List of places of worship in Eastbourne

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Eastbourne's stock of Anglican church buildings includes All Souls Church, a polychromatic Byzantine building with a prominent campanile, built by Alfred Strong in 1882.
The Salvation Army have citadels in the town centre and here at Downside.

The borough of Eastbourne, one of six local government districts in the English county of East Sussex, has around 40 extant churches and other places of worship. Several other former places of worship are still in existence but are no longer in religious use. The borough is on the English Channel coast and encompasses the town of Eastbourne and its suburbs. Until the late 18th century, the area was mostly farmland punctuated by four well-spread hamlets; but a fashionable seaside resort gradually developed from about 1780, based on a combination of royal patronage, a good climate, railway connections and the demands of rich visitors. Church-building rapidly followed; and although the town lacks the range of "worthwhile Victorian churches" found in seaside resorts such as Brighton and Bournemouth, a wide variety of architectural themes and denominations are represented.

Most residents of Eastbourne identify themselves as Christian, and churches representing many Christian denominations exist in the town. The largest number of these, including the town's oldest church, belong to the Church of England, the country's officially established church. Several Nonconformist and Roman Catholic churches were founded in the 19th century, while new churches were established on housing estates such as The Hydneye and Langney as the town grew inland. There are also Jewish and Muslim places of worship.

English Heritage has awarded listed status to several current and former church buildings in Eastbourne. A building is defined as "listed" when it is placed on a statutory register of buildings of "special architectural or historic interest" in accordance with the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990.[1] The Department for Culture, Media and Sport, a Government department, is responsible for this; English Heritage, a non-departmental public body, acts as an agency of the department to administer the process and advise the department on relevant issues.[2] There are three grades of listing status. Grade I, the highest, is defined as being of "exceptional interest"; Grade II* is used for "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and Grade II, the lowest, is used for buildings of "special interest".[3]

History of religious worship in Eastbourne[edit]

Eastbourne borough is a very small, pentagon-shaped area in the south of the county of East Sussex.
Eastbourne's location within East Sussex
St Saviour's Church, with its 176-foot (54 m) broach spire, "is accepted as the finest Victorian church in the town".[4]

The borough of Eastbourne covers 10,910 acres (4,420 ha) of the English Channel coast and its hinterland in southeast England.[5] The district of Wealden surrounds it to the west and north; the English Channel is to the east and south.[6] High cliffs, including Beachy Head, rise in the southwest corner.[7] The area was inhabited in the Stone Age, and a large Roman villa stood near the present-day Eastbourne Pier.[8] Four hamlets developed independently on the mainly agricultural land behind the cliffs: Meads, Seahouses, South Bourne and Bourne (also referred to as Old Town or East Bourne).[7][9][10] Farming, fishing and occasional smuggling were the main activities,[8] and religious worship was focused on Old Town's 12th-century St Mary the Virgin Church, a large flint and stone structure with later additions.[11] Sea-bathing and drinking seawater for medicinal reasons, popularised by Dr Richard Russell in nearby Brighton,[12] became popular in the late 18th century at Bourne's beach, and a visit by Prince Edward in 1780 encouraged tourism.[8] All the land in the area was owned by two rich families: the Davies-Gilberts and the Dukes of Devonshire. They oversaw the development of the town, ensured architectural harmony and encouraged the construction of a range of facilities appropriate to a growing, high-class town—from theatres and private schools to churches.[13] Unlike at Brighton, Worthing and other Sussex seaside resorts, development was slow and steady with periods of stability and inactivity.[14]

Into this quiet, high-class environment, with its libraries and expensive lodging-houses, came Canon Thomas Pitman—Vicar of Eastbourne for 62 years from 1828.[15][16] He recognised that the town needed a new Anglican church closer to the focus of seafront development, convinced William Cavendish, 7th Duke of Devonshire to donate land, and raised £2,500 (£196,000 as of 2014)[17] himself. The chapel of ease to St Mary the Virgin Church, designed by Decimus Burton and opened in 1838, later became Holy Trinity Church—modern Eastbourne's first Anglican church.[18][19] More churches were built throughout the Victorian era, especially in the town centre: Benjamin Ferrey's Christ Church opened in 1859;[20] St Saviour's Church was built eight years later on another tract of land donated by the Duke of Devonshire;[21] London-based architect A.P. Strong's multicoloured All Souls Church, funded by Lady Victoria Wellesley, opened in 1882;[22] and St Peter's Church (demolished in 1971) was built by Henry Currey in 1894 to replace a temporary church of 1878.[23] The Meads and Upperton suburbs were served by St John the Evangelist's Church (1869)[24] and St Anne's Church (1881)[25] respectively. The architectural quality of these churches has been described—notably by Nairn and Pevsner in the Buildings of England series of books—as inferior to that of other southern English seaside resorts, in particular Brighton and Bournemouth.[26] George Edmund Street's St Saviour's Church is considered the best by most architectural historians (including Pevsner and Goodhart-Rendel),[4][21][26][27] in particular because of its dominance of the townscape and the Spanish-influenced narrowing of the interior towards the chancel in order to emphasise that part of the building.[27] All Souls Church is "one of the most striking Victorian churches in Sussex" because of its enormous campanile, brightly coloured brickwork, intricate terracotta work and Italianate/Romanesque/Byzantine architecture.[22]

Eastbourne was ravaged by bombs during World War II—it was the worst hit town on the south coast of England—and several churches were damaged or destroyed.[28][29] St Anne's Church in Upperton was wrecked, and demolished without replacement in 1955;[30] only the tower of St John the Evangelist's Church in Meads survived;[31] a Junkers Ju 88 destroyed St Mary's Church at Hampden Park (again, apart from its bell tower) in 1940;[32] and the newly built St Elisabeth's Church on Victoria Drive was damaged.[30]

