List of monastic houses in Kent

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List of monastic houses in Kent is located in Kent
Aylesford Priory
Aylesford Priory
Bilsington Priory
Bilsington Priory
Blackwose Priory
Blackwose Priory
Boxley Abbey
Boxley Abbey
Combwell Priory (site)
Combwell Priory (site)
St Mary of the Angels Friary
St Mary of the Angels Friary
CANTERBURY (see below)
CANTERBURY (see below)
Darenth Priory
Darenth Priory
Dartford Priory
Dartford Priory
Davington Priory
Davington Priory
DOVER (see below)
DOVER (see below)
Faversham Abbey
Faversham Abbey
Folkestone Priory, earlier site
Folkestone Priory, earlier site
Folkestone Priory
Folkestone Priory
Higham Priory
Higham Priory
Hoo Monastery (poss. site)
Hoo Monastery (poss. site)
Hoo Monastery (prob. site)
Hoo Monastery (prob. site)
Horton Priory
Horton Priory
Leeds Priory
Leeds Priory
Lossenham Friary
Lossenham Friary
Lydd Minster
Lydd Minster
Lyminge Abbey
Lyminge Abbey
Maidstone Carmelite Friary
Maidstone Carmelite Friary
Minster in Sheppey Priory
Minster in Sheppey Priory
Minster in Thanet Priory, earlier site (purported)
Minster in Thanet Priory, earlier site (purported)
Minster in Thanet Priory
Minster in Thanet Priory
Minster in Moatenden Priory
Minster in Moatenden Priory
New Romney Priory
New Romney Priory
Romney Friary
Romney Friary
Newington Priory (alleged site)
Newington Priory (alleged site)
Newington Priory (poss. site)
Newington Priory (poss. site)
Patrixbourne Priory
Patrixbourne Priory
Reculver Abbey
Reculver Abbey
Rochester Cathedral Priory
Rochester Cathedral Priory
St Radegund's Abbey (Bradsole)
St Radegund's Abbey (Bradsole)
Sandwich Whitefriars
Sandwich Whitefriars
Shoreham Minster
Shoreham Minster
Sutton-at-Hone Preceptory
Sutton-at-Hone Preceptory
Swingfield Preceptory
Swingfield Preceptory
Temple Ewell Preceptory
Temple Ewell Preceptory
Thanington Nunnery
Thanington Nunnery
Throwley Priory
Throwley Priory
Tonbridge Priory
Tonbridge Priory
West Langdon Abbey
West Langdon Abbey
West Malling Abbey
West Malling Abbey
West Peckham Preceptory
West Peckham Preceptory
Locations of monastic houses in Kent
List of monastic houses in Kent is located in Canterbury Central
Austin Friars
Austin Friars
Austin Friars
Austin Friars
Blackfriars
Blackfriars
Canterbury Cathedral Priory
Canterbury Cathedral Priory
Friars of the Sack
Friars of the Sack
Greyfriars
Greyfriars
St Augustine’s Abbey
St Augustine’s Abbey
St Gregory's Priory
St Gregory's Priory
St Sepulchre's Priory
St Sepulchre's Priory
Locations of monastic houses in Canterbury
List of monastic houses in Kent is located in Dover Central
Dover Priory, earlier site
Dover Priory, earlier site
Dover Priory
Dover Priory
Dover Minster
Dover Minster
Dover Preceptory(?)
Dover Preceptory(?)
Locations of monastic houses in Dover

The following is a list of monastic houses in Kent, England.

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Templars and Hospitallers). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The name of the county is given where there is reference to an establishment in another county. Where the county has changed since the foundation's dissolution the modern county is given in parentheses, and in instances where the referenced foundation ceased to exist before the unification of England, the kingdom is given, followed by the modern county in parentheses.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from the details provided by English Heritage Pastscape [1] and Ordnance Survey publications.

A Monastic Glossary follows the listing, which provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure) or redundant intact structure
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented)
or ecclesiastical establishments with a monastic appellation but lacking monastic connection.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
EH English Heritage
LT Landmark Trust
NT National Trust

Alphabetical listing of establishments[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Aylesford Priory * Aylesford Priory, Kent.jpg Carmelite Friars
founded 1242 by Richard de Grey, Lord of Cudnor (Richard, Lord Grey);
conventual church built 1242-1248;
rebuilt 1348-1417;
dissolved 1538; granted to Sir Thomas Wyat 1541/2; church demolished, conventual buildings converted for private residence; rebuilt after fire 1930;
Carmelite Friars from 1949
'The Friars' [1][2]

51°18′11″N 0°28′19″E / 51.3030815°N 0.4720098°E / 51.3030815; 0.4720098 (Aylesford Priory)
Badlesmere Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 8th century


Badmonden Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
(?)alien house: cell dependent on Beaulieu, Normandy
dissolved 1414;
granted to St Andrew's Priory, Rochester;
dissolved 1540; granted to the dean and chapter of Rochester


Bilsington Priory ^ The Augustinian Priory, Bilsington, Kent - geograph.org.uk - 12909.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1253 by John Mansell (Maunsel), Lord Chief Justice of England;
dissolved 28 February 1536; granted to the Archbishop of Canterbury 1538/9;
used as a farmhouse through post-medieval period;
remains now incorporated into a house
[3][4]

