List of monastic houses in Hertfordshire

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List of monastic houses in Hertfordshire is located in Hertfordshire
Ashridge Priory
Ashridge Priory
Cathale Priory
Cathale Priory
Cheshunt Priory
Cheshunt Priory
Flamstead Priory, poss. site
Flamstead Priory, poss. site
Hertford Priory
Hertford Priory
Hertford Trinitarian Priory
Hertford Trinitarian Priory
Hitchin Priory
Hitchin Priory
Ivinghoe  (Muresley) Priory
Ivinghoe (Muresley) Priory
King's Langley Priory
King's Langley Priory
Markyate Priory
Markyate Priory
New Biggin Priory
New Biggin Priory
Redbourn Priory
Redbourn Priory
Rowney Priory
Rowney Priory
Royston Priory
Royston Priory
St Albans Cathedral Abbey
St Albans Cathedral Abbey
St Mary de Pre Priory (poss. site)
St Mary de Pre Priory (poss. site)
Sawbridgeworth Priory
Sawbridgeworth Priory
Sopwell Priory
Sopwell Priory
Standon Priory
Standon Priory
Temple Dinsley Preceptory
Temple Dinsley Preceptory
Ware Priory
Ware Priory
Ware Friary
Ware Friary
Wormley Priory
Wormley Priory
Wymondley Priory
Wymondley Priory
Locations of monastic houses in Hertfordshire

The following is a list of monastic houses in Hertfordshire, England.

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Templars and Hospitallers). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The name of the county is given where there is reference to an establishment in another county. Where the county has changed since the foundation's dissolution the modern county is given in parentheses, and in instances where the referenced foundation ceased to exist before the unification of England, the kingdom is given, followed by the modern county in parentheses.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from the details provided by English Heritage Pastscape [1] and Ordnance Survey publications.

A Monastic Glossary follows the listing, which provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure) or redundant intact structure
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown
identification ambiguous or confused

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented)
or ecclesiastical establishments with a monastic appellation but lacking monastic connection.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
EH English Heritage
LT Landmark Trust
NT National Trust

Alphabetical listing of establishments[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Ashridge Priory monastery or college
of the Precious Blood;
Bonshommes monks
founded 1283 by Edmund, Earl of Cornwall;
dissolved 16 November 1539
the Precious Blood

51°47′58″N 0°33′34″W / 51.7994861°N 0.5594015°W / 51.7994861; -0.5594015 (Ashridge Priory)
Barden Priory? Augustinian Canons Regular
possibly Berden, Essex or the hospital at Bigging (Berdene in Anstey)
St Mary

Cathale Priory Benedictine nuns
founded before 1189(?) (c.1200) probably by William de Mandeville;
dissolved before 1240; granted to the nuns of Cheshunt by Henry de Bohun; canons removed;
chapel survived to 1613 when land acquired by James I;
chapel remains extant 1830s
[1]

51°41′37″N 0°07′29″W / 51.6937151°N 0.1248515°W / 51.6937151; -0.1248515 (Cathale Priory)
Cheshunt Priory Benedictine nuns
founded before 1183;
dissolved 1536; granted to Sir Anthony Deny 1536/7
Cestrehunt Priory;
Chesthunt Priory
[2][3]

51°43′03″N 0°01′08″W / 51.7175606°N 0.0189042°W / 51.7175606; -0.0189042 (Cheshunt Priory)
Flamstead Priory Benedictine nuns
founded c.1150 (during the reign of Stephen) by Roger de Toney;
dissolved 1537; granted to Sir Richard Page 1539/40;
site now occupied by Beechwood Park School
Flamsted Priory [4]

51°49′09″N 0°29′05″W / 51.8190829°N 0.4848549°W / 51.8190829; -0.4848549 (Flamstead Priory - poss. site) (possible)
Hertford Priory # Benedictine monks
founded before 1093 (during the incumbency of Abbot Paul and during the reign of William the Conqueror[note 1]) by Ralph de Limesi and granted to St Albans, Hertfordshire after 1077;
dissolved 1538; granted to Sir Antony Denny and his wife 1537/8; conventual church demolished after 1540; passed to Sir Thomas Wiley who built the private chapel of St John, demolished 1680 on the orders of the Bishop of Lincoln;
site now occupied by parish church
St Mary [5]