After the English Reformation, Roman Catholicism in the Eastbourne area faded away. Censuses in 1603, 1676, 1724 and 1780 recorded no recusants in the area, although a few still lived in nearby villages.[33] The Papists Act 1778 and Roman Catholic Relief Act 1791 removed many restrictions on their worship, education and legal rights.[34] A Mission was set up further along the coast at St Leonards in 1830 by three retired priests, and a permanent priest was put in charge of it in 1841. The Mission was responsible for Roman Catholic worship, pastoral care and administration across a large area of East Sussex, including Eastbourne. By 1862, the priest in charge stated that the town would soon needs its own Mission.[35] Nevertheless, Eastbourne's 19th-century Roman Catholic community developed slowly: in 1867, when Father Charles King moved to the town and started celebrating Mass in his house in Ceylon Place, he said that around five or six worshippers typically attended.[4] (Many coastguards based along the coast and soldiers passing through the town also practised the faith, though, so attendances may often have been higher.)[36] Stella Maris Church on Junction Road, an Early English-style brick structure built in 1868–69 for £450 (£35,000 as of 2014)),[17] became the congregation's first permanent place of worship.[4][31] The Early English-style brick building could hold 100 people, and was well-attended on its official opening day of 1 April 1869.[37] It closed in 1890 and was demolished three years later.[31] In 1890, a former covered market in Grove Road became Eastbourne's new Roman Catholic church,[38] but the building had some structural problems and the arrangement was intended to be temporary while land and funds for a permanent church were sought.[39] This took more than a decade, but a site was bought from the Duke of Devonshire and the first stone of Our Lady of Ransom Church was laid on 12 December 1900.[40] The parish was vast, covering the whole of Eastbourne and extending up to 8 miles (13 km) to Hailsham, Alfriston and Cuckmere Haven,[41] and by the 1950s daughter churches had been established in the east (St Agnes) and northwest (St Gregory) of Eastbourne and at Polegate and Hailsham. Another church was built later in the northern suburb of Hampden Park.[42]

Religious affiliation[edit]

According to the 2001 United Kingdom Census, 89,667 people lived in Eastbourne. Of these, 72.8% identified themselves as Christian, 0.98% were Muslim, 0.24% were Hindu, 0.05% were Sikh, 0.34% were Buddhist, 0.29% were Jewish, 0.46% followed another religion, 16.7% claimed no religious affiliation and 8.1% did not state their religion. The proportion of Christians was higher than the 72.8% in England as a whole, and affiliation with Buddhism and faiths in the "any other religion" category was also more widespread. The proportion of people with no religious affiliation was also higher than the national figure of 14.6%. The other religions had much lower proportions of followers than in England overall: the corresponding national percentages were 3.1% for Islam, 1.11% for Hinduism, 0.67% for Sikhism and 0.52% for Judaism.[43]

Administration[edit]

All Anglican churches in the borough of Eastbourne are part of the Diocese of Chichester, whose cathedral is at Chichester in West Sussex.[44] The Rural Deanery of Eastbourne—one of eight deaneries in the Archdeaconry of Lewes and Hastings, which is in turn one of three archdeaconries in the diocese[45]—covers the whole borough and parts of neighbouring districts.[46]

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Arundel and Brighton, whose cathedral is at Arundel,[47] administers Eastbourne's five Roman Catholic churches. Eastbourne Deanery, one of 13 deaneries in the diocese,[48] has five parishes: Eastbourne parish includes the churches of Our Lady of Ransom, St Gregory and St Agnes, and Langney's Christ the King Church is part of a joint parish with St Joachim's Church in Hampden Park and a chapel at Pevensey Bay in Wealden district. The other three parishes cover Hailsham and Polegate in Wealden, Newhaven in Lewes district and Seaford in Lewes district.[49]

Eastbourne's four United Reformed congregations—St Andrew's Church in the town centre,[50] St Barnabas' Church in Langney,[51] St Luke's Church in Hampden Park[52] and Upperton United Reformed Church[53]—are in the Southern Synod, one of 13 Synods in Great Britain.[54] The Synod is responsible for about 170 United Reformed churches in Kent, East Sussex, West Sussex and parts of Surrey.[55] St Luke's Church has been demolished, and its congregation uses St Stephen's Methodist Church (now renamed the Broadway United Church).[56][57]

In September 2007, the United Reformed and Methodist churches in a large area of central Sussex came together to form a joint administrative group, the Central Sussex United Area.[58] All of Eastbourne's churches of those denominations, including the Broadway United Church, are members of the group, as is The Haven Church—an ecumenical partnership between the Methodist and Anglican churches which meets at a school at Sovereign Harbour.[57][59]

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Eastbourne is part of the Crawley Stake. The congregation was constituted as a branch in the 1960s. When the chapel was opened in 2001, the branch became a Ward within the Stake.[60]