51°04′57″N 0°54′57″E / 51.0826112°N 0.9159355°E / 51.0826112; 0.9159355 (Bilsington Priory)
Blakwose Priory Premonstratensian Canons
cell of Lavendon, Buckinghamshire
founded before 1158;
transferred to St Radegund's after 1203-4; retained as a grange of the abbey;
dissolved c.1377
Blackwose Priory [5]

51°04′27″N 1°04′04″E / 51.074034°N 1.0677485°E / 51.074034; 1.0677485 (Blackwose Priory)
Boxley Abbey ^ Remains of Boxley Abbey and North Downs - geograph.org.uk - 1101929.jpg Cistercian monks
daughter of Clairvaux;
founded 23 October 1143 (1143/46) by William de Ipre, Earl of Kent;
dissolved 21 January 1538; granted to Sir Thomas Wyat 1540/1;
part of remains now incorporated into a private house
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Bilsington [6][7]

51°18′00″N 0°31′29″E / 51.3000261°N 0.5246937°E / 51.3000261; 0.5246937 (Boxley Abbey)
Brockley Abbey Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in London
Canterbury Austin Friars, earlier site Augustinian Friars
founded 1318 by Richard French, baker (license granted to Walter Reynolds, Archbishop of Canterbury by Edward II to alienate part of the former Friars of the Sack site to the Austin Friars);
transferred to new site (see immediately below) 1324
[8][9]

51°16′37″N 1°04′54″E / 51.276936°N 1.081654°E / 51.276936; 1.081654 (Canterbury — Austin Friars)
Canterbury Austin Friars Augustinian Friars
(community founded at earlier site (see immediately above) 1318);
transferred here 1324;
rebuilt 1408;
dissolved December 1538; granted to G. Harper 1541/2
[8][9]

51°16′37″N 1°04′54″E / 51.276936°N 1.0816544°E / 51.276936; 1.0816544 (Canterbury — Austin Friars)
Canterbury Blackfriars ^ Canterbury - Kloster der Blackfriars und Stour.jpg Dominican Friars (under the Visitation of London)
founded c.1236 (c.1221) by Henry III; church built 1237 to after 1244;
dissolved 1538; granted to Thomas Wiseman 1559/60;
frater currently in use as a church of the Church of the First Church of Christ Scientist
[10][11]

51°16′53″N 1°04′45″E / 51.2813435°N 1.0792083°E / 51.2813435; 1.0792083 (Canterbury — Blackfriars)
Canterbury Cathedral Priory + Canterbury Cathedral - Portal Nave Cross-spire.jpeg secular canons possibly collegiate
founded c.600 (598): Roman church restored by St Augustine with the aid of Æthelberht, King of Kent;
episcopal diocesan cathedral
founded c.600; extant;
Benedictine monks
founded 997;
rebuilt 1070 under Archbishop Lanfranc;
dissolved 1539;
The Cathedral and Abbey Church of Christ, Canterbury,

The Cathedral Church of Christ, Canterbury

[12][12][13][14]

51°16′47″N 1°04′59″E / 51.279689°N 1.083183°E / 51.279689; 1.083183 (Canterbury Cathedral Priory)
Canterbury Friars of the Sack Friars of the Sack
founded before 1274;
some friars apparently transferred to new site at Cambridge before 1289;
dissolved after 1314
[15][16]

51°16′50″N 1°04′39″E / 51.2804644°N 1.0776365°E / 51.2804644; 1.0776365 (Canterbury — Sack Friars)
Canterbury Greyfriars, earlier site Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of London)
founded 1224;
transferred to new site (see immediately below) c.1268
[17][18]

Canterbury Greyfriars Canterbury - Greyfriars Chapel.jpg Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of London)
(community founded apparently on a site north of the hospital (see immediately above) 1224);
transferred here c.1268:
founded 1270 by John Diggs, an Alderman of the city;
Observant Franciscan Friars
transferred 1489;
dissolved 1534;
Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
transferred from Observants 1534;
dissolved 1538; granted to Thomas Spilman 1539/40
[17][18]

51°16′44″N 1°04′36″E / 51.2788839°N 1.0767943°E / 51.2788839; 1.0767943 (Canterbury — Greyfriars)
Canterbury — St Augustine's Abbey St Augustine Canterbury 02.JPG Benedictine monks (assumed)
founded (598-605) 598 by Æthelberht, King of Kent on the advice of St Augustine;
Benedictine monks
(re)founded c.960;
dissolved 30 July 1538; (EH)
St Peter and St Paul

St Peter, St Paul and St Augustine (978)

The Abbey Church of Saint Augustine, Canterbury
[19][20]

51°16′41″N 1°05′17″E / 51.278126°N 1.088156°E / 51.278126; 1.088156 (St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury)
Canterbury — St Gregory's Priory secular monastery
founded by 1087 (before 1086) by Lanfranc, Archbishop of Canterbury;
Augustinian Canons Regular
refounded c.1123;
church destroyed by fire 1145, rebuilt;
dissolved 1536 (1537); granted to the Archbishop of Canterbury 1536/7
St Gregory's Hospital [21][22]

