List of municipalities in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania

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Map of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, with Municipal Labels showing Cities and Boroughs (red), Townships (white), and Census-designated places (blue).

There are 52 municipalities in Lycoming County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. Under Pennsylvania law, there are three types of incorporated municipalities in Lycoming County: cities, boroughs and townships. Any municipality in Pennsylvania with more than 10 persons can incorporate as a borough. Any township or borough with a population of at least 10,000 can ask the state legislature to become chartered as a city. There are no unincorporated areas in the county, since all territory in Pennsylvania is incorporated.

The 52 incorporated municipalities in Lycoming County are the subject of the first list, which gives their names and etymologies, dates settled and incorporated, what they were formed from, area, population, and location within the county. Two other lists dealing with former parts of Lycoming County are included. The second list is of former incorporated townships and gives the same information as above on their current status. The third list gives information on the eighteen other Pennsylvania counties which were formed from or contain land originally in the county.

In the 2000 census, the population of Lycoming County was 120,044,[1] making it a "Fifth Class County" (defined by Pennsylvania law as "having a population of 95,000 and more, but less than 145,000 inhabitants").[2] It is included in the Williamsport, Pennsylvania Metropolitan Statistical Area and its county seat is Williamsport. Lycoming County is located in north central Pennsylvania, about 130 miles (209 km) northwest of Philadelphia and 165 miles (266 km) east-northeast of Pittsburgh, as the crow flies.[3]

Location of Lycoming County within Pennsylvania

Municipalities[edit]

As of 2012, Lycoming County has 52 incorporated municipalities: 1 city, 9 boroughs, and 42 townships. Lycoming County's townships include 1 census-designated place (CDP) and 50 villages. CDPs are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. Villages are marked with signs by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.[4] Neither CDPs nor villages are actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law and their territory is legally part of the township(s) where they are located. The first list also notes the CDP and villages within their respective townships.

At 1,244 square miles (3,220 km2) as of 2012, Lycoming County is the largest county by land area in Pennsylvania (Erie County is larger, but nearly half of its area is in Lake Erie). Lycoming County is also larger than Rhode Island, the smallest U.S. state, which has an area of 1,214 square miles (3,140 km2). Its incorporated municipalities range in size from 0.6 square miles (1.6 km2) (three of the boroughs) to 76.5 square miles (198 km2) (McHenry Township). The city of Williamsport has the highest population of any municipality (30,706 or 25.6% of the county total as of 2000), while Brown Township in the northwest corner of the county has the lowest population (111 or 0.092%). Most of the county's population is in the valley along the West Branch Susquehanna River.[1]

Incorporated municipalities of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania
Municipality
(type)  
Remarks [4][5]   Settled[6][7]   Incorporated[6]   Formed from[5][6]    Area in square miles (km²)   Population
as of 2000
  