Open places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
St Mary the Virgin Church St Mary the Virgin's Church, Church Street, Old Town, Eastbourne (NHLE Code 1293915) (October 2012, from Northwest).JPG Old Town
50°46′22″N 0°15′57″E / 50.7727°N 0.2657°E / 50.7727; 0.2657 (St Mary the Virgin Church, Old Town, Eastbourne)
Anglican I A Saxon place of worship dedicated to St Michael was superseded by this flint and stone Norman-era building. Eastbourne's oldest church has nave bays, a chancel arch and arcades dating from about 1200 and a 14th-century exterior. Sedilia, piscina and screens are of the same vintage, and dozens of memorials commemorate important residents. [61][62]
[11][63]
[64][65]
[66][67]
[68]
All Souls Church All Souls Church, Susan's Road, Eastbourne (NHLE Code 1353105) (October 2012).jpg Eastbourne
50°46′13″N 0°17′17″E / 50.7703°N 0.2881°E / 50.7703; 0.2881 (All Souls Church, Eastbourne)
Anglican II* Alfred Strong's church of 1882 combines the Italianate, Byzantine and Romanesque styles and has a tall campanile and decorative apse. Inside, Byzantine-style capitals top the columns in the arcades. The exterior is of red, white and yellow brick and terracotta. The nave has seven bays, and there are chancel and apse arches. [26][30]
[69][70]
[71][72]
[73]
Holy Trinity Church Holy Trinity Church, Trinity Trees, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Eastbourne
50°46′01″N 0°17′17″E / 50.7669°N 0.2881°E / 50.7669; 0.2881 (Holy Trinity Church, Eastbourne)
Anglican II* Between 1837 and 1839, Decimus Burton built a chapel of ease to St Mary the Virgin Church on the road between South Bourne and Seahouses. Aisles and the east end of the chancel were added in 1855 and 1861 respectively. The Early English-style flint church was parished in 1847. [7][30]
[18][74]
[75][76]
[61][77]
St Saviour's Church St Saviour's Church, South Street, Eastbourne (NHLE Code 1190569) (October 2012).jpg Eastbourne
50°45′57″N 0°16′58″E / 50.7659°N 0.2829°E / 50.7659; 0.2829 (St Saviour's Church, Eastbourne)
Anglican II* George Edmund Street's "noble church" was built on a turnip field granted to the town by the Duke of Devonshire. Founded in 1865, the red brick and ashlar building was completed in 1868. The whole church is tall, but the broach spire—the tallest in Eastbourne, and atop a tower which is barely attached to the north aisle—is the dominant feature. Details include diapering of the nave walls, mosaics and a tiled floor inside. [31][76]
[75][78]
[21][79]
[80][81]
[82]
All Saints Church All Saints Church, Eastbourne (IoE Code 293540).JPG Eastbourne
50°45′43″N 0°16′47″E / 50.7619°N 0.2796°E / 50.7619; 0.2796 (All Saints Church, Eastbourne)
Anglican II T.E.C. Streatfield built this Gothic Revival church of Kentish ragstone between 1878 and 1880. The foundation stone was laid on 1 November 1877. The nave was destroyed by fire in 1927 and had to be rebuilt. A tower with a cap-style spire stands at the northwest corner. [26][75]
[30][83]
[84][85]
Christ Church Christ Church, Seaside, Eastbourne (IoE Code 293599).JPG Roselands
50°46′27″N 0°17′49″E / 50.7743°N 0.2969°E / 50.7743; 0.2969 (Christ Church, Roselands)
Anglican II Eastbourne's "fishermen's church" was designed by Benjamin Ferrey in 1859. Early visitors included Princess Alice and Lewis Carroll, who preached there under his real name of Reverend Charles Dodgson. The Gothic Revival flint church was altered in 1870, a chancel was added in 1879, and G.H. Shackle's elaborate war memorial chapel dates from 1922. The tower took nine years to complete. [26][30]
[75][82]
[20][86]
[87]
St Elisabeth's Church St Elisabeth's Church (Present Building), Eastbourbe.jpg Downside
50°47′00″N 0°15′17″E / 50.7834°N 0.2547°E / 50.7834; 0.2547 (St Elisabeth's Church (present building), Downside)
Anglican II After the 1930s church was condemned and declared redundant, the congregation moved to the adjacent church hall (built in the Neo-Georgian style at the same time as the old church) and converted it into a place of worship. It opened as a combined church and community centre in July 2004, and structural additions are planned. [88][89]
[90]
St Mary the Virgin Church St Mary's Church, Hampden Park, Eastbourne (IoE Code 470628).jpg Hampden Park
50°47′49″N 0°16′18″E / 50.7969°N 0.2717°E / 50.7969; 0.2717 (St Mary's Church, Hampden Park)
Anglican II Hampden Park's first church was a chapel of ease to Willingdon, built in a Vernacular style in 1908. The bombed building was replaced by Edward Maufe's simplified Perpendicular Gothic church of 1952–54, which became one of the first postwar buildings to be listed. It has white-painted brickwork, a low tower and a small bell tower. [91][92]
[93]
[94]
St Michael and All Angels Church St Michael and All Angels Church, Eastbourne (IoE Code 293636).jpg Ocklynge
50°46′42″N 0°15′52″E / 50.7784°N 0.2644°E / 50.7784; 0.2644 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Ocklynge)
Anglican II G.E.S. Streatfield's large Decorated Gothic church, of flint and with a tower at the west end, is early 20th-century. The chancel, Lady chapel and vestry were built in 1901; a temporary metal structure served as the nave until 1911, when a permanent nave with aisles replaced it. The roof is of slate from Westmorland. [26][31]
[75][95]
St Andrew's Church St Andrew's Church, Seaside, Eastbourne.JPG Norway
50°47′00″N 0°18′16″E / 50.7834°N 0.3045°E / 50.7834; 0.3045 (St Andrew's Church, Norway)
Anglican "Norway Hamlet" in the east end of Eastbourne had no place of worship until a schoolroom was used from October 1881. In 1885, a tin tabernacle previously used by Baptists became available and was re-erected at Norway and dedicated to St Andrew. A permanent church was built by W.H. Murray in 1911–12; the Perpendicular-style red brick and stone structure has an apse and a seven-bay nave. [26][30]
[75][96]
St John the Evangelist's Church St John the Evangelist's Church, Meads, Eastbourne.JPG Meads
50°45′29″N 0°16′20″E / 50.7580°N 0.2723°E / 50.7580; 0.2723 (St John the Evangelist's Church, Meads)
Anglican The mostly modern appearance of Meads's Anglican church is a result of World War II bombing: all but the tower of H. Ewan Rumble's 1869 Decorated Gothic building was destroyed by Messerschmitt Bf 109s on 4 May 1942. The War Damage Commission funded R. Munch and A. Matthew's rebuilding work of 1955–57, which featured a glazed baptistery. The tower became a free-standing campanile. [26][31]