51°16′58″N 1°05′04″E / 51.2827159°N 1.0843608°E / 51.2827159; 1.0843608 (St Gregory's Priory, Canterbury)
Canterbury — St Mildred's Monastery purported early Saxon monastery;
probable minster 8th century
Canterbury — Priory of St Sepulchre Benedictine nuns
founded c.1100 by Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury;
dissolved 1536; granted to James Hale 1546/7
St Sepulchre's Nunnery [23][24][25]

51°16′26″N 1°05′05″E / 51.2739107°N 1.0846424°E / 51.2739107; 1.0846424 (St Sepulchre's Priory, Canterbury)
Canterbury — St Mary of the Angels Friary * Franciscan Friars Minor involved in running the Franciscan International Study Centre; extant Friary of St Mary of the Angels [26]

51°17′45″N 1°03′42″E / 51.2957075°N 1.0615915°E / 51.2957075; 1.0615915 (St Mary of the Angels Friary, Canterbury)
Cliffe Cell Cluniac monks[note 1]

Combwell Priory # Augustinian Canons Regular
abbey founded c.1220 by Robert de Turneham;
reduced to priory status c.1220 due to endowment shortfall;
disputed between Augustinian and Premonstratensian — found in favour of Augustinians c.1230;
dissolved 1536; granted to Thomas Culpepper 1537/8; granted to Sir John Gage 1542/3
Cumbwell Priory;
Combwell Abbey
[27][28]

51°04′26″N 0°26′02″E / 51.0738537°N 0.4338795°E / 51.0738537; 0.4338795 (Combwell Priory (site))
Darenth Priory Benedictine monks
cell, apparently dependent on Rochester
founded after 971: Archbishop Hubert granted the manor of Darent;
dissolution unknown
[29]

51°25′00″N 0°14′31″E / 51.4165689°N 0.2420104°E / 51.4165689; 0.2420104 (Darenth Priory)
Dartford Blackfriars Dominican Friars (under the visitation of London)
founded 1356; attached to the nunnery (see immediately below);
prior and friars recorded 1373;
dissolved 1539
[30][31]
Dartford Priory Dominican nuns (or Augustinian Canonesses) subject to King's Langley, Hertfordshire
founded 1346 by Edward III in the buildings of a former royal palace;
dissolved after 1 April 1539; Henry VIII built a manor house on the site; granted to Edmund Mervyn 1540/1, afterwards becoming the property of the Earl of Salisbury;
Dominican nuns — from King's Langley
refounded 1558;
dissolved after 1559; granted to Anne of Cleves by Edward VI; later used by Queen Elizabeth;
alienated by James I;
Hall's Engineering Works built on site
St Mary and St Margaret
____________________
Dertford Priory;
Dartford Nunnery
[30][31]

51°26′58″N 0°12′53″E / 51.4494672°N 0.2148342°E / 51.4494672; 0.2148342 (Dartford Priory)
Davington Priory +^ The church of St.Mary Magdalen, Davington - geograph.org.uk - 1276737.jpg Benedictine nuns
founded 1153 by Fulk de Newenham;
dissolved 1535; granted to Sir Thomas Cheney 1546/7;
church in now parochial use — priory buildings in private ownership;
restored as a private residence 19th century; since 1982 owned by Bob Geldof
The Priory Church of Saint Mary Magdalen, Davington;

(parochially also dedicated to St Lawrence)
[32][33][34]

51°19′09″N 0°53′03″E / 51.3191235°N 0.8842975°E / 51.3191235; 0.8842975 (Davington Priory)
Dover Priory, earlier site St Mary in Castro2.jpg Saxon minster, secular canons
founded 640 by Eadbald, King of Kent;
transferred to St Martin's c.696 (see immediately below) by King Wihtred;
church apparently rebuilt 10th century;
repaired 1582, but practically unused thereafter and in ruins by 1724;
in use as a Fives' Court early-1790s;
in use as a garrison coal store during Napoleonic Wars (1793-1815);
restored 1862 by Sir George Gilbert Scott and 1888 by William Butterfield
St Mary in Castro
(St Mary in the Castle)
[35][36][36]

51°07′42″N 1°19′24″E / 51.128374°N 1.3233697°E / 51.128374; 1.3233697 (Dover Priory, earlier site)
Dover Priory ^ secular canons
transferred to from site within the castle (see immediately above) c.696 by King Wihtred;
(?abbey 697[note 2]);
Augustinian Canons Regular
refounded 1131 by Henry I and William de Corbeil, Archbishop of Canterbury;
Benedictine monks — from Canterbury (who forced withdrawal of Augustinians) 1136;
monks apparently withdrawn;
Benedictine monks — sent from Canterbury by Theobald of Bec, Archbishop of Canterbury 1139;
cell dependent on Canterbury;
dissolved 1535;
remains now incorporated into a private school: Dover College
The Priory Church of Saint Mary the Virgin and Saint Martin of the New Work, Dover [36][37]

51°07′37″N 1°18′27″E / 51.1270341°N 1.3075729°E / 51.1270341; 1.3075729 (Dover Priory)
Dover Minster Saxon minster
founded 691;
rebuilt 1070s;
in parochial use as the Church of St Martin-le-Grand, from 16th century;
demolished 18th-19th century; remains destroyed during World War II
[38]

