List of monastic houses in Suffolk

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The following is a list of monastic houses in Suffolk, England.

List of monastic houses in Suffolk is located in Suffolk
Alnesbourne Priory
Alnesbourne Priory
Babwell Greyfriars
Babwell Greyfriars
Battisford Preceptory
Battisford Preceptory
Blakenham Priory
Blakenham Priory
Blythburgh Priory
Blythburgh Priory
Bruisyard Abbey
Bruisyard Abbey
Bungay Priory
Bungay Priory
Bury St Edmunds Abbey
Bury St Edmunds Abbey
Bury St Edmunds Greyfriars
Bury St Edmunds Greyfriars
Butley Priory
Butley Priory
Campsey Ash Priory
Campsey Ash Priory
Cavenham Preceptory
Cavenham Preceptory
Chipley Priory
Chipley Priory
Clare Friary
Clare Friary
Coddenham Camera
Coddenham Camera
Creeting St Mary Priory
Creeting St Mary Priory
Creeting St Olave Priory
Creeting St Olave Priory
Dodnash Priory
Dodnash Priory
DUNWICH
DUNWICH
East Bergholt Abbey
East Bergholt Abbey
Edwardstone Priory
Edwardstone Priory
Eye Priory
Eye Priory
Felixstowe (Walton) Priory)
Felixstowe (Walton) Priory)
Flixton Priory
Flixton Priory
Gislingham Preceptory
Gislingham Preceptory
Great Bricett Priory
Great Bricett Priory
Hoxne Priory
Hoxne Priory
IPSWICH
IPSWICH
Ixworth Priory
Ixworth Priory
Kersey Priory
Kersey Priory
Leiston Abbey
Leiston Abbey
Letheringham Priory
Letheringham Priory
Mendham Priory
Mendham Priory
Orford Austin Friars
Orford Austin Friars
Redlingfield Priory
Redlingfield Priory
Ringshall Cell (purported)
Ringshall Cell (purported)
Rumburgh Priory
Rumburgh Priory
St Olave's (Herringfleet) Priory
St Olave's (Herringfleet) Priory
Sibton Abbey
Sibton Abbey
Snape Priory
Snape Priory
Stoke by Clare Priory
Stoke by Clare Priory
Sudbury Blackfriars
Sudbury Blackfriars
Sudbury Benedictine Priory
Sudbury Benedictine Priory
Wangford Priory
Wangford Priory
Wherstead Priory (alleged)
Wherstead Priory (alleged)
Wickham Skeyth Priory
Wickham Skeyth Priory
Woodbridge Priory
Woodbridge Priory
Locations of monastic houses in Suffolk

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Templars and Hospitallers). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The name of the county is given where there is reference to an establishment in another county. Where the county has changed since the foundation's dissolution the modern county is given in parentheses, and in instances where the referenced foundation ceased to exist before the unification of England, the kingdom is given, followed by the modern county in parentheses.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from the details provided by English Heritage Pastscape [1] and Ordnance Survey publications.

A Monastic Glossary follows the listing, which provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure) or redundant intact structure
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown
identification ambiguous or confused

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented)
or ecclesiastical establishments with a monastic appellation but lacking monastic connection.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
EH English Heritage
LT Landmark Trust
NT National Trust

Alphabetical listing of establishments[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Alnesbourne Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1200, probably by Alberte de Neville, who granted endowments;
appropriated to Woodbridge probably c.1466;
dissolved before 1514; granted to Sir John Wingfield 1541/2
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Alnesbourne
____________________
Alnesbourn Priory;
Alnesborn Priory;
Alensborne Priory
[1][2]

52°01′08″N 1°11′35″E / 52.0187757°N 1.1929339°E / 52.0187757; 1.1929339 (Alnesbourne Priory)
Babwell Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of Cambridge)
transferred from earlier foundation at Bury St Edmunds;
founded 19 November 1262;
dissolved December 1538, surrendered to Richard Ingworth, Bishop of Dover; granted to Anthony Harvey May 1541
[3][4]

52°15′43″N 0°42′38″E / 52.2618374°N 0.7104582°E / 52.2618374; 0.7104582 (Babwell Greyfriars)
Battisford Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
preceptory/hospital
founded c.1154, benefactions from Henry II;
dissolved 1540
[5][6]

52°08′56″N 0°59′22″E / 52.1489648°N 0.9895232°E / 52.1489648; 0.9895232 (Battisford Preceptory)
Blakenham Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Bec-Hellouin;
manor granted to Bec-Hellouin by Walter Giffard, 'Earl of Buckingham'
founded before 1092;
dissolved before 1230, apparently reduced to grange;
transferred as a parcel to Ogbourne St George;
granted to Eton College 1460
Great Blakenham Priory [7][8]

52°06′29″N 1°04′47″E / 52.1080587°N 1.0798332°E / 52.1080587; 1.0798332 (Blakenham Priory)
Blythburgh Blackfriars Dominican Friars
license obtained 1384 to move from Dunwich, when that location was threatened by the sea; transfer never implemented
Blythburgh Priory Augustinian Canons Regular — from St Osyth's, Essex
dependent on St Osyth;
founded before 1135, assisted by Henry I and the Clavering family;
dissolved 12 February 1537; granted to Sir Arthur Hopton 1538/9
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Blythburgh
____________________
Bliburgh Priory
[9][10]

