List of monastic houses in London

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List of monastic houses in London is located in Greater London
Barking Abbey
Barking Abbey
Bentley Priory
Bentley Priory
Brockley Abbey
Brockley Abbey
Bromley-by-Bow (Stratford-at-Bow) Priory
Bromley-by-Bow (Stratford-at-Bow) Priory
Greenwich Greyfriars
Greenwich Greyfriars
Hampton Cell
Hampton Cell
Hampton Preceptory
Hampton Preceptory
Harmondsworth Priory
Harmondsworth Priory
Hornchurch (?)Priory
Hornchurch (?)Priory
Hounslow Priory
Hounslow Priory
Kilburn Priory
Kilburn Priory
Lesnes Abbey
Lesnes Abbey
Lewisham Priory
Lewisham Priory
St Dominic's Priory
St Dominic's Priory
Merton Priory
Merton Priory
Moor Hall Preceptory
Moor Hall Preceptory
Richmond Greyfriars
Richmond Greyfriars
Ruislip Priory
Ruislip Priory
Stratford Langthorne Abbey
Stratford Langthorne Abbey
Stratford Friary
Stratford Friary
Syon Abbey
Syon Abbey
Tooting Priory
Tooting Priory
Upminster (poss.)
Upminster (poss.)
Woodford Green Friary
Woodford Green Friary
CENTRAL LONDON (see below)
CENTRAL LONDON (see below)
Locations of monastic houses in Greater London
List of monastic houses in London is located in London & Westminster
Clerkenwell Priory
Clerkenwell Priory
Clerkenwell Preceptory
Clerkenwell Preceptory
Ealing Abbey
Ealing Abbey
Eastminster Abbey (St Mary Graces Abbey)
Eastminster Abbey (St Mary Graces Abbey)
Elsing Spital Priory
Elsing Spital Priory
St Helen's, Bishopsgate
St Helen's, Bishopsgate
St Mary of Bethlehem Friary
St Mary of Bethlehem Friary
Whitefriars
Whitefriars
Haliwell Priory
Haliwell Priory
New Temple
New Temple
Old Temple (Camden Preceptory)
Old Temple (Camden Preceptory)
Westminster Abbey
Westminster Abbey
Westminster Pied Friars
Westminster Pied Friars
Crutched Friars
Crutched Friars
Ludgate Blackfriars
Ludgate Blackfriars
Newgate Greyfriars
Newgate Greyfriars
Cornhill Greyfriars
Cornhill Greyfriars
Austin Friars
Austin Friars
Aldgate — Holy Trinity Priory
Aldgate — Holy Trinity Priory
Aldgate Abbey (Holy Trinity, Minories)
Aldgate Abbey (Holy Trinity, Minories)
Bermondsey Minster
Bermondsey Minster
Bermondsey Abbey
Bermondsey Abbey
Southwark Cathedral Priory
Southwark Cathedral Priory
St Bartholomew's Priory
St Bartholomew's Priory
London Charterhouse
London Charterhouse
Locations of monastic houses in Central London

The following is a list of monastic houses in Greater London, England.

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Templars and Hospitallers). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The name of the county is given where there is reference to an establishment in another county. Where the county has changed since the foundation's dissolution the modern county is given in parentheses, and in instances where the referenced foundation ceased to exist before the unification of England, the kingdom is given, followed by the modern county in parentheses.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from the details provided by English Heritage Pastscape [1] and Ordnance Survey publications.

A Monastic Glossary follows the listing, which provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure) or redundant intact structure
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown
identification ambiguous or confused

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented)
or ecclesiastical establishments with a monastic appellation but lacking monastic connection.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
EH English Heritage
LT Landmark Trust
NT National Trust

Alphabetical listing of establishments[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Aldgate Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1107-8 by Queen Maud;
conventual church rebuilt 1339 onwards;
dilapidated since 1532;
dissolved 1534; granted to Sir Thomas Audley, Speaker of the House of Commons 1531/2;
largely demolished thereafter
Christchurch, Aldgate [1][2]

51°30′49″N 0°04′41″W / 51.5136°N 0.0780°W / 51.5136; -0.0780 (Aldgate — Holy Trinity Priory)
Aldgate Abbey PA120152.JPG Franciscan nuns
founded 1293-4 by Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, confirmed by his brother Edward I;
dissolved March 1539;
The Abbey Church of the Grace of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Francis, without Aldgate
____________________
The Minories, London;
Holy Trinity, Minories
[3]

51°30′41″N 0°04′29″W / 51.5115°N 0.0746°W / 51.5115; -0.0746 (Aldgate Abbey (Holy Trinity, Minories))
Barking Abbey Barking Abbey.jpg Benedictine? nuns and monks — double house
founded c.666 by St Erkenwald son of Anna, King of the East Angles;
destroyed in raids by the Danes 870;
refounded 946-951
Benedictine nuns
refounded 965-75 by King Edgar and St Dunstan
dissolved 14 November 1539; granted to Edward, Lord Clinton 1551/2
St Mary

