List of places of worship in Horsham (district)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The district has many ancient churches with Anglican congregations, such as St Peter's Church at Upper Beeding—formerly linked to Sele Priory.
Nonconformist places of worship include Billingshurst Unitarian Chapel, founded in 1754.

There are more than 110 current and former churches and other places of worship in the district of Horsham, one of seven local government districts in the English county of West Sussex. The large, mostly rural district, whose largest town is also called Horsham, has 86 places of worship in use as of 2014, and a further 27 closed churches which, although still standing, are no longer in religious use. The area has a long history of Christian worship—in both the main population centres (Horsham, Billingshurst, Henfield, Pulborough, Steyning and Storrington) and the surrounding villages and hamlets—and many Anglican churches have Norman or even Saxon work. Roman Catholic places of worship include chapels within convents and priories, including England's only Carthusian monastery, as well as modern churches. Protestant Nonconformity has been well established since the 17th century. Plymouth Brethren are well represented in the north of the district; Baptists, Methodists and United Reformed Church worshippers have many churches; William Penn lived and preached in the area, which still has a strong Quaker presence;[1] and one of eight chapels belonging to a now vanished local sect, the Society of Dependants, still stands at Warnham. There is also a mosque in Horsham town.

English Heritage has awarded listed status to nearly 50 current and former church buildings in Horsham district. A building is defined as "listed" when it is placed on a statutory register of buildings of "special architectural or historic interest" in accordance with the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990.[2] The Department for Culture, Media and Sport, a Government department, is responsible for this; English Heritage, a non-departmental public body, acts as an agency of the department to administer the process and advise the department on relevant issues.[3] There are three grades of listing status. Grade I, the highest, is defined as being of "exceptional interest"; Grade II* is used for "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and Grade II, the lowest, is used for buildings of "special interest".[4] As of February 2001, there were 38 Grade I-listed buildings, 60 with Grade II* status and 1,628 Grade II-listed buildings in the district of Horsham.[5]

Overview of the district and its places of worship[edit]

Horsham district shown within West Sussex

Horsham is a large, mostly rural district in southeast England, which covers about 205 square miles (530 km2) of land between the North and South Downs. Much of the land is part of the Weald, some is heavily forested, and large parts are classified as Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.[6] More than one-third of residents live in the ancient market town of Horsham, which has grown rapidly since the 19th century to support a population of 45,000.[6][7] The next largest settlements are the villages of Billingshurst, Henfield, Pulborough, Steyning and Storrington.[6] These and many other villages and hamlets within the 32 civil parishes have ancient churches, particularly from the 13th century.[8] Clockwise from the south, the district is bordered by the districts of Adur, Arun and Chichester in West Sussex; the borough of Waverley and the district of Mole Valley in the county of Surrey; the West Sussex borough of Crawley and district of Mid Sussex; and the city of Brighton and Hove.[9]

The Christianisation of Sussex began with St Wilfrid in the 7th century, though,[10] and gained pace in the 8th century when St Cuthman arrived at Steyning and founded St Andrew's Church. The densely forested Weald had been a stronghold of pagan worship, but by the 9th century Sussex was "at least nominally, a Christian county" due to the work of travelling missionaries such as Cuthman, who spent their lives preaching and founding places of worship.[11][12]

In common with other parts of Sussex, many early churches were simple "two-cell" buildings with a nave and chancel. As worship became more elaborate, settlements grew larger and building techniques improved, many of these Saxon-era structures were extended or replaced,[13] and Norman or early Gothic architecture characterises many of Horsham district's churches. Many ancient churches were restored in the Victorian era—sometimes drastically, as at Amberley,[14] Ashington,[15] Billingshurst[16] and Wiston,[17] for example—for several reasons. New theological and ideological practices within the Anglican church, associated with the Oxford Movement and the Cambridge Camden Society, defined new architectural ideals for churches to follow. Those that lacked the required features, such as large chancels, chancel screens and a separate nave, were identified for restoration, as were churches with newly unfashionable features such as box pews and galleries.[18] In other cases, apathy and declining congregations had led to serious structural decay over the course of several centuries.[19][20] Meanwhile, population growth in larger settlements necessitated enlargements or rebuildings in some cases. Gordon Macdonald Hills, who conducted "particularly damaging restorations" at more than 30 Sussex churches,[19] was especially active in the Horsham area, but other architects such as Samuel Sanders Teulon, Henry Woodyer, John Loughborough Pearson, George Gilbert Scott, Jr. and R.H. Carpenter also left their mark on the district's old churches in the 19th century.[21]

Roman Catholic worship in the area has had an unbroken history since before the English Reformation,[22] despite being outlawed for centuries by various Acts of Parliament. Rich families such as the Wappingthorns at Steyning[23] and the Carylls at West Grinstead maintained the faith, sometimes using secret rooms to celebrate Mass. Example survives in the Priest's House next to the 19th-century Church of Our Lady of Consolation and St Francis in West Grinstead,[24] and possibly at Henfield.[25] Mass was sometimes said in private houses (as at Henfield)[26] before permanent churches were built, and three of the district's present Roman Catholic churches are linked to monasteries and convents. Public worship takes place in the chapels at St Hugh's Charterhouse Monastery at Parkminster[27] and The Towers Convent in Upper Beeding,[28] and the Priory Church of Our Lady of England in Storrington is physically linked to the Premonstratensian monastery there.[29]

Protestant Nonconformist worship has had a long and successful history in the area. Many denominations founded chapels and meeting places between the 17th and 19th centuries, both in the towns and in rural areas; many survive and remain in use. Baptist worship never gained such a hold as it did in East Sussex,[22] but Horsham town became a hotbed of the Strict and Particular Baptist cause in the 19th century, when three such chapels were founded: Hope, Rehoboth and Jireh.[30] General Baptists became established in the 1660s under the leadership of radical evangelist Matthew Caffyn, the first leader of Horsham General Baptist Chapel (1721).[30] Members of the chapel founded a mission at Billingshurst in 1754;[31] both causes moved towards Unitarianism in the 19th century,[32] and both chapels are still used. The later Brighton Road General Baptist Church also founded two offshoot chapels.[30] The Wesleyan and Primitive Methodist movements were also focused on Horsham. Wesleyan worship at a chapel in the town's London Road dates from 1832. Outreach work to surrounding villages led to the founding of chapels in Southwater (now demolished), Dragon's Green, Faygate, Mannings Heath and Partridge Green.[33] The United Reformed Church, into which the Congregational Church merged in 1972, has four congregations in the district; several other chapels fell out of use while still registered as Congregational, and one at Henfield became Evangelical.[34] The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) had a presence in towns and villages across the district from the 17th century, despite repression. William Penn lived at Warminghurst and preached there[35] and at a former meeting house in Steyning, now called Penn's House;[36] he was also linked to the curiously named Blue Idol, a Quaker place of worship since 1691.[22][37] Horsham's meeting house dates from 1834, but the community worshipped in houses or in the open air long before that.[30] Plymouth Brethren, meanwhile, maintain a strong presence in Horsham town. Their cause was helped by the support of Charles Eversfield of Denne Park, who founded their first meeting house in 1863. Three other meeting rooms survive in the town. The Anglican church was strongly opposed to the denomination in the 19th century, seeing it as an "irritant" locally.[30] Other extant places of worship for Christian Scientists, The Salvation Army and Jehovah's Witnesses exist, and denominations such as Presbyterians, Mormons, Swedenborgians, Pentecostalists[30] and the obscure, localised Society of Dependants [sic] formerly worshipped in the district. The last named sect, also known as Cokelers, established eight chapels in Sussex and Surrey in the 19th century, often with co-operative shops nearby. Warnham's old chapel was used until the 1970s, as was the associated shop.[38][39]

The only non-Christian place of worship in the district is a mosque, which found a permanent home in Horsham town centre only in 2008: the community used houses and industrial buildings previously. The former Jireh Independent Baptist Chapel, which passed out of religious use in the mid-20th century,[30][40] became Madina Mosque after Horsham District Council granted planning permission in 2008.[41]

Religious affiliation[edit]

According to the United Kingdom Census 2001, 122,088 people lived in Horsham district. Of these, 76.34% identified themselves as Christian, 0.37% were Muslim, 0.22% were Buddhist, 0.19% were Hindu, 0.18% were Jewish, 0.08% were Sikh, 0.36% followed another religion, 15.44% claimed no religious affiliation and 6.82% did not state their religion. The proportion of Christians was much higher than the 71.74% in England as a whole, and other religions not listed in the Census were also followed by more people than the national average (0.29%). The proportion of people with no religious affiliation was also higher than the national figure of 14.59%. The proportion of Buddhists was slightly lower than the 0.28% national figure; and adherents of Islam, Hinduism, Judaism and Sikhism were much less prevalent in the district than in England overall. In 2001, 3.1% of people in England were Muslim, 1.11% were Hindu, 0.67% were Sikh and 0.52% were Jewish.[42]

Administration[edit]

