List of places of worship in Adur

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The district of Adur, one of seven local government districts in the English county of West Sussex, has 26 extant churches and other places of worship, and a further seven former churches that are no longer in religious use. The southern part of the district forms part of the Brighton/Worthing/Littlehampton conurbation, and almost all of the churches are in the towns and villages within this continuous built-up area. The rural northern part of the district has one ancient church that is still in use, and another former chapel that served a now deserted medieval village. Many Christian denominations are represented, but followers of other religions must travel outside the area to worship.

Seven of Adur's extant places of worship, and two former churches, have been awarded listed status. A building is defined as "listed" when it is placed on a statutory register of buildings of "special architectural or historic interest" in accordance with the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990.[1] The Department for Culture, Media and Sport, a Government department, is responsible for this; English Heritage, a non-departmental public body, acts as an agency of the department to administer the process and advise the department on relevant issues.[2] There are three grades of listing status. Grade I, the highest, is defined as being of "exceptional interest"; Grade II* is used for "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and Grade II, the lowest, is used for buildings of "special interest".[3]

By the 11th century, the area now covered by Adur district had several small settlements, each with their own church. Although some have been restored and altered, most ancient structural work and internal features remain. These include an anchorite's cell (where a hermit was walled up for life),[4] a rare series of wall paintings,[5] an example of the Tapsel gate design found only in Sussex,[6] and a "Rhenish helm" four-gabled tower cap that is unique in England.[7][8][9]

Location[edit]

Adur district is a small, parallelogram-shaped area in the extreme south-east of the county of West Sussex.
Adur located within West Sussex

Adur, which has an area of 4,180 hectares (10,300 acres),[10] is a coastal district between the South Downs and the English Channel. The city of Brighton and Hove lies to the east, and Worthing is to the west.[11] The River Adur, from which the district takes its name,[12] flows from north to south and cuts the area in two. In the Saxon and Norman eras, villages developed on both sides: Southwick, Kingston Buci and Shoreham in the east; Lancing and Sompting in the west.[12] Each had its own ancient church. As the settlements grew, they merged into a continuous urban area and absorbed hamlets such as Upper Cokeham,[13] Lower Cokeham[13] and Fishersgate.[14] Housing spread on to the lower slopes of the Downs, but little extended north of the Old Shoreham Road (built as the main east-west route through the area in the 18th century).[14] The A27 trunk road now forms the northern limit of the urban area.

Churches had been founded at Southwick,[14] Kingston Buci,[15] Old Shoreham,[16] Sompting,[13] the downland village of Coombes[17] and the now abandoned village of Old Erringham[16] at the time of the Domesday Survey in 1086. New Shoreham's church existed by the end of the 11th century,[16] and Lancing had one by the 12th century.[18]

Religious affiliation[edit]

According to the 2001 United Kingdom Census, 59,627 people lived in Adur. Of these, 73.3% identified themselves as Christian, 0.7% were Muslim, 0.24% were Hindu, 0.07% were Sikh, 0.22% were Buddhist, 0.26% were Jewish, 0.4% followed another religion, 16.8% claimed no religious affiliation and 8% did not state their religion. The proportion of Christians was higher than the 71.7% in England as a whole, while affiliation with Islam, Hinduism, Judaism and Sikhism was much less widespread than in England overall: in 2001, 3.1% of people in England were Muslim, 1.1% were Hindu and 0.7% were Sikh. The proportion of people with no religious affiliation was also higher than the national figure of 14.6%.[19]

Administration[edit]

Adur's 12 extant Anglican churches are in the Archdeaconry of Chichester, one of three archdeaconries in the Diocese of Chichester, whose cathedral is at Chichester.[20] The Archdeaconry of Chichester has five deaneries (groups of parishes);[21] all 12 churches are administered by either the Hove Rural Deanery or the Worthing Rural Deanery. Kingston Buci's two churches, Southwick's two and the three in Shoreham-by-Sea are in Hove's territory;[22] the two churches in Lancing, two in Sompting and the church at Coombes are administered from Worthing.[23]

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Arundel and Brighton, whose cathedral is at Arundel,[24] administers Adur's Roman Catholic churches. The parish of Our Lady Queen of Peace, Adur Valley, includes St Peter's Church in Shoreham-by-Sea as well as two churches outside the district.[25] St Theresa of Lisieux Church in Southwick is in the combined parish of Southwick with Portslade, which also serves the Portslade area of Brighton and Hove.[26] The Church of the Holy Family in Lancing is part of the parish of East Worthing in the neighbouring district of Worthing.[27]

