List of municipalities in Alberta

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Map of Canada with Alberta highlighted in red
Location of Alberta in Canada
Locations of Alberta's specialized and rural municipalities
Distribution of Alberta's 5 specialized municipalities (red) and 75 rural municipalities, which include municipal districts (orange), improvement districts (green) and special areas (brown)

Alberta is the fourth-most populous province in Canada with 3,645,257 residents as of 2011 and is the fourth-largest in land area at approximately 640,000 km2 (250,000 sq mi).[1] Alberta's 357 municipalities cover 98.9% of the province's land mass and are home to 98.6% of its population.[2][3][a] These municipalities provide local government services, including roads, water, sewer and garbage collection among others, and a variety of programs to their residents.[4][5]

According to the Municipal Government Act (MGA), which was enacted in 2000, a municipality in Alberta is "a city, town, village, summer village, municipal district or specialized municipality, a town under the Parks Towns Act, or a municipality formed by special Act".[6] The MGA also recognizes improvement districts and special areas as municipal authorities while Metis settlements are recognized as municipalities by the Government of Alberta's Ministry of Municipal Affairs.[6][7] Cities, towns, villages, summer villages, municipal districts, specialized municipalities and improvement districts are formed under the provincial authority of the MGA.[6] Special areas and Metis settlements are formed under the provincial authority of the Special Areas Act (SAA) and the Metis Settlements Act (MSA) respectively, of which both were enacted in 2000.[8][9] As provincial law, the MGA, the SAA and the MSA were passed by the Legislative Assembly of Alberta with royal assent granted by the Lieutenant Governor.[10]

Of Alberta's 357 municipalities, 269 of them are urban municipalities (17 cities, 108 towns, 93 villages and 51 summer villages), 5 are specialized municipalities, 75 are rural municipalities (64 municipal districts, 8 improvement districts and 3 special areas) and 8 are Metis settlements.[2] The MGA, the SAA and the MSA stipulate governance of these municipalities.[6][8][9] Alberta's Ministry of Municipal Affairs is responsible for providing provincial services to municipalities.[11]

Over half of Alberta's population resides in its two largest cities. Calgary, the largest city, is home to 30% of the province's population (1,096,833 residents), while Edmonton, Alberta's capital city, is home to 22% (812,201 residents).[3] Improvement District No. 25 (Willmore Wilderness) and Improvement District No. 349 are Alberta's smallest municipalities by population; both are unpopulated.[3][12] The largest municipality by land area is Mackenzie County at 80,478 km2 (31,073 sq mi), while the smallest by land area is the Summer Village of Castle Island at 0.05 km2 (0.019 sq mi).[3]

Urban municipalities[edit]

Locations of Alberta's urban municipalities
Distribution of Alberta's 269 urban municipalities including 17 cities (black), 108 towns (dark purple), 93 villages (light purple) and 51 summer villages (pink)

Alberta's Municipal Government Act (MGA), enacted in 2000, defines urban municipality as a "city, town, village or summer village."[6] For federal census purposes, Statistics Canada recognizes all four urban municipality types as census subdivisions.[13]

Combined, Alberta has 269 urban municipalities comprising 17 cities, 108 towns, 93 villages and 51 summer villages.[2] The 269 urban municipalities have a total population of 2,593,839, a total land area of 3,784 km2 (1,461 sq mi), and an average population of 9,643. These totals represent 71% of Alberta's population yet only 0.6% of its land area.

Cities[edit]

Skyline of Calgary
Calgary, Alberta's largest city
Skyline of Edmonton
Edmonton, Alberta's capital and second largest city
Aerial view of Red Deer
Red Deer, Alberta's third largest city, is located at the midpoint between Calgary and Edmonton.
Skyline of Lethbridge
Lethbridge is Alberta's fourth largest city.
Downtown St. Albert
St. Albert, Alberta's fifth largest city, is located adjacent to Edmonton.

The MGA stipulates that an area may incorporate as a city if it has a population of 10,000 people or more and the majority of its buildings are on parcels of land smaller than 1,850 m2 (19,900 sq ft).[6] Alberta has 17 cities that had a cumulative population of 2,458,748 and an average population of 144,632 in the 2011 census.[2][3] These 17 cities include Lloydminster, of which a portion is located within the neighbouring province of Saskatchewan.[14] Alberta's largest city by population and land area is Calgary with 1,096,833 and 825 km2 (319 sq mi), while Lacombe is its smallest city by population with 11,707 and Brooks is its smallest city by land area with 18 km2 (6.9 sq mi).[3] Lacombe is also Alberta's newest city, which changed from a town to a city on September 5, 2010.[15]

Of Alberta's 17 cities, Cold Lake and Fort Saskatchewan have less than the current minimum density requirement of 400 residents per square kilometre. Cold Lake and Fort Saskatchewan were incorporated as a town and city respectively prior to the MGA being enacted in 2000.[6][15]

Towns[edit]

The MGA stipulates that an area may incorporate as a town if it has a population of 1,000 people or more and the majority of its buildings are on parcels of land smaller than 1,850 m2 (19,900 sq ft).[6] Alberta has 108 towns that had a cumulative population of 451,830 and an average population of 4,184 in the 2011 census.[2][3] The province's largest and smallest towns by population are Okotoks and Granum with 24,511 and 447 respectively, while its largest and smallest by land area are Drumheller and Eckville with 108 km2 (42 sq mi) and 1.6 km2 (0.62 sq mi) respectively.[3] Onoway is Alberta's newest town, which changed from a village to a town on September 1, 2005.[16]

Of Alberta's 108 towns, 14 have populations less than the current minimum population requirement of 1,000 and 61 have less than the current minimum density requirement of 400 residents per square kilometre. All of these were incorporated as either towns or villages prior to the MGA being enacted in 2000.[6][16]

Villages[edit]

The MGA stipulates that an area may incorporate as a village if it has a population of 300 people or more and the majority of its buildings are on parcels of land smaller than 1,850 m2 (19,900 sq ft).[6] Alberta has 93 villages that had a cumulative population of 38,675 and an average population of 416 in the 2011 census.[2][3] The province's largest and smallest villages by population are Stirling and Gadsby with 1,090 and 25 respectively, while its largest and smallest by land area are Chipman and Edberg with 9.6 km2 (3.7 sq mi) and 0.4 km2 (0.15 sq mi) respectively.[3] The last communities to incorporate as villages were Alberta Beach and Spring Lake, which both changed from summer villages to villages on January 1, 1999.[17]

Of Alberta's 93 villages, 40 have populations less than the current minimum population requirement of 300 and 78 have less than the current minimum density requirement of 400 residents per square kilometre. All of these were incorporated as villages prior to the MGA being enacted in 2000.[6][17]

Summer villages[edit]

Under previous legislation, a community could incorporate as a summer village if it had "a minimum of 50 separate buildings occupied as dwellings at any time during a six-month period".[18] A community can no longer incorporate as a summer village under the MGA.[6][19]

