List of people from Barnet

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Among those who were born in the London Borough of Barnet, or have dwelt within the borders of the modern borough are (alphabetical order, within category):

Notable residents[edit]

Key to "Notes" regarding the residents' affiliation to Barnet
Letter Description
B Indicates that the resident was born in Barnet.
D Indicates that the resident died in Barnet.
I Indicates that the subject is buried in Barnet.
L Indicates that the resident lived in Barnet.
Citations in the Notes box refer to the information in the entire row

Academia and research[edit]

Name Notability District [1] Notes [2]
William Cattley for whom the orchid species cattleya was named
Peter Collinson botanist Mill Hill [3]
Harold Hopkins Physicist
John Strugnell, Dead Sea Scrolls editor-in-chief and Harvard Professor

Arts and entertainment[edit]

Crime[edit]

Design[edit]

Travel and Exploration[edit]

Name Notability District [1] Notes [2]
Celia Fiennes Early recreational traveller, She is widely accepted as the first recorded woman to visit every county in England. Mill Hill L[3]
David Livingstone

Judiciary[edit]

Literature[edit]

Name Notability District [1] Notes [2]
Fleur Adcock poet
Kingsley Amis novelist and poet Barnet L
Martin Amis novelist Barnet L
Alison Weir novelist, historian Barnet L
Charles Dickens novelist Finchley L [7]
Tim Parks novelist (his semi-autobiographical Tongues of Flame is set in the North Finchley of 1968) Finchley
Samuel Pepys
Will Self novelist, reviewer and columnist Finchley L [8]

Journalism and the media[edit]

Name Notability District [1] Notes [2]
Stephen Douglas journalist, ITV
Richard Baker broadcaster
Mark Kermode film critic Finchley

Politics and government[edit]

Name Notability District [1] Notes [2]
John Bercow Current Speaker of the House of Commons and the Member of Parliament for Buckingham Edgware B [9]
Cyril Bibby who in 1958–1959 was the prospective Labour Party candidate opposing Reginald Maudling
Robert Carr (Baron Carr of Hadley) Conservative politician
Sir Sydney Chapman local MP 1979–2005
Nick Griffin Political Leader of the BNP
Octavia Hill social reformer L [10]
Sir Stamford Raffles Founder of Singapore Mill Hill L [3]
Reginald Maudling local MP 1950–1979
Sir Vincent Tewson TUC General Secretary Arkley
Margaret Thatcher local MP and Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, 1979–1990
William Wilberforce Politician, a philanthropist and a leader of the movement to abolish the slave trade Mill Hill L [3]
John Wilkes Radical, journalist and politician Mill Hill [3]

Sport and Games[edit]

Name Notability District [1] Notes [2]
David Crawley Gaelic football player
C. B. Fry Polymath best known as a cricketer Childs Hill L D[3]
Ram Vaswani professional poker player

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Entries with no sourced locality (district) of residence available are marked with a "?".
  2. ^ a b c d e f All entries contain a reliably sourced reference. Entries may also contain a letter indicating Birth, Lived, or Death.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Hibbert, Christopher; Ben Weinreb, John Keay, Julia Keay (2008). The London Encyclopaedia (3rd ed.). Pan Macmillan. p. 550. ISBN 978-1-4050-4924-5. 
  4. ^ "Spike Milligan Statue Fund". Finchley Society. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 
  5. ^ {{cite news|url=http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-1052851/I-say-What-bounder--All-dandy-comic-legend-Terry-Thomas-really-liked-jolly-eager-girls.html%7Ctitle=I say! What a bounder... All dandy comic legend Terry-Thomas really liked was 'jolly eager girls' |last=Mccann |first=Graham|date=5 September 2008|publisher=Daily Mail|accessdate=2009-04-29}}
  6. ^ Eastwood, Jill (1976). "Suffolk, Owen Hargraves (1830? – )". Australian Dictionary of Biography Online. Retrieved 2009-04-29. 
  7. ^ Nurse, Richard (2008-02-13). "Finchley N12 Fallow Corner". LB Barnet. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 
  8. ^ Self, Will (6 July 2007). "Head in the clouds". The Independent. Retrieved 2009-04-28. 
  9. ^ "John Bercow: Electoral history and profile". The Guardian. Retrieved 11 March 2010. 
  10. ^ "Early Social Reform Influences". Octavia Hill’s Birthplace House. Retrieved 2009-04-28.