51°07′30″N 1°18′45″E / 51.1250006°N 1.3125336°E / 51.1250006; 1.3125336 (Dover Minster)
Dover Preceptory (?) Knights Templar
founded c.1128(?)
apparently transferred to Temple Ewell before c.1185; (EH)
[39]

51°07′09″N 1°18′12″E / 51.1190578°N 1.3034517°E / 51.1190578; 1.3034517 (Dover Preceptory(?))
Eastry Monastery (?) a monastery purportedly founded before 673 by King Egbert — existence doubtful

Elfleet Monastery (?) founded by Domneva [note 3] — probably Ebbsfleet[note 4] possible duplication of Minster in Thanet Nunnery

Faversham Abbey Ruins Of Faversham Abbey, Stukeley, 1722.jpg Cluniac monks — from Bermondsey, Surrey
founded 1148 (1147) by King Stephen and his queen Maud (Matilda) (apparently only nominally Cluniac from the outset;
Benedictine monks 13th century (before 1207: by the reign of Henry III);
dissolved 8 July 1538
St Saviour [40][41]

51°19′08″N 0°53′42″E / 51.318774°N 0.8948708°E / 51.318774; 0.8948708 (Faversham Abbey)
Folkestone Priory, earlier site Saxon minster and Benedictine? nuns
founded before 640 by Eadbald, King of Kent — built in the castle precinct;
destroyed in raids by the Danes before 927 (before 924);
Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Lonlay
founded 1095: church granted to Lonlay by Nigel de Munevilla and his wife;
abandoned 1137: transferred to new site (see immediately below)
St Mary and St Eanswith [42][43]

51°04′45″N 1°11′01″E / 51.0790314°N 1.1837474°E / 51.0790314; 1.1837474 (Folkestone Priory, earlier site)
Folkestone Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Lonlay;
(community founded at earlier site (see immediately above) before 640);
transferred here 1137, permission granted to William de Albrinsis;
became denizen:independent from 1399;
dissolved November 1539, when priory was ruinous; leased to Edward,Lord Clinton;granted to him 9 January 1539
Falkstone Priory [43][44]

51°04′43″N 1°10′53″E / 51.0786935°N 1.1813951°E / 51.0786935; 1.1813951 (Folkestone Priory)
Greenwich Friary Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in London
Higham Priory Benedictine nuns
alien house: dependent on St-Sulpice-la-Forêt;
founded c.1148(?) (1551) by King Stephen;
became denizen: independent from after 1227;
dissolved 1521-2; granted to St John's College, Cambridge by Henry VIII 1522
Lillechurch Priory;
Littlechurch Priory;
Heyham Priory
[45][46]

51°26′27″N 0°28′11″E / 51.4408812°N 0.4697406°E / 51.4408812; 0.4697406 (Higham Priory)
Hoo Monastery Benedictine? monks
founded c.(686-)687: land on the island (later Hoo St Werburgh) and adjoining granted tn Ecgbald and his familia
monastery under an abbot 716;
destroyed in raids by the Danes 9th century?
[47][48][49]

51°27′24″N 0°29′19″E / 51.4565357°N 0.4886945°E / 51.4565357; 0.4886945 (Hoo Monastery (possible site)) (possible)
or
51°24′36″N 0°33′29″E / 51.410135°N 0.558055°E / 51.410135; 0.558055 (Hoo Monastery (probable site)) (more likely)
Horton Priory ^ Horton Priory, Kent.jpg Cluniac monks
alien house: cell dependent on Lewes, Sussex;
founded c.1142 by Robert de Vere;
became denizen: independent from 1351-74;
dissolved 1536; granted to Richard Tate 1338-9;
thereafter granted to --- Mantell;
remains now incorporated into a private house
The Priory Church of St John the Evangelist, Horton
____________________
Monk's Horton Priory;
Monkshorton Priory
[50][51]

51°06′52″N 1°00′28″E / 51.1143114°N 1.0078186°E / 51.1143114; 1.0078186 (Horton Priory)
Hythe Monastery uncertain order and foundation

Leeds Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1119 by Robert de Crevecoeur (Croucheart/Crepido Corde), Kt.;
dissolved c.1540 (1539); granted to Sir Antony St Leger 1550-1
St Mary and St Nicholas
____________________
Leedes Priory
[52][53]

51°14′51″N 0°36′42″E / 51.2474614°N 0.611659°E / 51.2474614; 0.611659 (Leeds Priory)
Lesnes Abbey (Westwood Abbey) Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in London
Lewisham Priory Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in London
Lossenham Friary Carmelite Friars
founded c.1242-7;
destroyed by fire 1275; rebuilt;
dissolved 1538
Lossenham Whitefriars [54][55]

51°01′12″N 0°37′27″E / 51.0199877°N 0.6241071°E / 51.0199877; 0.6241071 (Lossenham Friary)
Lydd Monastery + Saxon minster
possible monastic house founded after 774: land granted to the Archbishop of Canterbury;
destroyed in raids by the Danes 893;
Anglo-Saxon remains incorporated into All Saints' parish church
[56]