[75][97]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, The Hydneye, Hampden Park, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Hydneye
50°48′01″N 0°17′00″E / 50.8002°N 0.2834°E / 50.8002; 0.2834 (St Peter's Church, Hydneye)
Anglican This combined church and hall, of brick and with a tall roof, was built on the Hydneye estate in the early 1970s to replace the former St Peter's Church in Meads, an 1894 building which became redundant and was demolished in 1971. Some stained glass by Charles Eamer Kempe was retrieved from it and installed in the new church. [69][98]
St Philip's Church St Philip's Church Hall, Eastbourne.JPG Roselands
50°46′38″N 0°17′27″E / 50.7772°N 0.2907°E / 50.7772; 0.2907 (St Philip's Church, Roselands)
Anglican Structural faults in the original church with this dedication, designed by Charles Powell in 1903, caused its demolition in 2004. The church hall was rebuilt for worship in 2006. The Gothic Revival church had yellow and red brickwork and five lancet windows. The present church is part of Christ Church's parish. [31][99]
[100]
St Richard's Church St Richard's Church, Etchingham Road, Langney, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Langney
50°47′45″N 0°18′52″E / 50.7957°N 0.3144°E / 50.7957; 0.3144 (St Richard's Church, Langney)
Anglican Since 1956, the Anglican community in the Langney estate has been served by H. Hubbard Ford and Hugh Wilson's brick hall-style church with later extensions. There are some stained glass windows, and the foundation stone was made of rubble from the demolished St Anne's Church. [30][75]
[101][102]
Eastbourne Evangelical Free Church Eastbourne Evangelical Free Church.jpg Old Town
50°46′21″N 0°15′34″E / 50.7724°N 0.2595°E / 50.7724; 0.2595 (Eastbourne Evangelical Free Church, Old Town)
Evangelical The Victoria Gospel Hall was founded at the bottom of Victoria Drive in the 1920s. The red-brick building was later extended to the west and became an Evangelical church. [103][104]
Gateway Christian Church Frenchgate Christian Centre, Hydneye, Eastbourne.jpg Hydneye
50°48′00″N 0°16′47″E / 50.8001°N 0.2797°E / 50.8001; 0.2797 (Frenchgate Christian Centre, Hydneye)
Evangelical Frenchgate Chapel was registered for worship by Open Brethren in July 1968. It later became an Evangelical fellowship and community church. In 2011, the congregation merged with that of Edgmond Church in the Old Town. After this building is rebuilt and extended, it will become the centre of worship for both congregations under its new name. The two congregations currently meet at The Causeway school, whilst funds are raised to rebuild and extend. [105][106]
[107][108]
Kings Church Kings Church, Hampden Park, Eastbourne.jpg Hampden Park
50°47′45″N 0°17′12″E / 50.7958°N 0.2866°E / 50.7958; 0.2866 (Kings Church, Hampden Park)
Evangelical This large Evangelical church, part of the Newfrontiers movement, is based in a multipurpose conference centre. [109][110]
[111]
Living Stones Community Church Living Stones Community Church, Old Town, Eastbourne.JPG Old Town
50°46′29″N 0°16′00″E / 50.7746°N 0.2667°E / 50.7746; 0.2667 (Living Stones Community Church, Old Town)
Evangelical This Evangelical Christian community worships at Community Wise, a youth and community centre which was built in 1964 by the YWCA. That association sold the building in 2000, and staff and others set up a trust to buy the premises, which were then refurbished. [112][113]
[114][115]
Old Town Community Church Old Town Community Centre and Church, Eastbourne.jpg Old Town
50°46′48″N 0°15′15″E / 50.7801°N 0.2543°E / 50.7801; 0.2543 (Old Town Community Church)
Evangelical Founded in 1994 as an offshoot of the nearby Living Stones Community Church, this congregation worships in the Old Town Community Centre on Central Drive. The church is a member of the Evangelical Alliance. [116][117]
St Anthony's Centre St Anthony's Church Centre, Eastbourne.JPG St Anthony's Hill
50°47′20″N 0°18′36″E / 50.7890°N 0.3101°E / 50.7890; 0.3101 (St Anthony's Centre, St Anthony's Hill)
Evangelical This combined worship and community building was opened in September 2006 by the Eastbourne Community Church, which also uses the Bridgemere Centre on the Bridgemere housing estate. The congregation was founded in 1990 and merged with the former St Anthony's Church in 2004. [118][119]
[120][121]
Our Lady of Ransom Church Our Lady of Ransom RC Church, Grange Road, Eastbourne (NHLE Code 1385905) (October 2012, from North).JPG Eastbourne
50°45′58″N 0°16′40″E / 50.7661°N 0.2778°E / 50.7661; 0.2778 (Our Lady of Ransom Church, Eastbourne)
Roman Catholic II Frederick Walters designed this Roman Catholic church in the Decorated Gothic style in 1900–01. The Bath Stone and ashlar exterior conceals an impressively elaborate interior. Additions included a tower with a steeple in 1912, additional chapels in 1920 and a baptistery in 1967 (by architect A.J. McDonough). [26][30]
[122][123]
[124][125]
Christ the King Church Christ the King RC Church, Langney Road, Langney, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Langney
50°47′33″N 0°18′53″E / 50.7924°N 0.3148°E / 50.7924; 0.3148 (Christ the King Church, Langney)
Roman Catholic Mass was celebrated in Langney Village Hall by the priest from St Agnes' Church from 1959 until 1967, when Henry Bingham Towner designed and built a permanent church. The low Modernist building is of local dark brick and concrete. [30][126]
[127]
St Agnes' Church St Agnes RC Church, Eastbourne.JPG Roselands
50°46′39″N 0°17′48″E / 50.7774°N 0.2968°E / 50.7774; 0.2968 (St Agnes' Church, Roselands)
Roman Catholic P.D. Stonham's Early English red-brick and stone building was founded in September 1906 and opened six months later. The church was parished between 1957, when it was split from Our Lady of Ransom, and 1999. Mass centres served from St Agnes (later replaced by permanent churches) opened at Langney and Pevensey Bay in 1959. [30][128]
[129][130]
St Gregory's Church St Gregory's RC Church (Present Building), Victoria Drive, Downside, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Downside
50°46′57″N 0°15′15″E / 50.7825°N 0.2541°E / 50.7825; 0.2541 (St Gregory's Church (present building), Downside)
