List of monastic houses in Berkshire

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The following is a list of monastic houses in Berkshire, England.

List of monastic houses in Berkshire is located in Berkshire
Bradbourne Priory
Bradbourne Priory
Ankerwyke Priory
Ankerwyke Priory
Ascot Priory
Ascot Priory
Bisham Abbey
Bisham Abbey
Bisham Preceptory
Bisham Preceptory
Bradley Priory (approx.)
Bradley Priory (approx.)
Bromhall Priory (approx.)
Bromhall Priory (approx.)
Cold Ash Friary
Cold Ash Friary
Cookham Abbey (supposed)
Cookham Abbey (supposed)
Donnington Friary
Donnington Friary
Douai Abbey
Douai Abbey
Greenham Preceptory (approx.)
Greenham Preceptory (approx.)
Hurley Priory
Hurley Priory
Kintbury Priory
Kintbury Priory
Poughley Priory (approx.)
Poughley Priory (approx.)
READING (see below)
READING (see below)
Sandleford Priory
Sandleford Priory
Shalford (Brimpton) Preceptory (approx.)
Shalford (Brimpton) Preceptory (approx.)
Sonning Minster
Sonning Minster
Stratfield Saye
Stratfield Saye
Templeton Camera (approx.)
Templeton Camera (approx.)
Locations of monastic houses in Berkshire
List of monastic houses in Berkshire is located in Reading Central
Reading Abbey
Reading Abbey
Reading Nunnery
Reading Nunnery
Greyfriars
Greyfriars
Locations of monastic houses in Reading

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Templars and Hospitallers). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The name of the county is given where there is reference to an establishment in another county. Where the county has changed since the foundation's dissolution the modern county is given in parentheses, and in instances where the referenced foundation ceased to exist before the unification of England, the kingdom is given, followed by the modern county in parentheses.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from the details provided by English Heritage Pastscape [1] and Ordnance Survey publications.

A Monastic Glossary follows the listing, which provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure) or redundant intact structure
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown
identification ambiguous or confused

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented)
or ecclesiastical establishments with a monastic appellation but lacking monastic connection.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
EH English Heritage
LT Landmark Trust
NT National Trust

Alphabetical listing of establishments[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
Online References & Location|
Abingdon Abbey Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Oxfordshire
Ankerwycke Priory,
Wraysbury
Benedictine nuns
founded c.1160 by Gilbert de Mountfitchet, Kt., Lord of Wyrardisbury and his son;
dissolved before 8 July 1536; granted to Lord Windsor 1538/9 then to Sir Thomas Smith 1550/1
ruins in grounds of Ankerwycke House
The Priory Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, Ankerwyke
____________________
Ankerwick Priory;
Ankerwyke Priory
[1][2]
51°26′37″N 0°33′26″W / 51.443643°N 0.557191°W / 51.443643; -0.557191 (Ankerwyke Priory)
Ascot Priory *,
Winkfield
Anglican nuns
founded 1861; extant
The Priory Church of Jesus Christ [3]

51°33′26″N 0°46′43″W / 51.5571358°N 0.7785863°W / 51.5571358; -0.7785863 (Ascot Priory)
Bisham Abbey # Bisham - geograph.org.uk - 1155.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular priory
founded 1337 by William Montacute;
built to the northeast of the site of the former Knights Templars' preceptory (see immediately below)
dissolved 1536
Benedictine monks
abbey
founded 1537 by Henry VIII;
the abbey incorporating parts of the former Knights Templars' structure;
(transferred from Chertsey, Surrey);
dissolved 1538; granted to Sir Edward Hoby c.1554;
extant preceptory & demolished priory/abbey site now headquarters of the National Sports Council
The Priory Church of the Jesus Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary, Bisham

The Abbey Church of the Holy Trinity, Bisham
____________________
Bustlesham Priory;
[4][5][6]

51°33′25″N 0°46′45″W / 51.557016°N 0.779225°W / 51.557016; -0.779225 (Bisham Abbey)
Bisham Preceptory # Knights Templar
founded before 1139 by Robert de Ferrers;
dissolved 1308-12;
Augustinian priory later founded to northeast of site (see immediately above);
extant preceptory & demolished priory/abbey site now headquarters of the National Sports Council