Southwick Christian Community Church[28] is part of the 34-church South-East Area[29] of the Congregational Federation, an association of 294 independent Congregational churches in Great Britain. The federation came into existence in 1972 when the Congregational Church in England and Wales merged with several other denominations to form the United Reformed Church. Certain congregations wanted to remain independent of this, and instead joined the Congregational Federation.[30]

Open places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
Coombes Church Three-quarter view of a long, low, flint rubble church on a rising grass slope with some gravestones.  A tile-roofed porch juts out from the longer side, which also has two paired lancet windows and two other windows.  The shorter side has three single-light round-headed windows and a blocked lancet window below the roofline. Coombes
50°51′39″N 0°18′35″W / 50.8607°N 0.3097°W / 50.8607; -0.3097 (Coombes Church)
Anglican I The nave, entrance door and chancel arch remain from the original 11th-century building. The congregation rebuilt the church (apart from its former tower) after a partial collapse in the 18th century. Important 12th-century and later wall paintings were uncovered in 1949. The churchyard has a rare Tapsel gate—a design unique to Sussex. [17][31]
[32][33]
[5][34]
[6]
Lighthouse Community Church Three-quarter view of a long, low, cream-coloured painted hut with white cladding below the tiled roof.  An entrance porch with a brown door extends from the shorter side; the longer side, alongside a street corner, has four rectangular windows.  "The Lighthouse Community Church" is written in red letters above these. Fishersgate
50°49′58″N 0°13′07″W / 50.8329°N 0.2186°W / 50.8329; -0.2186 (Lighthouse Community Church)
Assemblies of God Originally recorded in 1909 as a mission hall, this became an Evangelical church by the 1930s. It has undergone several name changes, and is now affiliated with the Assemblies of God Pentecostal denomination. [14][31]
[35][36]
St Giles' Church A red-brick church with a tiled roof extending nearly to ground level.  Low shrubs surround the building on all sides.  A three-light lancet window with stone mullions dominates the nearest side.  A small stone cross and bell-tower are on the roof.  The left-hand side has a white entrance porch. Kingston Buci
50°50′26″N 0°15′41″W / 50.8405°N 0.2614°W / 50.8405; -0.2614 (St Giles' Church, Kingston Buci)
Anglican This church, built in 1906 in the Decorated Gothic style and attributed to Lacy W. Ridge, was the chapel of the workhouse (now Southlands Hospital) until 1934. It then became part of the parish of St Julian's Church and opened for public worship. [31][37]
[15]
St Julian's Church A flint rubble church with large stone quoins, behind a low flint wall.  A three-light lancet window in the nearest wall is partly obscured by a tree in full leaf.  A squat tower with a squared-off pyramidal roof stands in the middle.  To its right is a blank-walled protrusion with a blocked entrance. Kingston Buci
50°50′00″N 0°14′48″W / 50.8333°N 0.2466°W / 50.8333; -0.2466 (St Julian's Church, Kingston Buci)
Anglican I The dedication is 12th-century, but the church existed at the time of the Domesday survey and some 11th-century parts survive. There are remains of an anchorite cell, where a hermit lived in medieval times, in the chancel wall. [15][31]
[38][39]
[40]
St James the Less Church A long church with flint walls and tiled roofs.  A short tower with a pyramidal roof and two small windows rises slightly right of centre.  To the left, a longer section with a high roof, in front of which is a projection with a lower roofline and two low windows.  A porch with an arched doorway extends from the far left side.  To the right, there is a shorter and lower section with two windows.  A path leads through a graveyard to the porch. Lancing
50°50′16″N 0°19′21″W / 50.8379°N 0.3226°W / 50.8379; -0.3226 (St James the Less Church, Lancing)
Anglican I A Norman-era doorway is preserved in the south porch at this mostly 13th-century flint-built church. The font survives from the 12th century. The tower was given a new pyramidal cap in the 17th century. [18][31]
[41][42]
[43][44]
St Michael and All Angels Church A flint and stone church in three sections, behind a low flint wall alongside a road.  The middle section is the tallest and widest, and has a very large five-light lancet window with quatrefoils and an extremely narrow slit-like window above.  The partly hidden section on the left  has a smaller lancet window and a similar slit.  An extension on the right has a much lower roofline and two sets of four rectangular windows. Lancing
50°49′27″N 0°19′24″W / 50.8242°N 0.3233°W / 50.8242; -0.3233 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Lancing)
