List of mills in Manchester

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This is a list of the cotton and other textile mills in Manchester, England.

Mills[edit]

Name Owners Location Built Demolished Served
(Years)
Albany Works  SD 882 007 53°30′11″N 2°10′44″W / 53.503°N 2.179°W / 53.503; -2.179 (Albany Works)[1]
Albert Mill  SJ 875 941 53°26′38″N 2°11′24″W / 53.444°N 2.190°W / 53.444; -2.190 (Albert Mill)[1]
Albion Mill Pollard Street, Ancoats ,  53°28′45″N 2°13′14″W / 53.4793°N 2.2206°W / 53.4793; -2.2206 (Albert Mill)[2]
Alexandre Works  SD 855 022 53°30′58″N 2°13′12″W / 53.516°N 2.220°W / 53.516; -2.220 (Alexandre Works)[1]
Anchor Works  SD 845 013 53°30′29″N 2°14′06″W / 53.508°N 2.235°W / 53.508; -2.235 (Anchor Works)[1]
Aquatite Mills  SJ 839 999 53°29′46″N 2°14′38″W / 53.496°N 2.244°W / 53.496; -2.244 (Aquatite Mills)[1]
Ashenhurst Works  SD 847 030 53°31′23″N 2°13′55″W / 53.523°N 2.232°W / 53.523; -2.232 (Ashenhurst Works)[1]
Ashleigh Mills  SD 847 012 53°43′19″N 2°19′12″W / 53.722°N 2.32°W / 53.722; -2.32 (Ashleigh Mills)[1]
Atlantic Works  SD838 000 53°29′46″N 2°14′46″W / 53.496°N 2.246°W / 53.496; -2.246 (Atlantic Works)[1]
Atlas Mills  SJ876 942 53°26′38″N 2°11′17″W / 53.444°N 2.188°W / 53.444; -2.188 (Atlas Mills)[1]
Bank of England Mills  SJ 857 984 53°28′55″N 2°13′01″W / 53.482°N 2.217°W / 53.482; -2.217 (Bank of England Mills)[1]
Beehive Mill Ancoats SJ850987 53°29′06″N 2°13′41″W / 53.485°N 2.228°W / 53.485; -2.228 (Beehive Mill) 1824
Ancoats- Beehive 4469.JPG
Notes: (Room and Power)[3][4]
Bengal Street Block  SJ 851 986 53°29′02″N 2°13′34″W / 53.484°N 2.226°W / 53.484; -2.226 (Bengal Street Block)[5]
Beswick Street Mills  SJ858 985 53°28′59″N 2°12′54″W / 53.483°N 2.215°W / 53.483; -2.215 (Beswick Street Mills)
Ashton-under-Lyne Canal, 1990.jpg
Notes: [1]
Beswick  SJ863 986 53°29′02″N 2°12′29″W / 53.484°N 2.208°W / 53.484; -2.208 (Beswick)[6]
Big Cotton Mill  SJ 876 942 53°26′38″N 2°11′17″W / 53.444°N 2.188°W / 53.444; -2.188 (Big Cotton Mill)[1]
Bowker Bank Works  SD847 030 53°31′23″N 2°13′55″W / 53.523°N 2.232°W / 53.523; -2.232 (Bowker Bank Works)[1]
Bradford Mill  SJ872 986 53°29′02″N 2°11′38″W / 53.484°N 2.194°W / 53.484; -2.194 (Bradford Mill)[1]
Bradford Road Mill  SJ857 986 53°29′02″N 2°13′01″W / 53.484°N 2.217°W / 53.484; -2.217 (Bradford Road Mill)[1]
Bridge Mill  SJ856 985 53°28′59″N 2°13′05″W / 53.483°N 2.218°W / 53.483; -2.218 (Bridge Mill)[1]
Broom House  SJ882 940 53°26′35″N 2°10′44″W / 53.443°N 2.179°W / 53.443; -2.179 (Broom House)[1][3]
Brownsfield Mill Ancoats  SJ849 984 53°28′55″N 2°13′44″W / 53.482°N 2.229°W / 53.482; -2.229 (Brownsfield Mill)
Brownsfield Mill, Ancoats - geograph.org.uk - 715343.jpg
Notes: (Room and power) on Great Ancoats Street, Seven storeys L-shaped formation. In 1910, Verdon Roe established the AV Roe Company manufacturing aeroplanes.[7]