50°57′06″N 0°54′25″E / 50.9517832°N 0.90693°E / 50.9517832; 0.90693 (Lydd Minster)
Lyminge Abbey + Benedictine? nuns
founded c.633 by Ethelburga, daughter of Æthelberht, King of Kent, on the site of a possibly Roman villa;
monks and nuns
refounded before 736 under Abbot Cuthbert;
ravaged in raids by the Danes, but continued to after 964 (the time of Archbishop Dunstan);
Saxon church, rebuilt c.965, incorporating remains of abbey church
Liming Abbey [57][58]

51°07′35″N 1°05′13″E / 51.1262732°N 1.0869813°E / 51.1262732; 1.0869813 (Lyminge Abbey)
Maidstone Friary Carmelite Friars
13th century Allington Castle site sold to Carmelites 1951;
in private ownership early-21stC
[59]

51°17′36″N 0°30′41″E / 51.2934382°N 0.5114543°E / 51.2934382; 0.5114543 (Maidstone Carmelite Friary)
Maidstone Franciscan Friary Franciscan Friars
license obtained 13 May 1331 by John atte Water to alienate in mortmain to the minister and Friars Minors of England property and land in Maidstone to build an oratory and dwelling-place;
establishment never implemented
[60]
Minster in Sheppey Priory + Benedictine? nuns
founded c.670;
destroyed in raids by the Danes before 900 (855);
Benedictine nuns
founded before 1087;
Augustinian Canonesses?
refounded 1123 (1130?, 1150) by William de Corbeil, Archbishop of Canterbury;
Benedictine nuns
refounded 1186?;
Augustinian Canonesses
refounded 1396;
dissolved 1536; granted to Sir Thomas Cheiney (Cheney) 1537/8;
remains of conventual church incorporated into parochial church
St Sexburga

St Mary and St Sexburgha
____________________
Shepey Priory
[49][61][62]

51°25′20″N 0°48′43″E / 51.422169°N 0.812071°E / 51.422169; 0.812071 (Minster in Sheppey Priory)
Minster in Thanet Priory, earlier site Saxon minster and Benedictine? nuns
founded 669, granted by King Egbert to his niece Domneva to found a monastery;
destroyed in raids by the Danes 1011;
transferred to new site (see immediately below)
secular collegiate
Benedictine monks
granted to St Augustine's Abbey 1027 by King Cnut;
refounded as a grange of St Augustine's;
11th-13th century parochial church of St Mary reputedly built on site
St Domneva [63]

51°19′49″N 1°18′56″E / 51.3303703°N 1.3156772°E / 51.3303703; 1.3156772 (Minster in Thanet Priory, earlier site (purported)) (purported)
Minster in Thanet Priory Benedictine nuns
transferred from earlier site (see immediately above)
St Mary Virgin

St Mildred
[64][65]

51°19′53″N 1°19′03″E / 51.331287°N 1.3175547°E / 51.331287; 1.3175547 (Minster in Thanet Priory)
Minster Abbey * Benedictine nuns
founded 1937; built on site of the earlier abbey (see immediately above); extant
Minster in Thanet Nunnery Benedictine nuns
founded c.750, built by Ermengitha, sister of Domneva
destroyed? in raids by the Danes 980
Minster in Thanet Priory Benedictine monks
founded c.670, granted to Domneva by King Egbert, her uncle;
destroyed in raids by the Danes 980;
dependent on St Augustine's, Canterbury;
granted to St Augustine's by Cnut 1027;
St Mary Virgin
Moatenden Priory Trinitarian monks
founded 1224 by Sir Michael de Ponynges;
dissolved 1538; granted to Sir Antony Aucher 1538/9;
site now occupied by a house named 'Moatenden Manor'
Mottenden Priory;
Headcorn Priory;
Muttiden Friary
[66][67]

51°11′16″N 0°36′05″E / 51.1878755°N 0.601421°E / 51.1878755; 0.601421 (Minster in Moatenden Priory)
New Romney Priory Cistercian monks and nuns — double house
alien house: grange dependent on Pontigny;
founded 1264;
dissolved c.1414
St John [68][69]

50°59′09″N 0°56′23″E / 50.9859411°N 0.9397951°E / 50.9859411; 0.9397951 (New Romney Priory)
New Romney Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of London)
founded before 1241;
dissolved c.1287
Romney Greyfriars [70][71]

50°58′43″N 0°56′00″E / 50.9785373°N 0.9332371°E / 50.9785373; 0.9332371 (Romney Friary)
Newington Priory Benedictine nuns
foundation unknown;
transferred to Minster before 1087(?)
secular canons from between 1154 and 1170;
possible secular college, probably dissolved before 1179
[72] or [73]

51°20′42″N 0°39′18″E / 51.3449619°N 0.6549847°E / 51.3449619; 0.6549847 (Newington Priory (alleged site)) (alleged) or 51°05′27″N 1°06′42″E / 51.0908601°N 1.1117005°E / 51.0908601; 1.1117005 (Newington Priory (poss. site)) (possible)
Ospringe Crutched Friars Crutched Friars
founded before 1234;
dissolved c.1470;
became a secular hospital
Patrixbourne Priory St Mary, Patrixbourne, Kent.jpg Saxon minster
Augustinian Canons Regular
alien house: cell dependent on Beaulieu, Normandy;
founded c.1200;
dissolved 1409;
restored 1849 by Mr Marshall of Canterbury and 1857 by Sir George Gilbert Scott;
church in parochial use as the Parish Church of St Mary
St Mary [74]