St Mary and St Ethelburgha
____________________
Berking Abbey;
Bedenham Abbey
[4][5]

51°32′8″N 0°4′31″E / 51.53556°N 0.07528°E / 51.53556; 0.07528 (Barking Abbey)
Bentley Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1171 by Ranulf de Glanville;
dissolved before 1532;
house named 'The Priory' possibly built on site: formerly in use as a girls' school, then a hotel;
now in ownership of R.A.F. Bentley Priory
The Priory Church of Saint Mary Magdalen, Bentley [6][7]

51°37′12″N 0°20′16″W / 51.62°N 0.3377974°W / 51.62; -0.3377974 (Bentley Priory)
Bermondsey Minster Saxon monastery
founded not earlier than under Pope Constantine I (708-715)[note 1]
nothing further known about its history — possibly destroyed in raids by the Danes 9th century and succeeded by a new minster at Southwark
[8]

51°29′39″N 0°04′16″W / 51.4940828°N 0.0710893°W / 51.4940828; -0.0710893 (Bermondsey Minster)
Bermondsey Abbey Bermondsey Abbey 2.jpg Cluniac monks
alien house: dependent on La Charité;
priory founded 1082 by Alvin (Aylwin) Child, citizen of London (first monks arrived 1089);
became denizen: independent from 1381;
raised to abbey status 1399 by order of the Pope;
dissolved 1 January 1538; granted to Sir Richard Southwell 1541/2; and demolished soon after
St Saviour [9][10]

51°29′49″N 0°04′47″W / 51.4969099°N 0.0796375°W / 51.4969099; -0.0796375 (Bermondsey Abbey)
Brockley Abbey Premonstratensian Canons
daughter of Sulby, Northamptonshire;
founded before 1182 by Countess Juliana and her seneschal Michael of Thornham;
dissolved 1199-1208;
transferred to Bayham, (East) Sussex c.1180
The Abbey Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Brockley [11][12]

51°27′55″N 0°01′47″W / 51.4653443°N 0.0298584°W / 51.4653443; -0.0298584 (Brockley Abbey)
Bromley-by-Bow Priory Benedictine nuns
founded before 1122;
dissolved 1536
Bromley Priory;
Stratford-at-Bow Priory;
Stratford-by-Bow Priory
[13][14]

51°31′42″N 0°00′46″W / 51.5282668°N 0.0128612°W / 51.5282668; -0.0128612 (Bromley-by-Bow Priory (Stratford-at-Bow Priory))
Clerkenwell Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
founded c.1144 (or c.1100 by Jordan Briset, Baron, and his wife Muriel[note 2]);
dissolved 1540; the tower was blown up by Protector Somerset, much of the material used to build Somerset House
St John's Clerkenwell [15][16][17]

51°31′21″N 0°06′11″W / 51.5225262°N 0.1030988°W / 51.5225262; -0.1030988 (Clerkenwell Preceptory)
Clerkenwell Priory Augustinian Canonesses
founded 1100 by Robert, Priest, or c.1144 by Jordan FitzRalph (Briset);
also given as Benedictine nuns
dissolved c.1539; granted to Walter Hanley and John Williams, Knight 1545/6
The Priory Church of Saint Mary de Fonte

The Priory Church of Saint Mary of the Assumption
[18][19]

51°31′26″N 0°06′24″W / 51.5238813°N 0.1066393°W / 51.5238813; -0.1066393 (Clerkenwell Priory)
Ealing Abbey * Benedictine monks — from Downside, Somerset
founded 1897;
priory 1916;
raised to abbey status 1955; extant
The Abbey Church of Saint Benedict, Ealing [20][21]

51°31′11″N 0°18′32″W / 51.5198192°N 0.3089583°W / 51.5198192; -0.3089583 (Ealing Abbey)
Eastminster Abbey Cistercian monks
daughter of Beaulieu, Hampshire;
founded 20 March 1350 by Edward III;
dissolved 1538; granted to Sir Arthur Darcy 1542/3
New Abbey;
The Abbey of St Mary de Graciis;
St Mary Graces Abbey
[22][23]

51°30′33″N 0°04′19″W / 51.5092967°N 0.0720549°W / 51.5092967; -0.0720549 (Eastminster Abbey (St Mary Graces Abbey))
Elsing Spital Priory secular college
(community founded at London within Cripplegate before 1329)
transferred here: founded 1329 by William Elsing;
nuns
conventual hospital
founded 1331;
chapel for priory and hospital built 1332;
Augustinian Canons Regular
conventual hospital;
founded 1340; granted to John Williams, Master of the King's Jewels 1539/40;
destroyed by fire 24 December 1539/40;
priory church in parochial use from dissolution;
demolished 1923
Elsing Spittle Priory;
Priory and Hospital of St Mary-within-Cripplegate
Church of St Alphage, London Wall
[24][25][26]

