List of people educated at Stonyhurst College

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Stonyhurst College
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This article lists notable former pupils of Stonyhurst College in Lancashire, England, and its lineal antecedents at St Omer, Bruges and Liège. Former pupils are referred to in school contexts as O.S. (Old Stonyhurst). Inter alia the school counts among its most distinguished former pupils: three Saints,[1] twelve Beati,[1] twenty-two martyrs,[1] seven archbishops, and seven Victoria Cross winners.[1]

Alumni of the College at St Omer, Bruges, & Liège (1593–1794)[edit]

Saints, beati and martyrs[edit]

  • Fr Thomas Blount SJ, died in Shrewsbury gaol awaiting execution in 1647.[1]
  • Fr Brian Cansfield SJ, died whilst imprisoned in York in 1645.[1]
  • Fr Thomas Downes SJ, died in prison in 1678.[1]
  • Fr John Goodman, executed at Lancaster in 1646.[1]
  • Fr Thomas Jenison, died in Newgate prison in 1679.[1]
  • Fr Edmund Mico SJ, died in London gaol in 1678.[1]
  • Fr Francis Neville SJ, killed by pursuivants in 1679.[1]

Others[edit]

  • Hon. Aedanus Burke, soldier, judge and United States Representative from South Carolina; served in the militia forces of South Carolina during the American Revolutionary War; appointed judge of the State circuit court; member of the South Carolina House of Representatives; served in the Revolutionary Army; appointed one of three commissioners to prepare a digest of the State laws; member of the convention in 1788 called to consider ratification of the Constitution of the United States, which he opposed; elected as an Anti-Administration candidate to the First United States Congress; elected a chancellor of the courts of equity; senior member of the South Carolina appellate courts; Chief Justice of South Carolina.[6]
  • Philip Calvert, Keeper of the Conscience of Maryland; Governor of Maryland.[7]
  • Charles Carroll of Carrollton, last surviving and only Catholic signer of the U.S. Declaration of Independence, delegate to the Continental Congress and later US Senator for Maryland.[8]
  • Daniel Carroll, American Roman Catholic who helped draft the United States Constitution.[9]
  • Rt. Rev. John Carroll, first Roman Catholic bishop in the United States of America; first Archbishop of Baltimore, founder of Georgetown University and the Georgetown Preparatory School; John Carroll University is named in his honour.[10]
  • John Caryll, 1st Baron Caryll of Durford, in the Jacobite Peerage, poet, dramatist, and diplomat; translated Ovid's Epistle of Briseïs to Achilles and Virgil's first Eclogue; during the "Popish Plot" was committed to the Tower of London, but was soon let out on bail; when James II of England succeeded to the throne, he sent him as his agent to the court of Pope Innocent XI; secretary to Queen Mary of Modena, after the Glorious Revolution, he followed the exiled royal family to Saint-Germain; implicated in a plots to overthrow William of Orange (William III), whilst in exile he was created by the dethroned James II Baron Caryll of Durford (or Dunford) in West Sussex and appointed his Joint Secretary of State; his son, the so-called Old Pretender, James Francis Edward Stuart, recognised by Jacobites as "King James III and VIII", re-appointed him one of his Secretaries of State.[11]

Alumni/ae of the College at Stonyhurst (1794–present)[edit]

Alumnae (1990s-present)[edit]

  • Brittany Ashworth, actress, student.[27]

Alumni[edit]

Victoria Cross Holders[edit]

Seven Stonyhurst Alumni have won the Victoria Cross.

Others[edit]

  • Gerald Gallagher, Colonial Administrator Service, noted as the first officer-in-charge of the Phoenix Islands Settlement Scheme, the last colonial expansion of the British Empire
  • Major General Sir Montagu Gerard, Head of the British Military Mission to the Russian army in Manchuria
  • Fr John Gerard SJ, Jesuit priest, scientific, historical writer
  • Eulogio Gillow y Zavala, Archbishop of Antequera (Oaxaca, Mexico)
  • Peter Glenville, film and theatre director and producer and script writer; winner BAFTA (Best British Film – "Becket"); nominated for 4 Tony Awards, 2 Golden Globe Awards, 1 Academy Award "Oscar" (Best Director) and 1 Golden Lion.
Charles Waterton
  • Fr James Waterworth, missionary priest who published “Faith of Catholics”, a translation of the canons and decrees of the Council of Trent and of Veron's "Rule of Faith"; his last book, England and Rome was on the relations of the Popes to post-Reformation England. He was made canon and later provost of Nottingham
  • Professor John Watson, Deputy Chief Medical Officer for England
  • Sir Frederick Weld, New Zealand politician; elected to the first House of Representatives; member of the Stafford Executive; Native Affairs Minister; Prime Minister; Governor of West Australia; Governor of Tasmania; Governor of the Straits Settlements; Knight of the Order of St Pius
  • Christopher Wenner, journalist and television presenter for Blue Peter; war correspondent whose footage brought the plight of the East Timorese to world attention; winner of the Rory Peck Award for his journalism[citation needed]
  • George J. Wigley, architect, journalist, co-founder of the Society of St Vincent de Paul, co-founder of the Peterspence Association, awarded the Cross of St Gregory the Great by Pius IX.[71]
  • Douglas Wilmer, British actor (primarily associated with the role of Sherlock Holmes)
  • Paul Woodroffe, stained glass artist and book illustrator, produced the 15 windows for the Lady Chapel of St. Patrick's Cathedral (NYC)
  • Hugh Wooldridge, theatre and television director and producer
  • Sir Thomas Wyse, Member of Parliament (Liberal and second Irish Roman Catholic), advocate of Catholic Emancipation; Junior Lord of the Treasury; Secretary to the Board of Control; British Ambassador to the Kingdom of Greece

Miscellaneous accolades[edit]

The following were awarded to former Stonyhurst pupils: Great War:

Second World War:

Six O.S. were killed serving in the Boer War.