51°15′12″N 1°08′11″E / 51.2534448°N 1.1364627°E / 51.2534448; 1.1364627 (Patrixbourne Priory)
Reculver Abbey Reculver Abbey in Kent.jpg Benedictine? monks
founded 669, granted to Bass (Bassa), priest, by Egbert, King of Kent;
destroyed in raids by the Danes;
annexed to Canterbury 949 by King Eadred: abbot and Benedictines probably removed; under a dean until c.1030
Raculfe Abbey [75][76]

51°22′46″N 1°11′59″E / 51.3795322°N 1.1997628°E / 51.3795322; 1.1997628 (Reculver Abbey)
Rochester Cathedral Priory + Rochestercath.jpg secular canons
founded 604;
dissolved 1080;
episcopal diocesan cathedral
founded 604; extant;
Benedictine monks
refounded 1080 by Æthelberht, King of Kent;
dissolved 1540
The Cathedral and Priory Church of Saint Andrew, Rochester [77][78]

51°23′20″N 0°30′12″E / 51.3889331°N 0.5032146°E / 51.3889331; 0.5032146 (Rochester Cathedral Priory)
St Mildred's Monastery purported early Saxon monastery;
probably a minster 8th century


St Radegund's Abbey Premonstratensian Canons
daughter of Prémontré;
founded 1193;
dissolved 1536;
now in private ownership
Bradsole Abbey [79][80]

51°07′55″N 1°15′03″E / 51.1318449°N 1.2507623°E / 51.1318449; 1.2507623 (St Radegund's Abbey (Bradsole))
Salmstone Priory Benedictine monks
residential grange and manor with chapel dependent on St Augustine's, Canterbury
Sandwich Whitefriars Carmellite Friars
founded before 1268 (before c.1272 )
dissolved 1538
[81][82]

51°16′24″N 1°20′18″E / 51.2733301°N 1.3384169°E / 51.2733301; 1.3384169 (Sandwich Whitefriars)
Sittingbourne Austin Friars hospital, hermitage and chapel
Silvester, the superior, apparently became a member of Austin Friars and received a grant to alienate the foundation;
Austin Friars
founded 1255;
dissolved 1256?, Silvester apparently lapsed and the foundation ceased to be an Austin establishment
Shamele Austin Friars
Shoreham Minster Saxon minster
founded before 700;
present church on site, the Parish Church of SS Peter and Paul, built between 1230 and 1270 (during the reign of Edward III) on the site of an earlier church
[83]

51°19′59″N 0°11′04″E / 51.3330517°N 0.1844019°E / 51.3330517; 0.1844019 (Shoreham Minster)
Strood Hospital hospital
founded 1192-3
Benedictine monks
founded 1330: required master to be a Benedictine monk;
dissolved c.1402;
continued as hospital to 1539
St Mary
Strood Preceptory Knights Templar[note 5]
Sutton-at-Hone Preceptory + hospital
founded before 1199;
Knights Hospitaller
granted 1214; preceptory established;
lapsed before 1338 and farmed out[note 6];
evidently revived shortly afterwards;
dissolved 1358;
remains in use as chapel and private residence; (NT)
St John's Jerusalem [84][85]

51°24′39″N 0°14′25″E / 51.4108076°N 0.2403098°E / 51.4108076; 0.2403098 (Sutton-at-Hone Preceptory)
Swingfield Preceptory Sisters of the Order of St John of Jerusalem
cell foundation unknown;
transferred to Sisters of St John Priory, Buckland, Somerset c.1180;
Knights Hospitaller
founded before 1180;
dissolved 1540
St John's Commandery
St John's Chapel
[86][87]

51°09′07″N 1°11′26″E / 51.151887°N 1.1904824°E / 51.151887; 1.1904824 (Swingfield Preceptory)
Temple Ewell Preceptory +,
Ewell
St Peter and St Paul, Temple Ewell, Kent - geograph.org.uk - 325563.jpg Knights Templar
founded c.1185, benefactors William, brother of the King, and William Peverelle;
dissolved 1308-1312;
Knights Hospitaller
refounded 1312;
dissolved 1540;
remains incorporated into parochial church
[88][89]

51°09′52″N 1°16′04″E / 51.164581°N 1.2677246°E / 51.164581; 1.2677246 (Temple Ewell Preceptory)
Thanington Nunnery St James's hospital
founded before 1164;
apparently became nunnery or sisterhood before 1343, with regular priests or brethren to after 1415;
possibly ceased to be a hospital, at least for a time;
dissolved 1551; granted to Robert Dartnall 1551/2
Tanington Hospital [90]

51°15′48″N 1°03′06″E / 51.2633583°N 1.0516995°E / 51.2633583; 1.0516995 (Thanington Nunnery)
Throwley Priory # Benedictine monks
alien house: cell dependent on St Bertin, St Omer;
founded c.1150 by Hugh de Chilham and William de Ipra;
dissolved 1414; granted to Syon Abbey;
house named 'Glebe Cottage' built on site
Thurleigh Priory [91][92]