51°31′03″N 0°05′34″W / 51.5176286°N 0.0928742°W / 51.5176286; -0.0928742 (Elsing Spital Priory)
Feltham Priory Anglican Benedictine nuns
founded 24 June 1868 by Father Ignatius;
transferred to Twickenham
SS Mary and Scholastica
____________________
Feltham Nunnery
[27]

Greenwich Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded 1376 by Edward III and Sir John Norbury;
dissolved; refounded by Queen Mary;
dissolved by Elizabeth I
Greenwich Greyfriars # Observant Franciscan Friars
founded 1482: permission granted by the Pope to Edward IV, established 1485;
suppressed for rejection of papal authority 1534;
Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of London)
refounded 1534;
dissolved 1538;
Observant Franciscan Friars
refounded 1555;
dissolved 1559;
demolished;
north-west wing of hospital currently stands on site
[28][29]

51°28′59″N 0°00′23″W / 51.4831602°N 0.0065017°W / 51.4831602; -0.0065017 (Greenwich Greyfriars)
Haliwell Priory Augustinian Canonesses
founded before 1127 (before 1150(?)) by Robert fitz Gelran (Fitzmore), canon of St Paul's; benefacted by Richard Belmeis, Bishop of London;
also given as Benedictine nuns
dissolved c.1539; granted to William Webb 1544/5
The Priory Church of Saint John the Baptist, Holywell
____________________
Holywell Priory;
Holywell Nunnery, Shorditch
[30][31][32]

51°31′26″N 0°04′44″W / 51.5239615°N 0.07892°W / 51.5239615; -0.07892 (Haliwell Priory)
Hampton Cell Sisters of St John of Jerusalem
founded before 1180;
transferred to Sisters of St John Priory, Buckland, Somerset c.1180
[33]

51°24′31″N 0°21′44″W / 51.4085891°N 0.3623021°W / 51.4085891; -0.3623021 (Hampton Cell)
Hampton Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
founded before 1180(?);
manor procured by Hospitallers 1237; referred to as a camera 1338[note 3];
later guest house; leased out 1505;
dissolved 1338;
lands were leased to the royal courtier Giles Daubeney 1494, who built private house; demolished 1514;
99-year lease obtained from the Hospitallers by Wolsey June 1514;
Hampton Court built on site
[34][35]

51°24′13″N 0°20′16″W / 51.403486°N 0.3377008°W / 51.403486; -0.3377008 (Hampton Preceptory)
Harmondsworth Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: cell(?) dependent on St-Catherine-du-Mont, Rouen;
founded between 1066 and 1087 (during the reign of William the Conqueror);
dissolved ?before 1391; granted to Winchester College;
granted to Sir William Paget 1547/8
[36][37]

51°29′21″N 0°28′53″W / 51.4891462°N 0.4812607°W / 51.4891462; -0.4812607 (Harmondsworth Priory)
Hornchurch Hospital (?)and Priory + St Andrew's Hornchurch.jpg alien house: cell dependent on the Hospice of St Bernard Montjoux (St Bernard, Monte Jovis) in Savoy;
founded probably early-1159 by Henry II;
dissolved November 1390; granted to New College, Oxford 1391;
site now occupied by St. Andrews C.E. parish church
The Priory Church of Saint Nicholas and Saint Bernard, Hornchurch
____________________
Monasterium Cornutum;
Havering Priory
[38][39]

51°33′38″N 0°13′34″E / 51.560491°N 0.2262282°E / 51.560491; 0.2262282 (Hornchurch (?)Priory)
Hounslow Priory hospital
founded before 1200;
Trinitarians
founded after 1224 (possibly 1252);
dissolved 1538; granted to William, Lord Windsor;
Parish Church of the Holy Trinity built on site 1828
The Holy Trinity
____________________
Hounslow Friary
[40][41]

51°28′07″N 0°21′50″W / 51.4686126°N 0.3638363°W / 51.4686126; -0.3638363 (Hounslow Priory)
Kilburn Priory Remains of Kilburn Priory as it appeared in 1722.jpg anchoresses cell
founded before/c.1130;
Benedictine nuns
founded 1139 (during the reign of Henry I) by the Convent of Westminster;
possibly Augustinian Canonesses during existence — but began and ended as Benedictine;
dissolved 1537 (1536); granted to John, Earl of Warwick 1547/8
Kylburn Nunnery [37][42][43][44]

51°32′28″N 0°11′56″W / 51.5410663°N 0.198922°W / 51.5410663; -0.198922 (Kilburn Priory)
Lesnes Abbey Lesnes Abbey.JPG Augustinian Canons Regular — Arrouasian
founded June 1178 by Richard de Luci, Justiciar of England;
dissolved 1525; granted to Cardinal Wolsey's college at Oxford; granted to Sir Ralph Sadler 1536/7
The Abbey Church of Saint Thomas the Martyr, Lesnes
____________________
Westwood Abbey
[45][46]