All Anglican churches in Horsham district are part of the Diocese of Chichester, whose cathedral is at Chichester,[43] and the Archdeaconry of Horsham—one of three subdivisions which make up the next highest level of administration.[44] In turn, this archdeaconry is divided into eight deaneries.[44] The churches at Billingshurst, Broadbridge Heath, Colgate, Coolhurst, Itchingfield, Lower Beeding, Mannings Heath, Nuthurst, Partridge Green, Roffey, Rudgwick, Rusper, Shipley, Slinfold, Southwater, Tisman's Common, Warnham and West Grinstead, and the four in Horsham town, are in the Rural Deanery of Horsham.[45] Those at Amberley, Ashington, Ashurst, Botolphs, Bramber, Buncton, Greatham, Parham, Pulborough, Steyning, Storrington, Sullington, Thakeham, Upper Beeding, Washington, West Chiltington and Wiggonholt are part of the Rural Deanery of Storrington.[46] Cowfold, Edburton, Henfield and Shermanbury's churches are within the Rural Deanery of Hurst.[47] Two churches in the southwest of the district—at Coldwaltham and Hardham—are in the Rural Deanery of Petworth.[48]

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Arundel and Brighton, whose cathedral is at Arundel,[49] administers the district's eight Roman Catholic churches. Those at Billingshurst, Pulborough and Storrington are in Cathedral Deanery; Steyning and Upper Beeding's churches are part of Worthing Deanery; and the churches at Henfield, Horsham and West Grinstead are in the Crawley Deanery.[50]

Three Baptist churches in the district are part of the South Eastern Baptist Association, which administers about 150 churches of that denomination across southeast England.[51] Brighton Road and Trafalgar Road Baptist Churches in Horsham town are in the Association's Gatwick Network. Upper Beeding Baptist Church is in the Mid Sussex Network.[52] Brighton Road Baptist Church in Horsham set up a daughter church in the Littlehaven area of town in 1993. The Life Community Baptist Church now meets at a school,[53] and is also part of the South Eastern Baptist Association's Gatwick Network.[52]

