List of monastic houses in the East Riding of Yorkshire

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List of monastic houses in the East Riding of Yorkshire is located in East Riding of Yorkshire
BEVERLEY
BEVERLEY
Bridlington Priory
Bridlington Priory
Burstall Priory (approx)
Burstall Priory (approx)
Cottingham Priory
Cottingham Priory
Ellerton (on Spalding Moor) Priory
Ellerton (on Spalding Moor) Priory
Faxfleet Preceptory
Faxfleet Preceptory
Haltemprice Priory
Haltemprice Priory
Howden Minster
Howden Minster
KINGSTON UPON HULL
KINGSTON UPON HULL
Meaux Abbey
Meaux Abbey
North Ferriby Priory
North Ferriby Priory
Nunburnholme Priory (site)
Nunburnholme Priory (site)
Nunkeeling Priory
Nunkeeling Priory
Ottringham Priory
Ottringham Priory
Snaith Priory
Snaith Priory
Swine Priory
Swine Priory
Warter Priory
Warter Priory
Watton Priory
Watton Priory
Wilberfoss Priory
Wilberfoss Priory
Withernsea Priory
Withernsea Priory
Locations of monastic houses in East Riding of Yorkshire

The following is a list of monastic houses in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England.

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks), and also camerae of the military orders of monks (Templars and Hospitallers). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The name of the county is given where there is reference to an establishment in another county. Where the county has changed since the foundation's dissolution the modern county is given in parentheses, and in instances where the referenced foundation ceased to exist before the unification of England, the kingdom is given, followed by the modern county in parentheses.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from the details provided by English Heritage Pastscape [1] and Ordnance Survey publications.

A Monastic Glossary follows the listing, which provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure) or redundant intact structure
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented)
or ecclesiastical establishments with a monastic appellation but lacking monastic connection.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
EH English Heritage
LT Landmark Trust
NT National Trust

Alphabetical listing of establishments[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Beverley Minster + Beverley minster.jpg Benedictine? monks and nuns, secular collegiate
founded c.700 by John, Archbishop of York;
destroyed in raids by the Danes c.867
secular (collegiate)
refounded c.934;
dissolved 1547; granted to Michael Stanhope and John Bellew 1548/9
The Parish Church of Saint John and Saint Martin, Beverley [1][2][3][4]

53°50′21″N 0°25′29″W / 53.839167°N 0.424722°W / 53.839167; -0.424722 (Beverley Minster)
Beverley Blackfriars Dominican Friars (under the Visitation of York)
founded 1267 (or before 1240), purportedly by Stephen Goldsmith, but claimed by the town and the Crown;
dissolved 1539; granted to John Pope and Antony Foster 1544/5
[5][6][7]

53°50′24″N 0°25′23″W / 53.8401144°N 0.4230273°W / 53.8401144; -0.4230273 (Beverley Blackfriars)
Beverley Greyfriars, earlier site Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of York)
initially founded before 1267 possibly by John de Hightmede;
transferred to new site (see immediately below) 1297
[8][9]
Beverley Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of York)
(community founded at earlier site (see immediately above) before 1267);
transferred here 1297 by William Liketon and Henry Weighton;
dissolved 1539; granted to Thomas Culpeper 1541/2
[8][9]

53°50′26″N 0°26′11″W / 53.8406747°N 0.436264°W / 53.8406747; -0.436264 (Beverley Greyfriars)
Beverley Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
founded c.1201, manor of the Holy Trinity and other endowments granted by Sybilla de Valoniis;
dissolved 1540; granted to William Berkeley 1544/5
[10][11]

53°50′33″N 0°25′22″W / 53.8426117°N 0.4227966°W / 53.8426117; -0.4227966 (Beverley Preceptory)
Bridlington Priory + BridlingtonPriory.JPG Augustinian Canons Regular
founded before 1113-4 by Walter de Gant;
dissolved 1537;
conventual church now in parochial use
The Priory Church of Saint Mary the Virgin, Bridlington
____________________
Burlington Priory
[12][13][14]