Map  
Williamsport (city) Named for William Ross (son of founder Michael Ross); county seat; laid out 1796 1769 1806 (borough),
1866 (city)
Loyalsock Township 9.5 sq mi
(24.7 km²)
30,706 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Williamsport.png
Duboistown (borough) Named for founders John and Mathias Dubois, laid out 1852 1773 1878 Armstrong Township 0.6 sq mi
(1.7 km²)
1,280 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Duboistown.png
Hughesville (borough) Named for founder Jeptha Hughes; laid out 1816 1816 1852 Muncy Township 0.6 sq mi
(1.7 km²)
2,200 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Hughesville.png
Jersey Shore (borough) Named the "Jersey Shore" as its founders were from New Jersey and it was on the shore of the West Branch Susquehanna River; laid out 1820 1785 1826 Porter Township 1.2 sq mi
(3.2 km²)
4,482 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Jersey Shore.png
Montgomery (borough) Named for the "Montgomery Station" post office; known as "Black Hole" until circa 1836 (for Black Hole Creek) 1783 1887 Clinton Township 0.6 sq mi
(1.5 km²)
1,695 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Montgomery.png
Montoursville (borough) Named for Madame Montour and her son Andrew Montour; laid out 1820 1768 1850 Fairfield Township 4.2 sq mi
(10.8 km²)
4,777 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Montoursville.png
Muncy (borough) Named for the Munsee phratry of the Lenape; laid out 1797 1797 1826 Muncy Township 0.8 sq mi
(2.2 km²)
2,663 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Muncy.png
Picture Rocks (borough) Named for Indian pictographs found on the cliffs above Muncy Creek 1848 1857 Wolf Township 0.9 sq mi
(2.4 km²)
693 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Picture Rocks.png
Salladasburg (borough) Named for founder Jacob P. Sallada; laid out 1837 1837 1884 Mifflin Township 0.8 sq mi
(2.0 km²)
260 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Salladasburg.png
South Williamsport (borough) Named for its geographic location, south of Williamsport; 1790 1886 Armstrong Township 2.1 sq mi
(5.5 km²)
6,412 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting South Williamsport.png
Anthony Township Named for Joseph B. Anthony, a county judge circa 1844 and later Pennsylvania Supreme Court justice 1773 1844 Lycoming Township 15.9 sq mi
(41.1 km²)
904 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Anthony Township.png
Armstrong Township Named for James Armstrong, a local lawyer 1795 1842 Clinton Township 25.6 sq mi
(66.2 km²)
717 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Armstrong Township.png
Bastress Township Named for Solomon Bastress of Jersey Shore, former member of the state legislature and associate judge 1837 1854 Susquehanna Township 8.6 sq mi
(22.4 km²)
574 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Bastress Township.png
Brady Township Named for the Brady family, some of the earliest settlers in the area 1790 1855 Washington Township 8.6 sq mi
(22.4 km²)
494 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Brady Township.png
Brown Township Named for Jacob Brown, a general from Pennsylvania in the War of 1812; includes the villages of Cedar Run and Slate Run 1790 1815 Mifflin and Pine Townships 73.7 sq mi
(190.8 km²)
111 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Brown Township.png
Cascade Township Named for its cascading mountain streams; includes the village of Kellyburg 1843 1843 Hepburn and Plunketts Creek Townships 40.9 sq mi
(105.9 km²)
419 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Cascade Township.png
Clinton Township Named for DeWitt Clinton, governor of New York (1817–1822, 1824–1828) 1825 1825 Washington Township 28.8 sq mi
(74.5 km²)
3,947 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Clinton Township.png
Cogan House Township Named for David Cogan, a pioneer who settled on Larrys Creek in 1825; includes the villages of Beech Grove, Brookside, Cogan House, and White Pine 1825 1843 Jackson and Mifflin Townships 69.9 sq mi
(181.1 km²)
974 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Cogan House Township.png
Cummings Township Named for John Cummings, an associate on the bench; includes the village of Waterville, as well as two state parks: Little Pine and Upper Pine Bottom 1784 1832 Mifflin and Brown Townships 69.4 sq mi
(179.7 km²)
355 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Cummings Township.png
Eldred Township Named for C. D. Eldred, an associate on the bench; includes the village of Warrensville 1802 1858 Hepburn Township 14.3 sq mi
(37.1 km²)
2,178 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Eldred Township.png
Fairfield Township Named for "beautiful rolling land of the fertile river bottom"[7] 1742 1825–1826 Muncy Township 11.7 sq mi
(30.4 km²)
2,659 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Fairfield Township.png
Franklin Township Named for Benjamin Franklin; includes the village of Lairdsville 1795 1822 Moreland Township 24.5 sq mi
(63.4 km²)
915 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Franklin Township.png
Gamble Township Named for James Gamble, the judge who authorized the election that led to its creation; includes the village of Calvert and Rose Valley Lake 1784 1875 Lewis and Cascade Townships 46.2 sq mi
(119.5 km²)
854 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Gamble Township.png
Hepburn Township Named for William Hepburn, a founding father of Williamsport and Lycoming County; includes the villages of Cogan Station (also in Lycoming Township) and Hepburnville 1784 1804 Loyalsock Township 16.6 sq mi
(43.1 km²)
2,836 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Hepburn Township.png
Jackson Township Named for Andrew Jackson (prior to his presidency); includes the village of Buttonwood 1811 1824 Lycoming Township 35.6 sq mi
(92.2 km²)
414 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Jackson Township.png
Jordan Township Named for Alexander Jordan, president judge of the district court when formed; includes the villages of Lungerville and Unityville 1812 1854 Franklin Township 20.7 sq mi
(53.6 km²)
878 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Jordan Township.png
Lewis Township Named for Ellis Lewis, president judge of the district court when formed; includes the villages of Bodines, Field Station, and Trout Run 1812 1835 Hepburn Township 37.8 sq mi
(98.0 km²)
1,139 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Lewis Township.png
Limestone Township Named for its abundant limestone, originally known as "Adams Township" for John Adams (name changed 1835); includes the villages of Collomsville, Oriole, and Oval 1789 1824 Nippenose and Wayne Townships[b] 34.2 sq mi