Brunswick Mill Ancoats SJ859 987 53°29′06″N 2°12′50″W / 53.485°N 2.214°W / 53.485; -2.214 (Brunswick Mill) 1840
Notes: Adjacent to the Ashton Canal, it had seven storeys .35 loading bays faced directly onto the canal. It was built by David Bellhouse. In the 1850s it had some 276 carding machines, and 77,000 mule spindles. [3][8]
Cambridge Street India Rubber Works Hugh Birley Chorlton-on-Medlock  SJ837974 53°28′23″N 2°14′49″W / 53.473°N 2.247°W / 53.473; -2.247 (Cambridge Street India Rubber Works) 1814
Macintosh's Mill - geograph.org.uk - 712949.jpg
Notes: The first mill was built in 1814 and had six storeys and two basements with 20 loading bays along Cambridge Street. It was owned by Hugh Birley, infamous for his involvement at Peterloo. It was constructed using cast iron columns and iron framing, in-filled with brickwork. The mill was driven by a beam engine made by Boulton & Watt and used gas lighting; having its own gas storage tanks in the cellars. The several mills on Cambridge Street were interconnected by underground tunnels with rail tracks. By the end of the 1830s, Cambridge Street mill had a 600 loom shed and employed 2,000 people in spinning and weaving.A further block was added in 1845. In the 1860s the mill was sold to Charles Macintosh & Company who produced rubberised waterproofs. The word mackintosh became the generic term for waterproof overcoats [1][3]
Chain Bar Mill  SD882031 53°31′26″N 2°10′44″W / 53.524°N 2.179°W / 53.524; -2.179 (Chain Bar Mill)[1]
Chapeltown Street Mill  SJ851980 53°28′44″N 2°13′34″W / 53.479°N 2.226°W / 53.479; -2.226 (Chapeltown Street Mill)
Chapeltown Street Mills - geograph.org.uk - 715456.jpg
Notes: [1]
Chatham Mill
Runcorn's Mill
Chester Street, Chorlton-on-Medlock  SJ840973 53°28′19″N 2°14′35″W / 53.472°N 2.243°W / 53.472; -2.243 (Chatham Mill
Runcorn's Mill
)
1820
Runcorn's Chatham Mill, Chester Street, Chorlton on Medlock - geograph.org.uk - 712979.jpg
Notes: Built 1820 with an adjoining 1823 built warehouse at right angles. The mill has wooden floors (not fireproof) but the warehouse has iron columns. There is a truncated chimney at the back. [1][3]
Chatsworth Mill  SJ882 961 53°27′43″N 2°10′44″W / 53.462°N 2.179°W / 53.462; -2.179 (Chatsworth Mill)[1]
Chepstow Street Mill  SJ838978 53°28′37″N 2°14′46″W / 53.477°N 2.246°W / 53.477; -2.246 (Chepstow Street Mill)[9]
Chorlton New Mill Birley family Chorlton-on-Medlock
Little Ireland.  SJ838 974 53°28′23″N 2°14′46″W / 53.473°N 2.246°W / 53.473; -2.246 (Chorlton New Mill)
1813
Notes: Most of the site is under the Manchester Metropolitan University buildings. The three multi-storey mills were built in stages in 1813, 1818 and 1845. The complex included mills and associated engine house and a basement level gas works. The steel strapped chimney was built in 1853. [1][3]
Chorlton New Mill (north end) Chorlton-on-Medlock  SJ838 974 53°28′23″N 2°14′46″W / 53.473°N 2.246°W / 53.473; -2.246 (Chorlton New Mill (north end))