52°19′18″N 1°35′47″E / 52.3217°N 1.5965°E / 52.3217; 1.5965 (Blythburgh Priory)
Bruisyard Abbey secular college
(community founded at Campsey Ash 1347);
transferred here 1354;
dissolved 4 October 1366;
Franciscan nuns — from Waterbeach, Cambridgeshire
founded 1364-7 by Lionel, Duke of Clarence;
dissolved 1359; granted to Nicholas Hare 1539
Brusyard Priory [11][12]

52°14′40″N 1°25′03″E / 52.2444555°N 1.417467°E / 52.2444555; 1.417467 (Bruisyard Abbey)
Bungay Priory + BungayPriory.jpg Benedictine nuns
founded 1183 by Roger de Glanvill and his wife, Countess Gundreda;
dissolved 1336; nuns appear to have abandoned the house before April 1536; granted to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk 1537/8;
most of conventual buildings destroyed by fire 1688;
rebuilt 1699; reopened 1701 for parochial use as the Parish Church of St Mary
The Priory Church of Saint Mary and the Holy Cross, Bungay [13][14]

52°27′20″N 1°26′17″E / 52.4555321°N 1.4380234°E / 52.4555321; 1.4380234 (Bungay Priory)
Bury St Edmunds Abbey StEdmundsburyAbbeyPanorama.jpg Saxon (Benedictine?) monks
founded 633 by Sigeberht, King of the East Angles;
destroyed in raids by the Danes c.870
secular (collegiate)
founded 903;
refounded c.925, endowed by King Athelstan;
Benedictine monks
founded 1020-2
dissolved 4 November 1539; granted to John Eyre 1559/60;
subsequently granted to Thomas Badyby;
abbot's palace in use as a house until 1720; other buildings incorporated into houses 17th and 19th century: extant;
remains now within a public park; (EH)
episcopal diocesan cathedral in precinct
The Abbey Church of Saint Edmund, [Bury Saint Edmunds
____________________
Beordicsworth Abbey;
Bury St Edmond Abbey
[15][16]

52°14′38″N 0°43′09″E / 52.2438905°N 0.7190466°E / 52.2438905; 0.7190466 (Bury St Edmunds Abbey)
Bury St Edmunds Greyfriars, earlier site Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of Cambridge)
foundation attempted 1233, but discouraged by the legate and monks of the Abbey;
founded shortly after 22 June 1257: bull obtained from the Pope to establish their community;
expelled by Abbey officials;
re-established at a new site (see immediately below)
[17]
Bury St Edmunds Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of Cambridge)
(previous, unsuccessful foundation at earlier site (see immediately above));
founded 1258, with the assistance of Henry III;
Pope Urban IV ordered the friars to demolish their buildings;
re-established at Babwell
[4][17]

52°15′09″N 0°41′39″E / 52.2523739°N 0.6941718°E / 52.2523739; 0.6941718 (Bury St Edmunds Greyfriars)
Butley Priory ^ Remains of Butley Priory near Abbey Farm (geograph 2578345).jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1171 by Sir Ranulph de Glanvill;
dissolved 1 March 1538;
remains incorporated into later buildings
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Butley
____________________
Butleigh Priory
[18][19]

52°05′24″N 1°27′55″E / 52.089968°N 1.4652398°E / 52.089968; 1.4652398 (Butley Priory)
Campsey Ash Priory Augustinian Canonesses
founded c.1195 by Theobald de Valoines, who granted land to his sisters Joan (subsequently the first prioress) and Agnes;
(also given as Benedictine);
dissolved 1536; granted to Sir William Willoughby 1543/4;
post-medieval house and barn occupy site
The Priory Church of Saint Mary, Campsey Ash
The Blessed Virgin Mary
____________________
Campsey Priory;
Campess Priory
[20][21]

52°08′24″N 1°23′10″E / 52.1401242°N 1.3860852°E / 52.1401242; 1.3860852 (Campsey Ash Priory)
Cavenham Preceptory Knights Templar
founded before 1311?;
dissolved 1308-12(?)
Togrynd Preceptory;
Caveham Preceptory
Coddenham Preceptory
[22]

52°19′06″N 0°33′58″E / 52.3181991°N 0.5661151°E / 52.3181991; 0.5661151 (Cavenham Preceptory)
Chipley Priory # Augustinian Canons Regular
founded before 1291 (before 1235);
dissolved 1468; annexed to the college of Stoke by Clare 1468;
farmhouse occupies site, incorporating part of the west range of the monastic buildings, though no remains identifiably as early as 13th century
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Chipley [23][24]