51°29′20″N 0°07′44″E / 51.4887588°N 0.1289284°E / 51.4887588; 0.1289284 (Lesnes Abbey)
Lewisham Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: cell dependent on St Peter, Gent;
founded 11 September 918: granted by Elstrudis, Countess of Flanders and her sons Arnulf and Adelulf, confirmed by King Edgar August 964;
confiscated and destroyed;
restored 1044 by Edward the Confessor;
dissolved 1414; granted to the Carthusians at Sheen by Henry V 1415
[10][47]

51°27′26″N 0°00′54″W / 51.4571549°N 0.0151062°W / 51.4571549; -0.0151062 (Lewisham Priory)
London Areno Friars Friars of St Mary de Areno
founded 1267 by William Arnand, a knight of Henry III;
ceased 1317 with the death of the last brother, Hugh of York (appears to be the same establishment as the London Pied Friars and Westminster Pied Friars)
[48][49]
London Austin Friars Augustinian Friars
founded 1253 by Humphrey Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex;
dissolved 1538; granted to John a Losco 1550, who founded preaching house for congregation of Walloon refugees;
nave used as church, quire, transepts and tower demolished 1600;
church destroyed by fire 1862; rebuilt 1863;
bombed in 1940 during World War II;
rebuilt 1950-6 as the Dutch Church, Austin Friars
[50][51]

51°30′56″N 0°05′08″W / 51.5154763°N 0.0856751°W / 51.5154763; -0.0856751 (London Austin Friars)
London Charterhouse ^, Charterhouse Square CharterhouseEC1.jpg secular college intended 1348; chapel built; founded by Sir Walter de Manny;
Carthusian monks
founded 1371;
dissolved 1537; granted to Sir Thomas Audley 1544/5;
almshouse and Charterhouse School founded by Thomas Sutton on the site 1622; which transferred to Godalming 1872; and that part of the site is now research facilities for the Barts and The London medical school
House of the Salutation of the Mother of God [52]

51°31′17″N 0°05′59″W / 51.52139°N 0.09972°W / 51.52139; -0.09972 (London Charterhouse)
London, Cornhill Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of London)
founded 1224: hired a house here after living for a number of days with the Dominicans at Holborn upon arriving in London;
transferred to Newgate 1225
[53][54]

51°30′57″N 0°05′58″W / 51.5157701°N 0.0994724°W / 51.5157701; -0.0994724 (London Cornhill Greyfriars)
London Crutched Friars Crutched Friars
founded before 1269;
dissolved 1538
[49][55]

51°30′39″N 0°04′42″W / 51.5108325°N 0.0783473°W / 51.5108325; -0.0783473 (London Crutched Friars)
London, Friars of the Sack, Aldersgate Friars of the Sack
founded 1257;
transferred to Lothbury (see immediately below) before 1271-2
[56][57]
London, Friars of the Sack, Lothbury Friars of the Sack
(community founded at Aldersgate (see immediately above) 1257);
transferred here before 1271-1;
abandoned 1305; chapel became a chantry
[56][57][58][59]
London, Holborn Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded before 1224 (probably 1221);
transferred to Ludgate (see immediately below) after 1275
Monumenta Conventus Londinensis [60][61]
London, Ludgate Blackfriars Dominican Friars
(community founded at Holborn (see immediately above) before 1224 (probably 1221))
transferred here after 1275;
dissolved 12 November 1538;
briefly refounded under Queen Mary at Smithfield
[61][62]

51°30′44″N 0°06′11″W / 51.5122848°N 0.1031202°W / 51.5122848; -0.1031202 (London, Ludgate Blackfriars)
London, Newgate Greyfriars Franciscan Friars (under the Custody of London)
(community founded at Cornhill 1224);
transferred here 1225: John Iwyn, citizen of London, allowed them the use of land and property;
school founded
church completed 1327;
dissolved 12 November 1538;
granted to the City of London 1546/7; reused as Christ Hospital
[53][54]

51°30′58″N 0°06′00″W / 51.5162174°N 0.1000196°W / 51.5162174; -0.1000196 (London, Newgate Greyfriars)
London, New Temple + TempleChurch-Exterior.jpg Knights Templar
(community founded at earlier site (see immediately below) 1121);
transferred here 1161;
dissolved 1308-12;
Knights Hospitaller
transferred 1324;
part leased to lawyers for use as a hostel;
dissolved after 1540;
leased to the Benches of the Inner and Middle Temple by James I 1609;
restorations 19th century;
church severely damaged in World War II in 1941;
restored 1947-57
[63][64][65][66][67]
[68][69][70][71]

51°30′48″N 0°06′38″W / 51.5132029°N 0.1104856°W / 51.5132029; -0.1104856 (New Temple)
London, Old Temple Knights Templar
founded 1121;
transferred to new site (see immediately above) 1161
Camden Preceptory [71][72]