51°33′25″N 0°46′45″W / 51.557016°N 0.779225°W / 51.557016; -0.779225 (Bisham Preceptory)
Bradfield Abbey ~ monks
documented 1066
land granted by King Ine to Hean, Abbot of Abingdon, and Ceolswyth 688-90 to found a monastery; community included monks, status and site otherwise unknown


Bradley Priory ~ Benedictine monks
dependent on Abingdon (Oxfordshire)
manor, described in 1547 as 'lately a priory';
status and site otherwise unknown
[7]
51°26′38″N 1°08′17″W / 51.4438905°N 1.1379486°W / 51.4438905; -1.1379486 (Bradley Priory (approx. loc.)) (approx)
Bromhall Priory #,
Sunningdale
Benedictine nuns
daughter of Chertsey, Surrey;
founded before 1200 by Edward, the Black Prince;
accidentally burnt 1462;
dissolved 1521 when the last prioress died and the remaining sisters left;
given to Saint John's College Cambridge
remains destroyed or incorporated into farm buildings
The Priory Church of Saint Margaret, Bromhall
____________________
Broomhall Priory
[8][9]

51°23′23″N 0°37′42″W / 51.3896194°N 0.6282806°W / 51.3896194; -0.6282806 (Bromhall Priory (approx. loc.)) (approx)
Charney Manor Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Oxfordshire
Cholsey Abbey Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Oxfordshire
Cold Ash Centre * Francisan Friars Minor and sisters
Novitiate house for the Franciscan Missionaries of Mary founded 1930s; extant
The Cold Ash Centre [10]

51°25′22″N 1°15′21″W / 51.4227009°N 1.2559283°W / 51.4227009; -1.2559283 (Cold Ash Friary)
Cookham Abbey ~ probable double monastery
founded before 726; granted to Canterbury by Æthelbald of Mercia;
confiscated by Offa and Coenwulf;
restored before 798; granted by Archbishop Æthelheard to Cynethryth, an abbess;
site now occupied by parochial church
[11][12]

51°33′40″N 0°42′27″W / 51.5611263°N 0.7075506°W / 51.5611263; -0.7075506 (Cookham Abbey (supposed loc.)) (supposed)
Coxwell Grange Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Oxfordshire
Donnington Friary ^ Crouched Friars
founded before 1404 (1392/3), land granted by Sir Richard Abberbury to the London Friary c.1376;
dissolved 1538 (recorded at suppression as Trinitarian, later corrected to Crossed Friars);
site now occupied by country house of named 'The Priory'
Donington Friary [13][14]

51°24′53″N 1°19′52″W / 51.414588°N 1.331057°W / 51.414588; -1.331057 (Donnington Friary)
Douai Abbey *,
Woolhampton
Douai Abbey, geograph.jpg Benedictine monks
(community founded at Douai, Belgium, 1615)
removed from Douai 1903; extant
The Abbey Church of Saint Edmund, King and Martyr, Upper Woolhampton [15]

51°24′31″N 1°10′17″W / 51.408715°N 1.171454°W / 51.408715; -1.171454 (Douai Abbey)
East Hendred Cell Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Oxfordshire
Faringdon Abbey Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Oxfordshire
Greenham Preceptory ~ Knights Hospitaller
founded c.1180 (1199) on estates granted by Matilda Countess of Clare and Gervase Paynell;
last preceptor d. 1442;
made part of the estate of the prior of England by the grand master of Rhodes 1445
dissolved 1540;
briefly restored under Queen Mary
[16][17]

51°24′03″N 1°19′10″W / 51.400946°N 1.319561°W / 51.400946; -1.319561 (Greenham Preceptory (approx. loc.)) (approx)
Hurley Priory + St Mary's Church, Hurley - geograph.org.uk - 595442.jpg Benedictine monks
founded before 1087 (1065) granted by Godfrey de Magna Villa (Mandeville) to the Benedictines of Westminster to found a cell;
dissolved 1536; granted to Leonard Chamberleyn c.1544
nave of church now in parochial use
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Hurley [18]

51°33′03″N 0°48′31″W / 51.550922°N 0.808549°W / 51.550922; -0.808549 (Hurley Priory)
Kintbury Abbey # possible Saxon abbey, minuter or oratory
founded before 931, not mentioned in Domesday survey;
land granted to Fontevrault Benedictine nuns and brothers 1147 by Robert Le Bossu to found a monastery;
transferred to new site at Nuneaton, Warwickshire 1155;
planned refoundation probably never established
Saint Mary