52°07′06″N 0°34′20″E / 52.1184308°N 0.572142°E / 52.1184308; 0.572142 (Chipley Priory)
Clare Friary * Clare Priory, geograph.jpg Augustinian Friars (under the Limit of Cambridge)
founded 1248/9 by Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester and Hereford;
cell dependent on Bec-Hellouin;
reconstituted 1326 by Edward II as a cell dependent on Westminster, Middlesex;
refounded as a college 1490 by Edmund, Earl of March
dissolved 1538; granted to Richard Friend 1539/40;
Augustinian Friars — from Ireland
refounded 1953; extant;
former infirmary/barn in use as friars' chapel
The Priory Church of Our Lady, Saint Peter and Saint Paul and Saint Augustine, Clare
____________________
Clare Priory
[25][26][27]

52°04′30″N 0°34′53″E / 52.0750881°N 0.5813473°E / 52.0750881; 0.5813473 (Clare Friary)
Clare Priory secular collegiate founded c.1045
Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Bec-Hellouin;
founded 1090: collegiate church of St John the Baptist granted to Bec by Gilbert de Clare;
transferred to new site at Stoke by Clare
Coddenham Camera Knights Hospitaller
a member of Battisford
[28]

52°08′36″N 1°06′41″E / 52.1432106°N 1.1115047°E / 52.1432106; 1.1115047 (Coddenham Camera)
Coddenham Priory Eustace de Merch originally intended to found a house of Cistercian nuns from Nun Appleton during the reign of Henry II;
Augustinian Canons Regular
dependent on Royston, Hertfordshire;
founded before 1184 by Eustace de Merch, who granted the church to Royston;
dissolved 1537
Covenham Priory

Creeting St Mary Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: (probable) grange dependent on Bernay;
founded before 1156;
supervised by a prior from 1327;
dissolved before 1414; granted to Eton College 1462
[29][30]

52°08′36″N 1°06′41″E / 52.1432106°N 1.1115047°E / 52.1432106; 1.1115047 (Creeting St Mary Priory)
Creeting St Olave Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: cell or grange, under supervision of a prior, dependent on Grestein;
founded before 1087; monks have been suggested to have used the parish church of St Olave #;
dissolved 1360; sold privately
[31][32]

52°10′37″N 1°04′10″E / 52.1770495°N 1.0695429°E / 52.1770495; 1.0695429 (Creeting St. Olave Priory)
Dodnash Priory # Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1188 by Baldwin de Toeni and his mother Alda;
dissolved 1525, suppressed for Cardinal Wolsey's colleges at Oxford and Ipswich; granted to Thomas Alverde;
in use as a farmhouse 19th century;
some of the re-used masonry incorporated into the buildings of Dodnash Priory Farm
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Dodnash [33][34]

51°58′47″N 1°03′48″E / 51.9797458°N 1.063453°E / 51.9797458; 1.063453 (Dodnash Priory)
Dunwich Blackfriars Dominican Friars (under the Visitation of Cambridge)
founded before 1256 by Sir Roger de Holish;
license granted 1384 to move to Blythburgh due to threat of incursion by the sea;
dissolved 1538; granted to John Eyre 1544/5;
destroyed by coastal erosion and submerged by the sea
[35][36]

52°16′19″N 1°38′22″E / 52.2720769°N 1.6394734°E / 52.2720769; 1.6394734 (Dunwich Blackfriars)
Dunwich, Greyfriars, earlier site Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of Cambridge)
founded before 1277 (?before 1272: during the reign of Henry III) by Robert Fitz John;
transferred to new site (see immediately below) 1290, due to coastal erosion
[37][38]
Dunwich Greyfriars DunwichGreyfriars.jpg Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of Cambridge)
(community founded at earlier site (see immediately above) before 1277 (?before 1272));
transferred here due to coastal erosion 1290;
dissolved 1538; surrendered to Ingworth, Bishop of Dover; granted to John Eyre
[37][38]

52°16′32″N 1°37′51″E / 52.2755169°N 1.6307294°E / 52.2755169; 1.6307294 (Dunwich Greyfriars)
Dunwich Preceptory Knights Templar
founded before 1199;
dissolved 1308-12
passed to Knights Hopitaller, who maintained a chaplain but no preceptory here;
destroyed by coastal erosion and submerged by the sea
[39][40]

52°16′20″N 1°38′02″E / 52.272241°N 1.633755°E / 52.272241; 1.633755 (Dunwich Preceptory)
Dunwich Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Eye (itself dependent on Bernay);
founded after 1080, church granted to Eye by William the Conqueror;
submerged by the sea between 1272 and 1307 (in/about the reign of Edward I)
St Felix? [41][42]

52°16′34″N 1°38′56″E / 52.2762456°N 1.6489148°E / 52.2762456; 1.6489148 (Dunwich Priory)
East Bergholt Abbey * Benedictine nuns
land purchased 1857; extant
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, East Bergholt [43]

51°58′10″N 1°00′49″E / 51.969467°N 1.013529°E / 51.969467; 1.013529 (East Bergholt Abbey)
Edwardstone Priory # Benedictine monks
priory cell dependent on Abingdon, Berkshire (Oxfordshire)
founded 1114, church granted to Abingdon by Hubert de Monchesney, confirmed 1115;
dissolved c.1160: community transferred to Earl's Colne by Abbot Walkelin
The Blessed Virgin Mary [44][45]

