List of people from Richmond upon Thames

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This is a categorised list of notable people who were born in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, or have dwelt within the borders of the modern borough (which covers Barnes, East Sheen, Ham, Hampton, Kew, Mortlake, Petersham, Richmond, St Margarets, Teddington, Twickenham and Whitton). Only people who are sufficiently notable to have individual entries on Wikipedia have been included in the list and, in each instance, their birth or residence has been verified by citations. The list is divided into two main categories – Living people and Historical figures.

Living people[edit]

Actors, broadcasters, entertainers and musicians[edit]

15 Montpelier Row, Twickenham in August 2010. Its previous residents have included Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Pete Townshend
The Wick on Richmond Hill was the Mills family home for many years and is now the home of Pete Townshend
Montrose House in Petersham was for many years the home of Tommy Steele

Business people[edit]

Ormeley Lodge in Ham, the Goldsmith family home[47]

Lawyers, politicians and statesmen[edit]

Royals[edit]

Scholars, scientists and engineers[edit]

Socialites[edit]

Sportsmen and sportswomen[edit]

Writers and artists[edit]

Historical figures[edit]

Actors, broadcasters, entertainers and musicians[edit]

The house in Barnes where Gustav Holst lived between 1908 and 1913. A blue plaque signifying historical significance is fixed to the front of the building.
  • Simon Hoggart (1946–2014), broadcaster and journalist, lived in Sandycoombe Road, St Margarets[83]
  • Gustav Holst (1874–1934), composer, lived at 31 Gretna Road, Richmond between 1903 and 1908. He and his family moved to 10 The Terrace on the riverfront at Barnes in 1908, where they remained until 1913[72]
  • Celia Johnson (1908–1982), actress. There is a blue plaque at 46 Richmond Hill, Richmond, where she was born[74][84]
  • Edmund Kean (1787–1833), actor, had a house next door to the King's Theatre in Richmond where he was actor-manager, and died there[85][86]
  • Phil Lynott (1949–1986), Irish rock guitarist, songwriter and leader of Thin Lizzy, lived in Kew[87]
  • Rik Mayall (1958–2014), actor, writer and comedian, lived and died in Barnes[88][89]
  • Freddie Mercury (1946–1991), musician, vocalist and lyricist of the rock band Queen, shared a house in Ferry Road, Barnes[90]
  • Sir John Mills (1908–2005), actor, lived at The Wick on Richmond Hill[75]
  • Rudolph Nureyev (1938–1993), ballet dancer, briefly owned a house in Richmond[91]
  • Andrzej Panufnik (1914–1991), Polish-born composer and musician, lived in Riverside House in Twickenham overlooking the Thames, and died there[92]
  • Jon Pertwee (1919–1996), Doctor Who actor, had a family house in Barnes[93]
  • Harold Pinter (1930–2008), playwright, dramatist, actor and director, lived at Fairmead Court, Taylor Avenue, Kew[94]
  • Thomas German Reed (1817–1888), composer, musical director, actor, singer and theatrical manager, died at St. Croix, Upper East Sheen, and is buried in Mortlake cemetery[95]
  • William Christian Sellé (1813–1898), doctor of music and Musician in Ordinary to Queen Victoria for 44 years, lived at Old Palace Terrace, Richmond[96]
  • John Templeton (1802–1886), opera singer, lived at 114 High Street, Hampton Hill[97]
  • Terry-Thomas (1911–1990), comic actor, moved to a flat in Laurel Road, Barnes in 1988[98]
  • Frank Thornton (1921–2013), actor, who played Captain Peacock in the BBC comedy Are You Being Served?, lived and died in Barnes[99]
  • Rick Wright (1943–2008), English pianist, keyboardist and songwriter, shared a flat in Richmond with fellow Pink Floyd member Syd Barratt[73]

Architects and designers[edit]

Business people[edit]

York House, York Street, Twickenham, where the Indian industrialist Sir Ratan Tata lived
  • Angus Ogilvy (1928–2004), businessman, lived at Thatched House Lodge in Richmond Park[53]
  • James Goldsmith (1933–1997), billionaire financier, whose family lived at Ormeley Lodge[47]
  • Sir Ratan Tata (1871–1918), a Parsee and a major industrialist in India, who bought York House, Twickenham in 1906 and lived there until 1914, when he returned to India. His widow Navajbai decided to sell the house and its contents in 1924[105]
  • Thomas Twining (1675–1741) was a merchant, and the founder of the tea company Twinings. In about 1722 he bought a property later known as Dial House, next door to the church of St Mary's, Twickenham, where he either rebuilt, or converted and extended the buildings already there. The sundial on the façade carries the date 1726, possibly the time when the new building was finished. After Twining died in 1741, he was buried at St Mary's, next to his house where there is a memorial to him at the north-east corner of the church[77]
  • Sir Max Waechter (1837–1924), businessman, art collector, philanthropist and advocate of a federal Europe,[106] lived in Terrace House on Richmond Hill, and owned Glover's Island which he donated to the Borough of Richmond in 1900, helpeing to preserve the view from Richmond across the river[107]