Alberta has 51 summer villages that had a cumulative population of 4,586 and an average population of 90 in the 2011 census.[2][3] The province's largest summer village by population is Island Lake with 243, while Betula Beach and Kapasiwin are Alberta's smallest summer villages with a population of 10 each.[3][b] The province's largest and smallest summer villages by land area are Sandy Beach and Castle Island with 2.4 km2 (0.93 sq mi) and 0.05 km2 (0.019 sq mi) respectively.[3] Gull Lake and Kapasiwin were the last communities in Alberta to incorporate as summer villages. Both were incorporated on September 1, 1993.[21] Since then, two summer villages have incorporated as villages (Alberta Beach and Edmonton Beach, now named Spring Lake) and one has dissolved (White Gull).[17][22]

List of urban municipalities[edit]

Urban municipalities of Alberta
Name Status[2] Incorporation date
(current status)[15]
Population
(2011)[3]
Population
(2006)[3]
Change
(%)[3]
Land
area
(km²)[3]
Population
density
(per km²)[3]
Acme Village July 7, 1910 653 656 −0.5 2.47 263.9
Airdrie City January 1, 1985 42,564 28,927 47.1 33.10 1,286.0
Alberta Beach Village January 1, 1999 865 884 −2.1 1.98 436.7
Alix Village June 3, 1907 830 851 −2.5 3.15 263.4
Alliance Village August 26, 1918 174 158 10.1 0.64 270.1
Amisk Village January 1, 1956 207 172 20.3 0.76 272.2
Andrew Village June 24, 1930 379 465 −18.5 1.23 308.7
Argentia Beach Summer village January 1, 1967 15 52 −71.2 0.69 21.6
Arrowwood Village May 13, 1926 188 221 −14.9 0.66 286.1
Athabasca[c] Town September 19, 1911 2,990 2,580 15.9 17.48 171.1
Banff Town January 1, 1990 7,584 6,700 13.2 4.88 1,555.0
Barnwell Village January 1, 1980 771 618 24.8 1.49 517.2
Barons Village May 6, 1910 315 276 14.1 0.68 462.2
Barrhead Town November 26, 1946 4,432 4,209 5.3 8.10 547.2
Bashaw Town May 1, 1964 873 796 9.7 2.84 306.9
Bassano Town January 16, 1911 1,282 1,345 −4.7 5.16 248.6
Bawlf Village October 12, 1906 403 367 9.8 0.96 418.5
Beaumont Town January 1, 1980 13,284 8,961 48.2 10.50 1,264.8
Beaverlodge Town January 24, 1956 2,365 2,264 4.5 5.58 424.0
Beiseker Village February 23, 1921 785 804 −2.4 2.84 276.8
Bentley Town January 1, 2001 1,073 1,083 −0.9 2.30 466.3
Berwyn Village November 28, 1936 526 516 1.9 1.66 316.7
Betula Beach Summer village January 1, 1960 10 15 −33.3 0.18 54.5
Big Valley Village March 9, 1942 364 351 3.7 1.84 198.3
Birch Cove Summer village December 31, 1988 45 38 18.4 0.29 157.8
Birchcliff Summer village January 1, 1972 112 125 −10.4 0.98 114.0
Bittern Lake[d] Village November 2, 1904 224 225 −0.4 6.64 33.7
Black Diamond Town January 1, 1956 2,373 1,900 24.9 3.21 740.3
Blackfalds Town April 1, 1980 6,300 4,618 36.4 16.36 385.0
Bon Accord Town November 20, 1979 1,488 1,534 −3.0 2.11 706.2
Bondiss Summer village January 1, 1983 106 131 −19.1 1.33 79.9
Bonnyville Town February 3, 1948 6,216 5,832 6.6 14.10 440.7
Bonnyville Beach Summer village January 1, 1958 95 97 −2.1 0.38 253.2
Botha Village September 5, 1911 175 185 −5.4 1.09 160.7
Bow Island Town February 1, 1912 2,025 1,790 13.1 5.92 342.1
Bowden Town September 1, 1981 1,241 1,210 2.6 2.73 454.7
Boyle Village December 31, 1953 916 854 7.3 7.28 125.8
Breton Village January 1, 1957 496 550 −9.8 1.73 286.5
Brooks City September 1, 2005 13,676 12,508 9.3 18.19 751.9
Bruderheim Town September 17, 1980 1,155 1,215 −4.9 4.23 273.2
Burnstick Lake Summer village December 31, 1991 16 43 −62.8 0.18 89.9
Calgary City January 1, 1894 1,096,833 988,812 10.9 825.29 1,329.0
Calmar Town January 19, 1954 1,970 1,959 0.6 4.65 423.7
Camrose City January 1, 1955 17,286 15,630 10.6 42.50 406.7
Canmore Town June 1, 1966 12,288 12,039 2.1 68.90 178.4
Carbon Village November 18, 1912 592 570 3.9 2.00 295.6
Cardston Town July 2, 1901 3,580 3,452 3.7 8.64 414.1
Carmangay Village March 4, 1936 367 336 9.2 1.86 197.1
Caroline Village December 31, 1951 501 515 −2.7 1.98 252.8
Carstairs Town September 1, 1966 3,442 2,699 27.5 11.53 298.4
Castle Island Summer village January 1, 1955 19 22 −13.6 0.05 361.9
Castor Town June 27, 1910 932 931 0.1 2.72 343.1
Cereal Village August 19, 1914 134 126 6.3 0.95 141.6
Champion Village May 27, 1911 378 364 3.8 0.88 429.7
Chauvin Village December 30, 1912 334 308 8.4 2.32 143.9
Chestermere[e] Town March 1, 1993 14,824 9,923 49.4 32.64 454.1
Chipman Village October 21, 1913 284 253 12.3 9.61 29.5
Claresholm Town August 31, 1905 3,758 3,700 1.6 9.08 414.0
Clive Village January 9, 1912 675 562 20.1 2.12 318.3
Clyde Village January 28, 1914 503 470 7.0 1.36 370.7
Coaldale Town January 7, 1952 7,493 6,177 21.3 7.95 942.8
Coalhurst Town June 1, 1995 1,963 1,523 28.9 2.39 820.3
Cochrane Town February 15, 1971 17,580 13,760 27.8 30.03 585.5
Cold Lake City October 1, 2000 13,839 11,991 15.4 59.30 233.4
Consort Village September 23, 1912 689 739 −6.8 2.83 243.3
Coronation Town April 29, 1912 947 1,015 −6.7 3.73 253.6
Coutts Village January 1, 1960 277 305 −9.2 0.98 283.3
Cowley Village August 16, 1906 236 219 7.8 1.40 168.8
Cremona Village January 1, 1955 457 463 −1.3 1.71 267.8
Crossfield Town August 1, 1980 2,853 2,668 6.9 11.87 240.3
Crystal Springs Summer village January 1, 1957 90 112 −19.6 0.58 156.0
Czar Village November 12, 1917 167 175 −4.6 1.18 141.6
Daysland Town April 2, 1907 807 818 −1.3 1.75 461.2
Delburne Village January 17, 1913 830 765 8.5 3.92 211.5
Delia[f] Village July 20, 1914 186 207 −10.1 1.31 142.5
Devon Town February 24, 1950 6,510 6,261 4.0 11.72 555.6
Dewberry Village January 1, 1957 201 196 2.6 0.84 238.5
Didsbury Town September 27, 1906 4,957 4,305 15.1 16.08 308.2
Donalda Village December 30, 1912 259 224 15.6 0.99 262.3
Donnelly Village January 1, 1956 305 293 4.1 1.27 239.9
Drayton Valley Town February 1, 1957 7,049 6,893 2.3 12.27 574.3
Drumheller[g] Town March 2, 1916