52°03′31″N 0°49′43″E / 52.0585994°N 0.8285424°E / 52.0585994; 0.8285424 (Edwardstone Priory)
Eye Priory EyePriory.jpg Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Bernay;
founded c.1080 by Robert Malet;
became denizen: independent, refounded c.1385;
dissolved October 1534/1537
The Priory Church of Saint Peter, Eye [46]

52°19′21″N 1°09′25″E / 52.3223765°N 1.1570084°E / 52.3223765; 1.1570084 (Eye Priory)
Felixstowe Priory, possible earlier site Benedictine monks
priory cell dependent on Rochester, Kent;
founded c.1105 (before 1107);
church of St Felix granted to Rochester by Roger Bigod;
possibly transferred from this site to a new location (see immediately below) 14th century
[47]
Felixstowe Priory Benedictine monks
priory cell dependent on Rochester, Kent;
founded c.1105 (before 1107) (possibly at earlier site (see immediately above));
church of St Felix granted to Rochester by Roger Bigod;
absence of a church infers the monks used the parish church of St Mary
dissolved 1538: suppressed for Wolsey's college at Ipswich (formal grant 30 December 1528);
granted to the Duke of Norfolk on the suppression of Ipswich College;
granted to Thomas Seckford (Sexford) 1576/7
Walton Priory;
Walton, St Felix;
Wilton St Felix Priory;
Fylstowe Priory;
Filstou Priory
[47][48]

51°58′24″N 1°20′35″E / 51.9732543°N 1.3430437°E / 51.9732543; 1.3430437 (Felixstowe Priory (Walton Priory))
Flixton Priory ^? Augustinian Canonesses
founded 1258 by Marjory (Margery) Harnes, widow of Bartholomew de Crek (Clerk/Creke);
dissolved 1537; granted to Richard Warton 1537;
granted to John Tasburgh 1544;
remains of conventual church possibly incorporated into Abbey Farmhouse, 16th/17th century
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Katharine, Flixton [49][50]

52°25′34″N 1°24′15″E / 52.4261066°N 1.4041069°E / 52.4261066; 1.4041069 (Flixton Priory)
Gislingham Preceptory # Knights Templar
founded before 1228 by Sir Robert de Burgate;
dissolved before 1308(?);
destroyed 1338; granted to John Grene and Robert Hall 1553
Giselingham Preceptory [51]

52°18′30″N 1°01′09″E / 52.3083933°N 1.0192555°E / 52.3083933; 1.0192555 (Gislingham Preceptory)
Gorleston Friary Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in Norfolk
Great Bricett Priory + Great Bricett - Church of St Mary & St Laurence.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
alien house: dependent on St-Léonard-de-Noblat
founded c.1110 (1114-9) by Ralph fitz Brien and his wife Emma;
destroyed by fire 1416; apparently re-occupied;
dissolved 1444(?); granted by Henry VI to his college in Cambridge;
remains of conventual church incorporated into current parish church of SS Mary and Lawrence
The Priory Church of Saint Leonard, Bricett
____________________
Bricett Priory;
Bresete Priory
[52][53][54]

52°07′01″N 0°58′34″E / 52.1168431°N 0.9759861°E / 52.1168431; 0.9759861 (Great Bricett Priory (church)) (church)
52°07′01″N 0°58′24″E / 52.1169188°N 0.9732181°E / 52.1169188; 0.9732181 (Great Bricett Priory)
Hadleigh Monastery supposed Saxon monastery [55]
Hoxne Priory Farmhouse at Abbey Farm - geograph.org.uk - 349248.jpg Secular collegiate
founded before 951 by Theodred, Bishop of London
probably destroyed soon after;
joint cathedral with North Elmham before 1040 to 1072?;
Benedictine monks
church of St Peter and chapel of St Edmund, King and Martyr granted to Norwich, Norfolk by Bishop Herbert Losinga 1101;
chapel rebuilt, endowed and granted by Maurice of Windsor and his wife Egidis for a convent of monks 1130;
dissolved 1538; granted to Richard Gresham 1546/7
Hoxon Priory [56][57]

52°20′32″N 1°12′12″E / 52.3421909°N 1.2032658°E / 52.3421909; 1.2032658 (Hoxne Priory)
Icanho Monastery Saxon Benedictine? monks[note 1]
founded 653-4 by St Botolph[note 2];
destroyed in raids by the Danes c.870;
also suggested to have been in Lincolnshire[note 3]
Ikanho Monastery;
?Iken Monastery
Ipswich Austin Friars Augustinian Friars
founded during the reign of Henry III by Henry de Manesby and others;
dissolved; granted to William Sabyne 1541/2
Ipswich Blackfriars Remains of St Mary, Blackfriars, Ipswich - geograph.org.uk - 750359.jpg Dominican Friars (under the Visitation of Cambridge)
founded 1263;
dissolved 1538
[58][59]

52°03′15″N 1°08′57″E / 52.0540607°N 1.1490691°E / 52.0540607; 1.1490691 (Ipswich Blackfriars)
Ipswich Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of Cambridge)
founded before 1236;
dissolved 1535
[60]