Anglican A chapel of ease was provided for South Lancing in 1879. It was succeeded by a temporary iron church in 1893, but in 1924 Arthur Young designed a permanent building in the 14th-century Gothic style. A 1950s extension in brick contrasts with the original flint and stone. [18][31]
[41][45]
Lancing Tabernacle Three-quarter view of a dark brick building with lighter brick dressings around the arched entrance.  "LANCING TABERNACLE" is written in white letters above this and below a wide, tall, slightly arched window with brown mullions.  Evenly-spaced rectangular windows extend down the longer side.  A brick-paved area is in front. Lancing
50°49′49″N 0°19′19″W / 50.8302°N 0.3220°W / 50.8302; -0.3220 (Lancing Tabernacle)
Evangelical The first church of this name was a Railway Mission hall. The wooden building of 1927 was dismantled and re-erected at Fittleworth when a new Tabernacle, of red brick, opened nearby in 1937. [18][31]
[45][46]
[47]
Lancing Methodist Church A pale stone building with a tiled roof sloping further on the left than on the right.  A tower with a two-light lancet window, diamond-shaped decoration and a short spire stands in the near corner.  A porch, with two doors and two windows in a lancet style, stands in front of the main body of the church, dominated by a four-light lancet. Lancing
50°49′30″N 0°19′22″W / 50.8251°N 0.3228°W / 50.8251; -0.3228 (Lancing Methodist Church)
Methodist A Methodist church existed in South Lancing by 1833 and possibly as early as 1815. Its popularity grew, and in 1904 a larger Early English-style church was built on the site. The 250-capacity building has a tower and spire; a complementary porch was built in 1979. [18][31]
[45][48]
Plymouth Brethren Hall Three-quarter view of a pale brick hut with a shallow tiled roof, standing in asphalt-covered grounds behind a wire fence.  There is a recessed entrance door between two windows, and four windows in the longer side. Lancing
50°49′53″N 0°19′34″W / 50.8314°N 0.3261°W / 50.8314; -0.3261 (Plymouth Brethren Hall, Lancing)
Plymouth Brethren A Brethren community was established in Lancing in the 1930s. Its first place of worship was in First Avenue, but it later moved to a new building in Wembley Gardens. [18][31]
[49]
Church of the Holy Family A low, modern brick building with an entrance door surrounded by a ground-to-roof glazed wall.  A square tower with a metal-clad glazed area and a crucifix stands to the right.  A low-roofed extension to the left has tall windows on one side and one narrow window on the other. Lancing
50°49′53″N 0°19′18″W / 50.8314°N 0.3217°W / 50.8314; -0.3217 (Church of the Holy Family, Lancing)
Roman Catholic A former farmhouse was used for Masses from 1954. It was later extended, and served Roman Catholics in Lancing and Sompting until a church was built next to it. This new building was consecrated in 1972. [18][31]
[50]
St Peter the Apostle's Church Distant three-quarter view of a modern L-shaped brick building with three ground-to-roof windows on the longer side and a blank wall on the shorter side.  The tiled roof extends to just above ground level on the right side to cover an extension with two tall windows.  A tall tree in full leaf stands next to this. Lower Cokeham, Sompting
50°49′37″N 0°20′20″W / 50.8269°N 0.3389°W / 50.8269; -0.3389 (St Peter the Apostle's Church, Lower Cokeham)
Anglican This modern brick building is within the parish of St Mary the Blessed Virgin. Consecrated as a church in 1966, it functions as a church hall as well as a place of worship. [13][31]
Lancing Kingdom Hall Lower Cokeham, Sompting
50°49′35″N 0°20′03″W / 50.8264°N 0.3341°W / 50.8264; -0.3341 (Lancing Kingdom Hall, Lower Cokeham)
Jehovah's Witnesses This new Kingdom Hall on Leconfield Road replaced the building in Wembley Avenue used since 1960 and was registered for marriages in February 2014. It serves the Lancing Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. [51][52]
Church of the Good Shepherd Side view of a small brick church with a steeply pitched, red-tiled roof extending to just above ground level.  Below the roof, there are three paired windows separated by buttresses.  A round tower with a conical spire topped by a crucifix stands at the left end.  In front of this, a low, flat-roofed extension in dark brick, with a nine-light ground-to-roof window.  A shingle beach runs in front. Shoreham Beach
50°49′35″N 0°17′11″W / 50.8263°N 0.2865°W / 50.8263; -0.2865 (Church of the Good Shepherd, Shoreham Beach)
Anglican Architect Charles Latham designed this church to serve the Shoreham Beach area, where permanent houses were built to replace the wooden buildings of Bungalow Town—destroyed in a storm in 1913. His Early English-style roughcast-clad building opened in 1913 and was extended in 1971. [31][37]