January 1, 1998
8,029 7,932 1.2 107.93 74.4
Duchess Village May 12, 1921 992 978 1.4 1.89 526.2
Eckville Town July 1, 1966 1,125 951 18.3 1.58 710.8
Edberg Village February 4, 1930 168 155 8.4 0.36 470.9
Edgerton Village September 11, 1917 317 373 −15.0 1.89 168.1
Edmonton City October 8, 1904 812,201 730,372 11.2 684.37 1,186.8
Edson Town September 21, 1911 8,475 8,098 4.7 29.58 286.5
Elk Point Town January 1, 1962 1,412 1,487 −5.0 4.88 289.1
Elnora Village July 22, 1929 313 280 11.8 1.48 210.9
Empress Village February 5, 1914 188 136 38.2 1.75 107.6
Fairview Town April 25, 1949 3,162 3,297 −4.1 11.30 279.8
Falher Town January 1, 1955 1,075 941 14.2 2.87 374.7
Ferintosh Village January 9, 1911 181 153 18.3 0.62 290.2
Foremost Village December 31, 1950 526 524 0.4 1.89 277.8
Forestburg Village August 21, 1919 831 895 −7.2 2.75 302.0
Fort Macleod[h] Town March 29, 1912 3,117 3,072 1.5 23.34 133.5
Fort Saskatchewan City July 1, 1985 19,051 14,957 27.4 48.12 395.9
Fox Creek Town September 1, 1983 1,969 2,278 −13.6 11.54 170.6
Gadsby Village May 6, 1910 25 35 −28.6 0.82 30.5
Galahad Village March 5, 1918 119 134 −11.2 0.60 199.7
Ghost Lake Summer village December 31, 1953 81 78 3.8 0.63 129.4
Gibbons Town April 1, 1977 3,030 2,642 14.7 7.39 409.9
Girouxville Village December 31, 1951 266 282 −5.7 0.58 461.2
Glendon Village January 1, 1956 486 421 15.4 1.98 245.1
Glenwood Village January 1, 1961 287 280 2.5 1.46 197.2
Golden Days Summer village January 1, 1965 141 207 −31.9 2.27 62.0
Grande Cache Town September 1, 1983 4,319 3,783 14.2 35.48 121.7
Grande Prairie City January 1, 1958 55,032 47,107 16.8 72.80 755.9
Grandview Summer village January 1, 1967 108 127 −15.0 0.80 135.6
Granum[i] Town November 7, 1910 447 415 7.7 1.87 239.6
Grimshaw Town February 2, 1953 2,515 2,537 −0.9 7.21 349.0
Gull Lake Summer village September 1, 1993 122 204 −40.2 0.70 174.9
Half Moon Bay Summer village January 1, 1978 38 32 18.8 0.17 229.2
Halkirk Village February 10, 1912 121 113 7.1 0.65 185.7
Hanna Town April 14, 1914 2,673 2,847 −6.1 8.56 312.4
Hardisty Town November 9, 1910 639 760 −15.9 5.48 116.6
Hay Lakes[j] Village April 17, 1928 425 362 17.4 0.58 730.1
Heisler Village January 1, 1961 151 153 −1.3 0.76 199.9
High Level Town September 1, 1983 3,641 3,887 −6.3 31.99 113.8
High Prairie Town January 10, 1950 2,600 2,785 −6.6 7.92 328.2
High River Town February 12, 1906 12,920 10,716 20.6 14.27 905.5
Hill Spring Village January 1, 1961 186 192 −3.1 1.11 167.2
Hines Creek Village December 31, 1951 380 430 −11.6 4.37 86.9
Hinton Town December 29, 1958 9,640 9,738 −1.0 33.77 285.4
Holden Village April 14, 1909 381 398 −4.3 1.70 224.3
Horseshoe Bay Summer village January 1, 1985 37 214 −82.7 1.04 35.4
Hughenden Village December 27, 1917 230 231 −0.4 0.78 296.6
Hussar Village April 20, 1928 176 187 −5.9 0.99 177.8
Hythe Village August 31, 1929 820 821 −0.1 4.12 198.8
Innisfail Town November 20, 1903 7,876 7,331 7.4 19.53 403.2
Innisfree Village March 11, 1911 220 233 −5.6 1.27 172.6
Irma Village May 30, 1912 457 444 2.9 1.11 410.7
Irricana Town June 9, 2005 1,162 1,243 −6.5 3.18 364.9
Island Lake South Summer village January 1, 1983 72 105 −31.4 0.63 114.3
Island Lake Summer village January 1, 1958 243 351 −30.8 1.45 167.8
Itaska Beach Summer village June 30, 1953 20 35 −42.9 0.28 70.8
Jarvis Bay Summer village January 1, 1986 203 183 10.9 0.55 371.1
Kapasiwin Summer village September 1, 1993 10 15[25] −33.3 0.31 32.3
Killam Town May 1, 1965 981 1,019 −3.7 4.53 216.3
Kitscoty Village March 22, 1911 846 709 19.3 1.54 549.8
Lacombe City September 5, 2010 11,707 10,752 8.9 20.89 560.3
Lakeview Summer village October 25, 1913 26 36 −27.8 0.33 78.8
Lamont Town May 31, 1968 1,753 1,669 5.0 9.27 189.2
Larkspur Summer village January 1, 1985 38 56 −32.1 0.22 172.0
Leduc City September 1, 1983 24,279 16,967 43.1 36.97 656.7
Legal Town January 1, 1998 1,225 1,192 2.8 3.22 381.0
Lethbridge City May 9, 1906 83,517 74,685 11.8 122.36 682.6
Linden Village January 1, 1964 725 660 9.8 2.56 283.3
Lloydminster (part)[k] City January 1, 1958 18,032 15,910 13.3 24.19 745.6
Lomond Village February 16, 1916 173 175 −1.1 1.28 134.9
Longview Village January 1, 1964 307 300 2.3 1.09 282.1
Lougheed Village November 7, 1911 233 217 7.4 1.92 121.5
Magrath Town July 24, 1907 2,217 2,081 6.5 4.97 446.2
Ma-Me-O Beach Summer village December 31, 1948 113 155 −27.1 0.65 173.4
Manning Town January 1, 1957 1,164 1,493 −22.0 3.42 340.0
Mannville Village December 29, 1906 803 782 2.7 2.15 373.6
Marwayne Village December 31, 1952 612 521 17.5 1.68 364.5
Mayerthorpe Town March 20, 1961 1,398 1,474 −5.2 4.78 292.7
McLennan Town February 11, 1948 809 824 −1.8 3.58 226.2
Medicine Hat City May 9, 1906 60,005 56,997 5.3 112.01 535.7
Mewatha Beach Summer village January 1, 1978 79 167 −52.7 0.78 101.9
Milk River Town February 7, 1956 811 816 −0.6 2.39 339.6
Millet Town September 1, 1983 2,092 2,068 1.2 3.74 558.7
Milo Village May 7, 1931 122 100 22.0 1.04 116.9
Minburn Village June 24, 1919 105 65 61.5 0.73 144.2
Morinville Town April 21, 1911 8,569 6,775 26.5 11.34 755.6
Morrin Village April 16, 1920 245 253 −3.2 0.82 298.9
Mundare Town January 4, 1951 855 712 20.1 4.20 203.6
Munson Village May 5, 1911 204 217 −6.0 2.60 78.5
Myrnam Village August 22, 1930 370 362 2.2 2.76 134.2
Nakamun Park Summer village January 1, 1966 36 88 −59.1 0.41 88.7
Nampa Village January 1, 1958 362 360 0.6 1.86 194.9
Nanton Town August 9, 1907 2,132 2,055 3.7 4.80 443.9
Nobleford Village February 28, 1918 1,000 689 45.1 1.54 647.8
Norglenwold Summer village January 1, 1965 232 270 −14.1 0.67 345.2
Norris Beach Summer village December 31, 1988 46 40 15.0 0.16 285.5
Okotoks Town June 1, 1904 24,511 17,150 42.9 19.24 1,273.8
Olds Town July 1, 1905 8,235 7,253 13.5 14.87 553.8