52°03′18″N 1°09′02″E / 52.0549381°N 1.1504906°E / 52.0549381; 1.1504906 (Ipswich Greyfriars)
Ipswich — Holy Trinity Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1133, endowed largely by Norman Gastrode fitz Eadnoth, one of the first canons, before 1177;
dissolved 1537;
destroyed by fire and rebuilt 1194, by the bishop of Norwich;
dissolved 1537; granted to Sir Thomas Pope 1544/5
The Priory Church of the Holy Trinity, Ipswich
____________________
Christchurch
[61][62]

52°03′38″N 1°09′29″E / 52.0605602°N 1.1581403°E / 52.0605602; 1.1581403 (Ipswich — Holy Trinity Priory)
Ipswich — SS Peter & Paul Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1190 (late in the reign of Henry II) by [the ancestors of] Thomas Lacy and his wife Alice;
dissolved May 1528, suppressed for Wolsey's college at Ipswich; granted to Richard Percival and Edmund Duffield 1611/2
The Priory Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Ipswich [63][64]

52°03′11″N 1°09′18″E / 52.0530925°N 1.1549719°E / 52.0530925; 1.1549719 (Ipswich — Ss Peter and Paul Priory)
Ipswich Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded during the reign of William the Conqueror by Gilbert Blund;
dissolved; granted to Richard Codington 1538/9
Ipswich Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded before c.1271 (1278);
rededicated 1477 after a probable major rebuild;
dissolved 1538; granted to John Eyre 1544/5
[65][66]

52°03′11″N 1°09′18″E / 52.0530925°N 1.1549719°E / 52.0530925; 1.1549719 (Ipswich Whitefriars)
Ixworth Priory, earlier site possible early projection c.1100 either failed or lapsed;
Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1170 by a member of the Blunt family
destroyed during civil warfare;
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Ixworth [67]

Ixworth Priory ^ IxworthAbbey.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
(founded c.1170, on a different site from the original foundation (see immediately above));
dissolved 1537;
remains incorporated into house named 'Ixworth Abbey' built on site
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Ixworth
____________________
Ixworth Abbey
[67][68][69]

52°17′53″N 0°49′44″E / 52.2980852°N 0.8288321°E / 52.2980852; 0.8288321 (Ixworth Priory)
Kersey Priory hospital founded 1218 by Thomas de Burgh
Augustinian Canons Regular
founded before 1219;
dissolved 1443-4; granted to SS Mary and Nicholas, Cambridge (afterwards King's College) (1533/4?)
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Anthony, Kersey [70][71][72]

52°03′45″N 0°54′50″E / 52.0624°N 0.9139°E / 52.0624; 0.9139 (Kersey Priory)
Lavenham Priory ^ Benedictine monks
converted into mansion latterly open to public
now hotel accommodation


Leiston Abbey ^ LeistonAbbey.jpg Premonstratensian Canons from Welbeck, Nottinghamshire
(community founded at Old Leiston 1183);
transferred here 1365; dissolved 1536; granted to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk 1537;
parts of the conventual church incorporated into later buildings;
remains incorportated into house named 'Abbey House' built on site 17th century; (EH)
Leyestone Abbey [73][74]

52°13′17″N 1°34′41″E / 52.2214474°N 1.578016°E / 52.2214474; 1.578016 (Leiston Abbey)
Letheringham Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
dependent on SS Peter & Paul, Ipswich;
founded c.1194 by William de Bovile;
dissolved 1537; granted to Elizabeth Naunton, daughter of Sir Antony Naunton of Wingfield 1553;
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Letheringham
____________________
Letherington Priory
[75][76]

52°10′44″N 1°18′57″E / 52.1788234°N 1.3157845°E / 52.1788234; 1.3157845 (Letheringham Priory)
Little Welnetham Trinitarian

Mendham Priory Cluniac monks
alien house: dependent on Castle Acre, Norfolk;
founded before 1155 by William Huntingfield;
became denizen: independent from sometime between 1351 and 1374;
dissolved 1537; granted to Richard Freston
All Saints
____________________
Mindham Priory
[77][78]

52°23′17″N 1°19′18″E / 52.3880403°N 1.3216934°E / 52.3880403; 1.3216934 (Mendham Priory)
Old Leiston Abbey Premonstratensian Canons
daughter of Welbeck, Nottinghamshire;
founded 1183 by Sir Ranulph de Glanvil;
obtained license from the Pope to move to another site due to flooding;
transferred to new site at Leiston 1365; old site continued in use as a cell
The Blessed Virgin Mary [74]
Orford Austin Friars Augustinian Friars (under the Limit of Cambridge)
founded 1295-9, land granted by Robert Hewell 1205, building appears to have begun 1299;
dissolved December 1538
[79][80]

52°05′35″N 1°32′07″E / 52.0931131°N 1.5353125°E / 52.0931131; 1.5353125 (Orford Austin Friars)
Redlingfield Priory ^ Benedictine nuns
founded c.1120 by Manasses, Count of Giusnes (Ghisnes) and his wife Emma;
dissolved 10 February 1537; granted to Edmund Bedingfield 1536/7; house rebuilt 1875; monastic remains incorporated into barn
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Andrew, Redlingfield [81][82]

