sheriff seizes Tom McFeely's Ballsbridge home". RTÉ. 10 August 2012. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  34. ^ "CAB probes €140,000 find in Tom McFeely house". Irish Independent. 21 September 2013. Retrieved 21 September 2013. 
  35. ^ "An Problacht: Notices". AnPhoblacht.com. 2006-06-29. Retrieved 2007-05-19. 
  36. ^ "Shoot Them Down Before Tea". TIME Magazine. 1973-07-13. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
  37. ^ Gibney, Jim (2002-04-18). "The Wall of Freedom". Republican-News.org. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
  38. ^ "Irish Northern Aid Philadelphia IRA Roll of Honor". Noraid.org. 2000. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
  39. ^ McDonald, Henry (2002-10-29). "True tale of IRA 'martyrs' revealed". The Observer. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
  40. ^ Sutton, Malcolm (2000). "CAIN: Sutton Index of Deaths". CAIN Web Service. Retrieved 2007-05-17. 
  41. ^ De Baróid, Ciarán. Bally Murphy & the Irish War. London: Pluto Press, 1990.
  42. ^ Wood, Ian S. Crimes of Loyalty: A History of the UDA. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006. ISBN 0-7486-2427-9
  43. ^ "An Phoblacht/Republican News". Republican-News.org. 1999-07-15. Retrieved 2007-05-19. 
  44. ^ "Potential champion powerlifter guilty of IRA membership". The Irish Times. 14 December 2012. Retrieved 14 December 2012.