(88.5 km²)
2,136 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Limestone Township.png
Loyalsock Township Named for Loyalsock Creek; second most populous municipality in the county 1768 1786 Muncy Township 21.2 sq mi
(55.0 km²)
10,876 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Loyalsock Township.png
Lycoming Township Named for Lycoming Creek; includes the villages of Cogan Station (also in Hepburn Township) and Quiggleville 1773 1858 Old Lycoming Township 15.4 sq mi
(39.8 km²)
1,606 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Lycoming Township.png
McHenry Township Named for Alexander H. McHenry, a Jersey Shore surveyor; includes the villages of Cammal, Haneyville, Jersey Mills, and Okome 1785 1861 Brown and Cummings Townships 76.5 sq mi
(198.1 km²)
145 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting McHenry Township.png
McIntyre Township Named for Archibald McIntyre, a founder of the Williamsport and Elmira Railroad; includes the villages of Marsh Hill and Ralston 1794 1848 Lewis Township 47.2 sq mi
(122.4 km²)
539 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting McIntyre Township.png
McNett Township Named for H. I. McNett, who led the drive for its formation; includes the villages of Chemung, Ellenton, Leolyn, Penbryn, and Roaring Branch 1805 1878 McIntyre Township 33.8 sq mi
(87.5 km²)
211 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting McNett Township.png
Mifflin Township Named for Thomas Mifflin, the first governor of Pennsylvania (1790–1799) 1790 1803 Old Lycoming Township 27.9 sq mi
(72.2 km²)
1,145 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Mifflin Township.png
Mill Creek Township Named for Mill Creek; includes part of the village of Huntersville (also in Wolf Township) 1795 1879 Muncy Township 11.4 sq mi
(29.5 km²)
572 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Mill Creek Township.png
Moreland Township Named for a legend that the acres surveyed here were larger than a standard acre; includes the village of Opp 1790 1813 Muncy Creek Township 23.9 sq mi
(62.0 km²)
1,036 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Moreland Township.png
Muncy Township Named for the Munsee phratry of the Lenape; as it is older than Lycoming County, it is often called the "Mother Township"; includes the village of Pennsdale 1772 1772 One of the seven original townships of Northumberland County 15.8 sq mi
(40.8 km²)
1,059 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Muncy Township.png
Muncy Creek Township Named for Muncy Creek; includes the village of Clarkstown 1773 1797 Muncy Township 20.7 sq mi
(53.7 km²)
3,487 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Muncy Creek Township.png
Nippenose Township Named for the Indian phrase, "Nippeno-wi", meaning a warm and genial summer like place; includes the village of Antes Fort, which was named for Fort Antes (abandoned during the Big Runaway) 1769 1786 Bald Eagle Township[a] 11.2 sq mi
(29.1 km²)
729 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Nippenose Township.png
Old Lycoming Township Named indirectly for Lycoming Creek, it was originally part of Lycoming Township, the name was changed in 1858 when the township was divided; includes the census-designated place of Garden View 1773 1785 Iroquois land purchased as part of Northumberland County, before this was run by the Fair Play Men 9.5 sq mi
(24.6 km²)
5,508 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Old Lycoming Township.png
Penn Township Named for Penn Township, Berks County; includes part of the village of Glen Mawr (also in Shrewsbury Township) 1774 1828 Muncy Township 26.7 sq mi
(69.2 km²)
900 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Penn Township.png
Piatt Township Named for William Piatt, an associate county judge when it was created; includes the village of Larryville 1769 1858 Mifflin Township 10.1 sq mi
(26.3 km²)
1,259 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Piatt Township.png
Pine Township Named for its vast stands of pine trees; includes the villages of English Center and Oregon Hill 1806 1856 Brown, Cummings and Cogan House Townships 75.8 sq mi
(196.3 km²)
329 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Pine Township.png
Plunketts Creek Township Named for Plunketts Creek; includes the villages of Barbours and Proctor 1776 1838 Franklin Township and Davidson Township now part of Sullivan County 55.2 sq mi
(143.1 km²)
771 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Plunketts Creek Township.png
Porter Township Named for David R. Porter, Pennsylvania governor (1839–1845) 1772 1840 Mifflin Township 7.9 sq mi
(20.6 km²)
1,633 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Porter Township.png
Shrewsbury Township Named for Shrewsbury Township, New Jersey; includes the illages of Glen Mawr (also in Penn Township) and Tivoli 1794 1804 Muncy Township 17.5 sq mi
(45.3 km²)
433 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Shrewsbury Township.png
Susquehanna Township Named for the West Branch Susquehanna River which forms the northern boundary; includes the village of Nisbet 1801 1838 Nippenose and Armstrong Townships 7.8 sq mi
(20.2 km²)
993 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Susquehanna Township.png
Upper Fairfield Township Originally named "Pollock Township" for local judge, name changed to Fairfield Township in 1853; includes the villages of Farragut and Loyalsockville 1796 1851 Fairfield Township 18.2 sq mi
(47.2 km²)
1,854 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Upper Fairfield Township.png
Washington Township Named for George Washington; includes the village of Elimsport 1760 1785 Bald Eagle Township[a] 48.5 sq mi
(125.7 km²)
1,613 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Washington Township.png
Watson Township Named for Oliver Watson, president of a bank in Williamsport; includes the village of Tombs Run 1784 1845 Porter and Cummings Townships 23.5 sq mi
(61.0 km²)
550 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Watson Township.png
Wolf Township Named for George Wolf, governor of Pennsylvania (1829–1835); 1777 1834 Muncy Township 19.6 sq mi
(50.7 km²)
2,707 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Wolf Township.png
Woodward Township Named for Apollos Woodward, an associate judge; includes the village of Linden 1772 1855 Anthony Township 13.6 sq mi
(35.3 km²)
2,397 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Woodward Township.png
Garden View, (census-designated place) Not a municipality, just a part of Old Lycoming Township 1.0 sq mi
(2.7 km²)
2,679 Map of Lycoming County Pennsylvania Highlighting Garden View.png