Providence Strict Baptist Chapel Three-quarter view of a small stuccoed building with a pediment.  The longer side is a blank wall; a flint boundary wall runs alongside it.  The façade has two simple rectangular windows flanking a round-arched entrance, and a small round window below the pediment. Shoreham-by-Sea
50°49′57″N 0°16′35″W / 50.8325°N 0.2764°W / 50.8325; -0.2764 (Providence Strict Baptist Chapel, Shoreham-by-Sea)
Baptist This small stuccoed building, in a simple Classical style with deeply recessed windows, was opened in 1867 to replace a nearby meeting room. The chapel is aligned with the Gospel Standard movement. [37][53]
[54][55]
St Mary de Haura Church Side view of a substantial stone church with a square clock tower topped with a weather-vane.  The tower has two- and three-light arched openings in each face.  A triangular-roofed projection to the left has several round-arched windows and a small brown door.  The main body of the church, partly obscured by a tree, extends to the right, and has large buttresses topped with spirelets. Shoreham-by-Sea
50°49′58″N 0°16′27″W / 50.8329°N 0.2742°W / 50.8329; -0.2742 (St Mary de Haura Church, New Shoreham)
Anglican I This church, built to serve the Port of Shoreham, was built on a massive scale in the 11th century—possibly as a collegiate church; its east end has survived and forms the present building. The old chancel became the nave when the church was rebuilt in the 18th century from a ruined state. [16][31]
[56][57]
[58][59]
St Nicolas' Church A cruciform church of flint and stone with a pyramid-roofed central tower topped with a weather-vane.  The nearest section is fully obscured by a tree.  The tower has three blocked round-arched windows and two round openings below the roof. Shoreham-by-Sea
50°50′27″N 0°17′08″W / 50.8408°N 0.2856°W / 50.8408; -0.2856 (St Nicolas' Church, Old Shoreham)
Anglican I Old Shoreham's church predates the Norman conquest and received its dedication by the 11th century. Much of the present structure was built in about 1140, although it was restored in 1839–1840. The crossing has a set of carved faces. [16][31]
[60][61]
[62][63]
Shoreham Baptist Church A long, blue-painted building in three parts: a flat-roofed square block with two windows, a low entrance section with a wide entrance door and a triangular-roofed glazed section, and a building with a large pediment and tiled roof, with three tall round-arched windows. Shoreham-by-Sea
50°50′04″N 0°16′27″W / 50.8344°N 0.2742°W / 50.8344; -0.2742 (Shoreham Baptist Church)
Baptist Built in 1880 and since extended to the west, this chapel replaced a smaller predecessor dating from 1870. The Italianate design had stuccoed walls, but these have been painted over. [31][37]
[53][64]
Shoreham Free Church A brick building with an angular façade consisting of stepped brick walls above an entrance porch with a wooden door in a recess.  A crucifix and the words "SHOREHAM FREE CHURCH" are on the façade. Shoreham-by-Sea
50°50′07″N 0°16′18″W / 50.8352°N 0.2716°W / 50.8352; -0.2716 (Shoreham Free Church)
Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion Behind the 1958 red-brick façade, the original structure of 1906—built of brick and terracotta—remains. The Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion established its first church in Shoreham in 1800. The present church is part of the Evangelical Alliance. [31][37]
[53][65]
[66]
Shoreham Methodist Church Front view of a three-part building, mostly in brick: a modern glazed porch with a tiled roof links a dark brick annexe (with a single entrance door and a three-light round arched window) to the main church, in red brick and with doubled entrance doors and brick-dressed three-light lancet windows with stone mullions. Shoreham-by-Sea
50°49′59″N 0°16′22″W / 50.8331°N 0.2727°W / 50.8331; -0.2727 (Shoreham Methodist Church)
Methodist This was built as a Wesleyan Methodist chapel in 1900. The first such church in Shoreham had opened a century earlier, and another existed from 1829. Josiah Gunton designed a Perpendicular Gothic red-brick and flint building for the congregation. A glass porch was added in 1995. [31][53]
[67][68]
St Peter's Church Three-quarter view of a low, shallow-roofed white-painted building with brick quoins and red doors and window frames, situated on a corner plot behind a low flint wall and some shrubs. Shoreham-by-Sea
50°50′03″N 0°16′37″W / 50.8341°N 0.2770°W / 50.8341; -0.2770 (St Peter's Church, Shoreham-by-Sea)
Roman Catholic After the town's original Roman Catholic church, also dedicated to Saint Peter, closed in 1982, this new building opened nearby on the site of a Catholic school. Construction started in 1983. [31][69]