Onoway Town September 1, 2005 1,039 875 18.7 3.34 311.5
Oyen Town September 1, 1965 973 1,015 −4.1 4.93 197.4
Paradise Valley Village January 1, 1964 174 183 −4.9 0.57 306.9
Parkland Beach Summer village January 1, 1984 124 135 −8.1 0.93 133.8
Peace River[l] Town December 1, 1919 6,729 6,315 6.6 25.92 259.6
Pelican Narrows Summer village July 1, 1979 162 141 14.9 0.70 230.0
Penhold Town September 1, 1980 2,375 1,971 20.5 5.33 445.3
Picture Butte Town January 1, 1960 1,650 1,592 3.6 2.90 569.5
Pincher Creek Town May 12, 1906 3,685 3,625 1.7 10.19 361.6
Point Alison Summer village December 31, 1950 15 15 0.0 0.16 92.9
Ponoka Town October 15, 1904 6,773 6,576 3.0 13.05 519.2
Poplar Bay Summer village January 1, 1967 80 84 −4.8 0.79 101.0
Provost Town December 29, 1952 2,041 2,072 −1.5 4.93 413.8
Rainbow Lake Town September 1, 1995 870 965 −9.8 11.04 78.8
Raymond Town July 1, 1903 3,743 3,225 16.1 6.85 546.1
Red Deer City March 25, 1913 90,564 83,154 8.9 104.29 868.4
Redcliff Town August 5, 1912 5,588 5,116 9.2 16.20 344.9
Redwater Town December 31, 1950 1,915 2,202 −13.0 20.12 95.2
Rimbey Town December 13, 1948 2,378 2,252 5.6 11.34 209.7
Rochon Sands Summer village May 17, 1929 65[27] 66 −1.5 2.32 28.0
Rocky Mountain House Town August 31, 1939 6,933 6,874 0.9 12.99 533.6
Rockyford Village March 28, 1919 325 349 −6.9 1.08 300.0
Rosalind Village January 1, 1966 190 190 0.0 0.59 322.2
Rosemary Village December 31, 1951 342 388 −11.9 0.56 607.8
Ross Haven Summer village January 1, 1962 137 198 −30.8 0.70 194.5
Rycroft Village March 15, 1944 628 638 −1.6 1.69 372.5
Ryley[m] Village April 2, 1910 497 458 8.5 1.97 251.9
Sandy Beach Summer village January 1, 1956 223 239 −6.7 2.43 91.8
Seba Beach Summer village August 20, 1920 143 203 −29.6 0.71 201.1
Sedgewick Town May 1, 1966 857 891 −3.8 2.60 329.1
Sexsmith Town October 15, 1979 2,418 1,969 22.8 13.43 180.1
Silver Beach Summer village December 31, 1953 52 47 10.6 0.66 78.2
Silver Sands Summer village January 1, 1969 85 173 −50.9 2.35 36.2
Slave Lake Town August 2, 1965 6,782 6,703 1.2 14.18 478.4
Smoky Lake Town February 1, 1962 1,022 1,010 1.2 4.20 243.5
South Baptiste Summer village January 1, 1983 52 69 −24.6 1.05 49.6
South View Summer village January 1, 1970 35 115 −69.6 0.69 51.0
Spirit River Town September 18, 1951 1,025 1,148 −10.7 2.81 365.4
Spring Lake[n] Village January 1, 1999 533 501 6.4 2.12 251.5
Spruce Grove City March 1, 1986 26,171 19,541 33.9 32.37 808.6
St. Albert City January 1, 1977 61,466 57,764 6.4 48.27 1,273.4
St. Paul[o] Town December 15, 1936 5,400 5,106 5.8 7.89 684.7
Standard Village April 29, 1922 379 380 −0.3 2.34 162.1
Stavely Town May 25, 1912 505 435 16.1 1.62 311.3
Stettler Town November 23, 1906 5,748 5,445 5.6 13.12 438.2
Stirling Village September 3, 1901 1,090 921 18.3 2.64 413.6
Stony Plain Town December 10, 1908 15,051 12,363 21.7 35.61 422.7
Strathmore Town July 6, 1911 12,305 10,280 19.7 27.28 451.0
Strome Village February 3, 1910 228 252 −9.5 0.92 248.4
Sunbreaker Cove Summer village December 31, 1990 69 137 −49.6 0.49 140.6
Sundance Beach Summer village January 1, 1970 82 102 −19.6 0.42 196.2
Sundre Town January 1, 1956 2,610 2,523 3.4 11.16 233.9
Sunrise Beach Summer village December 31, 1988 149 170 −12.4 1.72 86.4
Sunset Beach Summer village May 1, 1977 44 88 −50.0 0.99 44.4
Sunset Point Summer village January 1, 1959 221 242 −8.7 1.11 198.6
Swan Hills Town January 1, 1967 1,465 1,645 −10.9 25.44 57.6
Sylvan Lake Town May 20, 1946 12,327 10,250 20.3 15.62 789.4
Taber Town July 1, 1907 8,104 7,591 6.8 15.09 537.2
Thorsby Village December 31, 1949 951 945 0.6 3.87 245.7
Three Hills Town January 1, 1929 3,198 3,089 3.5 5.63 567.8
Tofield Town September 10, 1909 2,182 1,876 16.3 8.17 267.1
Trochu Town August 1, 1962 1,072 1,005 6.7 2.82 380.1
Turner Valley Town September 1, 1977 2,167 1,908 13.6 5.45 397.6
Two Hills Town January 1, 1955 1,379 1,047 31.7 3.31 416.3
Val Quentin Summer village January 1, 1966 157 181 −13.3 0.30 522.5
Valleyview Town February 5, 1957 1,761 1,725 2.1 9.66 182.2
Vauxhall Town January 1, 1961 1,288 1,069 20.5 2.88 447.6
Vegreville Town August 15, 1906 5,717 5,519 3.6 13.92 410.6
Vermilion Town August 27, 1906 3,930 4,036 −2.6 13.69 287.0
Veteran Village June 30, 1914 249 293 −15.0 0.84 297.0
Viking Town November 10, 1952 1,041 1,085 −4.1 3.76 277.1
Vilna Village June 23, 1923 249 274 −9.1 0.90 277.5
Vulcan Town June 15, 1921 1,836 1,940 −5.4 6.58 279.0
Wabamun Village January 1, 1980 661 601 10.0 3.24 203.8
Wainwright Town July 14, 1910 5,925 5,426 9.2 8.91 665.4
Waiparous Summer village January 1, 1986 42 49 −14.3 0.41 103.0
Warburg Village December 31, 1953 789 621 27.1 2.70 292.6
Warner Village November 12, 1908 331 307 7.8 1.15 288.5
Waskatenau Village May 19, 1932 255 278 −8.3 0.60 427.6
Wembley Town August 1, 1980 1,383 1,443 −4.2 4.54 304.8
West Baptiste Summer village January 1, 1983 52 104 −50.0 0.60 86.2
West Cove Summer village January 1, 1963 121 169 −28.4 1.21 100.1
Westlock Town January 7, 1947 4,823 5,008 −3.7 13.57 355.3
Wetaskiwin City May 9, 1906 12,525 11,689 7.2 18.20 688.2
Whispering Hills Summer village January 1, 1983 108 125 −13.6 1.73 62.3
White Sands Summer village January 1, 1980 91 120 −24.2 1.60 57.0
Whitecourt Town December 20, 1971 9,605 8,971 7.1 26.14 367.4
Willingdon Village August 31, 1928 275 295 −6.8 0.97 283.8
Yellowstone Summer village January 1, 1965 124 170 −27.1 0.28 438.5
Youngstown Village December 31, 1936 178 170 4.7 1.00 177.7
Total cities 2,458,748 2,197,763 11.9 2,303.22 1,067.5
Total towns 451,830 404,662 11.7 1,273.68 354.7
Total villages 38,675 37,288 3.7 166.12 232.8
Total summer villages 4,586 6,140 −25.3 41.06 111.7
Total urban municipalities 2,953,839 2,645,853 11.6 3,784.08 780.6
Province of Alberta 3,645,257 3,290,350 10.8 640,081.87 5.7