51°47′59″N 0°04′31″W / 51.7996884°N 0.0752467°W / 51.7996884; -0.0752467 (Hertford Priory)
Hertford Trinitarian Priory lepers' hospital of St Mary Magdelene (founded before 1199) taken over by Trinitarians;
Trinitarian monks
founded c.1261; apparently under Easton, Wiltshire until 1448 as a hospital; later under Moatenden;
apparently abandoned before 1535(?)
St Mary Magdalene (before 1199)

Holy Trinity and St Thomas Martyr c.1261
[6][7]

51°47′59″N 0°04′21″W / 51.7998377°N 0.0726154°W / 51.7998377; -0.0726154 (Hertford Trinitarian Priory)
Hitchin Whitefriars ^ Carmelite Friars
founded c.1317;
dissolved 17 October 1538;
site now occupied by Hitchin Priory Hotel, part of cloister arches still visible;
17th/18th century country house built on site
St Mary
____________________
Hitchin 'Priory'
[8][9]

51°56′42″N 0°16′44″W / 51.9450982°N 0.2789497°W / 51.9450982; -0.2789497 (Hitchin Priory)
Hitchin Priory Gilbertine Canons[note 2]
founded 1361-2 by Edward de Kendale;
dissolved 1538
St Saviour
Hitchin Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded c.1316 by King Edward;
dissolved; granted to Edward Watson and H. Henderson 1546/7


Hitchin Minster Saxon minster
founded before 11th century (references 10th & 11th century);
parochial church before 1086


Muresley Priory,
nr Ivinghoe
Benedictine nuns
founded between 1107 and 1129, reputedly by Walter Giffard, bishop of Winchester (who died 1129), (or c.1160 or 1133);
community evicted; granted to Sir John Dance c.1537
St Margaret
____________________
Meursley Priory;
Mursley Nunnery;
St Margaret's Priory;
St Margaret's in the Wood, Meuresley;
St Margaret's de Bosco;
Ivinghoe Nunnery;
Ivinghoe Priory;
Ivanhoe Monastery
[10][11][12][13][14]

51°47′30″N 0°31′10″W / 51.7915385°N 0.5193266°W / 51.7915385; -0.5193266 (Ivinghoe (Muresley) Priory)
King's Langley Priory Geograph 2310899 52ccc4eb.jpg Dominican Friars (under the Visitation of Cambridge)
founded before 1308;
dissolved 1538;
Dominican nuns — from Dartford
refounded 1557;
dissolved 1558: nuns transferred to Dartford
King's Langley Blackfriars [15][16]

51°42′46″N 0°27′37″W / 51.7126665°N 0.4603207°W / 51.7126665; -0.4603207 (King's Langley Priory)
Lannock Knights Templar
founded before 1148 (manor granted to Templars but no preceptory founded);
Knights Hospitaller
let privately 1338


Markyate Priory # hermitage
before 1145;
Benedictine nuns
founded 1145 by Ralph de Langford, Dean and Chapter of St Paul's, through the influence of Geoffrey, Abbot of St Albans;
apparently soon destroyed by fire;
dissolved 1537; granted to George Ferrers;
site now occupied by a manor house named 'Markyate Cell' built on priory remains;
parochial church of St John the Baptist built at the south corner of the site
Holy Trinity
____________________
Mergate Priory;
Market-Street Priory
[17][18][19][20]

51°50′38″N 0°27′52″W / 51.8438715°N 0.4644084°W / 51.8438715; -0.4644084 (Markyate Priory)
Mirdial Priory? purported Augustinian Canons Regular (evidence lacking) St Mary

New Biggin Priory # Gilbertine Priory
priory cell
founded 1361-2 by Sir Edward de Kendale;
dissolved 1538; granted to John Cokke 1544/5;
residence built on site 1585; converted to almshouses c.1812
St Saviour
____________________
Hitchin Nunnery
[21][22]