Open places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
St Michael and All Angels Church Amberley St Michael.jpg Amberley
50°54′32″N 0°32′22″W / 50.9090°N 0.5394°W / 50.9090; -0.5394 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Amberley)
Anglican I Amberley's parish church stands next to the castle and has Norman origins: Bishop Luffa founded it in about 1100, and its windows were extended to "thumping great" proportions in the 1150s. Most of the present structure is 13th-century; in particular, Bishop Ralph Neville extended the chancel in about 1230. Gordon Macdonald Hills carried out restoration in the Victorian era. [14][54]
[55][56]
[57][58]
[19]
St Peter and St Paul's Church St Peter and St Paul's Church, Ashington - geograph.org.uk - 46919.jpg Ashington
50°55′53″N 0°23′42″W / 50.9314°N 0.3950°W / 50.9314; -0.3950 (St Peter and St Paul's Church, Ashington)
Anglican II* The church here was originally dependent on nearby Washington when founded in the 12th century. Some medieval features remain, but Robert Wheeler's "disastrous" (to Nikolaus Pevsner) restoration of 1871–72 was needed because of population growth. The flint and stone church has Perpendicular Gothic elements. [59][60]
[15][61]
St James's Church Ashurst Church, West Sussex.jpg Ashurst
50°56′05″N 0°19′38″W / 50.9348°N 0.3273°W / 50.9348; -0.3273 (St James's Church, Ashurst)
Anglican I Built of flint with a Horsham Stone roof in the 12th and 13th centuries, this remote church has a double nave split by an arcade. The tower has a broach spire. A very rare 18th-century vamp-horn, a bizarre musical instrument with a droning sound, survives inside: it was used to accompany the choir. [19][61]
[62][63]
[64][65]
[66][67]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Billingshurst (IoE Code 299080).JPG Billingshurst
51°01′21″N 0°27′03″W / 51.0224°N 0.4507°W / 51.0224; -0.4507 (St Mary's Church, Billingshurst)
Anglican I The west-end broach spire looms over the partly 12th-century church and the village. The tower is the oldest and architecturally best feature; much 15th-century work remains as well, but the east end has a Gothic Revival appearance because of a restoration in 1866. [16][68]
[69][70]
[71][72]
St Gabriel's Church St Gabriel's Church, Billingshurst.JPG Billingshurst
51°01′19″N 0°26′50″W / 51.0220°N 0.4472°W / 51.0220; -0.4472 (St Gabriel's Church, Billingshurst)
Roman Catholic Prolific Roman Catholic architect Henry Bingham Towner designed this church in 1962 to replace a chapel of 1925 elsewhere in the village. It is typical of his style, and opinion ranges from "deplorable" to "interesting and satisfying". The reconstituted stone exterior leads to an aisled nave and sanctuary with a miniature tower. [31][73]
[74]
Billingshurst Unitarian Chapel Billingshurst Unitarian Church, Billingshurst (IoE Code 299110).JPG Billingshurst
51°01′18″N 0°27′11″W / 51.0218°N 0.4531°W / 51.0218; -0.4531 (Billingshurst Unitarian Church, Billingshurst)
Unitarian II This Georgian Vernacular-style chapel has a well-preserved interior and is set back from the street in a large raised graveyard. Built of grey and red brick in 1754, it has a small porch and an interior gallery. An extension was added in 1825. [31][73]
[75][76]
Trinity United Reformed Church Trinity United Reformed Church, Billingshurst.JPG Billingshurst
51°01′15″N 0°27′11″W / 51.0208°N 0.4530°W / 51.0208; -0.4530 (Trinity United Reformed Church, Billingshurst)
United Reformed A Congregational chapel known as "Gingers Chapel" was founded in 1815. This church, by Thomas Elworthy, replaced it on a different site in 1868. The Early English-style building is of red and blue brick with some stuccoed stonework. [31][77]
St Botolph's Church St Botolph's Church from the north west.jpg Botolphs
50°52′14″N 0°18′18″W / 50.8705°N 0.3051°W / 50.8705; -0.3051 (St Botolph's Church, Botolphs)
Anglican I Apart from a small Victorian porch, this isolated church is ancient: parts of the chancel and nave are Saxon, and there is a 13th-century blocked aisle and tower with a "Sussex cap" roof. A good Jacobean pulpit survives from the 17th century, and fragmentary wall paintings are visible. [78][79]
[80][81]
[82][83]
[84][85]
St Nicholas' Church St Nicholas' Church, Bramber (IoE Code 298337).jpg Bramber
50°52′58″N 0°18′55″W / 50.8829°N 0.3153°W / 50.8829; -0.3153 (St Nicholas' Church, Bramber)
Anglican I William de Braose founded a chapel here, linked to his castle, in about 1073. It became the property of Saumur Abbey in France soon afterwards, and of Sele Priory later. The bulky, hollow, castellated tower is 18th-century. Crude Norman-era carvings survive inside. [86][87]
[88][89]
[90][91]
[92]
St John's Church St John's Church, Broadbridge Heath.jpg Broadbridge Heath
51°04′17″N 0°21′42″W / 51.0713°N 0.3616°W / 51.0713; -0.3616 (St John's Church, Broadbridge Heath)
Anglican Now part of a team ministry of five churches in the Horsham area, this church has its origins in a mission hall of 1853. A tin tabernacle replaced it in 1904, but structural problems led to its demolition in 1957. A cruciform replacement of extremely unusual design was completed in 1963. [93][94]
[95][96]
Broadbridge Heath Free Church Plymouth Brethren Chapel, Broadbridge Heath.jpg Broadbridge Heath
51°04′17″N 0°21′37″W / 51.0713°N 0.3604°W / 51.0713; -0.3604 (Broadbridge Heath Free Church, Broadbridge Heath)
Plymouth Brethren This was founded as a Baptist mission chapel in 1908 by Samuel Barrow, and was associated with Brighton Road Baptist Church in its early days. By 1955 it was called Broadbridge Heath Free Church, and the congregation is now Plymouth Brethren. The red-brick and stone chapel has lancet windows. [30][97]
[98]
All Saints Church All Saints, Buncton.jpg Buncton
50°54′48″N 0°22′21″W / 50.9133°N 0.3726°W / 50.9133; -0.3726 (All Saints Church, Buncton)
Anglican I Originally a chapel of ease to Ashington, this tiny two-cell stone building dates from the 11th or 12th century and now stands in a remote situation with few buildings nearby. Simple, "picturesque" and "delightfully unrestored", the building has many ancient internal features—but its famous feature, an extraordinary carving with exposed genitalia, was destroyed by a vandal in 2004. [60][99]
[100][101]
[102][103]
[104][105]
St Giles' Church Coldwaltham Church 3.JPG Coldwaltham
50°56′21″N 0°32′41″W / 50.9392°N 0.5448°W / 50.9392; -0.5448 (St Giles' Church, Coldwaltham)
Anglican II* A major but characterful rebuilding in 1871 replaced most features except a 13th-century arcade, the half-timbered Norman belfry and the Early English-style tower of the 14th century. The stained glass by Charles Eamer Kempe is considered to be among his best work. [106][107]
[108][109]
[110][111]
St Saviour's Church Church of St Saviour, Colgate - geograph.org.uk - 429645.jpg Colgate
51°04′54″N 0°14′38″W / 51.0817°N 0.2440°W / 51.0817; -0.2440 (St Saviour's Church, Colgate)
Anglican Gordon Macdonald Hills, restorer of many churches in the area, designed Colgate's parish church in 1871. It replaced a smaller building opened three years earlier as a chapel of ease to Lower Beeding. The Decorated/Perpendicular Gothic Revival yellow- and blue-brick structure has a bell turret and a reredos by F. W. Pomeroy. [112][113]
[114][115]
Blue Idol The Blue Idol in Oldhouse Lane - geograph.org.uk - 257749.jpg Coolham
50°59′49″N 0°25′24″W / 50.9969°N 0.4233°W / 50.9969; -0.4233 (Blue Idol, Coolham)
Quaker II* Forming one section of a 17th-century timber-framed cottage in a rural setting, this Quaker meeting house was founded for William Penn in 1691. The conversion, by John Shaw, created a large single-storey room. It fell out of use in 1793, but services started again in 1837 and there have been extensions since then. The name's origins are obscure. [31][37]
[116][117]
[118][119]
[120]
St John the Evangelist's Church St John the Evangelist's Church, Coolhurst.JPG Coolhurst
51°03′19″N 0°17′20″W / 51.0553°N 0.2890°W / 51.0553; -0.2890 (St John the Evangelist's Church, Coolhurst)
Anglican Land for a church in this wooded location was given in 1836, and the "forest church" (also known as the "Sun Oak church") was consecrated in 1839. The Early English-style stone building has a bell turret at the west end of the stone roof. Originally a chapel of ease to Lower Beeding, it was later served from Horsham. [93][112]
[114][121]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Cowfold, West Sussex - geograph.org.uk - 86098.jpg Cowfold
50°59′24″N 0°16′26″W / 50.9901°N 0.2738°W / 50.9901; -0.2738 (St Peter's Church, Cowfold)
Anglican I The "chief glory" of this substantial, largely 13th- and 15th-century church is a large floor-mounded brass memorial to Thomas Nelond, a Prior of Southover. He died in 1433, and the brass and its "enchanting", well-preserved canopy date from then. The font can be dated precisely to 1481. Restoration was carried out on the ashlar and rubble building in 1877. [108][122]
[123][124]
[125][126]
[127][128]
Parkminster Monastery Church St Hugh's Monastery - geograph.org.uk - 1276169.jpg Cowfold
