List of monastic houses in Nottinghamshire

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List of monastic houses in Nottinghamshire is located in Nottinghamshire
Beauvale Priory
Beauvale Priory
Blyth Priory
Blyth Priory
Felley Priory
Felley Priory
Fiskerton Cell
Fiskerton Cell
Lenton Priory
Lenton Priory
Mattersey Priory
Mattersey Priory
Newark Greyfriars
Newark Greyfriars
Newstead Priory
Newstead Priory
Nottingham Greyfriars
Nottingham Greyfriars
Nottingham Greyfriars
Nottingham Greyfriars
Nottingham Whitefriars
Nottingham Whitefriars
Ossington Preceptory (probable site)
Ossington Preceptory (probable site)
Rufford Abbey
Rufford Abbey
Shelford Priory
Shelford Priory
Thurgarton Priory
Thurgarton Priory
Wallingwells Priory
Wallingwells Priory
Welbeck Abbey
Welbeck Abbey
Worksop Priory
Worksop Priory
Locations of monastic houses in Nottinghamshire

The following is a list of monastic houses in Nottinghamshire, England.

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Templars and Hospitallers). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The name of the county is given where there is reference to an establishment in another county. Where the county has changed since the foundation's dissolution the modern county is given in parentheses, and in instances where the referenced foundation ceased to exist before the unification of England, the kingdom is given, followed by the modern county in parentheses.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from the details provided by English Heritage Pastscape [1] and Ordnance Survey publications.

A Monastic Glossary follows the listing, which provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure) or redundant intact structure
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown
identification ambiguous or confused

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented)
or ecclesiastical establishments with a monastic appellation but lacking monastic connection.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
EH English Heritage
LT Landmark Trust
NT National Trust

Alphabetical listing of establishments[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Beauvale Charterhouse Beauvale Priory Remains.jpg Carthusian monks
founded 1343 by Nicholas de Cauntlow (Cantilupo), Lord of Ilkeston: licence granted 1343;
dissolved 18 July 1539; granted to Richard Morison 1550/1
The Priory Church of the Holy Trinity, Beauvale

The Priory Church of the Holy Trinity and Saint Mary the Virgin with All Saints
____________________
Beauvale Priory
[1][2]

53°02′11″N 1°16′02″W / 53.0363825°N 1.26727°W / 53.0363825; -1.26727 (Beauvale Priory)
Blyth Priory + Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on St Holy Trinity, Rouen;
founded 1088 by Roger de Builly;
became denizen: independent from c.1409;
dissolved 1536; granted to Richard Andrews and William Ramesden 1543/4;
church now in parochial use
The Priory Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, Blyth [3][4]

53°22′44″N 1°03′48″W / 53.3788262°N 1.0634583°W / 53.3788262; -1.0634583 (Blyth Priory)
Broadholme Priory$ Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Lincolnshire
Felley Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
dependent on Worksop;
founded 1152: church and hermitage granted to Worksop by Ralph Britto of Annesley;
independent from 1260;
dissolved 1536
St Mary [5][6]

53°03′23″N 1°16′50″W / 53.0564564°N 1.2804517°W / 53.0564564; -1.2804517 (Felley Priory)
Fiskerton Cell Augustinian Canons Regular
possible cell dependent on Thurgarton (more likely a chapel served by Canons from Thurgarton);
founded c.1139 by Ralph de Ayncourt;
granted to Edward Fynes, Lord Clinton and Thomas Morrison
Fiskarton Cell [7]

53°03′05″N 0°54′45″W / 53.0512942°N 0.9123963°W / 53.0512942; -0.9123963 (Fiskerton Cell)
Lenton Priory Lenton Priory.jpg Cluniac monks
alien house: dependent on Cluny;
founded 1102-8 by William Peverell;
became denizen: independent from 1392;
dissolved 1538; granted to John Harrington 1562/3
The Priory Church of the Holy Trinity
____________________
St Anthony's Hospital
[8][9]

52°56′35″N 1°10′42″W / 52.943007°N 1.1782891°W / 52.943007; -1.1782891 (Lenton Priory)
Marske Cell (?) Benedictine monks
cell? dependent on York;
existence disputed
Marshe Cell
Mattersey Priory Mattersey Priory ruins.jpg Gilbertine Canons
founded c.1185 by Roger FitzRalph, son of Ranulf de Mattersey;
destroyed by fire 1279;
dissolved 3 October 1538; granted to Antony Neville, Esq. 1539/40; (EH)
The Priory Church of Saint Helen, Mattersey [10][11]