51°16′00″N 0°51′23″E / 51.2667384°N 0.8563542°E / 51.2667384; 0.8563542 (Throwley Priory)
Tonbridge Priory # Augustinian Canons Regular
founded before 1192 (late in the reign of Henry II) by Richard de Clare, Earl of Hartford (confirmed by the Pope 1192);
dissolved 8 February 1525;
became ruinous between 1753 and 1780;
site later occupied by a railway goods station
St Mary Magdalen [93][94]

51°11′28″N 0°16′24″E / 51.1911183°N 0.2733278°E / 51.1911183; 0.2733278 (Tonbridge Priory)
West Langdon Abbey # Premonstratensian Canons
daughter of Leiston;
founded 1189 (1192) by William de Auberville;
dissolved 1535; granted to the Archbishop of Canterbury 1538/9;
site now occupied by 16th-century farmhouse currently in use as a holiday cottage
St Mary and St Thomas Martyr of Canterbury
____________________
Langdon Abbey
[95][96]

51°10′28″N 1°19′36″E / 51.1745237°N 1.3266903°E / 51.1745237; 1.3266903 (West Langdon Abbey)
West Malling Abbey nuns
founded 688(?); no further reference until:
Benedictine nuns
transferred from Twickenham
founded c.1090 (during the reign of William II) by Gundulf, Bishop of Rochester;
transferred to Milford Haven; dissolved 1538; granted to Henry Cobham, alias Brook 1569/70
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, West Malling [97][98][99]

51°17′36″N 0°24′45″E / 51.2932051°N 0.4124084°E / 51.2932051; 0.4124084 (West Malling Abbey)
West Peckham Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
founded 1337 by Sir John Culpepper;
dissolved 1540; granted to Sir Robert Southwell 1543/4;
[note 7]
West Peccham Hospital;
West Peckham Camera
[100][101]

51°14′58″N 0°21′37″E / 51.2494727°N 0.360269°E / 51.2494727; 0.360269 (West Peckham Preceptory)

Glossary[edit]


edit this box

Map link to lists of monastic houses in England by county[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Cliffe Cell — listed in English Monastic Life but absent in Archives de la France Monastique and others
  2. ^ Dover Abbey — Hadcock & Knowles Medieval Religious Houses in England and Wales, p.140
  3. ^ Elfleet — source: Speed
  4. ^ Elfleet — "[actually Ebbsfleet] if [existed] at all": Dugdale, Notitia Monastica
  5. ^ Strood, Knights Templar — given as preceptory by J. C. Cox, Kent (1915), p.246; R. C. Fowler, — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent, Volume 2 (1926), p.175 states: "The manors of Dartford and Strood alsobelonged to the Templars, but it is doubtful whether preceptories were ever established there."
  6. ^ Sutton-at-Hone — L. B. Larkin, The Knights Hospitallers in England, Camden Society (1857)
  7. ^ West Peckham —W. Dugdale, Monasticon Anglicanum & others list as preceptory; Archaeologia Cantiana states no preceptory there, rather Grand Master's camera on land granted by Elizabeth de Burgh in 1337