[70][71]
Church of St Mary the Blessed Virgin Side view of a flint church surrounded by a graveyard with bare trees and with a path to the left.  The top of a tower with a four-sided slate cap is visible behind the main body of the church.  A low porch protrudes to the left. Sompting
50°50′19″N 0°21′06″W / 50.8386°N 0.3518°W / 50.8386; -0.3518 (Church of St Mary the Blessed Virgin, Sompting)
Anglican I Renowned for its German-style "Rhenish helm" spire (unique in England) and its Saxon tower, Sompting's parish church retains many 11th- and 12th-century structural elements, including additions made by the Knights Templar and Knights Hospitaller when they held the patronage. [13][31]
[8][9]
[72][73]
[74]
St Michael and All Angels Church Three-quarter view of a flint church with a tall, three-stage tower to the left, topped with a dark grey spire.  Low projections with paired arched windows flank the tower on both sides.  A porch juts forward from the main body of the church, next to three low lancet windows.  The roofs are of red tiles.  Irregularly spaced gravestones are in front of the church. Southwick
50°50′06″N 0°14′29″W / 50.8349°N 0.2413°W / 50.8349; -0.2413 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Southwick)
Anglican II* Southwick's flint-built parish church was controlled from Kingston Buci in its early years. Most structural work is from the 12th and 13th centuries, but traces of Norman walls remain and the nave dates from the 14th century. The tower was damaged by World War II bombing but was repaired. [14][31]
[75][76]
Southwick Christian Community Church Front view of a barn-style building consisting of a white-painted section with paired square windows grouped around an arch-headed entrance door and a red-tiled roof with two skylights, and to its right an extension with the same roofline but darker tiling, with a large glazed area and a spiky glass projection from the roof. Southwick
50°50′15″N 0°14′13″W / 50.8374°N 0.2370°W / 50.8374; -0.2370 (Southwick Christian Community Church)
Congregational Federation Modern additions have hidden the building's origins as a "traditional chapel" built in 1903. This was a stuccoed building with small round-arched windows. A large extension opened to the east in 2003, costing over £1 million. [14][31]
[28][77]
[78]
Southwick Methodist Church A bulky, plain brown brick building.  A flat-roofed projection on the near side has four evenly-spaced ground-to-roof windows with concrete details; the main part of the building behind it has six evenly-spaced windows in concrete surrounds, the leftmost of which is much taller than the others.  A tall, very thin green metal spire sits on the right side of the roof.  A modern porch with white cladding is attached to the left side of the building. Southwick
50°50′13″N 0°14′03″W / 50.8370°N 0.2341°W / 50.8370; -0.2341 (Southwick Methodist Church)
Methodist Southwick's first Methodist church—now demolished—was active from 1876 to 1955, when its successor opened. In 1965 a larger building opened on adjacent land; it is linked to the original brick hall by a modern porch structure. [14][31]
[77][79]
St Theresa of Lisieux Church Side view of a tall, plain red brick church with an entrance porch at the left end and several uneven projections from the near side.  The porch has a stone statue and an arched entrance door.  The tiled roof has stone ends, both of which have small stone crosses.  The lower level of the longer side has 15 unevenly spaced but identical round-headed windows; above this and immediately below the roofline are another eight windows of the same type, which are evenly spaced. Southwick
50°50′28″N 0°14′15″W / 50.8411°N 0.2375°W / 50.8411; -0.2375 (St Theresa of Lisieux Church, Southwick)
Roman Catholic Southwick's Roman Catholic community had to travel elsewhere to worship until 1950, when Mass began to be celebrated in a private house. A Romanesque-style church was built on a site next to the Old Shoreham Road in 1955. [14][31]
[80]
Sompting United Reformed Church Three-quarter view of a modern brick building in a vernacular style, resembling a cottage.  A porch with an arched entrance projects from the façade; above its brown-tiled roof is a three-light window and some wooden panelling with a white crucifix.  Three evenly spaced side windows and a larger round-arched window extend down the side. Upper Cokeham, Sompting
50°50′00″N 0°20′10″W / 50.8332°N 0.3362°W / 50.8332; -0.3362 (Sompting United Reformed Church)
United Reformed Church The Congregational community established a church in Sompting in 1936 in a brick building. Since the Congregational Church became part of the United Reformed Church in the 1970s, the church has served that denomination. [13][31]
[81]