51°56′54″N 0°16′31″W / 51.9483783°N 0.2753663°W / 51.9483783; -0.2753663 (New Biggin Priory)
Redbourn Priory Benedictine monks
cell dependent on St Albans;
founded 1178 by Abbot Simon or Abbot Warin built by John, Bishop of Ardfert;
plundered by the French 1217;
apparently abandoned before 1535; granted to John Cock 1539/40
St Amphibalus
____________________
St Amphibalus Priory;
Redburn Priory
[23][24]

51°47′52″N 0°23′42″W / 51.7976863°N 0.3949338°W / 51.7976863; -0.3949338 (Redbourn Priory)
Rowney Priory ^(?) Benedictine nuns
founded c.1164 by Conan, Duke of Brittany and Earl of Richmond;
plundered early 15th century;
dissolved 11 September 1457; granted to the patron, John Fray, chief baron of the Exchequer, who established a chantry; confiscated by the Crown 1548;
19th century house built on site, said to incorporate fabric from the priory
St John the Baptist
____________________
Rowheing Priory;
Rownay Priory
[25][26]

51°51′52″N 0°02′39″W / 51.8643534°N 0.0440311°W / 51.8643534; -0.0440311 (Rowney Priory)
Royston Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1173-9 by Ralph de Rochester (on the site of a chapel built by his uncle Eustace de Merk) built in the time of Walter Walensis, Abbot of Colchester;
dissolved 9 April 1537; granted to Robert Slete, Esq. 1540/1
priory church converted for parochial use as the Parish Church of St John the Baptist; a Georgian House also built on the site
The Priory Church of St John the Baptist and St Thomas the Martyr [27][28][29]

52°02′52″N 0°01′18″W / 52.0478389°N 0.0216722°W / 52.0478389; -0.0216722 (Royston Priory)
St Albans Abbey + StAlbansCathedral.JPG Benedictine? monks
founded c.793;
lax? c.820;
secular collegiate and nuns from before 940;
Benedictine monks and nuns c.970 (976) to 1140;
Benedictine monks
from 1140;
dissolved 5 December 1539;
parochial thereafter;
episcopal diocesan cathedral
founded 1877; extant
The Cathedral and Abbey Church of Saint Alban, St Albans [30][31][32][33]

51°45′02″N 0°20′34″W / 51.750620°N 0.342915°W / 51.750620; -0.342915 (St Albans Cathedral Abbey)
St Albans Nunnery Benedictine nuns — with regular priests or brethren;
attached to the abbey, living near the almonry;
founded before 940; transferred to Sopwell 1140


St Mary de Pre Priory leper hospital
founded 1194 by Warin (Garinus), Abbot of St Albans;
Benedictine nuns with regular priests or brethren
c.1328;
Benedictine nuns
founded after 1352;
abandoned 1528; annexed to St Albans; granted to Ralph Rawlet, Esq. 1540/1
St Mary de Pré Priory;
St Mary de Pre Nunnery;
De La Praye Nunnery
[34]

51°45′40″N 0°22′05″W / 51.7610853°N 0.3680487°W / 51.7610853; -0.3680487 (St Mary de Pre Priory (poss. site)) (possible)
St Margaret's Priory Benedictine nuns
founded before 1129, possibly by William Giffard, Bishop of Winchester, grants confirmed after his death 1129;
dissolved 1536
Ivinghoe Priory
Sawbridgeworth Priory St Mary the Great, Sawbridgeworth, Herts - geograph.org.uk - 358893.jpg Benedictine monks
probable cell dependent on Westminster Abbey
founded c.1135 (late in the reign of Henry I or during that of Stephen);
conventual church now in parochial use as the Parish Church of St Mary the Great
[35][36]

51°48′44″N 0°09′10″E / 51.8122896°N 0.1528537°E / 51.8122896; 0.1528537 (Sawbridgeworth Priory)
Sopwell Priory purportedly a hermitage prior to Benedictine foundation;
Benedictine nuns
founded 1140 by Geoffrey, Abbott of St Albans;
subject to the abbess of St Albans c.1330;
dissolved 1537
St Mary
____________________
Sopewell Priory
[37][38]