Fictional alumnus[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w T.E. Muir, Stonyhurst, (St Omers Press, Gloucestershire. Second edition, 2006) ISBN 0-9553592-0-1 p.188
  2. ^ Catholic.org entry. Retrieved 9 July 2008.
  3. ^ Catholic Encyclopaedia entry. Retrieved 9 July 2008.
  4. ^ a b List of 40 martyrs. Retrieved 20 July 2008.
  5. ^ Graham-Vernon, Deborah (2004). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/2712.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. ^ Biographical Directory of US Congress. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  7. ^ Calvert. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  8. ^ Signators of US Declaration of Independence. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  9. ^ Biography of Daniel Caroll. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  10. ^ Catholic Encyclopaedia entry. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  11. ^ Catholic Encyclopaedia entry. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  12. ^ Biographical Directory of U.S. Congress. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  13. ^ Catholic Encyclopaedia entry. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  14. ^ T.E. Muir, Stonyhurst, (St Omer Press, Gloucestershire. Second edition, 2006) ISBN 0-9553592-0-1 p.189
  15. ^ The Restoration.[dead link]
  16. ^ Catholic Encyclopaedia entry. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  17. ^ Anderson, Roberta (2004). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/12666.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  18. ^ T.E. Muir, Stonyhurst, (St Omers Press, Gloucestershire. Second edition, 2006) ISBN 0-9553592-0-1 p. 190
  19. ^ Tinling, Marion, “Thomas Lloyd’s Reports on the First Continental Congress”, The William and Mary Quarterly Vol 18 : 4 (October 1961), p. 521
  20. ^ McCoog, Thomas M. (2004). Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/19180.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  21. ^ Life of Arthur Murphy. Retrieved 31 December 2008.
  22. ^ a b c d T.E. Muir, Stonyhurst, (St Omer Press, Gloucestershire. Second edition, 2006) ISBN 0-9553592-0-1 p.191
  23. ^ Catholic Encyclopaedia entry. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  24. ^ Catholic Encyclopaedia entry for Anthony Terill. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  25. ^ Catholic Encyclopaedia entry. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  26. ^ Biographical Directory of the U.S. Congress. Retrieved 31 December 2008.
  27. ^ profile at Stonyhurst website. Retrieved 14 November 2008.
  28. ^ a b c d e f g T.E. Muir, Stonyhurst, (St Omers Press, Gloucestershire. Second edition, 2006) ISBN 0-9553592-0-1 pp.158–9
  29. ^ This is Lancashire. Retrieved 31 December 2008.
  30. ^ Times obituary for Nicholas Ardizzone. Retrieved 20 May 2009
  31. ^ NNDB article on Alfred Austin. Retrieved 19 May 2009
  32. ^ Dukes of Buckingham.org. Retrieved 19 May 2009
  33. ^ Patrick Baladi profile at IMDb. Retrieved 29 October 2009.
  34. ^ Catholic Encyclopaedia entry for Judge Nicholas Ball. Retrieved 23 October 2009.
  35. ^ Iain Balshaw profile. Retrieved 23 October 2009.
  36. ^ Bamford. Retrieved 23 October 2009.
  37. ^ [1]. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  38. ^ Profile of Count Michael de la Bédoyère. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  39. ^ T.E. Muir, Stonyhurst, (St Omers Press, Gloucestershire. Second edition, 2006) ISBN 0-9553592-0-1, p.?
  40. ^ Sir Hugh Charles Philip Bidwell profile. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  41. ^ a b c d Blake. Retrieved 23 October 2009.
  42. ^ Salford Diocese Clergy. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  43. ^ Blunt. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  44. ^ Bowen. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  45. ^ Bracken. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  46. ^ Brenninkmeijer. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  47. ^ Sir Edward Bulfin profile at firstworldwar.bham.ac.uk/donkey/bulfin.htm. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  48. ^ Times article. Retrieved 27 January 2009.
  49. ^ Callaghan. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  50. ^ Bill Cash. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  51. ^ Baron Chitnis profile. Retrieved 26 October 2009.
  52. ^ Mank, Gregory William. Hollywood's Maddest Doctors. Midnight Marquee Press: 1998.
  53. ^ Notice of death of John Coope
  54. ^ Stonyhurst Magazine Vol XII No 174, he was OS 1858
  55. ^ Doyle. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  56. ^ Dictionary of Australian National Biography
  57. ^ a b c d Australian Dictionary of National Biography
  58. ^ Profile of Archibald Matthias Dunn. Retrieved 26 December 2008.
  59. ^ Hart. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  60. ^ Tim Hetherington obituary
  61. ^ Horace A. Laffaye, The Evolution of Polo, Jefferson, North Carolina: McFarland & Company, 2009, p. 18
  62. ^ Robert Loughnan profile. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  63. ^ 1908 Catholic Who's Who entry for Joseph Constable Maxwell-Scott, J.P. for Roxburghshire. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  64. ^ MEMORIES OF ENGLAND: BRITISH IDENTITY AND THE RHETORIC OF DECLINE IN POSTWAR BRITISH DRAMA, 1956–1982
  65. ^ Report on Brendan O'Friel and the "Strangeways riots"
  66. ^ Obituary for Dermod Owen-Flood
  67. ^ http://www.1911census.co.uk/search/results4.aspx?x=1390793183
  68. ^ Australian Dictionary of National Biography
  69. ^ Sullivan. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  70. ^ William Tobin profile
  71. ^ Wigley. Retrieved 24 October 2009.