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: THE FRIARS
  2. ^ British History Online — Friaries: The Carmelite friars of Aylesford — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.201-203)
  3. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BILSINGTON PRIORY
  4. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Bilsington — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.156-157)
  5. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BLACKWOSE PRIORY
  6. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BOXLEY ABBEY
  7. ^ British History Online — Houses of Cistercian monks: The abbey of Boxley — A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.153-155)
  8. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: CANTERBURY AUSTIN FRIARY
  9. ^ a b British History Online — Friaries: The Austin friars of Canterbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.199-201)
  10. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CANTERBURY BLACKFRIARS
  11. ^ British History Online —Friaries: The Dominican friars of Canterbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.177-180)
  12. ^ a b Canterbury Cathedral — Home
  13. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL
  14. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine monks: The cathedral priory of the Holy Trinity or Christ Church, Canterbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.113-121)
  15. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CANTERBURY FRIARY OF FRIARS OF THE SACK
  16. ^ British History Online —Friaries: The friars of the sack, Canterbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.205)
  17. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: CANTERBURY GREYFRIARS
  18. ^ a b British History Online —Friaries: The Franciscan friars of Canterbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.190-194)
  19. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST AUGUSTINES ABBEY
  20. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine monks: The abbey of St Augustine, Canterbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.126-133)
  21. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST GREGORYS PRIORY
  22. ^ British History Online —Houses of Austin canons: The priory of St Gregory, St Canterbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.157-159)
  23. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CANTERBURY ST SEPULCHRES PRIORY
  24. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine nuns: The priory of St Sepulchre, Canterbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.142-144)
  25. ^ http://monasticmatrix.org/MatrixTextLibrary/mm-s12206-dugdalew-saintsepul-canterbury.pdf
  26. ^ Canterbury
  27. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: COMBWELL PRIORY
  28. ^ British History Online —Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Combwell — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.160-161)
  29. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 1301426
  30. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: DARTFORD PRIORY
  31. ^ a b British History Online —Friaries: The Dominican nuns of Dartford — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.181-190)
  32. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: DAVINGTON PRIORY
  33. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine nuns: The priory of Davington — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.144-145)
  34. ^ British History Online —Davington Priory
  35. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST MARY IN CASTRO
  36. ^ a b c British History Online —Houses of Benedictine monks: The priory of Dover — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.133-137)
  37. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: DOVER COLLEGE
  38. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST MARTIN-LE-GRAND
  39. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF THE KNIGHTS TEMPLAR
  40. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: FAVERSHAM ABBEY
  41. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine monks: The abbey of Faversham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.137-141)
  42. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: FOLKESTONE PRIORY
  43. ^ a b British History Online —Alien Houses: The priory of Folkestone — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.236-238)
  44. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: FOLKESTONE PRIORY
  45. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HIGHAM PRIORY
  46. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine nuns: The priory of Higham or Littlechurch — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.145-146)
  47. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 416700
  48. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: NUNNERY OF ST WERBURGH
  49. ^ a b British History Online —Houses of Benedictine nuns: The priory of Minster in Sheppey — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.149-150)
  50. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONKS HORTON PRIORY
  51. ^ British History Online —Houses of Cluniac monks: The priory of Monkshorton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.151-153)
  52. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LEEDS PRIORY
  53. ^ British History Online —Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Leeds — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.162-165)
  54. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LOSSENHAM WHITEFRIARS
  55. ^ British History Online —Friaries: The Carmelite friars of Lossenham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.203-204)
  56. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ALL SAINTS CHURCH
  57. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST MARY AND ST ETHELBURG
  58. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine nuns: The abbey of Lyminge — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (p.146)
  59. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ALLINGTON CASTLE
  60. ^ British History Online —Friaries: The Franciscan friars of Maidstone — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.198)
  61. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF SS MARY AND SEXBURGA
  62. ^ Abbey Of St Mary And St Sexburga Images
  63. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST MARYS CHURCH
  64. ^ Welcome to Minster Abbey
  65. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine nuns: The abbey of Minster in Thanet — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (p.151)
  66. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MOATENDEN PRIORY
  67. ^ British History Online —Friaries: The Trinitarian friars of Mottenden (Headcorn) — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.205-208)
  68. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST JOHNS PRIORY
  69. ^ British History Online —Alien Houses: The priory of New Romney — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (p.239)
  70. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: NEW ROMNEY GREYFRIARS
  71. ^ British History Online —Friaries: The Franciscan friars of Romney — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (p.199)
  72. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: NEWINGTON PRIORY
  73. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 463877
  74. ^ British History Online —Alien Houses: The priory of Patrixbourne — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (p.239)
  75. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST MARY
  76. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine monks: The abbey of Reculver — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.141-142)
  77. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine monks: The cathedral priory of St Andrew, Rochester — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.121-126)
  78. ^ Home — Rochester Cathedral
  79. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST RADEGUNDS ABBEY
  80. ^ British History Online —Houses of Premonstratensian canons: The abbey of Bradsole or St Radegund — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.172-175)
  81. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WHITEFRIARS
  82. ^ British History Online —Friaries: The Carmelite friars of Sandwich — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.204-205)
  83. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST PETER AND ST PAUL
  84. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HOSPITAL OF ST JOHN OF JERUSALEM
  85. ^ British History Online —Houses of Knights Hospitallers: The preceptory of Sutton at Hone — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.175-176)
  86. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST JOHNS COMMANDERY
  87. ^ British History Online —Houses of Knights Hospitallers — The preceptory of Swingfield — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (p.176)
  88. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: TEMPLE EWELL
  89. ^ British History Online —House of Knights Templar: The preceptory of Ewell — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (p.175)
  90. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST JAMES HOSPITAL
  91. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: THROWLEY PRIORY
  92. ^ British History Online —Alien Houses: The priory of Throwley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.239-240)
  93. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: PRIORY OF ST MARY MAGDALEN
  94. ^ British History Online —Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Tonbridge — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.167-169)
  95. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LANGDON ABBEY
  96. ^ British History Online —Houses of Premonstratensian canons: The abbey of West Langdon — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.169-172)
  97. ^ British History Online —Houses of Benedictine nuns: The abbey of Malling — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.146-148)
  98. ^ Saint Mary's Abbey
  99. ^ English Benedictine Congregation — Curzon Park Abbey
  100. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: DUKES PLACE
  101. ^ British History Online —Houses of Knights Hospitallers: The preceptory of West Peckham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (p.175)
  • Binns, Alison (1989) Studies in the History of Medieval Religion 1: Dedications of Monastic Houses in England and Wales 1066-1216, Boydell
  • Cobbett, William (1868) List of Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, And Other Religious Foundations in England and Wales and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, or Alienated by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments
  • Knowles, David & Hadcock, R. Neville (1971) Medieval Religious Houses England & Wales. Longman
  • Morris, Richard (1979) Cathedrals and Abbeys of England and Wales, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
  • Thorold, Henry (1986) Collins Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories of England and Wales, Collins
  • Thorold, Henry (1993) Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.
  • English Cathedrals and Abbeys, Illustrated, Odhams Press Ltd.
  • Map of Monastic Britain, South Sheet, Ordnance Survey, 2nd edition, 1954