Chorlton New Mill - geograph.org.uk - 712931.jpg
Notes: [10]
Chorlton Old Mill
Cambridge Mill
Chorlton-on-Medlock  SJ839 973 53°28′19″N 2°14′38″W / 53.472°N 2.244°W / 53.472; -2.244 (Chorlton Old Mill
Cambridge Mill
)
Cambridge Mill and Chorlton New Mill - geograph.org.uk - 712877.jpg
Notes: [6]
Chorlton Twist Mill  SJ842 973 53°28′19″N 2°14′20″W / 53.472°N 2.239°W / 53.472; -2.239 (Chorlton Twist Mill)[6]
City Corn Mill  SJ851 987 53°29′06″N 2°13′34″W / 53.485°N 2.226°W / 53.485; -2.226 (City Corn Mill)[6]
Clayton Works  SJ879 984 53°28′55″N 2°11′02″W / 53.482°N 2.184°W / 53.482; -2.184 (Clayton Works)[6]
Collyhurst Works  SJ849 998 53°29′42″N 2°13′44″W / 53.495°N 2.229°W / 53.495; -2.229 (Collyhurst Works)[6]
Crumpsall Mill  SD855 021 53°30′54″N 2°13′12″W / 53.515°N 2.220°W / 53.515; -2.220 (Crumpsall Mill)[6]
Culcheth Lane Mill  SD884001 53°29′49″N 2°10′34″W / 53.497°N 2.176°W / 53.497; -2.176 (Culcheth Lane Mill)[6]
Daisy Bank Mill  SD887002 53°29′53″N 2°10′19″W / 53.498°N 2.172°W / 53.498; -2.172 (Daisy Bank Mill)[6]
DeckerMill Ancoats  SJ 851 986 53°29′02″N 2°13′34″W / 53.484°N 2.226°W / 53.484; -2.226 (DeckerMill) Murray Mills
MurraysMillsOldDeckerMill.jpg
Notes: - [5]
Doubling Mill
see Waulk Mill
Ancoats ,  SJ 851 986 53°29′02″N 2°13′34″W / 53.484°N 2.226°W / 53.484; -2.226 (Doubling Mill)[11]
Drinkwater's Mill See
Piccadilly Mill
 SJ 845 979 53°28′41″N 2°14′06″W / 53.478°N 2.235°W / 53.478; -2.235 (Drinkwaters Mill)[6]
Fireproof Mill
see Waulk Mill
Ancoats ,  SJ 851 986 53°29′02″N 2°13′34″W / 53.484°N 2.226°W / 53.484; -2.226 (Fireproof Mill)[6]
Garratt Mill  SJ 843 975 53°28′26″N 2°14′17″W / 53.474°N 2.238°W / 53.474; -2.238 (Garratt Mill)[11]
Gorebrook Works  SJ 875 956 53°27′25″N 2°11′24″W / 53.457°N 2.190°W / 53.457; -2.190 (Gorebrook Works)[6]
Gorton Wadding Works  SJ891 966 53°27′58″N 2°09′58″W / 53.466°N 2.166°W / 53.466; -2.166 (Gorton Wadding Works)[6]
Great Bridgewater Street Mills  SJ837 975 53°28′26″N 2°14′49″W / 53.474°N 2.247°W / 53.474; -2.247 (Great Bridgewater Street Mills)[6]
Great Marlborough Street Mills  SJ840 974 53°28′23″N 2°14′35″W / 53.473°N 2.243°W / 53.473; -2.243 (Great Marlborough Street Mills)[6]
Hanover Mill  SJ 849 976 53°28′30″N 2°13′44″W / 53.475°N 2.229°W / 53.475; -2.229 (Hanover Mill)[6]
Harpurhey Dyeworks  SD854 014 53°30′32″N 2°13′19″W / 53.509°N 2.222°W / 53.509; -2.222 (Harpurhey Dyeworks)[6]
Havelock Mills  SJ 837 975 53°28′26″N 2°14′49″W / 53.474°N 2.247°W / 53.474; -2.247 (Havelock Mills)[6]
Heaton Mills  SD 844 046 53°32′17″N 2°14′13″W / 53.538°N 2.237°W / 53.538; -2.237 (Heaton Mills)[6]
Holt Town Works  SJ 862 986 53°29′02″N 2°12′32″W / 53.484°N 2.209°W / 53.484; -2.209 (Holt Town Works)[6]
Hope Mills Ancoats ,  SJ 857 985 53°28′59″N 2°13′01″W / 53.483°N 2.217°W / 53.483; -2.217 (Hope Mills)[6]
Jackson Street Mills  SJ847 976 53°28′30″N 2°13′55″W / 53.475°N 2.232°W / 53.475; -2.232 (Jackson Street Mills)[6]