50°58′23″N 0°16′59″W / 50.9731°N 0.2830°W / 50.9731; -0.2830 (Parkminster Monastery Church, Cowfold)
Roman Catholic II* The chapel at Britain's only post-Reformation Carthusian monastery has been open for public worship since 1943. Clovis Normand fils, a French architect, designed the French Gothic complex of buildings near Cowfold village. The large chapel lacks aisles and has an apsidal end. Stone, both foreign and local (from Hastings), are the main materials. [129][130]
[27][131]
[132]
St Andrew's Church Edburton Church.JPG Edburton
50°53′23″N 0°14′54″W / 50.8898°N 0.2483°W / 50.8898; -0.2483 (St Andrew's Church, Edburton)
Anglican II* This 13th-century church was a Peculier of Canterbury until 1846. Much original detail survives despite a restoration in 1878. A north chapel and large porch were added in the 14th century, and the tower is a century newer. Eadburh of Winchester may have founded the village and its original 10th-century church. [133][134]
[135][136]
[137][138]
Greatham Church Greatham Church.JPG Greatham
50°56′02″N 0°30′57″W / 50.9340°N 0.5158°W / 50.9340; -0.5158 (Greatham Church, Greatham)
Anglican I No dedication is recorded for this small church in Parham parish. The single-cell stone building has been said to resemble a haystack, as recalled by author Arthur Mee. Fittings include a good 17th-century communion rail and a Gothic pulpit. The roof, laid with slates, has a bell turret. [139][140]
[141][142]
[143][144]
St Botolph's Church St Boltoph's Church Hardham - geograph.org.uk - 710569.jpg Hardham
50°56′55″N 0°31′22″W / 50.9486°N 0.5227°W / 50.9486; -0.5227 (St Botolph's Church, Hardham)
Anglican I Nationally famous wall paintings include the earliest mural of Saint George in a British church. Dating from the 12th century, the extensive designs were covered a century later and were found when Victorian restorers were working on the interior in 1866. The simple two-cell stone church dates from the 11th century. [141][142]
[145][146]
[147][148]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Henfield (NHLE Code 1027400).JPG Henfield
50°55′56″N 0°16′35″W / 50.9323°N 0.2765°W / 50.9323; -0.2765 (St Peter's Church, Henfield)
Anglican II* The aisles, chancel and transepts were renewed in 1870 by William Slater and R.H. Carpenter, but a side chapel and the large Perpendicular Gothic tower retain their 16th-century appearance and the chancel arch dates from the 12th century. Stained glass includes a 1901 window with Art Nouveau overtones. [141][149]
[150][151]
[152][153]
[154]
Henfield Evangelical Free Church Henfield Evangelical Free Church, Henfield.JPG Henfield
50°55′52″N 0°16′19″W / 50.9311°N 0.2720°W / 50.9311; -0.2720 (Henfield Evangelical Free Church, Henfield)
Evangelical Originally a Congregational chapel, this has its origins in a two-bay chapel of 1832. The manse stood in front and obscured it until 1904, when it was demolished and the chapel was refronted in flint and brick. The congregation grew throughout the 20th century and aligned itself to the Evangelical movement. [34][155]
[156][157]
Corpus Christi Church Corpus Christi Church, Henfield.JPG Henfield
50°55′52″N 0°16′35″W / 50.9312°N 0.2763°W / 50.9312; -0.2763 (Corpus Christi Church, Henfield)
Roman Catholic Lilian Sterns held Roman Catholic services in her house, then built a timber church in the grounds in 1929. A parish was formed out of West Grinstead's territory in 1968, and a replacement church—in red brick, and still dedicated to Corpus Christi—was provided in 1974. Southern England's first seminary for Catholic priests was founded in Henfield in 1889. [25][26]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, The Causeway, Horsham (IoE Code 298126).jpg Horsham
51°03′35″N 0°19′51″W / 51.0597°N 0.3309°W / 51.0597; -0.3309 (St Mary's Church, Horsham)
Anglican I Reached down a quiet street lined with medieval buildings, and with open country behind, Horsham's 12th-century parish church is well situated but was given a thorough overhaul in the mid-13th century, giving it a "heavy, towny" character. S.S. Teulon's restoration of 1865 added an aisle, new windows (fitted with stained glass by various designers) and some elaborate gabling. [93][96]
[158][159]
[160][161]
[162][163]
Holy Trinity Church Holy Trinity Church, Rushams Road, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°04′10″N 0°19′49″W / 51.0694°N 0.3303°W / 51.0694; -0.3303 (Holy Trinity Church, Horsham)
Anglican The dedication of this church may relate to the former Holy Trinity chantry, founded in 1307. A 250-capacity tin tabernacle was opened in 1879 to serve a growing suburb; when the building moved to Broadbridge Heath in 1900, William Gillbee Scott designed a Gothic Revival red-brick replacement. [93][94]
[95][96]
[164][165]
[166][167]
St Leonard's Church St Leonard's Church, Cambridge Road, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′41″N 0°19′04″W / 51.0615°N 0.3177°W / 51.0615; -0.3177 (St Leonard's Church, Horsham)
Anglican Land in east Horsham was bought in 1899, but the town-centre St Mark's Church had to be closed to provide money to establish a new church in the growing area. This eventually happened in 1936, and the red-brick St Leonard's Church was ready in 1939. [93][95]
[96][168]
Brighton Road Baptist Church Brighton Road Baptist Church, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′37″N 0°19′17″W / 51.0603°N 0.3215°W / 51.0603; -0.3215 (Brighton Road Baptist Church, Horsham)
Baptist The present chapel is the third on the site. Originally founded in 1896 for General Baptists in a tin tabernacle which was given a Gothic Revival brick façade, it was rebuilt in 1923 in a similar style using red brick and stonework. This was in turn demolished in 2007 and rebuilt in a Modern style in 2008. [30][164]
[40][169]
[170][171]
[172][173]
Hope Strict Baptist Chapel Hope Strict Baptist Chapel, Oakhill Road, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′48″N 0°18′56″W / 51.0632°N 0.3156°W / 51.0632; -0.3156 (Hope Strict Baptist Chapel, Horsham)
Baptist Horsham's second Strict Baptist chapel had its origins in meetings in a public hall in March 1900. The congregation moved several times, but on 2 December 1903 their new red-brick square-windowed chapel on Oakhill Road was inaugurated, and worship has continued there ever since. The three founders were from Kent. [30][164]
[40][169]
[171][174]
[175]
Rehoboth Strict Baptist Chapel Rehoboth Strict Baptist Chapel, New Street, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′39″N 0°19′16″W / 51.0609°N 0.3212°W / 51.0609; -0.3212 (Rehoboth Strict Baptist Chapel, Horsham)
Baptist Particular Baptist seceders from the present Horsham Unitarian Church founded this chapel in 1834 after a period of worshipping at a farmhouse. It is a red-brick building with a gabled façade and round-headed windows. A modern frontage has been added. Hymnwriter Edward Mote was a long-serving pastor. [30][164]
[40][169]
[170][174]
[171][175]
Trafalgar Road Baptist Church Trafalgar Road Baptist Church, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°04′24″N 0°19′47″W / 51.0733°N 0.3297°W / 51.0733; -0.3297 (Trafalgar Road Baptist Church, Horsham)
Baptist Brighton Road Baptist Church established a mission chapel in the rapidly growing Trafalgar Road area in the 1920s. It became a separate cause, under the name Trafalgar Street Baptist Church, in 1955. The present brick building dates from 1972. [30]
Christian Life Centre Christian Life Centre, East Street, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′41″N 0°19′30″W / 51.0615°N 0.3251°W / 51.0615; -0.3251 (Christian Life Centre, Horsham)
Evangelical This large Renaissance Revival brick and stone chapel on East Street was built for a Primitive Methodist congregation in 1891. It closed in 1932, and in 1957 Pentecostal worshippers moved in and renamed it Fellowship Hall. This continued into the 1980s, but by 2005 the present name and Evangelical character had been adopted. [30][164]
[40][169]
[176][177]
Denne Road Gospel Hall Denne Road Gospel Hall, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′40″N 0°19′38″E / 51.0611°N 0.3273°E / 51.0611; 0.3273 (Denne Road Gospel Hall, Horsham)
Evangelical Charles Eversfield funded a new Plymouth Brethren chapel near his Denne Park home in 1863; it replaced earlier short-lived meeting houses elsewhere in Horsham. The stuccoed façade has a porch below an arched window. Eversfield's influence was significant—Brethren have always had a strong presence in this part of Sussex—but an Evangelical congregation now uses the chapel. [30][164]
[40][170]
[171][178]
[179]
First Church of Christ Scientist First Church of Christ Scientist, Guildford Road, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′54″N 0°20′19″W / 51.0651°N 0.3386°W / 51.0651; -0.3386 (First Church of Christ Scientist, Horsham)
Christian Scientist This brick building on the Guildford Road was registered for worship by members of the Church of Christ, Scientist in 1953. [30][180]
Kingdom Hall Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses, Stanley Walk, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′44″N 0°19′18″W / 51.0623°N 0.3216°W / 51.0623; -0.3216 (Kingdom Hall, Horsham)