Criminals and sinners[edit]

Lawyers, politicians and statesmen[edit]

Pembroke Lodge in the 1880s, when it was the home of Lord Russell, British Prime Minister. His grandson Bertrand Russell grew up there[109]
  • Henry Addington, 1st Viscount Sidmouth (1757–1844), British Prime Minister from 1801 to 1804, was given White Lodge, Richmond Park, as a home near London, by George III in 1801.[110] He was created Viscount Sidmouth in 1805, is commemorated in the name Sidmouth Wood at Richmond Park, and was buried in St. Mary-the-Virgin churchyard in Mortlake [2][111]
  • Charles Calvert (1768–1832), brewer and Member of Parliament, lived at Kneller Hall[112]
  • Edwin Chadwick, social reformer (1800–1890), died at Park Cottage, East Sheen[113]
  • Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey (1764–1845), British Prime Minister from 1831 to 1834, rented Sheen House from the Marquess of Ailesbury during his premiership, for use as a country house near London[114]
  • Liberal Party leader Jo Grimond (1913–1993) lived in Kew[115]
  • Henry Du Pre Labouchere (1831–1912), Liberal MP and journalist, lived at Pope's Villa, Cross Deep, Twickenham. The site is marked by a blue plaque[74]
  • Samuel Molyneux (1689–1728), Member of Parliament, and an amateur astronomer, who was married to Lady Elizabeth Diana Capel, the eldest daughter of the Earl of Essex, inherited Kew House on the death of Lady Capel of Tewkesbury.[116] Molyneux set up an observatory at the house and collaborated there with James Bradley in innovative designs for reflecting telescopes.[116] Kew House which later, as the White House, became the home of Prince Frederick and Princess Augusta, was pulled down in 1802 when George II's short-lived gothic "castellated palace" was built[117]
  • One of Henry VIII's closest friends, Henry Norris (c. 1482 – 1536) lived at Kew Farm,[118] which was later owned by Elizabeth I's favourite, Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester.[119] This large palatial house on the Thames riverbank predated the royal palaces of Kew Palace and the White House. Excavations at Kew Gardens in 2009 revealed a wall that may have belonged to the property[120]
  • Frederick North, Lord North (1732–1792), British statesman, Prime Minister from 1770 to 1782, lived at Bushy House as his London suburban residence when Ranger of Bushy Park, from 1771 to 1792[121]
Bernardo O'Higgins statue in Richmond

Royals[edit]

The north side of Bushy House in 2007. Its residents included Queen Adelaide, widow of William IV, and Prince Louis, Duke of Nemours
A musical portrait of Frederick, Prince of Wales and his sisters by Philip Mercier, dated 1733, uses the Dutch House, the present-day Kew Palace, as its plein-air backdrop
Queen Mary II's Bedchamber at Hampton Court Palace, also known as Queen Caroline's State Bedchamber

Scholars, scientists and engineers[edit]

Social reformers[edit]

A three storey brown brick building with a cupola, and a single storey extension on the left, the foreground is a green lawn
Beard and Ewart's Hampton home is now Hampton library (the extension on the left is modern)
A Blue plaque on a brick wall with the words "John Beard C1717 – 1791 Singer and William Ewart 1798 – 1861 Promoter of Public Libraries
Blue Plaque on Hampton Library to John Beard and William Ewart

Spiritual leaders[edit]

  • John Henry Newman, later Cardinal Newman (1801–1890), spent some of his early years at Grey Court, Ham Street, Ham. The site is marked by a blue plaque[74]
  • Thomas Wolsey, Cardinal Wolsey (1473–1530), lived at Hampton Court[131] and at Richmond Lodge on a site near the Kew Observatory[136]

Sportsmen and sportswomen[edit]

Warriors and explorers[edit]

Writers and artists[edit]

Spencer Gore's painting of Cambrian Road, Richmond, where he lived
French painter Camille Pissarro's impression of Kew Green in 1892
Wick House, home of Sir Joshua Reynolds and, later, Algernon Tollemache
'Hogarth House', 34 Paradise Road, Richmond, where Virginia Woolf and her husband Leonard lived

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