52°17′26″N 1°12′16″E / 52.2906556°N 1.2044138°E / 52.2906556; 1.2044138 (Redlingfield Priory)
52°17′28″N 1°12′16″E / 52.2910657°N 1.2044889°E / 52.2910657; 1.2044889 (Redlingfield Priory)
Ringshall Cell (?) Benedictine monks
purportedly a cell[note 4]; free chapel belonging to Norwich granted to Hoxne
[83]

52°07′12″N 0°57′50″E / 52.1200349°N 0.9637821°E / 52.1200349; 0.9637821 (Ringshall Cell (purported))
Rumburgh Priory + St Michael Rumburgh - geograph.org.uk - 1778638.jpg possible site of Saxon minster or monastery, 11th century;
Benedictine monks
priory dependent on St Benet's Abbey, Hulme, Norfolk
founded between 1047[note 5] and 1064[note 6] by Æthelmar, Bishop of Elmham and Thurston, Abbot of St Benet of Hulme and Oxenedes
possibly subsequently dependent on St Mélanie, Rennes;
cell dependent on St Mary's, York c.1137: granted to York by Stephen, Earl of Britanny 1135;
dissolved 1528; suppressed for Wolsey's college at Ipswich;
conventual church in parochial use as the Parish Church of St Michael
ThePriory Church of Saint Michael and Saint Felix, Rumburgh
____________________
Wisseta Priory
[84][85][86]

52°23′04″N 1°26′48″E / 52.3845616°N 1.4467943°E / 52.3845616; 1.4467943 (Rumburgh Priory)
St Olave's Priory, Herringfleet StOlave'sPriory.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1216 by Roger fitz Osbert;
dissolved 1537;
purchased by Sir Henry Jerringham, who built house on site 1547, incorporating monastic remains;
demolished 1784, and stone removed to repair Herringfleet church;
refectory undercroft converted to a cottage 1825 in use until 1902
The Priory Church of Saint Olave, Heringfleet

St Mary and St Olave, King and Martyr[note 7]
____________________
Herringfleet Priory
[87][88]

52°32′17″N 1°37′27″E / 52.5380897°N 1.6240481°E / 52.5380897; 1.6240481 (St Olave's Priory (Herringfleet Priory))
Sibton Abbey Remains of Sibton Abbey.jpg Cistercian monks from Warden, Bedfordshire
founded 22 February 1150 (1149) by William de Cayneto (Cheyney);
dissolved 1536; granted to Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk; sold to John Scrivener 1610; house built on the site, demolished later 18th century;
site currently within the estate of 19th century house named 'Sibton Abbey', without public access
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Sibton [89][90]

52°16′32″N 1°27′56″E / 52.2755784°N 1.465555°E / 52.2755784; 1.465555 (Sibton Abbey)
Snape Priory # Benedictine monks
cell dependent on Colchester, Essex
founded 1155 by William Martel, his wife and son;
dependent on Butley, granted by Henry VIII;
dissolved 19 January 1525;
Abbey Farm possibly occupies the site, though buildings appear not to incorporate monastic remains
St Mary [91][92][93]

52°10′01″N 1°29′24″E / 52.1668218°N 1.4900315°E / 52.1668218; 1.4900315 (Snape Priory)
South Elmham Monastery apparent religious centre 7th century[note 8]
Stoke by Clare Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Bec-Hellouin;
(community founded at Clare before 1090);
transferred here 1124 from Clare;
dissolved 1415;
became a secular college;
enlarged 1897 by Lutyens;
dissolved 1548, converted into a mansion;
present house currently in use as a school named 'Stoke College';
church rebuilt and in parochial use as the Parish Church of St John the Baptist;
[94][95][96]

52°03′40″N 0°32′17″E / 52.0611061°N 0.5380565°E / 52.0611061; 0.5380565 (Stoke by Clare Priory (church)) (church)
52°03′34″N 0°32′20″E / 52.0595361°N 0.5387861°E / 52.0595361; 0.5387861 (Stoke by Clare Priory)
Stoke-by-Nayland Monastery (?) monks or secular college
founded before 946 (?) possibly during the reign of King Edmund by Alfgar who left bequest to the community of Stoke;
land granted to Ely by King Edgar
Sudbury Blackfriars Dominican Friars (under the Visitation of Cambridge)
founded before 1247 by Baldwin de Shipling;
dissolved 1539; granted to Thomas Eden, Esq. 1539/40
demolished for a residential house; 'Priory Wall' is sleeper wall of 'Priory Gate', built shortly before dissolution
[97][98]

52°02′09″N 0°43′33″E / 52.0358351°N 0.725964°E / 52.0358351; 0.725964 (Sudbury Blackfriars)
Sudbury Augustinian Priory # Augustinian Canons Regular

Sudbury Benedictine Priory # Benedictine monks
cell dependent on Westminster, Middlesex;
founded c.1115 by Wilfric;
chapel built early-15th century, but monastic buildings appear not to have been built;
dissolved c.1538; granted to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster 1542/3;
priory house demolished 1779
St Bartholomew's Chapel [99]