Former townships[edit]

Map of the original extent of Lycoming County circa 1795, with current Pennsylvania county outlines for reference. Click on map to see dates.

The territory which today makes up Lycoming County was purchased from the Iroquois in two treaties signed at Fort Stanwix in New York: the first treaty was in 1768, and the second treaty was in 1784. The county was formed on April 13, 1795 from part of Northumberland County.[5] The county originally contained seven townships when formed: Lower Bald Eagle, Loyalsock, Lycoming, Muncy, Nippenose, Pine Creek, and Washington. Today Pine Creek is part of Clinton County and Lower Bald Eagle is part of both Centre and Clinton counties, but the rest are still in Lycoming County, although many other municipalities have been formed from these since.

When originally formed in 1795, Lycoming County was "roughly estimated at about 12,000 square miles" (31,000 km2).[5] Its territory stretched north to the New York state line, west to the Allegheny River, south nearly to the source of the West Branch Susquehanna River, and east to include modern Sullivan County and a bit beyond. However by 1800, just five years after its formation, the first territory was taken from it to form new counties, a process that continued until 1847.

Twenty other Pennsylvania counties today contain land that was once part of Lycoming County: five were formed completely from it (Jefferson, McKean, Potter, Tioga, and Sullivan), eight were formed from it and other counties (Armstrong, Bradford, Centre, Clearfield, Clinton, Indiana, Venango, and Warren), three were formed from counties that were themselves formed partly from it (Cameron, Clarion, and Elk), Forest was formed from a county that was formed completely from it, two (Luzerne and Wyoming) contain territory that was part of lycoming County in 1795, and finally Union received a township from it in 1861.[8][9]

The second table lists each of the twenty two known former incorporated areas in the county, and information on the modern township successors of these today. Note that former townships are only known for nine of the twenty counties containing land from Lycoming.