51°23′30″N 1°27′19″W / 51.391735°N 1.4552164°W / 51.391735; -1.4552164 (Kintbury Priory (approx. loc.)) (approx)
Poughley Priory ^ Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1160 by Ralph de Chaddleworth;
dissolved 1524 and granted to Cardinal Wolsey's college at Oxford and was occupied by scholars of the college;
remains (cellar range) now incorporated into after-dissolution farmhouse without public access
The Priory Church of Saint Margaret, Poughley [19]

51°28′44″N 1°24′06″W / 51.4788839°N 1.4016581°W / 51.4788839; -1.4016581 (Poughley Priory (approx. loc.)) (approx)
Reading Abbey ReadingAbbey.JPG Cluniac monks
founded 1121 by Henry I
Benedictine monks
refounded c.1210;
dissolved 1539; granted to Edward, Duke of Somerset c.1550;
quarried and dismantled c.1550-1643
ruins extant
The Abbey Church of Our Lady and Saint John the Evangelist, Reading [20][21]

51°27′23″N 0°57′55″W / 51.456367°N 0.965263°W / 51.456367; -0.965263 (Reading Abbey)
Reading Nunnery ReadingMinster.jpg nuns
founded 979
dissolved 1016; granted to Battle, Sussex by William the Conqueror;
apparently on the site now occupied by St Mary's Minster Church (restored 1551-1555 with masonry and timbers from the demolished Reading Abbey)
[22]

51°27′16″N 0°58′25″W / 51.454500°N 0.973690°W / 51.454500; -0.973690 (Reading Nunnery)
Reading Greyfriars, earlier site Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of Oxford)
founded 1233 by permission of Adam de Lathbury, abbot of Reading, and the abbey's convent;
transferred to new site 1285-6 (see immediately below)


Reading Greyfriars + ReadingGreyfriars.jpg Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of Oxford)
transferred from former site (see immediately above) 1285-6 with permission of the abbot of Reading;
church built 1311;
dissolved 15 September 1538; used as hospital, a poorhouse then a town jail;
converted back to a parish church
Saint Francis [23]

51°27′24″N 0°58′36″W / 51.4567346°N 0.9766352°W / 51.4567346; -0.9766352 (Reading Greyfriars)
Sandleford Priory ^ Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1193/1202 by Jeffrey (Geoffrey), Earl of Perch and his wife Maud (Matilda);
arrangements made 1274 by Maud de Clare, Countess of Gloucester and Hertford to refound as a double house for Fontevrault Benedictine nuns and brothers, but this did not come about;
dissolved 1478
remains converted to a country house;
now an Anglican Convent School
The Priory Church of Saint John the Baptist, Sandleford [24]

51°22′39″N 1°18′59″W / 51.3774596°N 1.3163853°W / 51.3774596; -1.3163853 (Sandleford Priory)
Shalford Preceptory Knights Templar
founded c.1198, apparently granted by Simon de Ovile;
Knights Hospitaller
dissolved after 1276;
by 1338 had become a member of Greenham
Brimpton Commandery;
Brimpton Preceptory
[25][26][27][28]
[29][30][31]

51°22′41″N 1°11′54″W / 51.3781561°N 1.1983681°W / 51.3781561; -1.1983681 (Brimpton Preceptory (approx. loc.)) (approx)
Sheffield Lesser Priory ~ Benedictine monks
alien house: manor-grange dependent on St Martin-de-Noyon, Charleval;
founded after 1086, manor granted to Charleval by the Count of Evreux;
locally known as a 'priory'
dissolved and privately leased c.1166-7;
passed to Reading 1270


Sonning Minster Saxon minster
held by Bishop of Ramsbury/Sherborne 10th/11th century
sometimes considered joint-see with Ramsbury, Wiltshire;
current parochial church dating to 9th century, largely rebuilt 1852-3;
restored 1870-90
Hundredal Minster [32]

51°28′27″N 0°54′47″W / 51.4740526°N 0.9130722°W / 51.4740526; -0.9130722 (Sonning Minster)
Steventon Priory Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Oxfordshire
Stratfield Saye Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: priory cell dependent on Valmont
founded 1169 or 1170 by Nicholas de Stoteville (Nicholas d'Estouteville): hermitage granted to Valmont;
dissolved 1399;
house named 'The Priory' built on site (Beech Hill in the Berkshire part of Stratfield Saye)
St Leonard
____________________
Stratfield-Say Priory
[33]

