List of people convicted of treason

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This is a list of people convicted of treason.

Some countries, such as the U.S., have a high constitutional hurdle to conviction for treason, while many countries, especially absolute monarchies and dictatorships, have less stringent definitions.

Armenia[edit]

Austria[edit]

Austria-Hungary[edit]

Canada[edit]

China[edit]

Republic of Congo[edit]

Czechoslovakia[edit]

Denmark (under the Nazi occupation government)[edit]

East Germany[edit]

England[edit]

Estonia[edit]

Fiji[edit]

Finland[edit]

  • Lauri Törni, for having served with the German Army at the end of World War II, later received a presidential pardon

France[edit]

Image taken from Trial of Marshal Ney for high treason taken in short-hand at the time of trial, 1916

Germany[edit]

Great Britain[edit]

For those before 1 May 1707, see England and Scotland. For those convicted on or after 1 January 1801, see United Kingdom

Greece[edit]

  • Dimitrios Gounaris, Prime Minister of Greece (1921–1922), convicted of treason in 1922 for the Asia Minor catastrophe. Executed 15 November 1922.
  • Petros Protopapadakis, Minister of Economy in Dimitrios Gounaris' government and later Prime Minister of Greece (1922), convicted of treason for the Asia Minor catastrophe. Executed 15 November 1922.
  • Nikolaos Stratos, Minister of Internal Affairs in Gounaris' government, convicted of treason for the Asia Minor catastrophe. Executed 15 November 1922.
  • Georgios Baltatzis (el), Minister of Foreign Affairs in Gounaris' government, convicted of treason for the Asia Minor catastrophe. Executed 15 November 1922.
  • Nikolaos Theotokis (el), Minister of Military Affairs in Gounaris' government, convicted of trason for the Asia Minor catastrophe. Executed 15 November 1922.
  • Georgios Hatzanestis, commanding officer of the Asia Minor and Eastern Thrace Greek army, convicted of treason for the Asia Minor catastrophe. Executed 15 November 1922.
  • Michail Goudas (el), rear admiral and minister in Gounaris' government, convicted of treason for the Asia Minor catastrophe. Sentenced to life imprisonment.
  • Xenophon Stratigos, major general and minister in Gounaris' government, convicted of treason for the Asia Minor catastrophe. Sentenced to life imprisonment.
  • George Papadopoulos, Greek colonel, leader of a military junta (1967-1973), convicted of treason and jailed for life, dying in Korydallos prison.

Hawaii[edit]

The Republic of Hawaii government had one trial for treason after the failed 1895 Counter-Revolution in Hawaii. Those charged were found guilty, but pardoned after serving time in prison.[11]

Hungary[edit]

India[edit]

Israel[edit]

Japan[edit]

Kenya[edit]

  • Hezekiah Ochuka, Kenya airforce soldier, for conspiring to overthrow the government of Daniel Moi in 1982

Kuwait[edit]

Mexico[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

New Zealand[edit]

  • Hamiora Pere, for fighting against the British government in Te Kooti's War.

Norway[edit]

Pakistan[edit]

Poland[edit]

For the betrayal of General Stefan Rowecki to Gestapo:

Russia[edit]

Scotland[edit]

For those convicted on or after 1 May 1707, see Great Britain and United Kingdom.

Soviet Union[edit]

For those convicted on or after 25 December 1991, see Russia .

Spain[edit]

Sweden[edit]

Switzerland[edit]

  • Jean-Louis Jeanmaire, sentenced to 18 years of prison (released after 12 for good behavior) for leaking information to the Soviet KGB.

Sri Lanka[edit]

  • Velupillai Prabhakaran, the Tamil rebel leader who fought with the government for 30 years. Prabhakaran was convicted in absentia by a sensation-seeking Colombo High Court judge Sarath Ambepitiya (a Sinhalese ethnic) based on dubious evidence. The crime was the Central Bank bomb blast in Colombo that happened on January 31, 1996, in which 96 died. Prabhakaran was not convicted for treason, but given a 200 years imprisonment. Sarath Ambepitiya was later assassinated on November 19, 2004, in a plot masterminded by a drug kingpin Mohamed Niyas Naufer.

Turkey[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

For those before 1 January 1801, see England, Scotland, and Great Britain.

United States[edit]

Zimbabwe[edit]


Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Guy Fawkes: A Biography". Britannia.com. 
  2. ^ Valode, Philippe (2007). Les Grands traitres de l'histoire. Paris, France: First Edition. p. 233. 
  3. ^ Valode, Philippe (2007). Les Grands traitres de l'histoire. Paris, France: First Edition. p. 155. 
  4. ^ Valode, Philippe (2007). Les Grands traitres de l'histoire. Paris, France: First Edition. p. 175. 
  5. ^ Valode, Philippe (2007). Les Grands traitres de l'histoire. Paris, France: First Edition. p. 112. 
  6. ^ Valode, Philippe (2007). Les Grands traitres de l'histoire. Paris, France: First Edition. p. 95. 
  7. ^ Valode, Philippe (2007). Les Grands traitres de l'histoire. Paris, France: First Edition. p. 214. 
  8. ^ Valode, Philippe (2007). Les Grands traitres de l'histoire. Paris, France: First Edition. p. 229. 
  9. ^ Valode, Philippe (2007). Les Grands traitres de l'histoire. Paris, France: First Edition. p. 203. 
  10. ^ Conway, Moncure Daniel (1893) [1892]. The Life of Thomas Paine. New York: Knickerbocker Press. p. 375. Retrieved 2006-07-06. 
  11. ^ "Prisoners Pardoned". Hawaiian gazette (Honolulu). January 3, 1896. Retrieved June 20, 2010.