Former townships of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania
Municipality
(type)
Remarks[5] Settled Incorporated Area in square miles (km²) Population
as of 2000
Map
Allison Township[b] Now in Clinton County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[10][11]  ? before 1839 2.0 mi2
(5.2 km2)
198 Map of Allison Township, Clinton County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Brady Township (now Gregg Township) Now in Union County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[5] 1798 1798 15.1 mi²
(39.2 km²)
4,687 Map of Gregg Township, Union County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.PNG
Ceres Township Now in McKean County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[12] 1798 1798 40.7 mi2
(105.4 km2)
1,003 Map of Ceres Township, McKean County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Chapman Township[b] Now in Clinton County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[10][11] 1780 before 1839 99.9 mi²
(258.7 km²)
848 Map of Chapman Township, Clinton County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Cherry Township[c] Now in Sullivan County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[13] 1816 1824 57.8 mi2
(149.8 km2)
1,718 Map of Sullivan County Pennsylvania Highlighting Cherry Township.png
Colebrook Township[b] Now in Clinton County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[10][11] 1777 before 1839 18.7 mi²
(48.4 km²)
179 Map of Colebrook Township, Clinton County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Davidson Township[c] Now in Sullivan County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[13] 1806 1833 78.2 mi²
(202.3 km²)
626 Map of Sullivan County Pennsylvania Highlighting Davidson Township.png
Dunnstable Township[b] Now in Clinton County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[10][11][14] 1785 before 1810 9.6 mi2
(24.8 km2)
993 Map of Dunnstable Township, Clinton County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Elkland Township[c] Now in Sullivan County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[13] 1798 1804 38.7 mi²
(100.2 km²)
607 Map of Sullivan County Pennsylvania Highlighting Elkland Township.png
Forks Township[c] Now in Sullivan County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[13] 1794 1833 43.9 mi²
(113.7 km²)
407 Map of Sullivan County Pennsylvania Highlighting Forks Township.png
Fox Township[c] Now in Sullivan County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[13] 1800 1839 38.6 mi²
(100.0 km²)
332 Map of Sullivan County Pennsylvania Highlighting Fox Township.png
Grove Township[b] Now in Cameron County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County, then one of twelve original townships in Clinton County (1839), then one of four original townships in Cameron (1860)[11][15] 1811 before 1839 74.0 mi2
(191.6 km2)
179 Map of Grove Township, Cameron County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Limestone Township (now Crawford Township)[b] Now in Clinton County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County,[10][11] name changed 1841. 1780 1824 22.1 mi²
(57.2 km²)
848 Map of Crawford Township, Clinton County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Lower Bald Eagle Township[a] (now Bald Eagle Township) Now in Clinton County, incorporated as part of Northumberland County, became part of Lycoming County in 1795[5] 1772 1772 41.6 mi²
(107.7 km²)
1,898 Map of Bald Eagle Township, Clinton County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Lumber Township[b] Now in Cameron County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County, then one of twelve original townships in Clinton County (1839), then one of four original townships in Cameron (1860)[11][15] 1810 before 1839 51.5 mi²
(133.4 km²)
241 Map of Lumber Township, Cameron County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Pine Creek Township[b] Now in Clinton County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[10][11] 1785 1772 14.9 mi²
(38.6 km²)
3,184 Map of Pine Creek Township, Clinton County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Pine Creek Township Now in Jefferson County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[7][16] 1785 1772 28.5 mi2
(73.9 km2)
1,369 Map of Pine Creek Township, Jefferson County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.PNG
Plunketts Creek Township[c] (now Hillsgrove Township) Now in Sullivan County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County,[13] name changed in 1856.[17] 1786 1847 28.4 mi2
(73.6 km2)
265 Map of Sullivan County Pennsylvania Highlighting Hillsgrove Township.png
Shrewsbury Township[c] Now in Sullivan County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[13] 1799 1803 48.1 mi²
(124.5 km²)
328 Map of Sullivan County Pennsylvania Highlighting Shrewsbury Township.png
Tioga Township Now in Tioga County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County[18] 1792 1797 40.5 mi2
(104.8 km2)
995 Map of Tioga Township, Tioga County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Upper Bald Eagle Township[a] (now Spring Township) Now in Centre County, incorporated as part of Northumberland County, became part of Lycoming County in 1795;[5] Name changed in 1801 to "Spring Township"[19] 1772 1772 25.9 mi2
(67.0 km2)
6,117 Map of Spring Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png
Wayne Township[b] Now in Clinton County, incorporated as part of Lycoming County;[10][11] named for "Mad" Anthony Wayne[5] 1768 1798 22.8 mi2
(59.2 km2)
1,363 Map of Wayne Township, Clinton County, Pennsylvania Highlighted.png

Clickable map[edit]

The map shown below is clickable; click on any municipality label to be redirected to the article for that city, borough or township.

