List of phytochemicals in food

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While there is ample evidence to indicate the health benefits of diets rich in fruits, vegetables, legumes, whole grains and nuts, no specific food has been acknowledged by scientists and government regulatory authorities as providing a health benefit. Current medical research is focused on whether health effects could be due to specific essential nutrients or phytochemicals.[1]

The following is a list of phytochemicals present in commonly consumed foods.

Terpenoids (isoprenoids)[edit]

Carotenoids (tetraterpenoids)[edit]

Carotenes[edit]

orange pigments

Xanthophylls[edit]

yellow pigments.

Triterpenoid[edit]

Monoterpenes[edit]

Steroids[edit]

Phenolic compounds[edit]

Natural monophenols[edit]

Polyphenols[edit]

Flavonoids[edit]

red, blue, purple pigments

Isoflavonoid[edit]

Flavonolignan[edit]

Lignans[edit]

A phytoestrogens – seeds (flax, sesame, pumpkin, sunflower, poppy), whole grains (rye, oats, barley), bran (wheat, oat, rye), fruits (particularly berries) and vegetables.[2]

Stilbenoids[edit]

Curcuminoids[edit]

Hydrolyzable tannin[edit]

Aromatic acid[edit]

Phenolic acids[edit]

Hydroxycinnamic acids[edit]

Capsaicin[edit]

chilli peppers.

Phenylethanoids[edit]

Alkylresorcinols[edit]

wholegrain wheat, rye and barley

Glucosinolates[edit]

The precursor to isothiocyanates[edit]

Aglycone derivatives[edit]

Organosulfides/ Organosulfur compounds[edit]

Indoles[edit]

Betalains[edit]

Chlorophylls[edit]

Other organic acids[edit]

Protease inhibitors[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University
  2. ^ Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University
  3. ^ Lignan contents of Dutch plant foods: a database i...[Br J Nutr. 2005] - PubMed Result