51°31′04″N 0°06′45″W / 51.5177621°N 0.1126313°W / 51.5177621; -0.1126313 (Old Temple (Camden Preceptory))
London Pied Friars Pied Friars
(appears to be the same as London Areno Friars, and Westminster Pied Friars)
[48][73]
London — St Dominic's Priory St Dominic's NW5 (B).jpg Dominican Friars
opened 1867, church completed 1882
The Priory of Our Holy Father St Dominic
Our Lady of the Rosary and Saint Dominic
[74]

51°33′03″N 0°09′26″W / 51.5507484°N 0.1572311°W / 51.5507484; -0.1572311 (London, St Dominic's Priory)
London — St Helen's, Bishopsgate + St Helens Bishopsgate.jpg Benedictine nuns
founded before 1216 by William fitz William(s), goldsmith;
dissolved 25 November 1538; granted to Sir Richard Cromwell 1541/2;
conventual buildings were acquired by the Leathersellers' Company 1543;
conventual church now in parochial use as the Parish Church of St Helen, Bishopsgate;
church restored 18th, 19th, 20th century;
damaged by IRA bomb 10 April 1992; restored 1995-7
St Helen [75][76]

51°30′53″N 0°04′54″W / 51.5148°N 0.0818°W / 51.5148; -0.0818 (London — St Helen's, Bishopsgate)
London — St James Monkswell Chantry Carthusian monks
house or cell of the Abbot of Garendon;
chantry(?), daughter of Garendon, Leicestershire;
founded 1341
London, St Mary Spital Augustinian Canons Regular
conventual hospital or priory
founded 1197 by Walter Fitz Ealdred land granted by Walter Brunus, citizen of London, and his wife Roisia;
granted to Stephen Vaughan who made his home in the precinct
St Mary the Virgin
____________________
St Mary Spittle, without Bishopsgate;
Domus Dei
[77][78]
London, St Mary of Bethlehem Friary Augustinian Canons Regular — Order of Bethlehem
conventual hospital;
St Mary of Bethlehem Sisters
founded 1247, land granted by Simon Fitz Mary to Godfrey, bishop of Bethlehem to founded a house of canons, brothers and sisters;
hospital became attached to the founded before 1329;
dissolved; hospital but was moved to Moorfields 1675-6 and then to the South side of the Thames in 1814 (see Bethlem Royal Hospital)
The Bethlehem Hospital;
Bedlam
[79][80]

51°31′03″N 0°05′12″W / 51.5174359°N 0.0867695°W / 51.5174359; -0.0867695 (London, St Mary of Bethlehem Friary)
London, St Thomas of Acon Hospital Augustinian Canons Regular
conventual hospital
London, Smithfield Blackfriars Dominican Friars
briefly founded under Queen Mary
[61]
London Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded 1247 by Sir Richard Grey;
church built 1253; rebuilt mid-14th century
dissolved 1538; granted to Richard Moresyne and William Butts 1540/1; frater, library and kitchen granted to the King's Armourer; Michael Drayton and Thomas Woodford, nephew of the playwright Thomas Lodge, converted the former refectory for use as The Whitefriars Theatre 1608 (or possibly 1606); theatre closed 1629
[81][82]

51°30′47″N 0°06′29″W / 51.5131094°N 0.1080877°W / 51.5131094; -0.1080877 (London Whitefriars)
London within Cripplegate (?)Priory nuns(?)/conventual hospital
founded before 1329;
became dilapidated;
abandoned 1329; transferred to Elsing
Merton Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1114 (1117) by Gilbert Norman, Sheriff of Surrey;
dissolved 1538;
Merton Abbey Station built on site 19th century;
site now occupied by shopping centre with purpose-built basement from which remains are visible
The Priory Church of Saint Mary, Merton

The Priory Church of Saint Mary of Merton
____________________
Merton Abbey St Mary's Priory;
St Mary of Merton
[83][84]

51°24′51″N 0°10′55″W / 51.4142839°N 0.1819181°W / 51.4142839; -0.1819181 (Merton Priory)
Moor Hall Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
founded apparently c.1176, granted by Beatrice de Bollers, widdow;
apparently became a camera by 1338;
dissolved 1338;
chapel demolished 1960
Harefield Preceptory;
Harefield Camera;
Moor Hall Camera
[35][85]

51°35′21″N 0°29′00″W / 51.5892462°N 0.4832777°W / 51.5892462; -0.4832777 (Moor Hall Preceptory)
Richmond Greyfriars # Observant Franciscan Friars
founded 1499 or 1500;
dissolved 1534; probably passed to the Austin Friars;
probably Augustinian Friars
refounded 1534;
dissolved 1536?
Richmond Austin Friars (1534-6)
Sheen Friary
[86]

51°27′37″N 0°18′28″W / 51.4603227°N 0.3078921°W / 51.4603227; -0.3078921 (Richmond Greyfriars)
Ruislip Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent Bec-Hellouin;
founded (during the reign of William the Conqueror) land granted by Ernulph de Heding;
conventual until after? c.1250;
parcel of Ogbourne, Wiltshire 1291;
dissolved 1404;
granted to Ralph Sadler 1540/1;
Manor Farm House built 16th century
Riselipp Priory [37][87]