Williamsport
1) Duboistown
1
2) Hughesville
2
3) Jersey Shore
3
4) Montgomery
4
5) Montoursville
5
6) Muncy
6
7) Picture Rocks
7
8) Salladasburg
8
9) South Williamsport
9
10) Garden View (CDP)
10
Anthony
Twp.
Armstrong
Twp.
Bastress Twp.
Brady
       Twp.
Brown Twp.
Cascade Twp.
Clinton Twp.
Cogan
House
Twp.
Cummings Twp.
Eldred
Twp.
Fairfield
  Twp.
Franklin
   Twp.
Gamble Twp.
Hepburn
Twp.
Jackson Twp.
Jordan
Twp.
Lewis Twp.
Limestone Twp.
Loyalsock Twp.
Lyco-
ming
 Twp.
McHenry Twp.
McIntyre Twp.
McNett Twp.
Mifflin
Twp.
Mill
Creek
Twp.
Moreland
Twp.
Muncy
Twp.
Muncy
Creek Twp.
   Nippe-
nose Twp.
Old
Lycoming
Twp.
Piatt Twp.
Pine Twp.
Penn
Twp.
Plunketts
Creek
Twp.
Porter
Twp.
Shrewsbury
  Twp.
Susque-
hanna Twp.
Upper
Fairfield
Twp.
Washington Twp.
Watson Twp.
Wolf
Twp.
Woodward
 Twp.
Map of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania All Blank.PNG
Bald Eagle Mountain Panorama as seen looking south from Loyalsock Township

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

a. ^ Bald Eagle Township was formed in 1772 as one of the seven original townships in Northumberland County (Muncy Township is the only other of the seven which is now part of Lycoming County). In August 1785, Washington Township was formed from Bald Eagle, and in November 1785 parts of Bald Eagle Township were added to the newly formed Lycoming and Pine Creek townships (the bulk of their territory had been purchased from the Iroquois in 1784). In May 1786, Bald Eagle Township was split into three new townships: Nippenose, Upper Bald Eagle, and Lower Bald Eagle. In 1789, Mifflin County was formed from Upper Bald Eagle Township and half of Potter Township (itself formed partly from the original Bald Eagle Township in May 1774).[5][20]
When Lycoming County was formed in 1795, Lower Bald Eagle was one of the original seven townships. Centre County was formed in 1800 from parts of Huntingdon, Lycoming, Mifflin, and Northumberland counties. Centre County originally had eight townships, with two (Lower Bald Eagle and Upper Bald Eagle), taken from Lycoming County. It is not clear if this Upper Bald Eagle was a newly formed township, or some portion of the original not taken when Mifflin County was formed.[21]|| Some territory from Lower Bald Eagle Township remained in Lycoming County.[5]
In 1801, Centre County renamed "Upper Bald Eagle Township" as "Spring Township" and "Lower Bald Eagle Township" as "Bald Eagle Township". In 1839 Clinton County was formed from Centre and Lycoming counties, with Bald Eagle Township as one of three taken from Centre County. Today neither Centre nor Lycoming counties have a township named "Bald Eagle".
b. ^ According to Meginness (Chapter 14), Wayne Township was formed from Nippenose Township in 1798, while part of Lycoming County.[5] Note that the PHMC sheet on Clinton County incorrectly says it was formed as part of Northumberland County,[10] but neither the Lycoming nor Northumberland County histories support this.[5][20] When Clinton County was formed in 1839, there were 12 original townships. It "embraced the following townships then in Centre County, viz., Bald Eagle, Lamar, and Logan; and from Lycoming, Allison, Chapman, Colebrook, Dunstable, Grove, Lumber, Limestone, Pine Creek, and Wayne."[11] Since Lamar was formed from Bald Eagle, 11 of the 12 original townships came at least indirectly from Lycoming County. Limestone was split from the Lycoming County township of the same name, then attached to Wayne Township, and renamed Crawford Township when it was reformed. Grove and Lumber townships became part of Cameron County, but the remaining ten townships are still in Clinton County.[11]
c. ^ When originally formed in 1803, Shrewsbury Township encompassed all of modern Sullivan County. Elkland Township was formed from Shrewsbury in 1804, as were Cherry (1824), Davidson and Forks Townships (both 1833). Plunketts Creek Township was formed from Franklin and Davidson Townships in 1838, and Fox Township was formed from Elkland in 1839. When Sullivan County was formed in 1847, both Shrewsbury and Plunketts Creek Townships were split, with each county originally having a township of that name (Plunketts Creek Township in Sullivan County changed its name to Hillsgrove Township in 1856).[17]

References[edit]

Unless otherwise noted, all information on area and population comes from the U.S. Census Bureau.