Specialized municipalities[edit]

Specialized municipalities in Alberta are unique local governments.[31] Alberta's Municipal Government Act (MGA), enacted in 2000, provides the authority to form a specialized municipality under the following scenarios:[6]

  • where the Minister of Municipal Affairs is satisfied that the other incorporated statuses under the MGA do not meet the needs of the proposed municipality's residents;
  • to form a local government that, in the opinion of the Minister of Municipal Affairs, will provide for the orderly development of the municipality in a similar fashion to the other incorporated statuses within the MGA, including other previously incorporated specialized municipalities; or
  • for any other circumstances that are deemed appropriate by the Minister of Municipal Affairs.

Alberta has five specialized municipalities, which are recognized as census subdivisions by Statistics Canada.[2][13] In the 2011 census, they had a cumulative population of 178,979, a total land area of 146,595 km2 (56,601 sq mi), and an average population of 35,796.[3] These totals represent 5% of Alberta's population yet 22.9% of its land area.

The province's largest and smallest specialized municipalities by population are Strathcona County and the Municipality of Jasper with 92,490 and 4,432 respectively, while its largest and smallest by land area are Mackenzie County and the Municipality of Crowsnest Pass with 80,478 km2 (31,073 sq mi) and 373 km2 (144 sq mi) respectively.[3][27] The Municipality of Crowsnest Pass is Alberta's newest specialized municipality, which was incorporated as a town prior to January 16, 2008.[32] Alberta's first specialized municipality was the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, which formed on April 1, 1995.[32]

Strathcona County and the Regional Municipality (RM) of Wood Buffalo are home to the unincorporated hamlets of Sherwood Park and Fort McMurray respectively.[33] These communities are designated urban service areas, which are deemed equivalents of cities.[34][35] Excluding Sherwood Park and Fort McMurray, 18 other unincorporated communities, also recognized as hamlets by Alberta Municipal Affairs, are distributed among Mackenzie County, Strathcona County and the RM of Wood Buffalo.[33]

List of specialized municipalities[edit]

Specialized municipalities of Alberta
Name Incorporation date
(specialized
municipality)[32]
Population
(2011)[3]
Population
(2006)[3]
Change
(%)[3]
Land
area
(km²)[3]
Population
density
(per km²)[3]
Crowsnest Pass, Municipality of January 16, 2008 5,565 5,749 −3.2 373.07 14.9
Jasper, Municipality of July 20, 2001 4,432[27] 4,265 3.9 925.52 4.8
Mackenzie County June 23, 1999 10,927 10,002 9.2 80,478.12 0.1
Strathcona County January 1, 1996 92,490 82,511 12.1 1,180.56 78.3
Wood Buffalo, Regional Municipality of April 1, 1995 65,565 51,924[25] 26.3 63,637.47 1.0
Total specialized
municipalities
178,979 154,451 15.9 146,594.74 1.2
Province of Alberta 3,645,257 3,290,350 10.8 640,081.87 5.7

Rural municipalities[edit]

Locations of Alberta's rural municipalities
Distribution of Alberta's 75 rural municipalities including 64 municipal districts (orange), 8 improvement districts (green) and 3 special areas (brown)

Rural municipalities in Alberta include municipal districts (counties), improvement districts and special areas.[36] For federal census purposes, Statistics Canada recognizes all three rural municipality types as census subdivisions.[13] However, Statistics Canada embeds Alberta's eight Metis settlements, a separate type of municipality, into the census subdivisions for six municipal districts.[37]

Combined, Alberta has 75 rural municipalities comprising 64 municipal districts, 8 improvement districts and 3 special areas.[2] The 75 rural municipalities have a total population of 458,619, a total land area of 483,653 km2 (186,739 sq mi), and an average population of 6,115.[3][p] These totals represent 13% of Alberta's population yet 75.6% of its land area.

Municipal districts[edit]

In Alberta, a municipal district, also known as a county, is a type of rural municipality.[36] The MGA, enacted in 2000, stipulates that an area may incorporate as a municipal district if it has a population of 1,000 people or more and the majority of its buildings are on parcels of land larger than 1,850 m2 (19,900 sq ft).[6]

Alberta has 64 municipal districts that had a cumulative population of 451,974 and an average population of 7,062 in the 2011 census.[2][3][p] The province's largest and smallest municipal districts by population are Rocky View County and the Municipal District (MD) of Ranchland No. 66 with 36,461 and 79 respectively, while its largest and smallest by land area are the MD of Greenview No. 16 and the MD of Spirit River No. 133 with 32,989 km2 (12,737 sq mi) and 684 km2 (264 sq mi) respectively.[3] Lac La Biche County is Alberta's newest municipal district, which was formed on August 1, 2007 through the amalgamation of the former Town of Lac La Biche and the former Lakeland County.[38] Unincorporated communities recognized as hamlets by Alberta Municipal Affairs are located within every municipal district with the exception of Flagstaff County, Mountain View County, the MD of Ranchland No. 66 and the MD of Spirit River No. 133.[33]