Jehovah's Witnesses There has been a Kingdom Hall on the present site in Stanley Walk since 1957, but the present brick building is modern. It serves the Roffey and Southwater Congregations of Jehovah's Witnesses. [30][181]
London Road Methodist Church Horsham Methodist Church, London Road, Horsham.JPG Horsham
51°03′53″N 0°19′45″W / 51.0647°N 0.3291°W / 51.0647; -0.3291 (London Road Methodist Church, Horsham)
Methodist Methodism came to Horsham in 1776, and the first Wesleyan chapel was erected in 1832 on London Road. Its 400-capacity Gothic Revival replacement, with prominent buttresses and stone dressings to its red-brick walls, opened in 1883 as a memorial to Kate Ireland, founder of the first chapel. [30][164]
[40][169]
[167][171]
[172][182]
[183]
Madina Mosque Madina Mosque (Formerly Jireh Independent Chapel), Park Terrace East, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′39″N 0°19′23″W / 51.0609°N 0.3231°W / 51.0609; -0.3231 (Madina Mosque, Horsham)
Muslim Horsham's Muslim population have worshipped at this former Baptist chapel since 2008 after a 14-year search for a permanent home. The stuccoed, rusticated, arch-windowed chapel was built as the Jireh Independent Chapel in 1857. The cause failed in the mid-20th century, and the building was used as a hair salon before its reversion to religious use. [30][164]
[40][174]
[170][171]
[184][185]
[41]
Arthur Road Meeting Room Brethren's Meeting Room - geograph.org.uk - 612976.jpg Horsham
51°03′37″N 0°19′13″W / 51.0602°N 0.3202°W / 51.0602; -0.3202 (Brethren Hall, Horsham)
Plymouth Brethren This stands on a road off the main Brighton Road and serves the Brethren community. [186]
Horsham Friends Meeting House Friends Meeting House, Worthing Road, Horsham (IoE Code 298208).jpg Horsham
51°03′45″N 0°20′02″W / 51.0624°N 0.3339°W / 51.0624; -0.3339 (Horsham Friends Meeting House, Horsham)
Quaker II Quakers had a presence in Horsham from 1655, and George Fox and William Penn visited in 1680. Soon afterwards, a meeting house was founded; the 1693 building on the present Worthing Road was replaced in 1786, and the present cottage-like structure dates from 1834. Its red-brick walls support a tiled hipped roof with moulded eaves. [30][40]
[96][167]
[187][188]
[189][190]
St John the Evangelist's Church St John the Evangelist's Church, Springfield Road, Horsham.JPG Horsham
51°03′51″N 0°19′55″W / 51.0641°N 0.3319°W / 51.0641; -0.3319 (St John the Evangelist's Church, Horsham)
Roman Catholic Architects E. and J. Goldie's building, a Perpendicular Gothic Revival stone and rubble church of 1919–23 with side chapels to the nave, is Horsham's third Roman Catholic church. All three stood on Springfield Road. A castellated church of 1820 was turned into a school when a new building was erected nearby in 1865. [164][165]
[94][170]
[96][172]
[191][192]
Salvation Army Citadel Horsham Salvation Army Corps.jpg Horsham
51°04′00″N 0°18′58″W / 51.0666°N 0.3162°W / 51.0666; -0.3162 (Salvation Army Citadel, Horsham)
Salvation Army The present citadel was erected to replace a smaller building on Barttelot Way. It combines a community centre and worship space. [193]
Horsham Unitarian Church Horsham Unitarian Church, Worthing Road, Horsham (IoE Code 298204).jpg Horsham
51°03′46″N 0°20′00″W / 51.0629°N 0.3334°W / 51.0629; -0.3334 (Horsham Unitarian Church, Horsham)
Unitarian II This vernacular, cottage-like building was erected in 1721 for General Baptists linked to radical preacher Matthew Caffyn. The two-storey red- and blue/grey-brick chapel was later extended with a porch and an arch-windowed lean-to. The cause moved towards Unitarianism in the late 19th century. [30][40]
[167][188]
[171][194]
[195][196]
[197]
Horsham United Reformed Church Horsham United Reformed Church, Springfield Road, Horsham.JPG Horsham
51°03′50″N 0°19′53″W / 51.0639°N 0.3314°W / 51.0639; -0.3314 (Horsham United Reformed Church, Horsham)
United Reformed Slinfold Chapel is served from this former Congregational church, as was Maplehurst's former church. Meetings of Congregationalists took place from the late 18th century; they built their first church in Springfield Road in 1814. A larger Gothic Revival chapel replaced it in 1884, and the present building (again on the same site) dates from 1983. [30][164]
[40][169]
[170][171]
[172][198]
St Nicolas' Church St Nicholas' Church Itchingfield - geograph.org.uk - 802353.jpg Itchingfield
51°02′55″N 0°23′14″W / 51.0486°N 0.3873°W / 51.0486; -0.3873 (St Nicolas' Church, Itchingfield)
Anglican II* The church fabric dates from three distinct periods: the Norman era, the 15th century—when the unusual all-wood tower was built—and 1866, when Sir George Gilbert Scott added an aisle and carried out general restoration. Many windows are 12th- or 14th-century. A curious timber-framed priest's house survives under a tree in the churchyard; it is partly 15th-century. [199][200]
[201][202]
[203][204]
Brethren Meeting Room Plymouth Brethren Chapel, Littlehaven, Horsham.jpg Littlehaven, Horsham
51°04′44″N 0°18′31″W / 51.0789°N 0.3087°W / 51.0789; -0.3087 (Brethren Hall, Littlehaven, Horsham)
Plymouth Brethren Planning permission was granted in 1981 to erect a meeting hall for Brethren on a site off the Rusper Road in the Littlehaven area of Horsham. [205][206]
Holy Trinity Church Holy Trinity Church, Lower Beeding (NHLE Code 1027015).JPG Lower Beeding
51°02′00″N 0°15′40″W / 51.0332°N 0.2610°W / 51.0332; -0.2610 (Holy Trinity Church, Lower Beeding)
Anglican II Henry Jones Underwood copied one of his earlier church designs—St Mary and St Nicholas Church at Littlemore, Oxfordshire—for his work on the new parish church at Lower Beeding. Matthew Habershon added north and south aisles with marble columns in 1864. The stone church has a west tower and is Early English Gothic Revival in style. [112][207]
[208][209]
[210][211]
Church of the Good Shepherd Church of the Good Shepherd, Mannings Heath.JPG Mannings Heath
51°02′41″N 0°17′01″W / 51.0447°N 0.2835°W / 51.0447; -0.2835 (Church of the Good Shepherd, Mannings Heath)
Anglican The first church in Mannings Heath was Methodist, and it had significant influence. The incumbent at Nuthurst parish church, in whose parish the village lay, founded a red-brick Gothic Revival chapel of ease there in 1881. A local resident funded its construction. The dedication was recorded by 1895. The roof has a small bell turret. [208][212]
[213]
St Mark's Church St Mark's Church, North Heath, Horsham.jpg North Heath, Horsham
51°04′57″N 0°18′56″W / 51.0824°N 0.3155°W / 51.0824; -0.3155 (St Mark's Church, North Heath, Horsham)
Anglican The dedication of the former St Mark's Church in Horsham town centre was transferred to this new church in the modern North Heath suburb in the north of Horsham. Built in the 1980s, its design uses traditional features of churches in the Weald of Sussex—in particular its heavy broach spire. [214]
St Andrew's Church St Andrew's Church, Nuthurst, West Sussex - geograph.org.uk - 86085.jpg Nuthurst
51°01′21″N 0°18′05″W / 51.0225°N 0.3015°W / 51.0225; -0.3015 (St Andrew's Church, Nuthurst)
Anglican II The parish of Nuthurst existed by 1207, and the first church dated from that time. "Terribly restored" (according to Pevsner) in a series of Victorian and Edwardian interventions, it was further altered by Harry Stuart Goodhart-Rendel in 1951. The sandstone building has an unusually elaborate vestry with Art Nouveau overtones, dating from 1907. [213][215]
[216][217]
St Peter's Church Parham St Peter.jpg Parham
50°54′59″N 0°29′39″W / 50.9165°N 0.4941°W / 50.9165; -0.4941 (St Peter's Church, Parham)
Anglican I The present cruciform church, next to Parham Park (an Elizabethan mansion) on the Parham Estate, is an 1820s reworking of a medieval building. A side chapel in the chancel, built in 1545, retains its original features, and an unusual lead font with inscribed stripwork and a coat of arms survives from the 14th century. The roof is of Horsham Stone. [131][218]
[219][220]
[221]
St Michael and All Angels Church St Michael and All Angels Church, Partridge Green.JPG Partridge Green
50°57′44″N 0°18′30″W / 50.9622°N 0.3082°W / 50.9622; -0.3082 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Partridge Green)
Anglican Built in 1890 and now surrounded by modern housing, Habershon and Fawkner's simple and unadorned Early English Gothic Revival church replaced a tin tabernacle at nearby Jolesfield. It is served from West Grinstead, whose former vicar Rev. John Goring gave the land. A flint and stone exterior hides a red-brick interior. [124][131]
[222]
[223]
[224]
Partridge Green Methodist Church Partridge Green Methodist Church, Partridge Green.JPG Partridge Green
50°57′36″N 0°18′11″W / 50.9600°N 0.3031°W / 50.9600; -0.3031 (Partridge Green Methodist Church, Partridge Green)
Methodist One of many Methodist chapels founded by members of the Horsham chapel, this simple red-brick Early English Gothic Revival building was opened in 1906. It replaced a wooden structure on the same site; the congregation had met in houses before its construction in about 1888. The architect was recorded as a Mr Tovey. [124][131]