  1. ^ a b "Fact Sheet: Lycoming County, Pennsylvania". U.S. Census Bureau. 2000. Retrieved 2007-10-08. 
  2. ^ "Pennsylvania Local Government" (PDF). Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Retrieved 2007-10-08. 
  3. ^ Michels, Chris (1997). "Latitude/Longitude Distance Calculation". Northern Arizona University. Retrieved 2007-09-17. 
  4. ^ a b Lycoming County Economic Development and Planning Services, GIS Division (2005). "Lycoming County, Pennsylvania" (PDF). Map. Archived from the original on 2007-08-10. Retrieved 2007-09-17.  Note: Official Lycoming County Map showing cities, boroughs, townships, and villages, but not smaller settlements
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Meginness, John Franklin (1892). History of Lycoming County, Pennsylvania: including its aboriginal history; the colonial and revolutionary periods; early settlement and subsequent growth; organization and civil administration; the legal and medical professions; internal improvement; past and present history of Williamsport; manufacturing and lumber interests; religious, educational, and social development; geology and agriculture; military record; sketches of boroughs, townships, and villages; portraits and biographies of pioneers and representative citizens, etc. etc. (1st ed.). Chicago, IL: Brown, Runk & Co. ISBN 0-7884-0428-8. Retrieved 2007-08-05. (Note: ISBN refers to Heritage Books July 1996 reprint. URL is to a scan of the 1892 version with some OCR typos). 
  6. ^ a b c "Lycoming County 5th class" (PDF). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved 2007-05-04. 
  7. ^ a b c Godcharles, Frederic A. (1933). Pennsylvania: Political, Governmental, Military and Civil: Political and Civil History Volume (First ed.). New York, New York: The American Historical Society. 
  8. ^ "Pennsylvania Historical Counties" (Interactive map). The Newberry Library. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  9. ^ Long, John H. (editor). "Pennsylvania: Individual County Chronologies". The Newberry Library. Retrieved 2010-08-28. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h "Clinton County 7th class" (PDF). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved 2007-10-09. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Linn, John Blair (1883). "Chapter CI: Organization, Civil List, etc.". History of Centre and Clinton Counties, Pennsylvania (Digitized scan) (First ed.). Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: Louis H. Everts. Retrieved 2007-10-31. 
  12. ^ "McKean County 6th class" (PDF). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved 2007-10-09. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g "Sullivan County 8th class" (PDF). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved 2007-10-09. 
  14. ^ "Townships of Clinton County (from Maynard's "Historical View of Clinton, County, Pennsylvania")". US GenWeb Project. Retrieved 2007-10-30. [dead link]
  15. ^ a b "Cameron County 8th class" (PDF). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved 2007-10-30. 
  16. ^ "Jefferson County 6th class" (PDF). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved 2007-10-09. 
  17. ^ a b Thomas J. Ingham (1899). History of Sullivan County, Pennsylvania: Compendium of Biography. Chicago, Illinois: Lewis Publishing Co. Retrieved 2007-10-01. 
  18. ^ "Tioga County 7th class" (PDF). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved 2007-10-09. 
  19. ^ "Centre County 6th class" (PDF). Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. Retrieved 2007-10-09. 
  20. ^ a b Bell, Herbert C. (1891). History of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, Including its Aboriginal History; the Colonial and Revolutionary Periods; Early Settlement and Subsequent Growth; Political Organization; Agricultural, Mining, and Manufacturing Interests; Internal Improvements; Religious, Educational, Social, and Military History; Sketches of its Boroughs, Villages, and Townships; Portraits and Biographies of Pioneers and Representative Citizens etc, etc.. Chicago, Illinois: Brown, Runk & Co. Retrieved 2007-11-04. 
  21. ^ "Centre County: Chronological Township Formation". North Central Pennsylvania. Retrieved 2007-11-04. 

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