Of Alberta's 64 municipal districts, 3 have populations less than the current minimum population requirement of 1,000. All of these were incorporated as municipal districts prior to the MGA being enacted in 2000.[6][38]

Improvement districts[edit]

In Alberta, an improvement district is a type of rural municipality that can be incorporated by the Lieutenant Governor in Council on the recommendation of Alberta's Minister of Municipal Affairs under the authority of the MGA.[6][36] Improvement districts are administered by the Province of Alberta through its Ministry of Municipal Affairs.[36]

Alberta has eight improvement districts that had a cumulative population of 2,146 and an average population of 268 in the 2011 census.[2][3] Five of them are within national parks while two are within provincial parks.[36] Alberta's largest improvement district by population is Improvement District (ID) No. 9, located within Banff National Park, with 1,175, while its largest by land area is ID No. 24, located within Wood Buffalo National Park, with 33,412 km2 (12,900 sq mi).[3][36] ID No. 25 (Willmore Wilderness) and ID No. 349 are Alberta's two unpopulated improvement districts, while its smallest by land area is ID No. 13 (Elk Island) with 165 km2 (64 sq mi).[3][12] ID No. 349 is also Alberta's newest improvement district, which was formed on January 1, 2012 from portions of Lac La Biche County and the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo.[39] Alberta Municipal Affairs recognizes two unincorporated communities within improvement districts as hamlets – Lake Louise within ID No. 9 (Banff National Park) and Waterton Park within ID No. 4 (Waterton Lakes National Park).[33]

Special areas[edit]

Main article: Special Areas Board

In Alberta, a special area is a type of rural municipality that can be incorporated by the Lieutenant Governor in Council under the authority of the Special Areas Act, which was enacted in 2000.[8][36] They were originally created in 1938 as a result of hardship brought upon a particular area in southeastern Alberta during the drought of the 1930s.[36]

Alberta has three special areas that had a cumulative population of 4,499 and an average population of 1,500 in the 2011 census.[2][3] The province's largest by population and land area is Special Area (SA) No. 2 with 2,025 and 9,342 km2 (3,607 sq mi) respectively. Alberta's smallest by population is SA No. 3 with 1,122, while its smallest by land area is SA No. 4 with 4,403 km2 (1,700 sq mi).[3] The last special area to form was SA No. 4, which incorporated on January 1, 1969 through the removal of certain lands from SA No. 3.[40] The three special areas are administered as a single unit by the Special Areas Board, and are home to 16 unincorporated communities recognized as hamlets by Alberta Municipal Affairs.[36][40]

List of rural municipalities[edit]