[225][226]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Pulborough (IoE Code 298533).JPG Pulborough
50°57′32″N 0°30′38″W / 50.9588°N 0.5106°W / 50.9588; -0.5106 (St Mary's Church, Pulborough)
Anglican I A largely unrestored Perpendicular Gothic church of the 13th and 14th centuries, with a slightly later tower, this well-proportioned sandstone building overlooks Pulborough's west end. The chancel has a 13th-century north chapel with an arcade of two bays. The font, of Purbeck Marble, dates from the 12th century. [19][227]
[228][229]
St Crispin and St Crispinian's Church St Crispin and St Crispinian's Church, Pulborough.JPG Pulborough
50°57′35″N 0°30′42″W / 50.9598°N 0.5117°W / 50.9598; -0.5117 (St Crispin and St Crispinian's Church, Pulborough)
Roman Catholic This church is dedicated to the twin saints Crispin and Crispinian and is administered as part of a joint parish with St Gabriel's Church at Billingshurst. [230]
Pulborough United Reformed Church Pulborough United Reformed Church, Pulborough.JPG Pulborough
50°57′25″N 0°29′36″W / 50.9569°N 0.4934°W / 50.9569; -0.4934 (Pulborough United Reformed Church, Pulborough)
United Reformed This church, originally Congregational, replaced the former Congregational chapel at the outlying hamlet of Marehill. It dates from soon after the latter's closure in 1947 and has a brick façade. [208]
All Saints Church All Saints Church, Roffey.jpg Roffey
51°04′36″N 0°17′38″W / 51.0767°N 0.2940°W / 51.0767; -0.2940 (All Saints Church, Roffey)
Anglican II Arthur Blomfield designed the parish church of this Victorian suburb of Horsham in 1878. Church provision had been considered from the 1840s, and from 1856 local Anglicans worshipped in a newly built iron school. A resident donated money and land for a permanent church to commemorate her late husband. Blomfield's Early English-style church has a tower, a single-aisle nave and local sandstone walls. [93][96]
[231][232]
[233][234]
[235][236]
[237][238]
St Andrew's Methodist Chapel St Andrew's Methodist Church, Roffey.jpg Roffey
51°04′26″N 0°18′06″W / 51.0740°N 0.3018°W / 51.0740; -0.3018 (St Andrew's Methodist Chapel, Roffey)
Methodist Founded by Primitive Methodists in 1878, this 160-capacity Early English Gothic Revival chapel is built of red and blue brick with some exterior stonework. The cause thrived, and the building was improved in 1971 (the porch dates from then) and dedicated to Saint Andrew. [30][177]
[232][233]
[237]
Holy Trinity Church Rudgwick Church - geograph.org.uk - 843423.jpg Rudgwick
51°05′51″N 0°26′36″W / 51.0976°N 0.4434°W / 51.0976; -0.4434 (Holy Trinity Church, Rudgwick)
Anglican I This mostly 14th-century church retains a medieval atmosphere and appearance despite modest Victorian restoration. An earlier, possibly 13th-century, church was completely rebuilt a century later: the aisle and tall, wide chancel date from then. Many windows are tall and have varied cusped tracery. The Sussex Marble font is 12th-century. [239][240]
[241][242]
[243]
Rudgwick Chapel Rudgwick Chapel - geograph.org.uk - 248745.jpg Rudgwick
51°05′43″N 0°26′41″W / 51.0952°N 0.4448°W / 51.0952; -0.4448 (Rudgwick Chapel, Rudgwick)
Evangelical Founded for a Congregational community but now used by Evangelicals, the small original (1860) part of this chapel has red-brick walls. In the early 20th century, it was extended with a new façade which had a partly timbered gabled porch with a tiled exterior. [233][243]
[244]
St Mary Magdalene's Church St Mary Magdalene's Church, Rusper (Geograph Image 1809912 ebfa88df).jpg Rusper
51°07′22″N 0°16′45″W / 51.1227°N 0.2793°W / 51.1227; -0.2793 (St Mary Magdalene's Church, Rusper)
Anglican I Thoroughly restored in 1854 by Henry Woodyer—only the substantial 16th-century Perpendicular Gothic tower survives from earlier—this church is on the Surrey border and has more in common with a Thames Valley-area church than a Sussex one. Inside, a brass memorial with Norman French inscriptions dates from the 1370s. [244][245]
[246][247]
[248][249]
St Giles' Church St Giles Church Shermanbury - geograph.org.uk - 1505077.jpg Shermanbury
50°57′22″N 0°16′21″W / 50.9562°N 0.2726°W / 50.9562; -0.2726 (St Giles' Church, Shermanbury)
Anglican II* The dedication was first recorded in 1341, and parts of the stone building date from then. John Gratwicke's restoration of 1710 gave the church its present appearance, and the nave was extended in 1885. Charles Eamer Kempe provided some stained glass. Queen Anne's coat of arms is prominent inside. [250][251]
[252][253]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Shipley, West Sussex (NHLE Code 1180756).JPG Shipley
50°59′03″N 0°22′13″W / 50.9843°N 0.3703°W / 50.9843; -0.3703 (St Mary's Church, Shipley)
Anglican I Although John Loughborough Pearson added a vestry and an aisle in 1893, the church retains its 12th-century appearance and character—especially on the completely unrestored south side. The central tower is characteristic of early Norman churches. Its bulk is accentuated by the lack of buttresses and the short chancel. A 13th-century enamelled reliquary survives inside. [224][254]
[255][256]
[257]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Slinfold (IoE Code 299579).JPG Slinfold
51°04′22″N 0°24′22″W / 51.0727°N 0.4061°W / 51.0727; -0.4061 (St Peter's Church, Slinfold)
Anglican II Benjamin Ferrey's individualistic Decorated Gothic Revival stone church of 1861 lost its broach spire in 1970, but the tower retains its clock face. Gigantic capitals on the arcades in the aisles contribute to a sense of space in the interior. [258][259]
[260][261]
[262]
Slinfold Chapel Slinfold Chapel (United Reformed Church), Slinfold.JPG Slinfold
51°04′17″N 0°24′20″W / 51.0715°N 0.4055°W / 51.0715; -0.4055 (Slinfold Chapel, Slinfold)
United Reformed This is the third chapel serving Slinfold's Congregational (now United Reformed) community. Hayes Chapel, in a cottage near the manor house, was used from 1812 until 1858, when a chapel was built on the site of the present brick and tile building. This replaced its predecessor in 1878. [260][261]
Church of the Holy Innocents Church of the Holy Innocents, Southwater (NHLE Code 1259780).JPG Southwater
51°01′31″N 0°21′31″W / 51.0253°N 0.3585°W / 51.0253; -0.3585 (Church of the Holy Innocents, Southwater)
Anglican II J.P. Harrison's "small, decent chapel" of 1850 was originally in the parish of Horsham. Sir Henry Aubrey-Fletcher, 3rd Baronet donated the land and most of the cost of construction. The stone Early English Gothic Revival building has a bell turret at the west end. A vestry was added in 1909. [93][235]
[263][264]
[265][266]
St Andrew's Church St Andrew's Church, Steyning (IoE Code 298687).jpg Steyning
50°53′24″N 0°19′30″W / 50.8900°N 0.3250°W / 50.8900; -0.3250 (St Andrew's Church, Steyning)
Anglican I Founded in bizarre circumstances by St Cuthman in the 8th century, and granted to Fécamp Abbey in the mid-11th century, the present substantial 12th-century building was identified as "the best in Sussex, and one of the best in the country" by Pevsner. The Duke of Norfolk financed rebuilding of the ruined chancel in the 18th century. Gordon Macdonald Hills carried out a poorly regarded restoration in 1863–64. [12][267]
[268][269]
[270][271]
Steyning Methodist Church Steyning Methodist Church, Steyning.jpg Steyning
50°53′16″N 0°19′35″W / 50.8877°N 0.3265°W / 50.8877; -0.3265 (Steyning Methodist Church, Steyning)
Methodist The growing Methodist community in Steyning moved out of Jarvis Hall, their home since 1843, into Worthing architect James E. Lund's new Gothic Revival chapel in 1878. Work on the flint and yellow-brick building had started a year earlier. There were internal extensions and improvements in 1968 and 1979. [264][265]
[272]
Church of Christ the King Church of Christ the King, Steyning.jpg Steyning
50°53′06″N 0°19′38″W / 50.8850°N 0.3273°W / 50.8850; -0.3273 (Church of Christ the King, Steyning)
Roman Catholic There was a significant Roman Catholic presence in Steyning during the 16th and 17th centuries. In recent times, Mass was celebrated in the town hall from 1948, and a former barn was turned into a permanent church in 1951. It was parished in 1968, and is now part of the three-church Parish of Our Lady Queen of Peace, Adur Valley. [23][273]
St Mary the Virgin Church St Mary the Virgin Church, Storrington (IoE Code 298791).JPG Storrington
50°54′58″N 0°27′23″W / 50.9160°N 0.4564°W / 50.9160; -0.4564 (St Mary the Virgin Church, Storrington)
Anglican II* Little ancient work remains in this substantial church, which stands in a high position: only the north aisle retains 11th-century details. The plain tower and much of the body of the church date from 1750 (the old steeple had collapsed a few years earlier, damaging the roof), and in 1876 the incumbent vicar, Rev. George Faithfull, funded another restoration which included the construction of a large wall with steps up from the road to the churchyard. [274][275]
[276][277]
[278][279]