51°44′39″N 0°20′05″W / 51.7441505°N 0.3347263°W / 51.7441505; -0.3347263 (Sopwell Priory)
Standon Cell Sisters of the Order of St John of Jerusalem
dissolved c.1180: transferred to Sisters of St John Priory, Buckland, Somerset


Standon Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
founded 1147 (before 1154) (during the reign of Stephen) by Gilbert de Clare, Earl of Hereford;
dissolved before 1443-4;
leased out 1330;
revived; under a preceptor 1360;
leased out before 1443-4
[39]
Standon Priory hermitage built by William the Anchorite
Benedictine monks
alien house: cell dependent on Stoke by Clare, Suffolk
founded 1173 and 1178 when Richard de Clare Earl of Hertford granted to his monks of Stoke the hermitage;
dissolved c.1306; apparently reverted to a hermitage or chapel 1306;
granted to Stoke College 1415
The Priory Church of St Michael of Salburn in Standon
____________________
Salburn Priory in Standon;
Salburn Priory
[40][41]

51°52′50″N 0°00′39″W / 51.8806611°N 0.0109112°W / 51.8806611; -0.0109112 (Standon Priory)
Temple Dinsley Preceptory # Knights Templar
founded 1147 (during the reign of Stephen): granted by Bernard de Balliol, preceptory established later;
dissolved 1308-12;
Knights Hospitaller
refounded 1324; let privately 1338;
preceptory
founded after 1338;
leased to the preceptor of Ribstone and Mount St John 1498;
let out privately 1507; granted by Henry VIII to Sir Ralph Sadler
demolished 1712;
site now occupied by The Princess Helena College built 1714
Temple Dynnesley Preceptory [42][43]

51°54′33″N 0°16′59″W / 51.9091745°N 0.2830938°W / 51.9091745; -0.2830938 (Temple Dinsley Preceptory)
Ware Priory #+ Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on St-Evroul;
founded before 1081, with endowment by Hugo de Grentemaisnil;
dissolved 1414; granted to the Carthusians at Sheen, Surrey (Greater London);
granted by Henry VIII;
The old rectory or manor house built on the site early-17th century, altered 18th and 19th century;
conventual church much altered, now in parochial use as parish church of St Mary the Virgin — little, if any, remaining monastic fabric
[44][45]

51°48′43″N 0°02′00″W / 51.8120442°N 0.0332218°W / 51.8120442; -0.0332218 (Ware Priory)
Ware Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor (under the Custody of Cambridge)
founded 1338 by Thomas second Lord Wake of Liddell, who received the king's permission in February 1338 to give to the Friars Minors property and land;
dissolved 1538;;
private residence 1544;
incorporated into a house named 'The Priory'
[46][47]

51°48′40″N 0°02′06″W / 51.8110625°N 0.0350833°W / 51.8110625; -0.0350833 (Ware Friary)
Wormley Priory + Augustinian Canons Regular
cell, dependent on Waltham, Essex;
founded after 1177 (when church and mannor granted to Waltham) and before c.1260;
dissolved c.1510(?): alienated from Waltham;
church restored 19th century; now in use of parish church of St Laurence
St Lawrence
____________________
Prior Sancti Laurentii de Worem
[48][49]

51°44′06″N 0°02′20″W / 51.735135°N 0.0388438°W / 51.735135; -0.0388438 (Wormley Priory)
Wymondley Priory,
Little Wymondley
hospital
founded before 1218 by Richard [de] Argentein;
Augustinian Canons Regular
founded soon after; hospital continued until 1290;
dissolved 6 April 1537; granted to James Nedeham, surveyor of the king's works, 1541/2;
site now occupied by a Tudor Tithe barn
St Mary
____________________
Little Wymondley Priory;
Wymondesley Parva Priory
[50][51][52]

51°56′16″N 0°13′42″W / 51.9377104°N 0.2282989°W / 51.9377104; -0.2282989 (Wymondley Priory)

Glossary[edit]


edit this box

Map link to lists of monastic houses in England by county[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hertford Priory: Cobbett
  2. ^ Hitchin Priory: mistakenly recorded as a nunnery by T. Tanner, Notitia Monastica