51°34′44″N 0°25′38″W / 51.5787964°N 0.4273295°W / 51.5787964; -0.4273295 (Ruislip Priory)
St Bartholomew's Priory + St barts the great exterior.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1123, land obtained from Henry I by Roahere, formerly a minstrel at court;
became a priory with a separate hospital;
dissolved October 1539; granted to Lord Rich 1558/9;
now St Bartholomew's Hospital, and priory church in parochial use
The Priory Church of St Bartholomew-the-Great, Smithfield [88][89]

51°31′7.92″N 0°05′58.77″W / 51.5188667°N 0.0996583°W / 51.5188667; -0.0996583 (St Bartholomew's Priory)
Sheen Priory Carthusian monks
founded c.1414 by Henry V;
dissolved 1539; granted to Edward, Earl of Hertford 1540/1;
restored 26 January 1557 by Queen Mary, under Maurice Chauncy of London (who became prior)
dissolved by Elizabeth I
The Priory Church of Jesus of Bethlehem
____________________
Richmond Priory;
Shene Priory


Sheen Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded c.1315;
dissolved c.1318; community transferred by Edward II to his manor called the 'Palace of Beaufort' at Oxford 1317-8
Southwark Cathedral Priory + Southwarkcath.jpg Saxon minster church pre-1066, allegedly built on the remains of an earlier nunnery; probably founded as a burghal minster either late in the reign of Alfred or earlier in the reign of Edward the Elder; probably succeeded the minster at Bermondsey;
Augustinian Canons Regular
(re)founded 1106;
largely destroyed by fire 1212; subsequently rebuilt;
dissolved 27 October 1539; granted to Sir Antony Brown 1544/5;
episcopal diocesan cathedral
founded 1 May 1905: see created for new diocese separated from Rochester; extant
The Priory Church of Saint Mary Overie, Southwark [90][91][92][93]

51°30′22″N 0°05′23″W / 51.506118°N 0.089660°W / 51.506118; -0.089660 (Southwark Cathedral Priory)
Stratford Langthorne Abbey Stratford Langthorne - Charnel stone.jpg Savignac monks
founded 25 July 1135;
Cistercian monks
orders merged 17 September 1147;
dissolved 1538
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Stratford Langthorne
____________________
West Ham Abbey
[94]

51°32′00″N 00°00′00″W / 51.53333°N -0.00000°E / 51.53333; -0.00000 (Stratford Langthorne Abbey)
Stratford Friary * Franciscan Friars Minor
extant
[95]

51°32′40″N 0°00′14″E / 51.5444802°N 0.0038087°E / 51.5444802; 0.0038087 (Stratford Friary)
Syon Abbey Bridgetine nuns
founded 1431;
dissolved 1539;
18th century house acquired
Charterhouse at Sheen [96]

51°28′36″N 0°18′45″W / 51.4767456°N 0.3124881°W / 51.4767456; -0.3124881 (Syon Abbey)
Tooting Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Bec-Hellouin;
manor held by Bec-Hellouin at the Domesday Survey;
founded before 1086: granted by Richard de Tonbridge, Lord of Clare;
dissolved before 1315(?); parcel of Ogbourne 1315;
dissolved by Henry V 1414 and granted to his brother John, Duke of Bedford; on his death 14 September 1436, it passed to Henry VI who granted to John Ardern for ten years;
granted to Eton College 1440
Tooting Bec Priory [97][98]

51°25′56″N 0°08′44″W / 51.4323338°N 0.1456654°W / 51.4323338; -0.1456654 (Tooting Priory)
Twickenham Abbey Bridgetine nuns
founded 1415 by Henry V (who laid the first stone 22 February and signed charter 3 March);
transferred to Syon 1431
Twickenham Priory Anglican Benedictine nuns
transferred from Feltham;
transferred to West Malling, Kent
[27]

Upminster Upminster, Essex - The Parish Church of Saint Laurence - geograph.org.uk - 645647.jpg Saxon 'minster';
possibly on site now occupied by the Parish Church of St Laurence
[99]

51°33′21″N 0°14′52″E / 51.555765°N 0.2479085°E / 51.555765; 0.2479085 (Upminster (possible)) (possible)
Westminster Abbey + Westminster abbey west.jpg legendary very early foundation[note 4];
possibly monastery founded c.616 (probably just a chapel or church) by Sebert on instruction by Bishop Mellitus;
some evidence of monastery, possibly secular, founded before 785, destroyed? in raids by the Danes 871-2?, restored
Benedictine monks
founded c.960 (959)[note 5];
dissolved 16 January 1540;
episcopal cathedral 1540-1550;
restored 1556;
dissolved 1559;
collegiate church 1560;
now in use as a royal peculiar
The Abbey Church of Saint Peter in Westminster [100]