Former places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
St Peter and St Mary's Church A long brick and tile building with central tower on the near side.  The whole structure is surrounded by scaffolding and barricades.  The tower has tall round-headed windows and louvres on each face, a shallow tiled cap and a stone crucifix. Fishersgate
50°49′57″N 0°13′27″W / 50.8326°N 0.2242°W / 50.8326; -0.2242 (Former St Peter and St Mary's Church, Fishersgate)
Anglican A mission hall opened in 1881 to serve new housing in this area southeast of Southwick. It was replaced in 1938 by a Romanesque church of dark brickwork and tiles, with a squat tower and spire. It became part of the Parish of Southwick in 2004, was declared redundant in 2008 and is now the Stepping Stones Children and Family Centre. [14][77]
[82][83]
Kingdom Hall Side view of a long, low brick building with a corrugated roof, behind a wire fence and metal gates and next to an asphalt car park.  There are two doors and two sets of square windows. Lancing
50°49′49″N 0°19′35″W / 50.8303°N 0.3265°W / 50.8303; -0.3265 (Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses, Lancing)
Jehovah's Witnesses This Kingdom Hall was built in 1960 to serve the Lancing Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. In 2009, planning permission was granted for the site to be redeveloped with housing, and it has been replaced by a new building in Leconfield Road. [18][31]
[84][85]
First Avenue Hall Lancing
50°50′07″N 0°19′07″W / 50.8352°N 0.3187°W / 50.8352; -0.3187 (Former Brethren Meeting Room, Lancing)
Plymouth Brethren This was the Brethren community of Lancing's first permanent place of worship. The building stands behind First Avenue and is now empty: the present hall on Wembley Avenue superseded it. [18][49]
Erringham Chapel A lightly rutted field in winter, with several buildings in the middle distance and hills behind.  The buildings are partly obscured by fences, and consist of farm outbuildings, a large farmhouse with a red-tiled roof and chimneys, a smaller adjacent building in a similar style, and a two-storey house. Old Erringham
50°51′25″N 0°17′18″W / 50.8569°N 0.2882°W / 50.8569; -0.2882 (Former Erringham Chapel)
Pre-Reformation[note 1] II A chapel of ease to St Nicolas' Church at Old Shoreham was built in the now depopulated village of Old Erringham in the 11th century. It was out of use by the time of the Reformation, and the remains of its chancel have been turned into a barn. This now stands on private land and is only visible from a distance. [16][86]
[87][88]
[89]
St Peter's Church Side view of a tall, narrow flint building with a steeply-pitched red-tiled roof in which several skylights have been inserted at irregular intervals.  Four identical lancet window openings with modern windows, separated by buttresses, dominate the near side; an identical window is visible on the recessed side wall behind it.  A stone bell-tower rises from the left-hand side, and below it a porch projects forward a short way. Shoreham-by-Sea
50°49′58″N 0°16′37″W / 50.8327°N 0.2769°W / 50.8327; -0.2769 (Former St Peter's Church, Shoreham-by-Sea)
Roman Catholic II Shoreham's first permanent Roman Catholic church was completed in 1875. Charles Alban Buckler's 13th-century Decorated Gothic style design was executed in flint and stone, and featured a bell-turret. Augusta, Duchess of Norfolk funded it. It was replaced by a new church in 1982, and became a nursing home and then flats. [37][90]
[91]
West Street Primitive Methodist Chapel Three-quarter view of a pale blue building with a plain exterior and a large pediment, on a crowded site between two flint structures.  The façade has three tall, triple-recessed blank arches, the centre of which is shortened to accommodate an entrance door.  A round opening sits just below the pediment.  The side has round-arched windows. Shoreham-by-Sea
50°49′59″N 0°16′39″W / 50.8330°N 0.2776°W / 50.8330; -0.2776 (Former Primitive Methodist Chapel, Shoreham-by-Sea)
Methodist This Classical-style chapel was opened in 1862 for the Primitive Methodist community. When a new chapel opened in 1879, it became a Salvation Army hall. Since the 1930s it has been home to the Shoreham Snooker Club. The round-arched recessed side windows can still be seen. [67]
All Souls Centre Three-quarter view of a low, green-roofed building of stone, wood panelling and white cladding, behind a brick wall with a wooden fence.  A flat-roofed section to the right has an entrance door and a three-part window. Southwick
50°50′36″N 0°13′54″W / 50.8434°N 0.2318°W / 50.8434; -0.2318 (Former All Souls Centre, Southwick)
Anglican This combined church and nursery school was built in 1955 on the site of a mission hall linked to the Church Army movement. It was sold, with permission to redevelop the site for housing, in 2008. [14][31]
[92]
Southwick Undenominational Mission Hall Southwick
50°50′15″N 0°14′23″W / 50.8376°N 0.2396°W / 50.8376; -0.2396 (Former Southwick Undenominational Mission Hall, Southwick)
Non-denominational This mission hall on Cross Road in Southwick was registered for religious worship in 1932. In 1978, planning permission was granted to convert it into a house. [14][93]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The church fell out of use before the Reformation, when the Church of England was established.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". The UK Statute Law Database. Ministry of Justice. 1990-05-24. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  2. ^ "History of English Heritage". English Heritage. 2010. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  3. ^ "What does Listing mean?". English Heritage website. English Heritage. 2008. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  4. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 252.