52°03′07″N 0°43′38″E / 52.0519924°N 0.7273266°E / 52.0519924; 0.7273266 (Sudbury Benedictine Priory)
Wangford Priory Cluniac monks
cell dependent on Thetford, Norfolk;
founded before 1160 by Doudo Asini;
became denizen: independent from sometime between 1376 and 1393;
granted to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk 1540/1;
last remains demolished 19th century
[100][101]

52°21′15″N 1°37′10″E / 52.3542663°N 1.6195741°E / 52.3542663; 1.6195741 (Wangford Priory)
Welnetham Crutched Friars Crutched Friars
dependent on London, Middlesex;
chapel of St Thomas Martyr granted to London;
founded before 1274;
dissolved 1538
Wherstead Priory uncertain order and foundation;
alleged 13th century monastery at Wervestede
[102]

52°01′00″N 1°07′55″E / 52.0167519°N 1.1319566°E / 52.0167519; 1.1319566 (Wherstead Priory (alleged)) (alleged)
Wickham Skeyth Priory Benedictine monks
dependent on Colchester, Essex;
founded after 1135 (early in the reign of Stephen) by Robert de Salchovilla (Sakeville), later a monk at Colchester;
dissolved c.1164, transferred to Colchester by consent of Jordan, son of the founder
Wickham Skeith Priory [103]

52°16′43″N 1°03′13″E / 52.27874°N 1.0536146°E / 52.27874; 1.0536146 (Wickham Skeyth Priory)
Woodbridge Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
founded c.1193 by Ernald Rufus (Ernaldus Ruffus);
dissolved 1534/7; granted to Thomas Seckford, Master of Requests 1576/7; building constructed on site 1547-64, now in use as school known as 'the Abbey'
The Blessed Virgin Mary [104][105]

52°05′35″N 1°18′50″E / 52.0930703°N 1.3138881°E / 52.0930703; 1.3138881 (Woodbridge Priory)
Yenston Grange Benedictine monks
alien house: grange dependent on St-Sever;
foundation and dissolution unknown

Glossary[edit]


edit this box

Map link to lists of monastic houses in England by county[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Icanho — order: special rule approved by Benedict Biscop c.670: Victoria County History: A History of the County of Lincoln, Volume 2, (1906), p.96-7
  2. ^ Icanho — foundation: Anglo-Saxon Chronicles, (ed. D. Whitelock &c, 1961), p.20, with note that it was located in East Anglia; T. H. Bryant, Churches of Suffolk, (1912) , Volume 1, p.5, and F. S. Stevenson assert Iken in Suffolk. Full attribution by N. Scarfe, S. West and R. Cramp, 'Iken, St Botolph and the Coming of East Anglian Christianity', Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of Archaeology & History xxxv (1984), 279-302.
  3. ^ Icanho — location: Victoria County History: A History of the County of Lincoln, Volume 2, (1906), p.96-7 and T. Tanner, Notitia Monastica, p.248 suggest location was near Boston in Lincolnshire
  4. ^ Ringsford — given as cell: W. A. Dutt (1905) Suffolk:
  5. ^ Rumburgh — earliest date for foundation: Æthelmar became bishop of Elmham 1047
  6. ^ Rumburgh — latest date for foundation: Thurston was abbot until 1064 at latest
  7. ^ St Olave — dedication given by T. Tanner, (1744) Notitia Monastica
  8. ^ South Elmham Monastery — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk, Volume 2, p.215; cf Taylor