54°05′40″N 0°12′06″W / 54.0943418°N 0.2017772°W / 54.0943418; -0.2017772 (Bridlington Priory)
Burstall Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: dependent on Aumale
founded after 1115, endowments granted by Stephen, Count of Albermarle;
dissolved 1395, sold to Kirkstall;
submerged under the Humber Estuary after 1540
Birstall Priory [15][16]

53°38′28″N 0°02′28″E / 53.6411524°N 0.0410271°E / 53.6411524; 0.0410271 (Burstall Priory (approx)) (approx)
Cottingham Priory Augustinian Canons Regular — (?)Arroasian
founded 1322 by Thomas Wake, Lord of Liddell, licensed 1320;
transferred to Haltemprice 1325-6
[17]

53°47′04″N 0°24′29″W / 53.7843742°N 0.4079774°W / 53.7843742; -0.4079774 (Cottingham Priory)
Ellerton Priory $ Gilbertine Canons
priory and hospital
founded before c.1209 (1212) by William Fitz Peter;
dissolved 18 December 1538; granted to John Aske 1541/2
St Mary
____________________
Elreton on the Derwent Priory;
Ellerton on Spalding Moor Priory
[18][19]

53°51′02″N 0°56′09″W / 53.8506177°N 0.935867°W / 53.8506177; -0.935867 (Ellerton (on Spalding Moor) Priory)
Faxfleet Preceptory Knights Templar
founded 1185 (before 1220(?));
dissolved 1308-12;
site now occupied by a fortified manor house
[20][21]

53°42′43″N 0°41′53″W / 53.7119742°N 0.698179°W / 53.7119742; -0.698179 (Faxfleet Preceptory)
Haltemprice Priory Haltpriside.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular — (?)Arroasian
(community founded at Cottingham 1322)
transferred here 1325-6 (1327);
church and buildings built and occupied by Arroasian canons from Bourne, Lincolnshire by January 1326;
Augustinian Canons Regular
independent from before 1355
transferred here 1327;
dissolved 12 August 1536 (1536-7); granted to Thomas Culpeper 1540/1
St Mary and the Holy Cross

53°45′53″N 0°25′15″W / 53.7646128°N 0.4208171°W / 53.7646128; -0.4208171 (Haltemprice Priory)
Hemingbrough Minster church held by Benedictine monks of Durham Cathedral; license obtained 1426 to found a secular college;
dissolved 1547
St Mary
____________________
Hemingburgh Minster

Howden Minster Howden Minster.jpg secular canons
founded 1267 by Robert, Bishop of Durham;
dissolved 1550, collegiate
The Collegiate and Minster Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Howden [22][23][24][25]

53°44′43″N 0°52′02″W / 53.7453149°N 0.8672923°W / 53.7453149; -0.8672923 (Howden Minster)
Kingston upon Hull Austin Friars Augustinian Friars (under the Limit of York)
founded before 1303 (1304);
dissolved 1539;
extant remains demolished c.1796; remains incorporated into the Tiger Inn;
some remains incorporated into Guildhall, demolished 1806
[26]

53°44′25″N 0°19′57″W / 53.740192°N 0.3326288°W / 53.740192; -0.3326288 (Kingston upon Hull Austin Friars)
Kingston upon Hull Blackfriars(?) Dominican Friars
granted to John Broxholme 1544/5
possible error — confusion for Lincoln Blackfriars? (see entry under List of monastic houses in Lincolnshire)
Kingston upon Hull Greyfriars secular college founded by Edward I;
Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual (under the Custody of York(?))
founded after 1307(?);
dissolved before 1365; friars removed to found a Franciscan nunnery, which never transpired;
Carthusian Priory established 1377


53°44′55″N 0°20′02″W / 53.7486997°N 0.3337902°W / 53.7486997; -0.3337902 (Kingston upon Hull Greyfriars)
Kingston upon Hull Whitefriars, earlier site Carmelite Friars
founded 1290-3
transferred to new site (see immediately below) 1307
Kingston upon Hull Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
(community founded at earlier site (see immediately above) 1290-3);
transferred here 1307 when the King granted a new site in exchange for the old;
dissolved 1539; granted to John Henneage 1540/1
Kingston Whitefriars [27]