Roman Catholic The dedication of McDonough and Robins's 1965 Modernist church recalls the ancient chantry chapel of St Gregory in Meads, first documented in 1239 and now lost. The yellow brick and concrete building, with a prominent circular baptistery of glass and flint, cost £43,000 and replaced the adjacent timber hut used for Masses since 1934. English Heritage called it a "bold modern design". [30][131]
[132][133]
St Joachim's Church St Joachim's RC Church, Hampden Park, Eastbourne.jpg Hampden Park
50°48′03″N 0°16′38″E / 50.8008°N 0.2773°E / 50.8008; 0.2773 (St Joachim's Church, Hampden Park)
Roman Catholic Hampden Park's Roman Catholics worshipped at St Gregory's Church or at Polegate until the latter's priest paid £3,632 for land on Broderick Road and founded a church there. Built between June 1959 and April 1960 and parished from June 1960, the church was reunited with Polegate's parish in 1999. [134][135]
Central Methodist Church Central Methodist Church, Pevensey Road, Eastbourne (NHLE Code 1268358) (October 2012).jpg Eastbourne
50°46′08″N 0°17′20″E / 50.7689°N 0.2888°E / 50.7689; 0.2888 (Central Methodist Church, Eastbourne)
Methodist/Baptist II Unusually for an early 20th-century Nonconformist church, Carlos Crisford's 1907–08 building is in the Decorated Gothic style and has a steeple. It replaced a similar building of 1863–64 on the same site, which had succeeded a chapel founded in 1809 in Grove Road. The present church was built with attached schoolrooms, which survive on the Langney Road façade. As of 2014, the congregation of the former Ceylon Place Baptist Church shares the church. [103][136]
[76][137]
[138][139]
[140]
Greenfield Methodist Church Greenfield Methodist Church, Eastbourne.jpg Old Town
50°46′22″N 0°15′43″E / 50.7728°N 0.2620°E / 50.7728; 0.2620 (Greenfield Methodist Church, Old Town)
Methodist The Old Town's Methodist community worship in an 1898 church with later extensions. It was built of red brick in the Early English style. There are stone drip-moulds. [103][141]
[142]
Broadway United Church Broadway United Church, Hampden Park, Eastbourne.jpg Hampden Park
50°47′57″N 0°15′57″E / 50.7993°N 0.2658°E / 50.7993; 0.2658 (St Stephen's Church, Hampden Park)
Methodist/United Reformed Church The Methodist community's former St Stephen's Church is now united with Hampden Park's United Reformed Church community, whose St Luke's Church has been demolished. The new name reflects this union. The red-brick building dates from 1960. [57][103]
[143]
St Andrew's Church St Andrew's United Reformed Church, Blackwater Road, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Eastbourne
50°45′54″N 0°17′05″E / 50.7649°N 0.2846°E / 50.7649; 0.2846 (St Andrew's United Reformed Church, Eastbourne)
United Reformed Church F.J. Barker designed this church in 1878 for the Presbyterian community—now part of the United Reformed Church. The cruciform Early English-style red-brick building has good interior decoration, and exterior embellishments include a flèche. [31][76]
[138][144]
St Barnabas Church St Barnabas United Church, Kingfisher Drive, Langney, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Langney
50°48′10″N 0°18′07″E / 50.8028°N 0.3019°E / 50.8028; 0.3019 (St Barnabas United Reformed Church, Langney)
United Reformed Church This was built in 1975–76 to serve the rapidly growing population of the Langney estate. Money came from an anonymous donor and the sale of a dilapidated former Congregational church of 1862 in Pevensey Road—part of town which had lost its residential character. [31][145]
[146][147]
Upperton United Reformed Church Upperton United Reformed Church, Upperton Road, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Upperton
50°46′28″N 0°16′10″E / 50.7745°N 0.2695°E / 50.7745; 0.2695 (Upperton United Reformed Church)
United Reformed Church In 1901, this turreted red-brick and stone Decorated Gothic church replaced the neighbouring chapel, which became the church hall. The foundation stone was laid on 19 April 1899 and an official opening ceremony was held on 23 May 1900. The final cost was £5,600 (£530,000 as of 2014). [31][148]
[149][17]
[150]
Salvation Army Citadel Salvation Army Citadel, Langney Road, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Eastbourne
50°46′17″N 0°17′33″E / 50.7714°N 0.2926°E / 50.7714; 0.2926 (Salvation Army Citadel, Eastbourne)
Salvation Army Anti-Salvation Army feeling in the late 19th century, when the group founded their citadel in Langney Road, culminated in disturbances involving thousands of residents and the formation of the town's police force. J.W. Durnford designed the red-brick building, with its distinctive painted battlements, in 1890. [103][151]
[152]
Salvation Army Hall Salvation Army Citadel, Downside, Eastbourne.jpg Downside
50°46′47″N 0°15′00″E / 50.7797°N 0.2501°E / 50.7797; 0.2501 (Salvation Army Hall, Downside)
Salvation Army This red-brick hall, used for Salvation Army worship, was designed by architect Oswald Archer. It opened in 1935 and serves the west side of the town. Another had opened three years earlier nearby, but no longer exists. The building was registered for marriages in February 1936. [103][153]
[154][155]
Victoria Baptist Church Victoria Baptist Church, Eastbourne.jpg Downside
50°46′47″N 0°15′37″E / 50.7798°N 0.2604°E / 50.7798; 0.2604 (Victoria Baptist Church, Downside)
Baptist Baptist worship in Eastbourne was established in 1870 by Charles Spurgeon, a church was founded at Ceylon Place in 1871, and a second was built in the Old Town in 1925–26. A 1.5-acre (0.61 ha) site on Eldon Road was bought in 1960, and a new 560-capacity church (square, with a lantern-style spire) opened on 23 June 1973. [31][156]
[157]
Suncoast Church Suncoast Church, 3 Courtlands Road, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Eastbourne
50°46′42″N 0°17′18″E / 50.7782°N 0.2884°E / 50.7782; 0.2884 (Suncoast Church, Eastbourne)
Christian Outreach Centre This congregation is part of the evangelical Christian Outreach Centre movement. It is based in a building in the Courtlands Road industrial area. Previously, a building at Kilburn Terrace had been registered for worship and marriages from July 1996. [158][159]
[160]
[161]
First Church of Christ, Scientist First Church of Christ Scientist, Eastbourne.jpg Eastbourne
50°45′57″N 0°16′55″E / 50.7657°N 0.2820°E / 50.7657; 0.2820 (First Church of Christ Scientist, Eastbourne)
Christian Scientist This church has stood on Spencer Road opposite St Saviour's Church since 1922, but its present appearance is attributable to local architectural firm Benz and Williams's refurbishment of 1975–79. It is built on to the side of the neighbouring house. [94][103]