Storrington Chapel Storrington Chapel (Evangelical Free Church), Storrington.JPG Storrington
50°55′07″N 0°27′14″W / 50.9187°N 0.4540°W / 50.9187; -0.4540 (Storrington Chapel, Storrington)
Evangelical Pastor Robert Mustow, who led Nonconformist worship in the late 19th century at nearby Cootham, founded a mission chapel in Storrington village centre in 1909. The tin tabernacle was replaced by this permanent building in 1932. The old building passed into commercial use and survived until 1970. [280]
Trinity Methodist Church Trinity Methodist Church, Storrington.JPG Storrington
50°55′13″N 0°26′44″W / 50.9202°N 0.4456°W / 50.9202; -0.4456 (Trinity Methodist Church, Storrington)
Methodist Methodist worship in Storrington dates from 1960. Neighbouring Sullington's parish hall was used from 1962 until 1967; in 1962 the community bought a plot of land in Sullington parish (but within the urban boundary of Storrington) to build a permanent church. This happened in 1966–67. The 140-capacity church and adjoining hall are of brick. [280][281]
Priory Church of Our Lady of England Priory Church of Our Lady of England, Storrington.JPG Storrington
50°55′00″N 0°27′36″W / 50.9166°N 0.4599°W / 50.9166; -0.4599 (Priory Church of Our Lady of England, Storrington)
Roman Catholic Edward Goldie's "fine" red brick and stone Decorated Gothic Revival church of 1902–04 was added to the side of Storrington's Premonstratensian monastery, which dates from 1888. Features include a timber bell turret, an apse and an interior gallery. Henry Fitzalan-Howard, 15th Duke of Norfolk donated the land. [265][280]
[29][282]
St Mary's Church Sullington St Mary.jpg Sullington
50°54′25″N 0°26′21″W / 50.9070°N 0.4392°W / 50.9070; -0.4392 (St Mary's Church, Sullington)
Anglican I Saxon work survives in this remote church, situated in farmland below the South Downs. The tall, narrow nave predates the Norman Conquest, and the tower, chancel and its arch are 13th-century. Survivals from the 12th-century include a single window and a doorway. One window has good reticulated tracery. [283][284]
[285][286]
[287][288]
St Mary's Church St Marys Church - geograph.org.uk - 266919.jpg Thakeham
50°56′41″N 0°25′17″W / 50.9447°N 0.4214°W / 50.9447; -0.4214 (St Mary's Church, Thakeham)
Anglican I The church has Norman origins but was rebuilt in the 13th century; the details of the transepts and chancel arch suggest a date in the early part of that century. The large tower is later and Perpendicular Gothic in style, as is the ornate font. An earlier dedication was to Saints Peter and Paul. [289][290]
[283][291]
[292]
Kingdom Hall Kingdom Hall, Storrington Road, Abingworth, near Thakeham.JPG Thakeham
50°55′57″N 0°26′10″W / 50.9324°N 0.4360°W / 50.9324; -0.4360 (Kingdom Hall, Thakeham)
Jehovah's Witnesses The land on which this Kingdom Hall stands is owned by Thakeham Parish Council by means of a charitable trust. It is used by the Pulborough Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, and was registered for marriages in March 1990. [293][294]
[295][296]
St John's Church St Johns Church, Tismans Common - geograph.org.uk - 243115.jpg Tisman's Common
51°04′57″N 0°28′13″W / 51.0825°N 0.4704°W / 51.0825; -0.4704 (St John's Church, Tisman's Common)
Anglican This hamlet in the parish of Rudgwick has a very small church on land donated by the owner of Exfold Wood, a cottage, in 1913. The tiny brick chapel is hidden behind another house which now occupies the site. [243][297]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Upper Beeding (IoE Code 298872).jpg Upper Beeding
50°53′15″N 0°18′20″W / 50.8874°N 0.3056°W / 50.8874; -0.3056 (St Peter's Church, Upper Beeding)
Anglican II* William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber founded Sele Priory in the late 11th century, and attached it to the church which had recently been built at Upper Beeding. It was thereafter used by both villagers and monks, but the two congregations were physically separated. The church was modest, and experienced alteration in the 19th century. Surviving pre-Victorian detail is mostly 13th-century. [298][299]
[300][301]
[302][303]
Upper Beeding Baptist Church Upper Beeding Baptist Church.JPG Upper Beeding
50°52′57″N 0°18′17″W / 50.8826°N 0.3046°W / 50.8826; -0.3046 (Upper Beeding Baptist Church, Upper Beeding)
Baptist The present brick building by C.J. Greening dates from 1966, but Baptist worship in the village began at a farm in 1905. A tin tabernacle was erected in 1913 by Jonathan Willet; it stood in front of the new church, and was finally demolished in 1975. [28][304]
The Towers Convent Chapel Chapel at The Towers Convent, Upper Beeding.jpg Upper Beeding
50°52′46″N 0°17′52″W / 50.8794°N 0.2979°W / 50.8794; -0.2979 (The Towers Convent Chapel, Upper Beeding)
Roman Catholic II Nikolaus Pevsner called the dour medieval-style convent, built in 1870 as a private house, "terrifying". Its chapel, which has been open for public worship from the beginning, was built in 1929 to E.G. Geary's Decorated Gothic Revival design. It has an apsidal end and is stuccoed with stone dressings. [28][305]
[306][307]
St Margaret's Church St Margaret's Church, Warnham in 2007.jpg Warnham
51°05′27″N 0°20′47″W / 51.0907°N 0.3465°W / 51.0907; -0.3465 (St Margaret's Church, Warnham)
Anglican I Arthur Blomfield's restoration of 1885–86 left some 14th- and 16th-century detail, and the simple but substantial 16th-century tower is unaltered. Rusper Priory owned the original church on this site after William de Braose, 1st Lord of Bramber granted the advowson in the 12th century, and its Purbeck Marble font survives. The original dedication was to Saint Mary. [308][309]
[310]
St Mary's Church Washington Church.JPG Washington
50°54′16″N 0°24′37″W / 50.9044°N 0.4103°W / 50.9044; -0.4103 (St Mary's Church, Washington)
Anglican II* Gordon Macdonald Hills altered the whole church, except the Norman north aisle and the 15th-century Perpendicular Gothic tower, in 1866–67. Good-quality stencil work on the interior, by Heaton and Butler in about 1880, is now covered up. Sele Priory held the church in the 11th century. [311][312]
[313][314]
St Mary's Church West Chiltington Church - geograph.org.uk - 985122.jpg West Chiltington
50°57′15″N 0°26′57″W / 50.9542°N 0.4493°W / 50.9542; -0.4493 (St Mary's Church, West Chiltington)
Anglican I Largely unrestored—except for a 12th-century doorway, poorly treated in the 19th century—this stone church has many wall paintings, 13th- and 14th-century windows and an enormous hagioscope. The nave and chancel are both aisled, and a shingle-clad bell turret with 17th-century timberwork sits on the roof. Also dating from that time is the king post ceiling. [312][315]
[38][316]
[317][318]
[319][320]
St George's Church St George's Church, West Grinstead (NHLE Code 1284797).JPG West Grinstead
50°58′25″N 0°20′01″W / 50.9737°N 0.3337°W / 50.9737; -0.3337 (St George's Church, West Grinstead)
Anglican I A simple two-cell stone church topped by a visually dominant, although low, tower with a shingled "Sussex cap", West Grinstead's parish church is mostly 12th- and 13th-century but retains 11th-century blocked windows on one side of the nave. There is some 14th-century stained glass, and more by Charles Eamer Kempe in 1890 and 1892. The west-facing porch is timber-framed. [222][321]
[322][323]
[324][325]
[326]
Church of Our Lady of Consolation and St Francis Church of Our Lady of Consolation and St Francis, West Grinstead.JPG West Grinstead
50°58′40″N 0°19′29″W / 50.9778°N 0.3246°W / 50.9778; -0.3246 (Church of Our Lady of Consolation and St Francis, West Grinstead)
Roman Catholic Benedictines and Jesuits maintained a Roman Catholic mission at this shrine to Our Lady during the post-Reformation centuries when such worship was illegal. A French priest, Mgr Jean-Marie Denis, founded a church next to it in 1875. Intended to be a "miniature French cathedral", the French Gothic Revival flint and ashlar building was designed by John Crawley. Hilaire Belloc worshipped here and is buried in the churchyard. [315][327]
[328][329]
[24][330]
Wiggonholt Church Wiggonholt Church.jpg Wiggonholt
50°56′26″N 0°29′33″W / 50.9406°N 0.4925°W / 50.9406; -0.4925 (Wiggonholt Church, Wiggonholt)
Anglican I The chancel and nave of this simple 13th-century church have no arch to separate them, and the only exterior ornamentation is a small bell turret. James Powell and Sons' stained glass of 1859 (Jesus walking on water) has an unusual, "weirdly effective colour scheme". The entrance is in a porch on the south side. [331][332]
[333][334]
[335]
St Peter's Church Woodmancote church.jpg Woodmancote
50°55′17″N 0°14′59″W / 50.9214°N 0.2498°W / 50.9214; -0.2498 (St Peter's Church, Woodmancote)
Anglican II* Henry Woodyer's restoration of 1868 gave the church its present Victorian appearance; only the original king post ceiling and a piscina survive from the original 13th-century building, successor to the original 11th-century church. The plan consists of a chancel, aisleless nave, porch and bell turret. The 12th-century font has Sussex Marble work. [336][337]
[338][339]