53°44′34″N 0°20′11″W / 53.7426897°N 0.3364778°W / 53.7426897; -0.3364778 (Kingston upon Hull Whitefriars)
Kingston upon Hull Priory previously Fransciscan Friary
licence granted to Sir William de la Pole to found a hospital, and later an abbey for Franciscan nuns — (never established);
Carthusian monks
founded 1377;
dissolved 1539
St Mary Virgin, St Michael and All Angels, and St Thomas Martyr [28][29]

53°44′55″N 0°20′02″W / 53.7486696°N 0.3338626°W / 53.7486696; -0.3338626 (Kingston upon Hull Priory)
Kirkham Priory Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in North Yorkshire
Meaux Abbey Meaux Abbey.jpg Cistercian monks
daughter of Fountains, Yorkshire;
founded 1150 by William of Blois, 'le Gros', Count of Albermarle and Lord of Holderness, site chosen by Adam, monk of Fountains;
community arrived 1 January 1151;
dissolved 11 December 1539; granted to John, Earl of Warwick 1549/50;
site now occupied by Crown Farm, in private ownership
Melsa Abbey [30][31]

53°50′23″N 0°20′30″W / 53.8397283°N 0.341531°W / 53.8397283; -0.341531 (Meaux Abbey)
North Ferriby Priory # purported Knights Templar preceptory
appears not to have existed[note 1]
Augustinian Canons Regular — Order of the Temple of St John of Jerusalem
founded c.1140(?) by Eustace fitz John;
dissolved 1536-7; granted to Thomas Culpeper c.1540
The Priory Church of St Marie, North Ferriby
____________________
North Ferriby Preceptory (dubious);
North Ferry Priory
[32][33][34]

53°43′06″N 0°30′21″W / 53.7183362°N 0.50587°W / 53.7183362; -0.50587 (North Ferriby Priory)
Nunburnholme Priory Benedictine nuns
founded possibly before 1170 or before 1188 (during the reign of Henry II) by the ancestors of Roger de Merlay, Lord of the Barony of Morpeth, probably William de Merlay or Roger I de Merlay;
with regular priests or brethren 12th century until sometime after 1318;
dissolved 1536; granted to Robert Tyrwhit
The Priory Church of Saint Mary, Nunburnholme
____________________
Brunnum Priory
[35][36]

53°55′29″N 0°42′14″W / 53.924727°N 0.7039565°W / 53.924727; -0.7039565 (Nunburnholme Priory (site))
Nunkeeling Priory Benedictine nuns
founded 1152 by Agnes de Arches (Agnes de Catfoss);
with regular priests or brethren 12th century until sometime after 1318;
sometimes given as Cistercian nuns
dissolved 1539; granted to Richard Gresham 1540/1;
remains incorporated into church of St Mary Magdalene and St Helena built 1810, now ruined
The Priory Church of Saint Mary Magdalene, Keeling
____________________
Nonnekelyng Priory;
Nun Kelynge Priory
[37][38][39]

53°56′05″N 0°15′24″W / 53.9348372°N 0.2567089°W / 53.9348372; -0.2567089 (Nunkeeling Priory)
Ottringham Priory Cistercian
residential chantry dependent on Meaux;
monks from Meaux resided at Ottringham church 1293 to 1323;
possibly St Wilfrid's Church
[40]

53°42′03″N 0°04′52″W / 53.7008733°N 0.0811046°W / 53.7008733; -0.0811046 (Ottringham Priory)
Snaith Priory + SnaithPriory.JPG Benedictine monks
founded after 1101;
chapel of St Lawrence granted to Selby by Gerard, Archbishop of York;
resident monks from 1310;
dissolved 1539
St Lawrence [41]

53°41′31″N 1°01′51″W / 53.6920755°N 1.0307622°W / 53.6920755; -1.0307622 (Snaith Priory)
Swine Priory + Priory Church of St Mary the Virgin, Swine.jpg Cistercian nuns and Premonstratensian(?) canons double house
founded before 1153 by Robert de Verli, built c.1180, confirmed by Hugh de Puiset (Pudsey);
Premonstratensian(?) replaced by Trinitarian(?) between 1287 and 1290;
Cistercian nuns
became ordinary nunnery after 1335;
dissolved 9 September 1539; granted to Sir Richard Gresham c.1540;
conventual church now in parochial use
St Mary
____________________
Swinhey Priory
[42][43][44][45]