Rural municipalities of Alberta
Name Status[2] Incorporation date
(current status)
[38][39][40]
Population
(2011)[3]
Population
(2006)[3]
Change
(%)[3]
Land
area
(km²)[3]
Population
density
(per km²)[3]
AcadiaMD of Acadia No. 34 Municipal district December 9, 1913 495 545 −9.2 1,076.26 0.5
Athabasca County Municipal district January 1, 1947 7,662 7,572 1.2 6,122.75 1.3
Barrhead County of Barrhead No. 11 Municipal district January 1, 1955 6,096 5,845 4.3 2,404.70 2.5
Beaver County Municipal district February 1, 1943 5,689 5,676 0.2 3,315.84 1.7
Big Lakes MD of Big Lakes[p] Municipal district January 1, 1995 4,194[14] 3,995 5.0 11,965.83 0.3
Bighorn MD of Bighorn No. 8 Municipal district January 1, 1988 1,341 1,264 6.1 2,767.94 0.5
Birch Hills County Municipal district January 1, 1995 1,582 1,470 7.6 2,856.69 0.6
Bonnyville MD of Bonnyville No. 87[p] Municipal district January 1, 1955 10,101[14] 9,047 11.7 5,451.49 1.9
Brazeau County Municipal district July 1, 1988 7,201 7,040 2.3 3,020.71 2.4
Camrose County Municipal district January 1, 1944 7,721 7,150 8.0 3,320.61 2.3
Cardston County Municipal district January 1, 1954 4,167 4,037 3.2 3,414.87 1.2
Clear Hills County Municipal district January 1, 1995 2,801 2,714 3.2 15,115.03 0.2
Clearwater County Municipal district January 1, 1985 12,278 11,826 3.8 18,691.78 0.7
Cypress County Municipal district January 1, 1985 7,214 6,709 7.5 13,160.44 0.5
Fairview MD of Fairview No. 136 Municipal district December 9, 1914 1,673 1,432 16.8 1,389.01 1.2
Flagstaff County Municipal district January 1, 1944 3,244 3,506 −7.5 4,065.56 0.8
Foothills MD of Foothills No. 31 Municipal district January 1, 1954 21,258 19,731 7.7 3,642.90 5.8
Forty Mile County of Forty Mile No. 8 Municipal district January 1, 1954 3,336 3,414 −2.3 7,229.68 0.5
Grande Prairie County of Grande Prairie No. 1 Municipal district December 21, 1943 20,347 17,929 13.5 5,862.74 3.5
Greenview MD of Greenview No. 16 Municipal district January 1, 1994 5,299 5,464 −3.0 32,989.05 0.2
Imp004Improvement District No. 4 (Waterton) Improvement district January 1, 1944 88 160 −45.0 480.58 0.2
Imp009Improvement District No. 9 (Banff) Improvement district April 1, 1945 1,175 938 25.3 6,782.23 0.2
Imp012Improvement District No. 12 (Jasper National Park) Improvement district April 1, 1945 34 24 41.7 10,181.58 0.0
Imp013Improvement District No. 13 (Elk Island) Improvement district April 1, 1958 10 21 −52.4 165.28 0.1
Imp024Improvement District No. 24 (Wood Buffalo) Improvement district January 1, 1967 590 422 39.8 33,412.25 0.0
Imp025Improvement District No. 25 (Willmore Wilderness) Improvement district January 2, 1994 0 0 4,604.97 0.0
Imp349Improvement District No. 349 Improvement district January 1, 2012 0[41] 5,804.56 0.0
Kananaskis Improvement District Improvement district January 1, 1983 249 429 −42.0 4,210.72 0.1
Kneehill County Municipal district January 1, 1944 4,921 5,218 −5.7 3,380.04 1.5
Lac La Biche County[p] Municipal district August 1, 2007 8,397[14] 9,118 −7.9 16,299.60 0.5
Lac Ste. Anne County Municipal district January 1, 1944 10,260 9,880 3.8 2,845.61 3.6
Lacombe County Municipal district January 1, 1944 10,312 10,394 −0.8 2,766.65 3.7
Lamont County Municipal district January 1, 1944 3,872 3,905 −0.8 2,385.91 1.6
Leduc County Municipal district January 1, 1944 13,541 13,135 3.1 2,607.56 5.2
Lesser Slave River MD of Lesser Slave River No. 124 Municipal district January 1, 1995 2,929 2,820 3.9 10,075.88 0.3
Lethbridge Lethbridge County Municipal district January 1, 1954 10,061 10,254 −1.9 2,837.80 3.5
Minburn County of Minburn No. 27 Municipal district January 30, 1942 3,278 3,319 −1.2 2,910.71 1.1
Mountain View County Municipal district January 1, 1944 12,359 12,308 0.4 3,779.34 3.3
Newell County of Newell Municipal district January 1, 1953 6,786 6,852 −1.0 5,904.72 1.1
Northern Lights County of Northern Lights[p] Municipal district January 1, 1995 3,555 3,556 −0.0 19,027.69 0.2
Northern Sunrise County[p] Municipal district April 1, 1994 1,791[14] 1,747 2.5 21,140.10 0.1
Opportunity MD of Opportunity No. 17 Municipal district August 1, 1995 3,074 2,847 8.0 29,140.78 0.1
Paintearth County of Paintearth No. 18 Municipal district January 1, 1944 2,029 2,126 −4.6 3,287.24 0.6
Parkland County Municipal district January 1, 1969 30,568 29,220 4.6 2,387.68 12.8
Peace MD of Peace No. 135 Municipal district December 11, 1916 1,344 1,487 −9.6 850.88 1.6
Pincher Creek MD of Pincher Creek No. 9 Municipal district January 1, 1944 3,158 3,309 −4.6 3,480.91 0.9
Ponoka County Municipal district January 1, 1952 8,856 8,640 2.5 2,807.94 3.2
Provost MD of Provost No. 52 Municipal district March 1, 1943 2,288 2,547 −10.2 3,625.2 0.6
Ranchland MD of Ranchland No. 66 Municipal district January 1, 1995 79 86 −8.1 2,639.16 0.0
Red Deer County Municipal district January 1, 1944 18,351 18,649 −1.6 3,949.00 4.6
Rocky View County Municipal district January 1, 1955 36,461 33,173 9.9 3,885.41 9.4
Saddle Hills County Municipal district January 1, 1995 2,288 2,458 −6.9 5,836.92 0.4
Smoky Lake County[p] Municipal district March 1, 1943 2,459[14] 2,716 −9.5 2,632.92 0.9
Smoky River MD of Smoky River No. 130 Municipal district January 1, 1952 2,126 2,442 −12.9 2,842.59 0.7
Special Area No. 2 Special area April 7, 1959 2,025 2,074 −2.4 9,342.42 0.2
Special Area No. 3 Special area April 7, 1959 1,122 1,266 −11.4 6,623.96 0.2
Special Area No. 4 Special area January 1, 1969 1,352 1,389 −2.7 4,403.03 0.3
Spirit River MD of Spirit River No. 133 Municipal district December 11, 1916 713 662 7.7 684.14 1.0
St. Paul County of St. Paul No. 19 Municipal district January 30, 1942 5,831 5,925 −1.6 3,296.72 1.8
Starland County Municipal district February 1, 1943 2,057 2,371 −13.2 2,557.7 0.8
Stettker County of Stettler No. 6 Municipal district March 1, 1943 5,089 5,189 −1.9 4,005.10 1.3
Sturgeon County Municipal district January 1, 1955 19,578 18,566 5.5 2,088.55 9.4
Taber MD of Taber Municipal district January 1, 1954 6,851 6,275 9.2 4,203.79 1.6
Thorhild County Municipal district January 1, 1955 3,417 3,547 −3.7 2,000.05 1.7
Two Hills County of Two Hills No. 21 Municipal district January 1, 1944 3,160 2,918 8.3 2,631.33 1.2
Vermilion River County of Vermilion River Municipal district January 1, 1944 7,905 7,462 5.9 5,518.18 1.4
Vulcan County Municipal district January 1, 1951 3,875 3,718 4.2 5,429.50 0.7
Wainwright MD of Wainwright No. 61 Municipal district January 30, 1942 4,138 3,558 16.3 4,153.72 1.0
Warner County of Warner No. 5 Municipal district January 1, 1954 3,841 3,654 5.1 4,517.67 0.9
Westlock County Municipal district February 1, 1943 7,644 6,910 10.6 3,170.71 2.4
Wetaskiwin County of Wetaskiwin No. 10 Municipal district February 1, 1943 10,866 10,519 3.3 3,129.40 3.5
Wheatland County Municipal district January 1, 1955 8,285 8,109 2.2 4,539.26 1.8
Willow Creek MD of Willow Creek No. 26 Municipal district January 1, 1954 5,107 5,337 −4.3 4,558.89 1.1
Woodlands County Municipal district January 1, 1994 4,306 4,158 3.6 7,668.31 0.6
Yellowhead County Municipal district January 1, 1994 10,469 10,045 4.2 22,296.26 0.5
Total municipal districts[p] 451,974 437,495 3.3 397,641.40 1.1
Total improvement districts 2,146 1,994 7.6 65,642.17 0.0
Total special areas 4,499 4,729 −4.9 20,369.41 0.2
Total rural municipalities[p] 458,619 444,218 3.2 483,652.98 0.9
Province of Alberta 3,645,257 3,290,350 10.8 640,081.87 5.7

Metis settlements[edit]

Locations of Alberta's Metis settlements
Distribution of Alberta's 8 Metis settlements among its 64 municipal districts
Main article: Metis in Alberta

Metis settlements are unique local governments dedicated to Alberta's Metis people.[42][q] The settlements were originally created in 1938 under the authority of the Metis Population Betterment Act with land and governance being transferred to the settlements in 1989.[42] Metis settlements are presently under the jurisdiction of the Metis Settlements Act, which was enacted in 2000.[9]

Alberta has eight Metis settlements.[2] Unlike the other types of municipalities, Metis settlements are not recognized as census subdivisions by Statistics Canada for federal census purposes.[13] Rather, Statistics Canada recognizes them as designated places embedded within six municipal districts.[37]

Alberta's eight Metis settlements had a cumulative population of 4,826 and an average population of 603 in the 2011 census.[43] The province's largest and smallest Metis settlements by population are Kikino and East Prairie with 964 and 366 respectively, while the largest and smallest by land area are Paddle Prairie and Elizabeth with 1,717 km2 (663 sq mi) and 250 km2 (97 sq mi) respectively.[43]

List of Metis settlements[edit]

Metis settlements of Alberta
Name Municipal district[33][37] Population
(2011)[43]
Population
(2006)[43]
Change
(%)[43]
Land
area
(km²)[43]
Population
density
(per km2)[43]
Buffalo Lake Smoky Lake County 492 248 98.4 336.97 1.5
East Prairie Big LakesMD of Big Lakes 366 352 4.0 333.87 1.1
Elizabeth BonnyvilleMD of Bonnyville No. 87 654 663 −1.4 250.21 2.6
Fishing Lake BonnyvilleMD of Bonnyville No. 87 436 484 −9.9 355.74 1.2
Gift Lake[r] Big LakesMD of Big Lakes
Northern Sunrise County
662 820 −19.3 812.45 0.8
Kikino[s] Smoky Lake County
Lac La Biche County
964 398 142.2 444.27 2.2
Paddle Prairie Northern LightsCounty of Northern Lights 562 216 160.2 1,716.72 0.3
Peavine Big LakesMD of Big Lakes 690 822 −16.1 817.13 0.8
Total Metis settlements 4,826 4,003 20.6 5,067.36 3.7
Province of Alberta 3,645,257 3,290,350 10.8 640,081.87 5.7