[162]
South Street Free Church South Street Free Church, South Street, Eastbourne (NHLE Code 1393286) (October 2012).jpg Eastbourne
50°46′00″N 0°16′46″E / 50.7666°N 0.2795°E / 50.7666; 0.2795 (South Street Free Church, Eastbourne)
Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion II Henry Ward's Congregational church of 1903 now has an Evangelical congregation which is part of the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion denomination. The church, of red brick with stone banding and dressings, was listed by English Heritage in May 2009. The "Free Gothic"-style structure stands on the site of a blacksmith's forge. In 1908, a local undertakers firm built their premises in a similar style adjoining the church's west wall. [76][103]
[163][164]
[165][166]
Elim Family Church Elim Pentecostal Church, Eastbourne.jpg Upperton
50°46′17″N 0°16′37″E / 50.7714°N 0.2770°E / 50.7714; 0.2770 (Elim Family Church, Upperton)
Elim Foursquare Gospel Alliance The Elim Pentecostal church is now based in a complex of retirement flats on the site of the original church—a painted brick building with a gabled roof and a pediment over the entrance. The 1929 building was demolished in 2006–2007, and the flats (owned by the church) and a nursery school were built above a 230-capacity worship space between 2007 and 2008. [103][167]
[168]
St Panteleimon and St Theodore Church St Panteleimon and St Theodore Greek Orthodox Church, Cavendish Place, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Eastbourne
50°46′08″N 0°17′28″E / 50.7689°N 0.2912°E / 50.7689; 0.2912 (St Panteleimon and St Theodore Church, Eastbourne)
Greek Orthodox Cavendish Place Calvinistic Independent Chapel, founded by a local farmer, was opened in 1857 to replace a converted stable used for worship by Calvinists since 1823. It closed in 1985, and in 1990 the Gothic-style building was sold to the Greek Orthodox Church. The exterior is rendered. [31][169]
[170][171]
Kingdom Hall Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses, Brodrick Road, Hampden Park, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Hampden Park
50°48′06″N 0°16′37″E / 50.8016°N 0.2770°E / 50.8016; 0.2770 (Jehovah's Witnesses Kingdom Hall, Hampden Park)
Jehovah's Witnesses This building on Brodrick Road was registered for marriages in March 1985 and is used by four Eastbourne-based Congregations of Jehovah's Witnesses: Hampden Park, Langney, Old Town and Seaside. [172][173]
[174][175]
[176]
Eastbourne Hebrew Congregation Synagogue Eastbourne Hebrew Congregation Synagogue.jpg Eastbourne
50°46′10″N 0°17′18″E / 50.7694°N 0.2883°E / 50.7694; 0.2883 (Eastbourne Hebrew Congregation Synagogue)
Jewish Orthodox This synagogue is based in Susans Road in the town centre. Provision for Jewish burials is also made at the Eastbourne Borough Cemetery, where an area has been set aside. [177][178]
[179]
Eastbourne Ward Meetinghouse Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Eastbourne.JPG Eastbourne
50°45′57″N 0°16′47″E / 50.7658°N 0.2798°E / 50.7658; 0.2798 (Meetinghouse of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Eastbourne)
Latter-day Saint A branch was founded for Eastbourne's Latter-day Saint followers in 1968, although worship had taken place since the late 1950s. Various halls, houses and hotels were used, and worshippers also travelled to Brighton or Hastings. A former theological college, built in 1874, was bought in 2000 and became a meetinghouse in October 2001, when Eastbourne Ward was formed. [60][180]
Eastbourne Islamic Cultural Centre and Mosque Eastbourne Islamic Cultural Centre and Mosque, Ashford Square, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Eastbourne
50°46′22″N 0°17′13″E / 50.7727°N 0.2869°E / 50.7727; 0.2869 (Eastbourne Islamic Cultural Centre and Mosque)
Muslim This long single-storey building was originally an office. In 1953, four years after it was built, SEEBOARD turned it into a social club for its employees. Eastbourne's Muslim community acquired it in 1995 and it became a 50-capacity mosque and social centre. Planning permission for a new 300-capacity two-storey mosque was refused in 2004. [181]
Eastbourne Christian Prayer Centre Eastbourne Christian Prayer Centre, Lismore Road, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Eastbourne
50°46′04″N 0°17′16″E / 50.7677°N 0.2877°E / 50.7677; 0.2877 (Eastbourne Christian Prayer Centre)
Non-denominational Revival—a non-denominational, evangelical-based Christian media group founded in 1952—operate from this small red-brick town-centre building. It is used as a place of worship and meditation, drop-in centre, prayer ministry, broadcasting centre and a recording studio. The building was registered for worship as the Lismore Road Room between 1933 and 1967. [182][183]
[184][185]
[186][187]
Marine Hall Marine Hall (Brethren Meeting Room), Seaside, Eastbourne.JPG Eastbourne
50°46′20″N 0°17′43″E / 50.7722°N 0.2954°E / 50.7722; 0.2954 (Marine Hall, Eastbourne)
Open Brethren This gospel hall, a Christian (Open) Brethren place of worship, stands on Seaside east of Eastbourne town centre. [188][189]
[190]
Friends Meeting House Friends Meeting House, Wish Road, Eastbourne (October 2012, from Northwest).JPG Eastbourne
50°45′55″N 0°17′04″E / 50.7654°N 0.2844°E / 50.7654; 0.2844 (Friends Meeting House, Eastbourne)
Quaker Eastbourne's Quaker community worship in a modern building near the town centre. The 90-capacity premises are made available to other organisations as well. [191][192]
Eastbourne Christian Spiritualist Church Eastbourne Christian Spiritualist Church.JPG Eastbourne
50°46′22″N 0°17′21″E / 50.7727°N 0.2892°E / 50.7727; 0.2892 (Eastbourne Christian Spiritualist Church)
Spiritualist Part of a building on Cavendish Avenue is registered for Spiritualist services. [193][194]
Grove Road Strict Baptist Church Grove Road Strict Baptist Church, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Eastbourne
50°46′05″N 0°16′47″E / 50.7680°N 0.2796°E / 50.7680; 0.2796 (Grove Road Strict Baptist Chapel, Eastbourne)
Strict Baptist J.J. Skinner's 1881 red brick and stone chapel replaced an earlier Strict Baptist place of worship, Marsh Chapel, which was founded in the first few years of the 19th century. Reordering was carried out inside in 2002. The church is aligned with the Gospel Standard movement. [31][195]
[196][197]