53°23′53″N 0°56′37″W / 53.398193°N 0.94369°W / 53.398193; -0.94369 (Mattersey Priory)
Newark Greyfriars # Observant Franciscan Friars
founded 1507 (or c.1499 by Henry VII);
dissolved 1534;
Augustinian Friars
refounded;
dissolved 1539; granted to John Andrews;
house built on site named 'The Friary'
Newark Greyfriars;
Newark Austin Friars
[12][13]

53°04′40″N 0°48′15″W / 53.0776629°N 0.804255°W / 53.0776629; -0.804255 (Newark Greyfriars)
Newstead Priory Newstead Abbey 02.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1163 by Henry II;
dissolved 21 July 1539; granted to Sir John Byron 1541/2;
converted into a mansion named 'Newstead Abbey';
restored by George Gordon Byron, poet, c.1800;
restored by John Shaw for Col. Wildman 1819; further altered c.1862 for William Frederick Webb, African explorer, upon whose death, 1899, estate passed via his surviving children to his grandson Charles Ian Fraser who sold Newstead to philanthropist Sir Julien Cahn, who presented it to Nottingham Corporation 1931;
now in ownership of Nottingham City Council
St Mary [14][15]

53°04′42″N 1°11′33″W / 53.0783332°N 1.1925745°W / 53.0783332; -1.1925745 (Newstead Priory)
Nottingham Basford Cell Cluniac monks
cell dependent on Lenton?;
founded before c.1200;
dissolved after 1300
Nottingham Friary * Franciscan Friars Minor
extant
Friary and Parish of Our Lady and St Edward [16]

52°57′47″N 1°07′41″W / 52.9631061°N 1.1280245°W / 52.9631061; -1.1280245 (Nottingham Greyfriars)
Nottingham Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of Oxford)
founded before 1230;
dissolved 1539
[17][18]

52°56′59″N 1°09′00″W / 52.9498419°N 1.1501125°W / 52.9498419; -1.1501125 (Nottingham Greyfriars)
Nottingham — Holy Sepulchre Priory Augustinian Canons Regular — Holy Sepulchre
founded c.1170;
dissolved after 1188
Nottingham Roche Cell Cluniac monks
cell dependent on Lenton;
foundation unknown;
dissolved after 1405
Nottingham Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded before 1271, site granted by Reginald de Grey;
dissolved 5 February 1539; granted to Thomas Henneage 1548/9
[19][20]

52°57′09″N 1°09′07″W / 52.9526311°N 1.1518398°W / 52.9526311; -1.1518398 (Nottingham Whitefriars)
Ossington Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
founded before 1154, granted by William, Archbishop of York;
merged with Newland, Yorkshire 1382;
church of the Holy Rood built 1782, probably stands on or near site
[21][22]

53°10′41″N 0°51′57″W / 53.1780964°N 0.8657259°W / 53.1780964; -0.8657259 (Ossington Preceptory (probable site)) (probable)
Rufford Abbey Rufford Hall from SW.JPG Cistercian monks
founded 13 July 1136 by Gilbert de Gant, Earl of Lincoln;
dissolved 1536; granted to George, Earl of Shrewsbury;
now in ownership of Nottinghamshire County Council
[23][24]

53°10′35″N 1°02′08″W / 53.1763538°N 1.0356385°W / 53.1763538; -1.0356385 (Rufford Abbey)
Shelford Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded (in the reign of Henry II) by Ralph Hanselyn;
dissolved 1536; granted to Michael Stanhope 1539/40;
remains incorporated into house named 'Shelford House' built c.1600, destroyed by fire 1645, rebuilt c.1678
[25][26]

52°59′02″N 1°00′00″W / 52.9839162°N 1.0000348°W / 52.9839162; -1.0000348 (Shelford Priory)
Thurgarton Priory + Geograph-1506935-by-Alan-Murray-Rust.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1119-39 by Ralph Deincourt, with the influence of Archbishop Thurstan;
dissolved 12 June 1538;
fortified for Charles I 1643;
in use as Bishop's Palace 1884-1904;
part of church now in parochial use
The Priory Church of Saint Peter, Thurgarton [27][28]

53°02′07″N 0°58′12″W / 53.0353257°N 0.9699498°W / 53.0353257; -0.9699498 (Thurgarton Priory)
Wallingwells Priory ^ Benedictine nuns
founded 1130 (probably c.1140-4) by Ralph de Chevrolcourt (Cheurolcourt);
also given as Augustinian
dissolved 14 December 1539; granted to Richard Pype and Francis Boyer 1563/4; granted to Richard Whalley 1548/9;
remains possibly partly incorporated into country house named Wallingwells Hall, built 18th/19th century
St Mary de Parco [29][30]