Knutsford Vale Works  SJ875 956 53°27′25″N 2°11′24″W / 53.457°N 2.190°W / 53.457; -2.190 (Knutsford Vale Works)[6]
Levenshulme Works  SJ 883 946 53°26′53″N 2°10′41″W / 53.448°N 2.178°W / 53.448; -2.178 (Levenshulme Works)[6]
Little Green Works  SD 849 001 53°29′49″N 2°13′44″W / 53.497°N 2.229°W / 53.497; -2.229 (Little Green Works)[6]
Little Mill Murray Mills Ancoats  SJ 851 986 53°29′02″N 2°13′34″W / 53.484°N 2.226°W / 53.484; -2.226 (Little Mill)
Little Mill.jpg
Notes: [11]
Lloydsfield Mill Miles Platting  SJ 856 991 53°29′17″N 2°13′05″W / 53.488°N 2.218°W / 53.488; -2.218 (Lloydsfield Mill)
Lloydsfield Mill - geograph.org.uk - 904906.jpg
Notes: [11]
Macintosh's Mill
see:Cambridge Street Mills
Chorlton-on-Medlock  1837
McConnel and Kennedy Mills Ancoats 
McConnel & Company mills about 1913.jpg
Notes:
Royal Mill 1797
Sedgewick Mill, 1818–1820
Sedgewick New Mill 1912
Paragon Mill 1912,
8 storey. Worlds tallest cast iron structure when built. Alexis de Tocqueville, described Redhill Street Mill in 1835 as "a place where some 1500 workers, labouring 69 hours a week, with an average wage of 11 shillings, and where three-quarters of the workers are women and children". It was the biggest mill in the Manchester region. Further buildings were added in 1868 and 1912.[3][12]
Marslands Mill  SJ 840 973 53°28′19″N 2°14′35″W / 53.472°N 2.243°W / 53.472; -2.243 (Marslands Mill)[6]
Medlock Mill  SJ 838 973 53°28′19″N 2°14′46″W / 53.472°N 2.246°W / 53.472; -2.246 (Medlock Mill)[6]
Monsall Mills  SD 863 009 53°30′18″N 2°12′29″W / 53.505°N 2.208°W / 53.505; -2.208 (Monsall Mills)[6]
Moston Mill  SD 885 027 53°31′16″N 2°10′30″W / 53.521°N 2.175°W / 53.521; -2.175 (Moston Mill)[6]
Murrays' Mills Ancoats 
Notes:
Old Mill 1798
Decker Mill 1799
New Mill 1802
Murray Block 1804 [13]
Murray Street Block  SJ 851 986 53°29′02″N 2°13′34″W / 53.484°N 2.226°W / 53.484; -2.226 (Murray Street Block)
Murray Street Block and Basin.jpg
Notes: [5]
New Mill Murray Mills Ancoats  SJ 851 986 53°29′02″N 2°13′34″W / 53.484°N 2.226°W / 53.484; -2.226 (New Mill) 1802
Murrays Mills 2008.jpg
Notes: [5]
New Old Mill
see Royal Mill
McConnel and Kennedy Mills Ancoats  SJ 850 985 53°28′59″N 2°13′41″W / 53.483°N 2.228°W / 53.483; -2.228 (New Old Mill)
Notes: With 8 floors and an area of 650 square yards. Gas lighting was installed in 1809 by Boulton & Watt. By 1811, with a downturn in trade the firm of McConnel & Kennedy went bankrupt (to re-emerge later [3][6]
Newton Silk Mill  SD 882 007 53°30′11″N 2°10′44″W / 53.503°N 2.179°W / 53.503; -2.179 (Newton Silk Mill)[6]
Old Mill Murray Mills Ancoats ,  SJ 851 986 53°29′02″N 2°13′34″W / 53.484°N 2.226°W / 53.484; -2.226 (Old Mill)[5] 1798
Old Mill, Henry Street
see Royal Mill
McConnel and Kennedy Mills ,  SJ 849 985 53°28′59″N 2°13′44″W / 53.483°N 2.229°W / 53.483; -2.229 (Old Mill, Henry Street)[3][6] 1799