53°48′23″N 0°16′45″W / 53.806268°N 0.279070°W / 53.806268; -0.279070 (Swine Priory)
Thicket Priory Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in North Yorkshire
Warter Priory Warter StJamesChurch.JPG Augustinian Canons Regular — Arroasian
alien house: daughter of Arrouaise;
abbey founded 1132 by Jeffery (Geoffrey) Fitz Pain Trusbut;
became denizen: independent from 1162;
priory before 1181-92 to dissolution;
dissolved 1536; granted to Thomas, Earl of Rutland c.1540
conventual church remained in parochial use until demolished 1864;
parochial church of St James built on site
St James [46][47]

53°56′34″N 0°40′34″W / 53.9428563°N 0.6761903°W / 53.9428563; -0.6761903 (Warter Priory)
Watton Priory WattonPriory.JPG Benedictine? nuns
founded c.686;
probably destroyed in raids by the Danes 9th century;
Gilbertine Canons and nuns double monastery
founded 1150;
dissolved 1539; granted to John, Earl of Warwick;
house named 'Watton Abbey' built on site, in private ownership
Walton Priory [48][49][50]

53°56′05″N 0°26′34″W / 53.9348214°N 0.4427683°W / 53.9348214; -0.4427683 (Watton Priory)
Wilberfoss Priory Benedictine nuns
founded c.1154 (before 1153) by Alan de Cotton, who granted land and property, and Jordan fitz Gilbert, who granted church etc. (which was confirmed by Henry, Archbishop of York);
dissolved 1539; granted to George Gale c.1543;
current parish church possibly the nave of the conventual church
The Priory Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Wilberfoss
____________________
Wilburfosse Priory
[51][52]

53°57′00″N 0°53′06″W / 53.9498763°N 0.8850056°W / 53.9498763; -0.8850056 (Wilberfoss Priory)
Withernsea Priory Benedictine monks
alien house: cell dependent on Aumale;
founded c.1115, church, etc. granted by Stephen, Count of Albermarle;
destroyed by the sea
[53]

53°43′20″N 0°01′46″E / 53.7221628°N 0.029389°E / 53.7221628; 0.029389 (Withernsea Priory)
Yedingham Priory Historical county location. See entry under List of monastic houses in North Yorkshire

Glossary[edit]


edit this box

Map link to lists of monastic houses in England by county[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ North Ferriby Knights Templar - Knowles & Hadcock (1971) Medieval Religious Houses: England and Wales p.197