Closed or disused places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
Beamsley Methodist Church Beamsley Hall (Former Methodist Chapel), Eastbourne.JPG Eastbourne
50°46′36″N 0°17′55″E / 50.7767°N 0.2987°E / 50.7767; 0.2987 (Former Beamsley Methodist Church, Eastbourne)
Methodist This combined church and school was in use by Methodists for less than 20 years: it was built in 1886 and sold to Christ Church in 1904. It is no longer in religious use. The school was in the basement of the red-brick Gothic Revival building, which is now painted over. [103]
Wish Hill Methodist Church Former Wish Hill Methodist Chapel, Lower Willingdon, Eastbourne.JPG Lower Willingdon
50°47′47″N 0°15′10″E / 50.7965°N 0.2527°E / 50.7965; 0.2527 (Former Wish Hill Methodist Church, Lower Willingdon)
Methodist This building is now used as the headquarters of the Beachy Head Chaplaincy, whose volunteers patrol the cliffs at the infamous suicide location and offer support and counselling. [198]
St Elisabeth's Church (original building) St Elisabeth's Church, Eastbourne (IoE Code 293633).jpg Downside
50°46′59″N 0°15′18″E / 50.7831°N 0.2549°E / 50.7831; 0.2549 (St Elisabeth's Church (original building), Downside)
Anglican II Peter Dulvey Stonham's gigantic unadorned Gothic red-brick church was founded in 1935 and consecrated on 19 February 1938. Eastbourne was well provided with Anglican churches, but the will of its reclusive donor stipulated her £80,000 had to be spent in the town—so the diocese's desire to build new churches in Brighton with the legacy was unfulfilled. Design faults in the construction of walls and roof affected the structural integrity, and the church has been declared redundant. The adjacent parish hall is now used for worship. [30][88]
[199][200]
Ceylon Place Baptist Church Former Ceylon Place Baptist Church, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Eastbourne
50°46′11″N 0°17′31″E / 50.7696°N 0.2919°E / 50.7696; 0.2919 (Former Ceylon Place Baptist Church, Eastbourne)
Baptist The first church on the site, an iron chapel erected in 1871, was given to the Anglican community in 1885 when J. Wills built a permanent replacement. The brick and Bath Stone Early English-style church has a corner tower. World War II bomb damage closed it for five years; it reopened in 1948, but was sold in 2005 for conversion into flats. The congregation meets at Central Methodist Church but expects to move to a new building. [31][146]
[136][201]
[202]
Upperton Congregational Church Former Upperton Congregational Church, Eastbourne.jpg Upperton
50°46′28″N 0°16′09″E / 50.7745°N 0.2693°E / 50.7745; 0.2693 (Upperton Congregational Church (original building))
Congregational Congregationalism in Eastbourne originated with services at a hall in 1862, and the town's second permanent Congregational church was built for £1,135 in 1885 in the newly developed Upperton area. When the present church was built next to it in 1901, the brick building became a church hall and lecture theatre. Since 2008 it has housed the Eastbourne Montessori Nursery School. [149][203]
[204]
Edgmond Evangelical Church Edgmond Evangelical Church (now closed), Church Road, Old Town, Eastbourne (October 2012).JPG Old Town
50°46′20″N 0°15′51″E / 50.7722°N 0.2641°E / 50.7722; 0.2641 (Edgmond Evangelical Church, Old Town)
Evangelical Edgmond Hall was built as Eastbourne's excise office in about 1840, but was converted to an Open Brethren church in 1872 by William Brodie. The stucco-faced Neoclassical building was extended and taken over by an Evangelical congregation in 1993, but they sold it in 2011 and merged with the Frenchgate church on the Hydneye estate. [103][205]
[206][207]
Bourne Hall Bourne Hall, Eastbourne.jpg Eastbourne
50°46′12″N 0°17′33″E / 50.7701°N 0.2926°E / 50.7701; 0.2926 (Bourne Hall, Eastbourne)
Plymouth Brethren This small building, on Bourne Street in central Eastbourne, was used by town's Plymouth Brethren community but has been sold and now houses a company offering private tuition. [208][209]
[210]
St Gregory's Church (original building) St Gregory's Church (Original Timber Building), Eastbourne.jpg Downside
50°46′58″N 0°15′15″E / 50.7827°N 0.2541°E / 50.7827; 0.2541 (St Gregory's Church (original building), Downside)
Roman Catholic The first Roman Catholic place of worship in the northwest suburbs of Eastbourne was this small painted wooden chapel, built for £1,000 in 1934. The new St Gregory's Church was built on adjacent land in 1965, and the timber building became a hall and later a Montessori nursery school. [30][211]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