53°21′03″N 1°08′29″W / 53.3509676°N 1.1413993°W / 53.3509676; -1.1413993 (Wallingwells Priory)
Welbeck Abbey Welbeckabbeysmall123.jpg Premonstratensian Canons — from Newsham, Lincolnshire
founded 1153 by Thomas of Cuckney (Thomas Jocei); canons in residence by October 1134;
dissolved 20 June 1538;
remains incorporated into private residence, under the ownership of Sir Charles Cavendish before 1607; since altered and remodelled
The Abbey Church of Saint James, Welbeck [31][32]

53°15′44″N 1°09′22″W / 53.2621776°N 1.1559892°W / 53.2621776; -1.1559892 (Welbeck Abbey)
Winkburn Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
founded 1189-99, church granted by Henry Hosat and vill by Adam Tysun;
serving as a camera of Ossington;
dissolved 1382
Worksop Priory + Worksop Priory.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular — probably from Huntingdon
founded after 1119 by William de Lovetot;
dissolved 15 November 1538; granted to Francis, Earl of Shrewsbury 1541/2
church now in parochial use
The Priory Church of Saint Mary and Saint Cuthbert, Worksop
____________________
Wirksop Priory;
formerly known as Radford Priory
[33][34]

53°18′13″N 1°06′55″W / 53.3036786°N 1.1153269°W / 53.3036786; -1.1153269 (Worksop Priory)

The following location lacks monastic connections:

Glossary[edit]


edit this box

Map link to lists of monastic houses in England by county[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BEAUVALE PRIORY
  2. ^ British History Online — House of Carthusian monks: The priory of Beauvale — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.105-109)
  3. ^ "Detailed Result: BLYTH PRIORY". Pastscape. Retrieved 4 November 2011. 
  4. ^ British History Online — House of Benedictine monks: The priory of Blyth — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.83-88)
  5. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: FELLEY PRIORY
  6. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Felley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.109-112)
  7. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 322463
  8. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LENTON PRIORY
  9. ^ British History Online — House of Cluniac monks: The priory of Lenton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.91-100)
  10. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MATTERSEY PRIORY
  11. ^ British History Online — House of Gilbertine canons: The priory of Mattersey — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.140-141)
  12. ^ British History Online — Friaries: Observant friars of Newark — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.147-148)
  13. ^ Newark Greyfriars Images
  14. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: NEWSTEAD ABBEY
  15. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Newstead — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.112-117)
  16. ^ Nottingham
  17. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: NOTTINGHAM GREYFRIARS
  18. ^ British History Online — Friaries: Franciscan friars of Nottingham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.144-145)
  19. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: NOTTINGHAM WHITEFRIARS
  20. ^ British History Online — Friaries: Carmelite friars of Nottingham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.145-147)
  21. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: OSSINGTON HOSPITALLERS PRECEPTORY
  22. ^ British History Online — House of Knights Hospitallers: The preceptory of Ossington — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.142-144)
  23. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: RUFFORD ABBEY
  24. ^ British History Onlinde — House of Cistercian monks: The abbey of Rufford — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.101-105)
  25. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: SHELFORD MANOR
  26. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Shelford — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.117-120)
  27. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: THURGARTON PRIORY
  28. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Shurgarton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.120-125)
  29. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WALLINGWELLS PRIORY
  30. ^ British History Online — House of Benedictine nuns: The priory of Wallingwells — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.89-90)
  31. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WELBECK ABBEY
  32. ^ British History Online — House of Premonstratensian canons: The abbey of Welbeck — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.129-138)
  33. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WORKSOP PRIORY
  34. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: The priory of Worksop — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Nottingham: Volume 2 (pp.125-129)
  • Binns, Alison (1989) Studies in the History of Medieval Religion 1: Dedications of Monastic Houses in England and Wales 1066-1216, Boydell
  • Cobbett, William (1868) List of Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, And Other Religious Foundations in England and Wales and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, or Alienated by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments
  • Knowles, David & Hadcock, R. Neville (1971) Medieval Religious Houses England & Wales. Longman
  • Morris, Richard (1979) Cathedrals and Abbeys of England and Wales, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
  • Thorold, Henry (1986) Collins Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories of England and Wales, Collins
  • Thorold, Henry (1993) Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.
  • English Cathedrals and Abbeys, Illustrated, Odhams Press Ltd.
  • Map of Monastic Britain, South Sheet, Ordnance Survey, 2nd edition, 1954