Paragon Mill McConnel and Kennedy Mills Ancoats SJ 849 985 53°28′59″N 2°13′44″W / 53.483°N 2.229°W / 53.483; -2.229 (Paragon Mill) 1912
Paragon Mill, Jersey Street, Manchester.jpg
Notes: [12]
Phoenix Mill Ancoats  SJ 855 984 53°28′55″N 2°13′12″W / 53.482°N 2.220°W / 53.482; -2.220 (Phoenix Mill)
Notes: (Room and Power) Doubling [6][14]
Piccadilly Mill
<aka>Drinkwater's Mill
 SJ 845 979 53°28′41″N 2°14′06″W / 53.478°N 2.235°W / 53.478; -2.235 (Picadilly Mill
<aka>Drinkwaters Mill
)
Notes: Built at Bank Top, Piccadilly in the late 1780s by Peter Drinkwater and managed in the 1790s by Robert Owen, this cotton mill was the first in Manchester to use a stationary steam engine made by Boulton and Watt. Isaac Perrins was involved in the installation of this.[15] [6]
Pin Mill Ancoats ,  SJ 856 976 53°28′30″N 2°13′05″W / 53.475°N 2.218°W / 53.475; -2.218 (Pin Mill)[6]
Reservoir Mill  SJ 865 987 53°29′06″N 2°12′18″W / 53.485°N 2.205°W / 53.485; -2.205 (Reservoir Mill)[6]
Redhill Street Mills,
McConnel and Kennedy Mills Ancoats,  SJ850985 53°28′59″N 2°13′41″W / 53.483°N 2.228°W / 53.483; -2.228 (Redhill Street Mills)[3] 1818
Rhodes Mill  SJ 857 984 53°28′55″N 2°13′01″W / 53.482°N 2.217°W / 53.482; -2.217 (++++)[6]
Royal Mill McConnel and Kennedy Mills Ancoats  SJ 849 985 53°28′59″N 2°13′44″W / 53.483°N 2.229°W / 53.483; -2.229 (Royal Mill) 1797
Royal and Sedgwick Mills - geograph.org.uk - 715451.jpg
Notes: Renamed after visit from HM King George, 19 November 1942 [12]
Salvin's Factory Ancoats ,  SJ 852 984 53°28′55″N 2°13′26″W / 53.482°N 2.224°W / 53.482; -2.224 (Salvin's Factory)[6] c1788
Sedgwick Mill McConnel and Kennedy Mills Ancoats  SJ 850 985 53°28′59″N 2°13′41″W / 53.483°N 2.228°W / 53.483; -2.228 (Sedgwick Mill) 1818
Notes: Designed by James Lowe 8 storey, 17 bay. [3][12]
Sedgwick New Mill McConnel and Kennedy Mills Ancoat,  SJ850985 53°28′59″N 2°13′41″W / 53.483°N 2.228°W / 53.483; -2.228 (Sedgwick New Mill)[16]> 1912
Shudehill Mill Shudehill,  SJ844989 53°29′13″N 2°14′13″W / 53.487°N 2.237°W / 53.487; -2.237 (Shudehill Mill)[6]
Smedley Vale Dye Works James Ashworth 1891  SD850011 53°30′22″N 2°13′41″W / 53.506°N 2.228°W / 53.506; -2.228 (Smedley Vale Dye Works)[6][14]
Smedley Works  SD850 012 53°30′25″N 2°13′41″W / 53.507°N 2.228°W / 53.507; -2.228 (Smedley Works)[6]
Soho Iron Works Site  SJ 855 983 53°28′52″N 2°13′12″W / 53.481°N 2.220°W / 53.481; -2.220 (Soho Iron Works Site)
Notes: A manufacturer and supplier of mill machinery, spindles and other goods to the textiles industries. The Soho Factory had many specialist manufactures within its 100 yard frontage, including machinery makers, spindle makers and calico printing machinery makers. They also supplied the dyeing, bleaching and local chemical industries, with goods and parts.[3][6]
Supreme Mills  SJ 852987 53°29′06″N 2°13′30″W / 53.485°N 2.225°W / 53.485; -2.225 (Supreme Mills)[6]
Talbot Mill  SJ 827974 53°28′23″N 2°15′43″W / 53.473°N 2.262°W / 53.473; -2.262 (Talbot Mill)[6]