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CATHALE PRIORY
  2. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHESHUNT PRIORY
  3. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Cheshunt Priory — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.426-428)
  4. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: FLAMSTEAD PRIORY
  5. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HERTFORD PRIORY
  6. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HOSPITAL OF ST MARY MAGDALENE
  7. ^ British History Online — Friaries: Trinitarian friars of Hertford — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.452-453)
  8. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HITCHIN PRIORY
  9. ^ British History Online — Hitchin: Priory church and charities — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 3 (pp.12-21)
  10. ^ "Full text of "Memorials of old Buckinghamshire"". Archive.org. Retrieved 6 April 2010. 
  11. ^ "Houses of Benedictine nuns — The priory of Ivinghoe | British History Online". British-history.ac.uk. 22 June 2003. Retrieved 6 April 2010. 
  12. ^ "Monasticon". Monasticmatrix.usc.edu. Retrieved 6 April 2010. 
  13. ^ "Ivinghoe St Margarets". Fivenine.co.uk. 17 February 2009. Retrieved 6 April 2010. 
  14. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST MARGARETS DE BOSCO PRIORY OR IVINGHOE PRIORY
  15. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: KINGS LANGLEY PRIORY
  16. ^ British History Online — Friaries: King's Langley priory — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.446-451)
  17. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: The priory of Markyate — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Bedford: Volume 1 (pp.358-361)
  18. ^ Markyate
  19. ^ Markyate Parish Council
  20. ^ Church of St John the Baptst — Markyate — Hertfordshire — England | British Listed Buildings
  21. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: NEW BIGGIN PRIORY
  22. ^ British History Online — House of Gilbertine canons: New Bigging priory, Hitchin — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (p.443)
  23. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: REDBOURN PRIORY
  24. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: Redbourn Priory — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.416-419)
  25. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ROWNEY PRIORY
  26. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Rowney Priory, Great Munden — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.434-435)
  27. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST
  28. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ROYSTON PRIORY
  29. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Royston priory — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.436-440)
  30. ^ The Cathedral and Abbey Church of Saint Alban
  31. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST ALBANS ABBEY
  32. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: St Albans Abbey — Before the Conquest — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.367-372)
  33. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: St Albans Abbey — After the Conquest — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.372-416)
  34. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST MARY DE PRE PRIORY
  35. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST MARY THE GREAT
  36. ^ British History Online — RELIGIOUS HOUSES: Introduction — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.365-367)
  37. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: SOPWELL PRIORY
  38. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Sopwell Priory — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.422-426)
  39. ^ British History Online — House of Knights Hospitallers: Preceptory of Standon — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (p.444)
  40. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 368028
  41. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: Salburn priory in Standon — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.421-422)
  42. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: TEMPLE DINSLEY
  43. ^ British History Online — House of Knights Templars: Preceptory of Temple Dinsley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.445-446)
  44. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WARE PRIORY
  45. ^ British History Online — Alien House: Ware Priory — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.451)
  46. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: THE PRIORY
  47. ^ British History Online — Friaries: Friars minors of Ware — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (p.451)
  48. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WORMLEY PRIORY CELL
  49. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST LAURENCES CHURCH
  50. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WYMONDLEY PRIORY
  51. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 971221
  52. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Wymondley priory — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Hertford: Volume 4 (pp.440-443)
  • Binns, Alison (1989) Studies in the History of Medieval Religion 1: Dedications of Monastic Houses in England and Wales 1066-1216, Boydell
  • Cobbett, William (1868) List of Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, And Other Religious Foundations in England and Wales and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, or Alienated by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments
  • Knowles, David & Hadcock, R. Neville (1971) Medieval Religious Houses England & Wales. Longman
  • Morris, Richard (1979) Cathedrals and Abbeys of England and Wales, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
  • Thorold, Henry (1986) Collins Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories of England and Wales, Collins
  • Thorold, Henry (1993) Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.
  • English Cathedrals and Abbeys, Illustrated, Odhams Press Ltd.
  • Map of Monastic Britain, South Sheet, Ordnance Survey, 2nd edition, 1954