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Official Site for Beverley Minster, East Riding of Yorkshire, UK". Beverleyminster.org. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  2. ^ "CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Beverley Minster". Newadvent.org. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  3. ^ "Beverley Minster — Visit East Yorkshire — E&A Details". Realyorkshire.co.uk. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  4. ^ "Beverley Minster, East Yorkshire". Touristinformationbeverley.co.uk. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  5. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BEVERLEY BLACKFRIARS
  6. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: THE OLD FRIARY
  7. ^ British History Online — Friaries - Black friars of Beverley — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.263-264)
  8. ^ a b Pastscape — Detailed Result: BEVERLEY GREYFRIARS
  9. ^ a b British History Online — Friaries: Houses of grey friars — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.264-267)
  10. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BEVERLEY HOSPITALLERS PRECEPTORY
  11. ^ British History Online — Houses of Knights Hospitaller — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.260-262)
  12. ^ "The Priory Church of St Mary, Bridlington". Bridlingtonpriory.co.uk. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  13. ^ British History Online — Houses of Austin canons: Priory of Bridlington — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.199-205)
  14. ^ The Dedicated Partnership — promoting tourism — http://www.dedicate.co.uk. "Bridlington Priory in Bridlington". UK Attraction. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  15. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: BURSTALL PRIORY
  16. ^ British History Online — Alien houses: The Priory of Burstall — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.387-391)
  17. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: COTTINGHAM PRIORY
  18. ^ Pastscape - Detailed Result: ELLERTON PRIORY
  19. ^ Gilbertine houses - Priory of Ellerton on Spalding Moor | A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp. 251-252)
  20. ^ Pastscape — Faxfleet Templars Preceptory Images
  21. ^ British History Online — Houses of Knights Templar — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.256-260)
  22. ^ "Howden Minster". Eastriding.gov.uk. 1 October 2004. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  23. ^ "Howden Minster K940506 — Yorkshire — Regions of England — English Heritage Images". Englishheritageprints.com. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  24. ^ "Howden Minster ruins — History, Travel, and accommodation information". Britainexpress.com. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  25. ^ A Church Near You. "Howden, Howden Minster (St Peter & St Paul) — East Riding of Yorkshire | Diocese of York". Achurchnearyou.com. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  26. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: KINGSTON UPON HULL AUSTIN FRIARY
  27. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: KINGSTON UPON HULL WHITEFRIARS
  28. ^ Pastscape - Detailed Result: CARTHUSIAN PRIORY OF KINGSTON UPON HULL
  29. ^ British History Online — Houses of Carthusian monks: Priory of Kingston-upon-Hull — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.190-192)
  30. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: MEAUX ABBEY
  31. ^ British History Online — Houses of Cistercian monks: Meaux — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.146-149)
  32. ^ The monastic order in Yorkshire ... — Google Books. Books.google.co.uk. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  33. ^ Austin canons (Order of the Temple of our Lord at Jerusalem) - Priory of North Ferriby | A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp. 241-243)
  34. ^ http://www.york.ac.uk/inst/bihr/Publications/MRB8i.pdf
  35. ^ "Pastscape — Detailed Result: NUNBURNHOLME PRIORY". Pastscape.english-heritage.org.uk. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  36. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Priory of Nunburnholme — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.118-119)
  37. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: NUNKEELING PRIORY
  38. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST MARY MAGDALENE AND ST HELENA
  39. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Priory of Nunkeeling — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.119-122)
  40. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: ST WILFRIDS CHURCH
  41. ^ http://www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=57947
  42. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: SWINE PRIORY
  43. ^ British History Online — Houses of Cistercians nuns: Priory of Swine — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.178-182)
  44. ^ "Swine Priory". Cistercensi.info. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  45. ^ Nichols, John A.. "Bibliographia". Monasticmatrix.usc.edu. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  46. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WARTER PRIORY
  47. ^ British History Online — Henry VIII — November 1535, 6-10
  48. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WATTON PRIORY
  49. ^ British History Online — Gilbertine houses  Priory of Watton — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.254-255)
  50. ^ "A&A | Outbuilding, Watton Priory". Artandarchitecture.org.uk. Retrieved 15 April 2010. 
  51. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: WILBERFOSS PRIORY
  52. ^ British History Online — Houses of Benedictine nuns: Priory of Wilberfoss — Victoria County History: A History of the County of York: Volume 3 (pp.125-126)
  53. ^ Pastscape — Detailed Result: CHURCH OF ST MARY
  • Binns, Alison (1989) Studies in the History of Medieval Religion 1: Dedications of Monastic Houses in England and Wales 1066-1216, Boydell
  • Cobbett, William (1868) List of Abbeys, Priories, Nunneries, Hospitals, And Other Religious Foundations in England and Wales and in Ireland, Confiscated, Seized On, or Alienated by the Protestant "Reformation" Sovereigns and Parliaments
  • Knowles, David & Hadcock, R. Neville (1971) Medieval Religious Houses England & Wales. Longman
  • Morris, Richard (1979) Cathedrals and Abbeys of England and Wales, J. M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
  • Thorold, Henry (1986) Collins Guide to Cathedrals, Abbeys and Priories of England and Wales, Collins
  • Thorold, Henry (1993) Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.
  • English Cathedrals and Abbeys, Illustrated, Odhams Press Ltd.
  • Map of Monastic Britain, South Sheet, Ordnance Survey, 2nd edition, 1954