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ALNESBOURN PRIORY
  2. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Alnesbourn — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (p.91)
  3. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BABWELL FRIARY
  4. ^ a b British History Online — Franciscan friars: Bury St Edmunds — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.124-125)
  5. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BATTISFORD HOSPITALLERS PRECEPTORY
  6. ^ British History Online — House of Knights Hospitaller — Preceptory of Battisford — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.120-121)
  7. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 388725
  8. ^ British History Online — Alien houses: Priory of Blakenham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.152-153)
  9. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BLYTHBURGH PRIORY
  10. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Blythburgh — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.91-94)
  11. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BRUISYARD ABBEY
  12. ^ British History Online — House of minoresses — Abbey of Bruisyard — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.131-132)
  13. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF THE HOLY TRINITY
  14. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Priory of Bungay — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.81-83)
  15. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BURY ST EDMUNDS ABBEY
  16. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: Abbey of Bury St Edmunds — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.56-72)
  17. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: BURY ST EDMUNDS GREYFRIARS
  18. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BUTLEY PRIORY
  19. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons — Priory of Butley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.95-99)
  20. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CAMPSEY ASH PRIORY
  21. ^ British History Online — British History Online — Houses of Austin nuns: Priory of Campsey — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.112-115)
  22. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CAVENHAM TEMPLARS PRECEPTORY
  23. ^ Pastscape - Detailed Result: CHIPLEY PRIORY
  24. ^ British History Online — British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Chipley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (p.99)
  25. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CLARE AUSTIN FRIARY
  26. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CLARE PRIORY CHAPEL
  27. ^ British History Online — British History Online — Austin friaries: Clare — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.127-129)
  28. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 1340102
  29. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 386818
  30. ^ British History Online — British History Online — Alien houses: Priory of Creeting St Mary — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (p.153)
  31. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST OLAVES CHURCH
  32. ^ British History Online — Alien houses: Priory of Creeting St Olave — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.153-154)
  33. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: DODNASH PRIORY
  34. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Dodnash — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.99-100)
  35. ^ Pastscape - Detailed Result: DUNWICH BLACKFRIARS
  36. ^ British History Online — Dominican friaries: Dunwich — Victoria County History: A History of the County ouf Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.121-122)
  37. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: DUNWICH GREYFRIARS
  38. ^ a b British History Online — Franciscan friars - Dunwich — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.125-126)
  39. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: DUNWICH TEMPLARS PRECEPTORY
  40. ^ British History Online — House of Knights Templar — Dunwich — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (p.120)
  41. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 392131
  42. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: Priory of Dunwich — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (p.76)
  43. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST MARYS ABBEY
  44. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: PRIORY FARM
  45. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: Priory of Edwardstone — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (p.76)
  46. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: EYE PRIORY
  47. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: WALTON PRIORY
  48. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: Priory of Felixstowe — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.80-81)
  49. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: FLIXTON PRIORY
  50. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin nuns: Priory of Flixton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.115-117)
  51. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: GISLINGHAM TEMPLARS PRECEPTORY
  52. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST MARY AND ST LAURENCE
  53. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BRICETT PRIORY
  54. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons - Priory of Bricett — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.94-95)
  55. ^ The Hadleigh Society, Apr 2000
  56. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: HOXNE PRIORY
  57. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: Priory of Hoxne — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.76-77)
  58. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: IPSWICH BLACKFRIARS
  59. ^ British History Online — Dominican friaries — Ipswich — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.122-123)
  60. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: IPSWICH GREYFRIARS
  61. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHRISTCHURCH MANSION
  62. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of the Holy Trinity, Ipswich — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.103-105)
  63. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: PRIORY OF ST PETER AND ST PAUL IPSWICH
  64. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons - Priory of St Peter and St Paul, Ipswich — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.102-103)
  65. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: IPSWICH WHITEFRIARS
  66. ^ British History Online — Carmelite friars - Ipswich — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.130-131)
  67. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: IXWORTH PRIORY
  68. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Ixworth — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.105-107)
  69. ^ Ixworth Abbey - Ixworth - Suffolk - England | British Listed Buildings
  70. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: KERSEY PRIORY
  71. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Kersey — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.107-108)
  72. ^ The Priory - Kersey - Suffolk - England | British Listed Buildings
  73. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: LEISTON ABBEY
  74. ^ a b British History Online — House of Premonstratensian canons: Abbey of Leiston — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.117-119)
  75. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST MARYS CHURCH
  76. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Letheringham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (p.108)
  77. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MENDHAM PRIORY
  78. ^ British History Online — Houses of Cluniac monks: Priory of Mendham — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.86-87)
  79. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ORFORD AUSTIN FRIARY
  80. ^ British History Online — Austin friaries: Orford — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (p.130)
  81. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: REDLINGFIELD PRIORY
  82. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Priory of Redlingfield — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.83-85)
  83. ^ Pastscape - Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 1301750
  84. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST MICHAELS CHURCH
  85. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 1125252
  86. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: Priory of Rumburgh — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.77-79)
  87. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST OLAVES PRIORY
  88. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Herringfleet — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.100-101)
  89. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: SIBTON ABBEY
  90. ^ British History Online — Houses of Cistercian monks: Abbey of Sibton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.89-91)
  91. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: SNAPE PRIORY
  92. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine monks: Priory of Snape — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.79-80)
  93. ^ Sibton Abbey & Accounts
  94. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: PRIORY OF ST JOHN THE BAPTIST
  95. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST JOHN THE BAPTISTS CHURCH
  96. ^ British History Online — Alien houses: Priory of Stoke by Clare — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.154-155)
  97. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: SUDBURY BLACKFRIARS
  98. ^ British History Online — Dominican friaries - Sudbury — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.123-124)
  99. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST BARTHOLOMEWS CHAPEL
  100. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WANGFORD PRIORY
  101. ^ British History Online — Houses of Cluniac monks: Priory of Wangford — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.88-89)
  102. ^ Pastscape - Detailed Result: MONUMENT NO. 388477
  103. ^ http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=386954
  104. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WOODBRIDGE PRIORY
  105. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Woodbridge — Victoria County History: A History of the County of Suffolk: Volume 2 (pp.111-112)
  • Binns, Alison (1989) Studies in the History of Medieval Religion 1: Dedications of Monastic Houses in England and Wales 1066-1216, Boydell
  • Cobbett, William (1868) List of Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, And Other Religious Foundations in England and Wales and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, or Alienated by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments
  • Knowles, David & Hadcock, R. Neville (1971) Medieval Religious Houses England & Wales. Longman
  • Morris, Richard (1979) Cathedrals and Abbeys of England and Wales, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
  • Thorold, Henry (1986) Collins Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories of England and Wales, Collins
  • Thorold, Henry (1993) Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.
  • English Cathedrals and Abbeys, Illustrated, Odhams Press Ltd.
  • Map of Monastic Britain, South Sheet, Ordnance Survey, 2nd edition, 1954