51°29′57″N 0°07′39″W / 51.4992743°N 0.12748°W / 51.4992743; -0.12748 (Westminster Abbey)
Westminster Pied Friars Pied Friars
(appears to be the same establishment as the London Areno Friars and London Pied Friars)
[48]

51°30′34″N 0°07′20″W / 51.5093267°N 0.1223248°W / 51.5093267; -0.1223248 (Westminster Pied Friars)
Woodford Green Friary * Franciscan Friars Minor
extant
Friary and Parish of St Thomas of Canterbury [101]

51°36′55″N 0°01′28″E / 51.615172°N 0.0245583°E / 51.615172; 0.0245583 (Woodford Green Friary)

Glossary[edit]


edit this box

Map link to lists of monastic houses in England by county[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Bermondsey, Saxon minster -'Vermundesei' given as a dependency of Medeshamstede (Peterborough) in 690: Walter de Gray Birch, (1885-93), Cartularium Saxonicum p.133
  2. ^ Clerkenwell Preceptory — foundation according to Stow: Survey of London (1633); Jordan Briset died 1110; foundation as early as 1100 not possible
  3. ^ Hampton Preceptory — status given as camera: C. S. Larking, The Knights Hospitallers in England, (1857), (pp.127-8);
  4. ^ Westminster Abbey — AD184 foundation according to 15th century monk, converted to a temple of Apollo under Diocletian
  5. ^ Westminster Abbey — or less reliably c.965, given by William of Malmesbury