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  2. ^ "History of English Heritage". English Heritage. 2010. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  3. ^ "What does Listing mean?". English Heritage. 2008. Retrieved 29 March 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c d Surtees 2002, p. 45.
  5. ^ "Area: Eastbourne (Local Authority) – Population Density (UV02)". "Neighbourhood Statistics" website. Office for National Statistics. 18 November 2004. Retrieved 29 March 2010. 
  6. ^ "Boundary Commission for England: Provisional Recommendations for East Sussex and Brighton and Hove" (GIF). Boundary Commission for England map of East Sussex and Brighton and Hove. Office for National Statistics. 2000. Retrieved 29 March 2010. [dead link]
  7. ^ a b c Lewis, Samuel (ed) (1848). "A Topographical Dictionary of England: Earnshill – Eastbourne". British History Online. pp. 124–127. Retrieved 29 March 2010. 
  8. ^ a b c Surtees & Taylor 2005, p. 7.
  9. ^ Berry & Gordon 1996, p. 5.
  10. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 483.
  11. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 483–484.
  12. ^ Carder 1990, §161.
  13. ^ Surtees & Taylor 2005, pp. 7–8.
  14. ^ Elleray 1978, Introduction.
  15. ^ Elleray 1978, §132.
  16. ^ Surtees 2002, pp. 11, 14.
  17. ^ a b c UK CPI inflation numbers based on data available from Gregory Clark (2014), "What Were the British Earnings and Prices Then? (New Series)" MeasuringWorth.
  18. ^ a b Elleray 1978, §133.
  19. ^ Surtees 2002, pp. 15–16.
  20. ^ a b Elleray 1978, §134.
  21. ^ a b c Elleray 1978, §137.
  22. ^ a b Elleray 1978, §139.
  23. ^ Elleray 1978, §142.
  24. ^ Elleray 1978, §135.
  25. ^ Elleray 1978, §141.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 486.
  27. ^ a b Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 65.
  28. ^ Wilton 1999, Introduction.
  29. ^ Surtees 2002, p. 96.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Elleray 2004, p. 20.
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Elleray 2004, p. 21.
  32. ^ Surtees 2002, p. 102.
  33. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 11.
  34. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 12.
  35. ^ Kennedy 2001, pp. 13–14.
  36. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 18.
  37. ^ Kennedy 2001, pp. 23–25.
  38. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 37.
  39. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 51.
  40. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 79.
  41. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 73.
  42. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 135.
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  44. ^ "A little bit of history". Diocese of Chichester. 2012. Archived from the original on 19 January 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  45. ^ "Deaneries in the Diocese of Chichester". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  46. ^ "Rural Deanery of Eastbourne". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  47. ^ "Arundel Cathedral Parish". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2009. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  48. ^ "Deaneries of the Diocese". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2009. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  49. ^ "Eastbourne Deanery". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2009. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  50. ^ "St Andrew's". The United Reformed Church. 2008. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  51. ^ "St Barnabas United Church". The United Reformed Church. 2008. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  52. ^ "St Luke's". The United Reformed Church. 2008. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  53. ^ "Upperton". The United Reformed Church. 2008. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
  54. ^ "Other URC Synods". URC Southern Synod. 10 August 2009. Retrieved 31 March 2010. [dead link]
  55. ^ "Welcome To The URC Southern Synod Website". URC Southern Synod. 10 August 2009. Retrieved 31 March 2010. [dead link]
  56. ^ "St Luke's United Reformed Church, Elm Grove, Eastbourne: Demolition of existing church and erection of a terrace of four three-bedroom houses (EB/2006/0923(FP), Hampden Park)" (PDF). Eastbourne Borough planning application EB/2006/0923: Officer's report. Eastbourne Borough Council. 7 February 2007. Retrieved 31 March 2010. 
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  58. ^ "About Us". Central Sussex United Area of the Methodist Church and the United Reformed Church. 2009. Retrieved 7 April 2010. 
  59. ^ "About Us – The Haven Church". The Haven Church, Sovereign Harbour. 2009. Retrieved 7 April 2010. 
  60. ^ a b Anon. 2002, pp. 19–20.
  61. ^ a b Surtees & Taylor 2005, p. 80.
  62. ^ Surtees 2002, pp. 24, 31–33.
  63. ^ Salter 2000, p. 29.
  64. ^ Elleray 1978, §§16–18.
  65. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Church of St Mary, Church Street, Old Town, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 7 October 2010. 
  66. ^ Berry & Gordon 1996, p. 58.
  67. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 97.
  68. ^ Whiteman & Whiteman 1998, pp. 56–57.
  69. ^ a b Surtees & Taylor 2005, p. 82.
  70. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of All Souls, Susan's Road, Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  71. ^ Berry & Gordon 1996, p. 57.
  72. ^ Elleray 1978, §§139, 140.
  73. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 143.
  74. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of Holy Trinity, Seaside Road, Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 29 March 2010. 
  75. ^ a b c d e f g h Salter 2000, p. 76.
  76. ^ a b c d e Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 487.
  77. ^ Berry & Gordon 1996, p. 64.
  78. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Saviour, South Street, Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  79. ^ Berry & Gordon 1996, p. 61.
  80. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, pp. 63, 104.
  81. ^ Watney 2007, pp. 102–104.
  82. ^ a b Surtees & Taylor 2005, p. 81.
  83. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Church of All Saints, Carlisle Road, Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 7 October 2010. 
  84. ^ Elleray 1978, §138.
  85. ^ "All Saints (Eastbourne, All Saints)". Sussex On-line Parish Clerks (OPC). 2010. Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  86. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Christ Church, Seaside, Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 7 October 2010. 
  87. ^ "Christ Church (Eastbourne, Christ Church)". Sussex On-line Parish Clerks (OPC). 2010. Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  88. ^ a b Surtees & Taylor 2005, p. 84.
  89. ^ "History and Future Development". St Elisabeth's Church. 2009. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  90. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Church Hall to Church of St Elisabeth, Victoria Drive, Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 7 October 2010. 
  91. ^ Allen, John (12 January 2009). "Eastbourne – St Mary, Hampden Park". Sussex Parish Churches (www.sussexparishchurches.org). Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  92. ^ Allen, John (14 September 2009). "Eastbourne introduction". Sussex Parish Churches (www.sussexparishchurches.org). Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  93. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Mary, Decoy Drive, Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  94. ^ a b "St Mary the Virgin (Hampden Park)". Sussex On-line Parish Clerks (OPC). 2010. Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  95. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Michael and All Angels, Willingdon Road, Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  96. ^ Stoner & Hollands 2007, pp. 13–15, 27.
  97. ^ Surtees 2002, pp. 45, 105, 117.
  98. ^ Allen, John (14 January 2009). "Eastbourne – St Peter, Hydnye (sic)". Sussex Parish Churches (www.sussexparishchurches.org). Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  99. ^ Allen, John (8 June 2009). "Eastbourne – St Philip, Whitley Road". Sussex Parish Churches (www.sussexparishchurches.org). Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  100. ^ "St Philip (Eastbourne, Christ Church)". Sussex On-line Parish Clerks (OPC). 2010. Retrieved 11 May 2010. 
  101. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 548.
  102. ^ Surtees 2005, p. 69.
  103. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Elleray 2004, p. 22.
  104. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 51576; Name: Eastbourne Evangelical Free Church; Address: Victoria Drive, Eastbourne; Denomination: Christians not otherwise designated). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  105. ^ "Frenchgate Christian Fellowship". Frenchgate Christian Fellowship. 2010. Retrieved 9 April 2010. 
  106. ^ The London Gazette: no. 44630. p. 7628. 9 July 1968. Retrieved 9 May 2012.
  107. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 58299; Name: Frenchgate Christian Centre; Address: Frenchgate Road, Hampden Park, Eastbourne; Denomination: Open Brethren). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  108. ^ "Where are we?". Gateway Christian Church. 2012. Retrieved 29 October 2012. 
  109. ^ "Kings Conference Centre". The Frontiers Charitable Trust. 2010. Retrieved 9 April 2010. 
  110. ^ "Kings Church, Eastbourne". East Sussex County Council Library and Information Services. 2010. Retrieved 9 April 2010. 
  111. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 79893; Name: Kings Centre; Address: 27 Edison Road, Eastbourne; Denomination: Evangelical Christians). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  112. ^ "Brief History of Community Wise". Community Wise. 2010. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  113. ^ "Living Stones, Eastbourne: Contact and Trustees". Charity Commission. 2010. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
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  116. ^ "What do we believe?". Old Town Community Church, Eastbourne. 24 January 2010. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  117. ^ "Who are we, and what are we like?". Old Town Community Church, Eastbourne. 24 January 2010. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  118. ^ "Community Church – Eastbourne: Welcome". Community Church – Eastbourne. 2010. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  119. ^ "Community Church – Eastbourne: Community Church". Community Church – Eastbourne. 2010. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  120. ^ "Community Church – Eastbourne: Our History". Community Church – Eastbourne. 2010. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  121. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 52917; Name: St Anthony's Hall; Address: Seaside, Eastbourne; Denomination: Christians not otherwise designated). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  122. ^ Elleray 1978, §143.
  123. ^ Surtees & Taylor 2005, p. 83.
  124. ^ "Detailed Record: Our Lady of Ransom Roman Catholic Church, Grange Road, Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
  125. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 38846; Name: Catholic Church of Our Lady of Ransom; Address: Grange Road, Eastbourne; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  126. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 141.
  127. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 71407; Name: Church of Christ the King; Address: Princes Road, Eastbourne; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  128. ^ "English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005 (Extract): St Agnes, Eastbourne" (PDF). English Heritage. 2005. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  129. ^ Kennedy 2001, pp. 135–144.
  130. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 45023; Name: Roman Catholic Church of St Agnes; Address: 10 Whitley Road, Eastbourne; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  131. ^ Kennedy 2001, pp. 3–4.
  132. ^ "English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005 (Extract): St Gregory, Eastbourne" (PDF). English Heritage. 2005. Retrieved 2 April 2010. 
  133. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 70779; Name: St Gregory's Roman Catholic Church; Address: Victoria Drive, Eastbourne; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  134. ^ Kennedy 2001, p. 147.
  135. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 67682; Name: Church of St Joachim; Address: Brodrick Road, Hampden Park, Eastbourne; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  136. ^ a b "Ceylon Place Baptist Church – Who R U?". Ceylon Place Baptist Church. 2010. Retrieved 9 April 2010. 
  137. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 43233; Name: Methodist Church; Address: Pevensey Road, Eastbourne; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  138. ^ a b Berry & Gordon 1996, p. 63.
  139. ^ Elleray 1978, §147.
  140. ^ "Detailed Record: Central Methodist Church, former hall and school and attached walls, Susans Road (south west side), Eastbourne, Eastbourne, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 3 April 2010. 
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  192. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 58564; Name: Friends' Meeting House; Address: Wish Road, Eastbourne; Denomination: Friends). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  194. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 66439; Name: Eastbourne Christian Spiritualist Church; Address: 1A Cavendish Avenue, Eastbourne; Denomination: Christian Spiritualists). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  197. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 25941; Name: Grove Road Baptist Chapel; Address: Grove Road, Eastbourne; Denomination: Baptists). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  207. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 51090; Name: Edgmond Evangelical Church; Address: Church Street, Eastbourne; Denomination: Christians). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  209. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 57332; Name: Bourne Hall; Address: 18 Bourne Street, Eastbourne; Denomination: Brethren). Retrieved 24 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  211. ^ "St Gregory (Eastbourne, St Elisabeth)". Sussex On-line Parish Clerks (OPC). 2010. Retrieved 11 May 2010. 

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