  5. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 194–195.
  6. ^ a b Wales 1999, pp. 67–68.
  7. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 330.
  8. ^ a b Coppin 2006, p. 104.
  9. ^ a b "Detailed Record: The Parish Church of St Mary, Church Lane, Sompting, Adur, West Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-12. 
  10. ^ "Area: Adur (Local Authority) – Population Density (UV02)". "Neighbourhood Statistics" website. Office for National Statistics. 2004-11-18. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  11. ^ "Where is Adur?". Adur District Council. 2005-11-01. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  12. ^ a b "Your environment: the River Adur". Adur District Council. 2008-02-22. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Sompting". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 53–64. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Southwick". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 173–183. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  15. ^ a b c Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Kingston by Sea". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 132–138. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  16. ^ a b c d e f Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Old and New Shoreham - Churches". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 167–171. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  17. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Coombes". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 215–219. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Lancing". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 34–53. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  19. ^ "Area: Adur (Local Authority) – Religion (UV15)". "Neighbourhood Statistics" website. Office for National Statistics. 2004-11-18. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  20. ^ "A little bit of history". Diocese of Chichester. 2012. Archived from the original on 19 January 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  21. ^ "Deaneries in the Diocese of Chichester". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  22. ^ "Rural Deanery of Hove". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  23. ^ "Rural Deanery of Worthing". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  24. ^ "Arundel Cathedral Parish". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  25. ^ "Adur Valley, West Sussex". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  26. ^ "Southwick with Portslade, West Sussex". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  27. ^ "Lancing, West Sussex". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  28. ^ a b "Southwick – Christian Community". Congregational Federation. 2007. Retrieved 4 June 2012. 
  29. ^ "South-East Area". Congregational Federation. 2007. Retrieved 4 June 2012. 
  30. ^ "The Story so far...". Congregational Federation. 2007. Retrieved 4 June 2012. 
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z "Churches, religions and current places of worship". Adur District Council. 2005-11-01. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  32. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 107.
  33. ^ "Detailed Record: The Parish Church, Coombes Road, Coombes, Adur, West Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-12. 
  34. ^ Pé 2006, p. 46.
  35. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 53501; Name: The Lighthouse Christian Centre; Address: St Aubyn's Road, Fishersgate; Denomination: Christians not otherwise designated). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  36. ^ "The Lighthouse Community Church". Assemblies of God Incorporated. 2012. Retrieved 30 November 2012. 
  37. ^ a b c d e f Elleray 2004, p. 49.
  38. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Julian, St Julians Lane (south side), Shoreham by Sea, Adur, West Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  39. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 132.
  40. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 252–253.
  41. ^ a b Wales 1999, p. 134.
  42. ^ "Detailed Record: The Parish Church of St James, Manor Road, Lancing, Adur, West Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  43. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 105.
  44. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 255–256.
  45. ^ a b c Elleray 2004, p. 37.
  46. ^ "Lancing Tab: Welcome". Lancing Tabernacle Christian Centre. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  47. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 57762; Name: Lancing Tabernacle; Address: North Road, Lancing; Denomination: Independent Evangelical Church). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  48. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 40386; Name: Methodist Church; Address: Lancing; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  49. ^ a b Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 74826; Name: Meeting Room; Address: Rear of Dorset Lodge, First Avenue, Lancing; Denomination: Christians not otherwise designated). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  50. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 72401; Name: Church of the Holy Family; Address: North Road, Lancing; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  51. ^ "Congregation Meeting Search (State/Province: West Sussex)". jw.org (Jehovah's Witnesses) Congregation Finder app. Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania, Inc. 2012. Retrieved 29 November 2012.  (Select "Search" then "Expand all details".)
  52. ^ The London Gazette: no. 60786. p. 3750. 20 February 2014. Retrieved 24 February 2014.