Ten Acres Mill  SD873 003 53°29′56″N 2°11′35″W / 53.499°N 2.193°W / 53.499; -2.193 (Ten Acres Mill)[6]
Thistle Mill  SD855 021 53°30′54″N 2°13′12″W / 53.515°N 2.220°W / 53.515; -2.220 (Thistle Mill)[6]
Union & Bengal Mills  SJ861 988 53°29′10″N 2°12′40″W / 53.486°N 2.211°W / 53.486; -2.211 (Union & Bengal Mills)[6]
Victoria Mill William Holland Miles Platting  SJ 859 993 53°29′24″N 2°12′50″W / 53.490°N 2.214°W / 53.490; -2.214 (Victoria Mill) 1867, 1873
Rochdale Canal, Miles Platting.jpg
Notes: Alongside the Rochdale Canal and Varley Street, Victoria Mills were constructed for William Holland, of the Adelphi Mill, Salford. It was designed by George Woodhouse of Bolton. It was a six storey double mill with shared engine house. It had an octagonal chimney. It was worked to the 1960, and has now been converted into office space and residential.[3][6]
Victoria Mills Ancoats ,  SJ 856 985 53°28′59″N 2°13′05″W / 53.483°N 2.218°W / 53.483; -2.218 (Victoria Mills)[6]
Waterside Works  SD 839 034 53°31′37″N 2°14′38″W / 53.527°N 2.244°W / 53.527; -2.244 (Waterside Works)[6]
Waulk Mill
aka Fire Proof Mill, Doubling Mill
Murray Mills Ancoats  SJ 861 988 53°29′10″N 2°12′40″W / 53.486°N 2.211°W / 53.486; -2.211 (Waulk Mill) 1842
Doubling and Fireproof mill.jpg
Notes: [6]
Wellington Mill Ancoats ,  SJ 859 987 53°29′06″N 2°12′50″W / 53.485°N 2.214°W / 53.485; -2.214 (Wellington Mill)[6]
Wellington Mill  SD 866 003 53°29′56″N 2°12′11″W / 53.499°N 2.203°W / 53.499; -2.203 (Wellington Mill)[6]
Wellington Mills Bridgewater Street, Castlefield ,  SJ 832 976 53°28′33″N 2°15′17″W / 53.4759°N 2.2546°W / 53.4759; -2.2546 (Wellington Mills)[6] 1912
York Mill  SJ 845 983 53°28′52″N 2°14′06″W / 53.481°N 2.235°W / 53.481; -2.235 (York Mill)[6]


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 191
  2. ^ Booth, Robert (25 March 2008). "How boom quickly converted to bust". The Guardian (UK). Retrieved 14 November 2009. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Manchester 2000
  4. ^ Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 151
  5. ^ a b c d e Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 160
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 192
  7. ^ Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 153
  8. ^ Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 154
  9. ^ Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 156
  10. ^ Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 158
  11. ^ a b c d Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 162
  12. ^ a b c d Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 164
  13. ^ Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 159
  14. ^ a b Grace
  15. ^ Chaloner, W. H. (October 1973). "Isaac Perrins, 1751–1801, Prize-fighter and Engineer". History Today 23 (10): 140–143. 
  16. ^ Williams & Farnie 1992, p. 165

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]