51°22′28″N 0°59′03″W / 51.374315°N 0.984226°W / 51.374315; -0.984226 (Stratfield Saye Priory)
Templeton Camera Knights Templar
possible small hospice or hostel with chapel;
passed to Knights Hospitallers in 1311; in private hands at Dissolution;
mansion named 'Templeton House' built on site 1895
[34]

51°23′40″N 1°28′56″W / 51.3944931°N 1.4823389°W / 51.3944931; -1.4823389 (Templeton Camera (approx. loc.)) (approx)
Wallingford Priory Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Oxfordshire
Wytham Priory Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Oxfordshire

Glossary[edit]


edit this box

Map link to lists of monastic houses in England by county[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Houses of Benedictine nuns — The priory of Ankerwick | British History Online". British-history.ac.uk. 22 June 2003. Retrieved 6 April 2010. 
  2. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ANKERWYCKE PRIORY
  3. ^ Ascot Priory Home Page
  4. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Bisham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire, Volume 2 (pp.82-85)
  5. ^ Berkshire History: Bisham Abbey Manor House
  6. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BISHAM ABBEY
  7. ^ Parishes: Chieveley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 4 (pp.55-70)
  8. ^ British History Online — House of Benedictine nuns: The priory of Bromhall  — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 2 (pp.80-81)
  9. ^ "RBH: History of Sunningdale, Berkshire". 
  10. ^ Cold Ash
  11. ^ "Cookham History". 
  12. ^ English Historical Documents 500-1042 — Google Books. 
  13. ^ British History Online — Friaries: The crouched friars of Donnington — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire, Volume 2 (pp.91-92)
  14. ^ "RBH: History of Donnington, Berkshire". 
  15. ^ "Douai Abbey, Benedictine monks at Woolhampton, Reading, Berkshire, UK". 
  16. ^ British History Online — House of Knights Hospitallers: The preceptory of Greenham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 2 (pp.88-89)
  17. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: GREENHAM HOSPITALLERS PRECEPTORY
  18. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: The priory of Hurley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 2 (pp.73-77)
  19. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Poughley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 2 (pp.85-86)
  20. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: The abbey of Reading — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 2 (pp.62-73)
  21. ^ "RBH: History of Reading Abbey, Berkshire". 
  22. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: READING MINSTER OF ST MARY THE VIRGIN
  23. ^ British History Online — Friaries: The grey friars of Reading — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire, Volume 2 (pp.89-91)
  24. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Sandleford — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 2 (pp.86-88)
  25. ^ British History Online — House of Knights Hospitallers: The preceptory of Greenham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 2 (pp.88-89)
  26. ^ British History Online — Parishes: Brimpton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 4 (pp.51-55)
  27. ^ A History of Berkshire — Google Books. 
  28. ^ "Brimpton Berkshire history — Map and description". 
  29. ^ "Brimpton". 
  30. ^ "Narrative History of Norman & Medieval Berkshire". 
  31. ^ "Brimpton Berkshire history — Map and description". 
  32. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST ANDREW
  33. ^ British History Online — Alien priories: The priory of Stratfield Saye — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Berkshire: Volume 2 (p.113)
  34. ^ Cutler, Chris (ed.) (2004). Kintbury through the Ages. Kintbury: Kintbury Volunteer Group. 
  • Binns, Alison (1989) Studies in the History of Medieval Religion 1: Dedications of Monastic Houses in England and Wales 1066-1216, Boydell
  • Cobbett, William (1868) List of Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, And Other Religious Foundations in England and Wales and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, or Alienated by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments
  • Knowles, David & Hadcock, R. Neville (1971) Medieval Religious Houses England & Wales. Longman
  • Morris, Richard (1979) Cathedrals and Abbeys of England and Wales, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
  • Thorold, Henry (1986) Collins Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories of England and Wales, Collins
  • Thorold, Henry (1993) Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.
  • English Cathedrals and Abbeys, Illustrated, Odhams Press Ltd.
  • Map of Monastic Britain, South Sheet, Ordnance Survey, 2nd edition, 1954