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The remaining 1.4% of Alberta's population resides on Indian reserves or Indian settlements, which occupy the remaining 1.1% of the province's land mass.[3]
  2. ^ Actual populations may not be 10 as Statistics Canada, to protect privacy, rounds population to the nearest 5 in the event a geographic area's actual population is less than 15.[20]
  3. ^ Athabasca was formerly known as Athabasca Landing prior to August 4, 1913.[16]
  4. ^ Bittern Lake was formerly known as Rosenroll prior to December 16, 1911.[23]
  5. ^ Chestermere was formerly known as Chestermere Lake prior to March 1, 1993.[16]
  6. ^ Delia was formerly known as Highland prior to December 9, 1915.[24]
  7. ^ Drumheller originally incorporated as a city on April 3, 1930 but reverted from city status as a result of its amalgamation with the M.D. of Badlands No. 7 in 1998.[16]
  8. ^ Fort Macleod was formerly known as Macleod prior to April 1, 1952.[16]
  9. ^ Granum was formerly known as Leavings prior to March 31, 1908.[16]
  10. ^ Hay Lakes was formerly known as Hay Lake prior to January 1, 1932.[17]
  11. ^ The balance of Lloydminster is located within Saskatchewan. The 2011 and 2006 populations presented here do not include 9,772 and 8,118 in the Saskatchewan portion of Lloydminster respectively, while the land area also does not include 17.34 km2 (6.70 sq mi) in the Saskatchewan portion. The city's total populations in 2011 and 2006 were 27,804 and 24,028 respectively, while its total land area was 41.53 km2 (16.03 sq mi).[26]
  12. ^ Peace River was formerly known as Peace River Crossing prior to May 22, 1916.[16]
  13. ^ Ryley was also known as Equity in 1909.[28]
  14. ^ Spring Lake was formerly known as Edmonton Beach prior to January 1, 1999.[29]
  15. ^ St. Paul was originally named St. Paul de Metis.[30]
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Statistics presented for six municipal districts (the MD of Big Lakes, the MD of Bonnyville No. 87, Lac La Biche County, the County of Northern Lights, Northern Sunrise County and Smoky Lake County) differ from statistics for their corresponding census subdivisions published by Statistics Canada to recognize that Alberta's eight Metis settlements, which are designated places located within these six municipal districts, are separate municipalities.[37] The statistics presented for total municipal districts and total rural municipalities therefore exclude the statistics associated with the eight Metis settlements.
  17. ^ The Metis are descendants of people of mixed First Nations and European heritage.
  18. ^ Gift Lake comprises two parts. The majority is located within the Municipal District of Big Lakes, while the balance is located within Northern Sunrise County. The Municipal District of Big Lakes portion had a population of 662 living on 811.30 km2 (313.24 sq mi) in 2011, while the Northern Sunrise County portion had a population of 0 living on 1.15 km2 (0.44 sq mi).[44]
  19. ^ Kikino comprises two parts. The majority is located within Smoky Lake County, while the balance is located within Lac La Biche County. The Smoky Lake County portion had a population of 959 living on 442.92 km2 (171.01 sq mi) in 2011, while the Lac La Biche County portion had a population of 5 living on 1.35 km2 (0.52 sq mi).[45]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, 2011 and 2006 censuses". Statistics Canada. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "2013 Municipal Codes" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. August 30, 2013. pp. 1–5. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. January 30, 2013. Retrieved May 22, 2013. 
  4. ^ "What Are Municipalities?". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved October 28, 2013. 
  5. ^ "The Provisions of Programs and Services Through Municipalities". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved October 28, 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Municipal Government Act, Revised Statutes of Alberta 2000, Chapter M–26 (Office Consolidation)" (PDF). Alberta Queen's Printer. June 17, 2013. pp. 30–31, 47, 64–66, 69, 306. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  7. ^ "Types Of Municipalities In Alberta". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved November 5, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b c "Special Areas Act, Revised Statutes of Alberta 2000, Chapter S–16 (Office Consolidation)" (PDF). Alberta Queen's Printer. May 27, 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b c "Metis Settlements Act, Revised Statutes of Alberta 2000, Chapter M–14 (Office Consolidation)" (PDF). Alberta Queen's Printer. June 17, 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Information Sheet: The Legislative Assembly of Alberta" (PDF). Legislative Assembly of Alberta. p. 2. Retrieved November 1, 2013. 
  11. ^ "About The Ministry of Municipal Affairs". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  12. ^ a b "2013 Municipal Affairs Population List" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. November 20, 2013. p. 9. ISBN 978-1-4601-1418-6. Retrieved December 6, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b c d "Interim List of Changes to Municipal Boundaries, Status, and Names: From January 2, 2012 to January 1, 2013" (PDF). Statistics Canada. pp. 6–7. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f "2012 Municipal Affairs Population List" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. November 22, 2012. pp. 1–2, 10. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  15. ^ a b c "Municipal Profiles: Summary Reports (Cities)" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 18, 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h "Municipal Profiles: Summary Reports (Towns)" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 18, 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  17. ^ a b c d "Municipal Profiles: Summary Reports (Villages)" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 18, 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  18. ^ Jack K. Masson with Edward C. LeSage (1994). Alberta's Local Governments: Politics and Democracy. The University of Alberta Press. p. 69. ISBN 0-88864-251-2. 
  19. ^ "Types of Municipalities in Alberta: Urban Municipal Governments". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Population and Dwelling Count Highlight Tables, 2011 Census – Notes (Adjustment of population counts)". Statistics Canada. January 30, 2013. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Municipal Profiles: Summary Reports (Summer Villages)" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 18, 2013. Retrieved October 20, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Order in Council 461/2002". Government of Alberta. October 8, 2002. Retrieved October 31, 2013. 
  23. ^ "Order in Council 979/11" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. December 16, 1911. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  24. ^ "Change in Name of Village Municipality – Highland to Delia" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. December 9, 1915. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  25. ^ a b "2006 Census corrections and updates". Statistics Canada. June 23, 2009. Retrieved June 1, 2013. 
  26. ^ "Census Profile: Lloydminster (Part), Alberta (Code 4810039) and Lloydminster (Part), Saskatchewan (Code 4717029) (table)". Statistics Canada. March 1, 2013. Retrieved November 3, 2013. 
  27. ^ a b c "Corrections and updates". Statistics Canada. March 21, 2013. Retrieved April 15, 2013. 
  28. ^ "The Village of Ryley – Equity". Village of Ryley. Retrieved April 13, 2010. 
  29. ^ "Order in Council 517/98". Alberta Municipal Affairs. December 9, 1998. Retrieved July 26, 2010. 
  30. ^ "Order in Council 518/12" (PDF). Government of Alberta. June 14, 1912. Retrieved November 3, 2013. 
  31. ^ "Types Of Municipalities In Alberta: Specialized Municipalities". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved October 28, 2013. 
  32. ^ a b c "Municipal Profiles: Summary Reports (Specialized Municipalities)" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. October 18, 2013. pp. PDF pages 1, 9, 17, 25 and 34 of 41. Retrieved October 28, 2013. 
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