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ALDGATE PRIORY
  2. ^ British History Online — Austin canons: Priory of Holy Trinity or Christchurch, Aldgate — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.465-475)
  3. ^ British History Online — Friaries: The minoresses without Aldgate — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.516-519)
  4. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BARKING ABBEY
  5. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Abbey of Barking — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Essex: Volume 2 (1907), (pp.115-122)
  6. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BENTLEY PRIORY
  7. ^ British History Online — Religious Houses: House of Augustinian canons, Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1: "Physique, Archaeology, Domesday, Ecclesiastical Organization, The Jews, Religious Houses, Education of Working Classes to 1870, Private Education from Sixteenth Century" (1969), (pp.169-170)
  8. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 404445
  9. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BERMONDSEY ABBEY
  10. ^ a b British History Online — Alien houses: The priory of Lewisham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (p.238)
  11. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BROCKLEY ABBEY
  12. ^ British History Online — Houses of Premonstratensian canons: Abbey of Bayham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 2 (pp.86-89)
  13. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: STRATFORD-BY-BOW PRIORY
  14. ^ British History Online — Religious Houses: House of Benedictine nuns — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1 (pp.156-159)
  15. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CLERKENWELL PRIORY OF THE KNIGHTS HOSPITALLERS
  16. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST JOHNS GATE
  17. ^ British History Online — Religious Houses: House of Knights hospitallers — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1 (pp.193-204)
  18. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LONDON CLERKENWELL PRIORY
  19. ^ British History Online — Religious Houses: Houses of Augustinian canonesses — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1 (pp.170-182)
  20. ^ English Benedictine Congregation - Ealing Abbey
  21. ^ Ealing Abbey — Home
  22. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ABBEY OF ST MARY GRACES
  23. ^ British History Online — Cistercian monks: Eastminster, New Abbey — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.461-464)
  24. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST ALPHAGE LONDON WALL
  25. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST ALPHAGE
  26. ^ British History Online — List of houses — The records of St. Bartholomew's priory [and] St. Bartholomew the Great, West Smithfield: Volume 1 (pp.LVII)
  27. ^ a b English Benedictine Congregation — Curzon Park Abbey
  28. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: GREENWICH GREYFRIARS
  29. ^ British History Online — Friaries: The observant friars of Greenwich — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.194-198)
  30. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: PRIORY OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST, HALIWELL
  31. ^ British History Online — Religious Houses: Houses of Augustinian canonesses — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1 (pp.170-182)
  32. ^ The Augustinian Priory of St. John the Baptist, Holywell — Survey of London: volume 8 (pp.153-187)
  33. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HAMPTON HOSPITALLERS PRECEPTORY
  34. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HAMPTON HOSPITALLERS PRECEPTORY
  35. ^ a b British History Online — Religious Houses: House of Knights hospitallers — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1 (pp.193-204)
  36. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HARMONDSWORTH PRIORY
  37. ^ a b c British History Online — Religious Houses: Introduction — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1 (pp.152-155)
  38. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HOSPITAL OF ST NICHOLAS AND ST BERNARD
  39. ^ British History Online — Alien houses: Hospital or Priory of Hornchurch — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Essex: Volume 2 (pp.195-196)
  40. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HOUNSLOW PRIORY
  41. ^ British History Online — Religious Houses: House of Trinitarian friars — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1 (pp.191-193)
  42. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: KILBURN PRIORY
  43. ^ British History Online — Religious Houses: Houses of Augustinian canonesses — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1 (pp.170-182)
  44. ^ Park, John J. (1814). "Kilburn Priory". The topography and natural history of Hampstead, in the County of Middlesex. pp. 159–202. 
  45. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LESNES ABBEY
  46. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The abbey of Lesnes or Westwood — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2 (pp.165-167)
  47. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LEWISHAM PRIORY
  48. ^ a b c Pastscape — Detailed Result: WESTMINSTER FRIARY OF PIED FRIARS
  49. ^ a b British History Online — Friaries: The crossed friars — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.514-516)
  50. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LONDON AUSTIN FRIARS
  51. ^ British History Online — Friaries: The Austin friars — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.510-513)
  52. ^ British History Online — Religious Houses: House of Carthusian monks, Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1: "Physique, Archaeology, Domesday, Ecclesiastical Organization, The Jews, Religious Houses, Education of Working Classes to 1870, Private Education from Sixteenth Century (1969), (pp.159-169)
  53. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: LONDON GREYFRIARS
  54. ^ a b British History Online — Friaries: The grey friars — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.502-507)
  55. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LONDON FRIARY OF CRUTCHED FRIARS
  56. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: LONDON FRIARY OF FRIARS OF THE SACK
  57. ^ a b British History Online — Friaries: The friars of the Sack — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.513-514)
  58. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 404572
  59. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LONDON FRIARY OF FRIARS OF THE SACK
  60. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HOLBORN BLACKFRIARS
  61. ^ a b c British History Online — Friaries: The black friars — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.498-502)
  62. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LUDGATE DOMINICAN FRIARY
  63. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: THE INNER AND MIDDLE TEMPLE
  64. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: TEMPLE CHURCH OF ST MARY
  65. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: 1-1A MIDDLE TEMPLE LANE
  66. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: 2 MIDDLE TEMPLE LANE
  67. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: 3 MIDDLE TEMPLE LANE
  68. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: INNER TEMPLE GARDENS
  69. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MIDDLE TEMPLE HALL
  70. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MIDDLE TEMPLE GARDENS
  71. ^ a b British History Online — Houses of Military Orders: The Temple — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.485-491)
  72. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CAMDEN TEMPLARS PRECEPTORY
  73. ^ British History Online — Friaries: The pied friars — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (p.516)
  74. ^ London
  75. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST HELENS CHURCH
  76. ^ Benedictine nuns: St Helen's, Bishopsgate — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.457-461)
  77. ^ The Priory of St. Mary Spital — Survey of London: volume 27 (pp.21-23)
  78. ^ The precinct of St. Mary Spital — The priory site — Survey of London: volume 27 (pp.39-51)
  79. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: PRIORY AND HOSPITAL OF ST MARY OF BETHLEHEM
  80. ^ British History Online — Houses of Military Orders: St Mary of Bethlehem — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.495-498)
  81. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LONDON WHITEFRIARS
  82. ^ British History Online — Friaries: The white friars — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.507-510)
  83. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MERTON PRIORY
  84. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of St Mary of Merton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 2 (pp.94-102)
  85. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MOOR HALL HOSPITALLERS PRECEPTORY
  86. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: RICHMOND GREYFRIARS
  87. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: RUISLIP PRIORY
  88. ^ Priory Church of Saint Bartholomew the Great
  89. ^ Austin canons: Priory of St Bartholomew, Smithfield — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.475-480)
  90. ^ Southwark Cathedral
  91. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL
  92. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST MARY OVERY PRIORY
  93. ^ Austin canons: Priory of Southwark — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.480-484)
  94. ^ British History Online — Houses of Cistercian monks: Abbey of Stratford Langthorne, Victoria County History: A History of the County of Essex: Volume 2 (1907), (pp.129-133)
  95. ^ Stratford
  96. ^ British History Online — Religious Houses: House of Bridgettines — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Middlesex: Volume 1 (pp.182-191)
  97. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: TOOTING BEC PRIORY
  98. ^ British History Online — Alien house: Priory of Tooting — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Surrey: Volume 2 (pp.129-130)
  99. ^ St Laurences Church Images
  100. ^ Benedictine monks: St Peter's abbey, Westminster — Victoria County History: A History of the County of London: Volume 1 (pp.433-457)
  101. ^ Woodford Green
  • Binns, Alison (1989) Studies in the History of Medieval Religion 1: Dedications of Monastic Houses in England and Wales 1066-1216, Boydell
  • Cobbett, William (1868) List of Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, And Other Religious Foundations in England and Wales and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, or Alienated by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments
  • Knowles, David & Hadcock, R. Neville (1971) Medieval Religious Houses England & Wales. Longman
  • Morris, Richard (1979) Cathedrals and Abbeys of England and Wales, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
  • Thorold, Henry (1986) Collins Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories of England and Wales, Collins
  • Thorold, Henry (1993) Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.
  • English Cathedrals and Abbeys, Illustrated, Odhams Press Ltd.
  • Map of Monastic Britain, South Sheet, Ordnance Survey, 2nd edition, 1954