  53. ^ a b c d Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Old and New Shoreham - Protestant Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 171–172. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  54. ^ "List of Chapels and Times of Services" (PDF). Gospel Standard Trust Publications. 2009. Archived from the original on 14 February 2013. Retrieved 14 February 2013. 
  55. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 18142; Name: Providence Chapel; Address: John Street, Shoreham-by-Sea; Denomination: Baptists). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  56. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Mary de Haura, Church Street (east side), Shoreham by Sea, Adur, West Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  57. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 116.
  58. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 276–282.
  59. ^ Pé 2006, p. 93.
  60. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 115.
  61. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 285–287.
  62. ^ Pé 2006, pp. 91–93.
  63. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Nicolas, St Nicolas Lane (north side), Shoreham by Sea, Adur, West Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2009-08-04. 
  64. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 25256; Name: Baptist Chapel; Address: Western Road, Shoreham-by-Sea; Denomination: Baptists). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  65. ^ "Connexional Churches in the South East". Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  66. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 63163; Name: Shoreham Free Church; Address: Gordon Road, Shoreham-by-Sea; Denomination: Countess Of Huntingdon's Connexion). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  67. ^ a b Elleray 2004, p. 50.
  68. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 37655; Name: Methodist Church; Address: Brunswick Road, Shoreham-by-Sea; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  69. ^ Norman 1989, p. 13.
  70. ^ Colquhoun 2008, p. 29.
  71. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 76540; Name: St Peter's Church; Address: West Street, Shoreham-by-Sea; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  72. ^ Pé 2006, p. 39.
  73. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 330–332.
  74. ^ Wales 1999, p. 196.
  75. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Michael, Church Lane (south side), Shoreham by Sea, Adur, West Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  76. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 334–335.
  77. ^ a b c Elleray 2004, p. 51.
  78. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 40767; Name: Southwick Christian Community Church; Address: Corner of Green and Southview Road, Southwick; Denomination: Congregationalists). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  79. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 70546; Name: Methodist Church; Address: Manor Hall Road, Southwick; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  80. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 65064; Name: St Theresa; Address: Old Shoreham Road, Southwick; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  81. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 57951; Name: Sompting United Reformed Church; Address: Cokeham Road, Sompting; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  82. ^ "St Peter & St Mary, Fishersgate". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-11. 
  83. ^ "Stepping Stones Children and Family Centre: How to Find Us". West Sussex County Council. 2011. Retrieved 8 September 2011. 
  84. ^ "Application Details (ADC/0036/09)". Adur District Council planning application. Adur District Council/CAPS Solutions Ltd. 2009. Retrieved 2009-08-05. 
  85. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 71500; Name: Kingdom Hall; Address: Wembley Gardens, Wembley Avenue, Lancing; Denomination: Jehovah's Witnesses). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  86. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 287.
  87. ^ Vincent 2005, p. 46.
  88. ^ "Detailed Record: Remains of Chapel to southwest of No.1 and No.2 (Old Erringham Farm Cottages), Steyning Road (east side), Shoreham by Sea, Adur, West Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2009-07-12. 
  89. ^ Vigar 1994, p. 64.
  90. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Peter, Ship Street (east side), Shoreham by Sea, Adur, West Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2009-09-22. 
  91. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Old and New Shoreham - Roman Catholicism". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 171. Retrieved 2009-07-09. 
  92. ^ "Application Details (ADC/0021/09)". Adur District Council planning application. Adur District Council/CAPS Solutions Ltd. 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-07. 
  93. ^ "SW/12/78/TP/8600: Change of Use from Mission Hall to Residential". Adur District Council Planning Application SW/12/78/TP/8600. Adur District Council. 12 January 1978. Retrieved 19 September 2011. 

Bibliography[edit]

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  • Coppin, Paul (2006). 101 Medieval Churches of West Sussex. Seaford: S.B. Publications. ISBN 1-85770-306-5. 
  • Elleray, D. Robert (1981). The Victorian Churches of Sussex. Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd. ISBN 0-85033-378-4. 
  • Elleray, D. Robert (2004). Sussex Places of Worship. Worthing: Optimus Books. ISBN 0-9533132-7-1. 
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  • Whitman, Ken; Whitman, Joyce (1994). Ancient Churches of Sussex. Brighton: Roedale Books. ISBN 0-9522560-0-2.