Closed or disused places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
Amberley Congregational Church Amberley Pottery - geograph.org.uk - 1333820.jpg Amberley
50°54′31″N 0°32′14″W / 50.9087°N 0.5371°W / 50.9087; -0.5371 (Former Amberley Congregational Chapel, Amberley)
Congregational This Congregational chapel closed in 1977 or 1978 after more than a century of religious use. The Early English Gothic Revival building, of stone with dressings of red brick, has passed into commercial use. [340][341]
[342]
Ashington Methodist Church Former Methodist Church, Ashington, West Sussex (Geograph Image 2420575 6ef902ab) - Cropped.jpg Ashington
50°56′03″N 0°23′23″W / 50.9342°N 0.3896°W / 50.9342; -0.3896 (Former Ashington Methodist Church, Ashington)
Methodist Centrally located in Ashington village and opened in 1894, this church—latterly part of the Downs Section of the Worthing Methodist Circuit, along with the Storrington and Steyning chapels—closed in October 2010. It has lancet windows with y-tracery and is built of flint and red brick. [340][343]
[344][345]
Barns Green Chapel Former Congregational Chapel, Barns Green.JPG Barns Green
51°01′49″N 0°23′47″W / 51.0303°N 0.3963°W / 51.0303; -0.3963 (Former Barns Green Chapel, Barns Green)
Congregational Members of the Congregational church in Horsham founded a mission chapel in this village in Itchingfield parish in 1865, and the present building was erected in 1912–13. The simple brick structure became a house after its closure in 1982. [343][346]
[347]
St Mary's Mission Chapel Former St Mary's Mission Chapel, Coolham.JPG Coolham
50°59′38″N 0°24′19″W / 50.9939°N 0.4052°W / 50.9939; -0.4052 (Former St Mary's Mission Chapel, Coolham)
Anglican This chapel of ease to St Mary's Church at Shipley was opened in 1898 to serve the villagers of Coolham, which was in Shipley parish. It closed in 1974 and was sold for residential conversion in 1977. [255]
Cootham Mission Church Former Cootham Mission Church (now Village Hall), Cootham.JPG Cootham
50°55′13″N 0°28′28″W / 50.9202°N 0.4745°W / 50.9202; -0.4745 (Former Cootham Mission Church, Cootham)
Anglican Concerned by the rise in Nonconformism in Cootham, neighbouring Storrington's vicar commissioned architects Giles and Gave to design and build a mission chapel for the village. Services were held between 1875 and 1904 and again in the 1940s. The red-brick building, with an apse, lancet windows and a flèche, has been used as the village hall at other times. [114][121]
[348]
Pastor Mustow's Mission Hall Former Pastor Mustow's Mission Hall (now Cootham Cottage), Chapel Lane, Cootham.JPG Cootham
50°55′09″N 0°28′27″W / 50.9192°N 0.4743°W / 50.9192; -0.4743 (Former Pastor Mustow's Mission Hall, Cootham)
Independent Nonconformist worship in Cootham was led by Pastor Robert Mustow, who converted Cootham Cottage into a chapel and Sunday school. A second chapel (now demolished) was built in Storrington in 1909, but services stopped in the 1920s and the cottage reverted to residential use. [114][349]
Crabtree Bethel Chapel Former Bethel Baptist Chapel, Crabtree, West Sussex.JPG Crabtree
51°00′50″N 0°15′35″W / 51.0139°N 0.2598°W / 51.0139; -0.2598 (Former Crabtree Bethel Chapel, Crabtree)
Baptist This hamlet in the parish of Lower Beeding was given a Particular Baptist chapel in 1835. It was used for worship until about 1896, and also served as a school. [350][351]
Shipley Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Former Shipley Methodist Chapel, Dragon's Green.JPG Dragon's Green
51°00′00″N 0°22′43″W / 50.9999°N 0.3785°W / 50.9999; -0.3785 (Former Shipley Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Dragon's Green)
Methodist Wesleyan Methodists from London Road Methodist Church in Horsham founded a chapel to serve Shipley and surrounding areas in the hamlet of Dragon's Green in 1880. Religious worship ceased in 1951 and the building was sold in 1953 for use as a Scout hut. [225][352]
[353]
St Francis' Church Former St Francis' Church (Anglican and Methodist), Faygate.jpg Faygate
51°05′36″N 0°15′45″W / 51.0933°N 0.2624°W / 51.0933; -0.2624 (Former St Francis' Church, Faygate)
Methodist/Anglican The trustees of Horsham's Methodist church founded this 100-capacity brick chapel in 1885, and local builder T. Denny erected it. It was shared with Anglicans from the 1930s, and when Methodist congregations became negligible in the 1960s the building was sold to the Diocese of Chichester, thereafter becoming the Anglican church of St Francis. It closed in 1979 and was converted into a house. [225][246]
[354][355]
[356]
Rehoboth Strict Baptist Chapel Henfield
50°55′41″N 0°16′31″W / 50.9281°N 0.2753°W / 50.9281; -0.2753 (Former Rehoboth Strict Baptist Chapel, Henfield)
Baptist Another corrugated iron former chapel was moved to Henfield from nearby Blackstone. Despite "many vicissitudes" and the lack of a permanent minister, it served Strict Baptists from 1897 until 1990, when it was sold after congregations declined. [155][157]
[174][357]
[358]
Nep Town Mission Chapel Former Nep Town Mission Chapel, Henfield.JPG Henfield
50°55′41″N 0°16′41″W / 50.9281°N 0.2781°W / 50.9281; -0.2781 (Former Nep Town Mission Chapel, Henfield)
Congregational This small corrugated iron building, facing Nep Town Road in the Nep Town area of Henfield village, was associated with the Congregationalist cause when it was founded. In 1940 it joined the present Henfield Evangelical Free Church—itself a Congregational church at the time—and has since become a carpentry shop. [359]
St Mark's Church Former St Mark's Church (Spire), North Street, Horsham.JPG Horsham
51°03′47″N 0°19′33″W / 51.0630°N 0.3258°W / 51.0630; -0.3258 (Former St Mark's Church, Horsham)
Anglican Horsham's second church, after the ancient St Mary's parish church, was erected on land donated by Thomas Coppard in 1841. William Moseley's Early English-style building was replaced by William Habershon and Edgar Brock's stone church in 1870. It was extended in 1888, closed in the 1930s and reopened briefly in 1948 before its final closure. The spire and tower survive, but most of the building was demolished in 1989 for office development by Royal & Sun Alliance. [93][168]
[96][172]
[164][165]
[235][360]
[361]
Railway Mission Hall Former Railway Mission Hall, Oakhill Road, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′50″N 0°19′01″W / 51.0640°N 0.3170°W / 51.0640; -0.3170 (Former Railway Mission Hall, Horsham)
Independent Horsham's branch of the non-denominational Railway Mission opened in 1896 in the Oakhill area of the town. It thrived for more than 100 years, but closed at the end of the 20th century and is now in commercial use. [30][169]
[171]
Primitive Methodist Chapel Former Primitive Methodist Chapel, Rushams Road, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°04′10″N 0°19′54″W / 51.0694°N 0.3316°W / 51.0694; -0.3316 (Former Primitive Methodist Chapel, Horsham)
Methodist Several Primitive Methodist chapels were founded in the Horsham area in the late 19th century. This brick building on Rushams Road in the northwest of the town dates from 1885; it closed in the early 1920s. [30][40]
[177]
Salvation Army Citadel Former Salvation Army Citadel, Barttelot Road, Horsham.jpg Horsham
51°03′45″N 0°19′28″W / 51.0624°N 0.3244°W / 51.0624; -0.3244 (Former Salvation Army Citadel, Horsham)
Salvation Army This building replaced the original Salvation Army place of worship on Springfield Road in 1969. The original citadel, formerly the town's National school, dated from 1887. Religious and social activities moved to another new citadel in the early 21st century. [30][180]
[170][171]
Mannings Heath Wesleyan Chapel Former Methodist Chapel, Mannings Heath.JPG Mannings Heath
51°02′48″N 0°16′54″W / 51.0467°N 0.2817°W / 51.0467; -0.2817 (Former Mannings Heath Wesleyan Chapel, Mannings Heath)
Methodist This red-brick Gothic Revival chapel was in use between 1869 and 1973, and replaced an 1832 building which was Mannings Heath's first place of worship: the Anglican church was founded later. The trustees of London Road Methodist Church in Horsham established the original chapel. [225][362]
[363]
Maplehurst Congregational Mission Room Former Congregational Mission Room, Maplehurst.JPG Maplehurst
51°00′47″N 0°18′13″W / 51.0131°N 0.3035°W / 51.0131; -0.3035 (Former Maplehurst Congregational Mission Chapel, Maplehurst)
United Reformed Horsham Congregational Church founded this wayside red- and yellow-brick building as a Congregational chapel in the mid-1890s. Services had started a few years earlier in a small room in the village. It joined the United Reformed Church when that denomination was formed in 1972, but declining use led to its closure soon afterwards. [208][212]
[363]
Providence Congregational Chapel Former Mare Hill Congregational Chapel, Mare Hill, Pulborough.JPG Marehill
50°57′19″N 0°29′12″W / 50.9554°N 0.4868°W / 50.9554; -0.4868 (Former Mare Hill Congregational Chapel, Marehill)
Congregational Serving the east end of Pulborough, this stuccoed Classical-style building with arched windows was erected in 1845 for the Congregational community. It became redundant after a new church was opened in the centre of Pulborough, and was sold in 1947 for conversion into a shop. The building was refronted in 2002. [208][212]
St Mary the Virgin's Church St Mary's Church - North Stoke - geograph.org.uk - 631286.jpg North Stoke
50°53′15″N 0°33′05″W / 50.8874°N 0.5514°W / 50.8874; -0.5514 (Former St Mary the Virgin's Church, North Stoke)
Anglican I The dedication of this unrestored, partly 11th-century church was rediscovered in 2007 after it was lost centuries earlier. Worship ceased in 1992, and the cruciform stone building was placed in the care of the Churches Conservation Trust. The transepts have excellent windows and date from about 1290, and medieval carvings abound. [360][364]
[365][366]
[367]
Jarvis Hall Jarvis Hall, Jarvis Lane, Steyning (IoE Code 298766).jpg Steyning
50°53′14″N 0°19′30″W / 50.8872°N 0.3251°W / 50.8872; -0.3251 (Jarvis Hall, Steyning)
Plymouth Brethren II Now in residential use, this Nonconformist chapel has housed four different congregations since its construction in 1835. Rev. Edward Lambert of Brighton founded it for the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion, but the cause soon failed and Wesleyan Methodists bought it in 1843. The Salvation Army used it for a time, then between 1907 and 1987 Plymouth Brethren worshipped there. The simple Neoclassical building has a stuccoed façade, four large pilasters, arched windows and a pediment. The Methodist congregation moved into the new Steyning Methodist Church in 1878. [264][272]
[265][368]
[369]
Penn's House Penn's House, Steyning (IoE Code 298764).jpg Steyning
50°53′30″N 0°19′56″W / 50.8918°N 0.3323°W / 50.8918; -0.3323 (Penn's House, Steyning)
Quaker II This 17th-century timber-framed brick and stone cottage became a Quaker meeting house in 1678 after a community developed there. William Penn preached there in 1695, and the house remained in Quaker ownership thereafter—although it passed out of and back into religious use several times. Services were briefly held as recently as the 1960s. [272][282]
[36]
Former Chapel at Toat Farm Toat Farm, Pulborough
50°59′13″N 0°30′37″W / 50.9869°N 0.5102°W / 50.9869; -0.5102 (Former chapel at Toat Farm, Pulborough)
(Unknown) II Now a farm building, this 18th-century ashlar-built room was apparently founded as a chapel. Round-arched windows and a tiled roof survive, and there is a font inside. [370]
Church of the Holy Sepulchre Holy Sepulchre Church, Warminghurst - geograph.org.uk - 46960.jpg Warminghurst
50°56′25″N 0°24′41″W / 50.9403°N 0.4114°W / 50.9403; -0.4114 (Former Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Warminghurst)
Anglican I This 13th-century church, declared redundant in 1979 after an initial temporary closure in the 1920s, stands in a thinly populated part of Ashington parish on the site of an 11th-century predecessor. It belonged to St Andrew's Church in Steyning for many years, after a period of annexation to Fécamp Abbey. The simple single-cell building has sandstone walls, a tiled roof with a spire-topped bell turret and some Decorated Gothic windows. [309][360]
[371][372]
[373]
Dependants Chapel Former Society of Dependents Chapel, Warnham.jpg Warnham
51°05′11″N 0°21′33″W / 51.0864°N 0.3593°W / 51.0864; -0.3593 (Former Dependants Chapel, Warnham)
Society of Dependants The Society of Dependants [sic], also known as Cokelers, were a tiny sect of Protestant Dissenters with links to Arminianism, founded by John Sirgood and based mainly in West Sussex and Surrey. One of their chapels was founded in 1874 at Warnham. The arch-windowed red-bricj building remained in use until 1976, when a declining congregation resulted in the building's sale and residential conversion. [38][315]
[39]
Watersfield Baptist Chapel The Old Chapel, Watersfield.JPG Watersfield
50°56′00″N 0°33′29″W / 50.9333°N 0.5581°W / 50.9333; -0.5581 (Former Watersfield Baptist Chapel, Watersfield)
Baptist This building has been converted into a house and has been altered. It dates from 1901 and was built of stone and red brick with round-arched windows and bargeboards to the gables. [38][315]
Watersfield Congregational Chapel Watersfield chapel 2.JPG Watersfield
50°55′56″N 0°33′29″W / 50.9323°N 0.5580°W / 50.9323; -0.5580 (Former Watersfield Congregational Chapel, Watersfield)
Congregational This red-brick chapel and its graveyard survive intact despite being disused and neglected. The building, which has round-arched windows, was erected in 1823. [38][315]
St Mary's Church Wiston
50°53′58″N 0°21′30″W / 50.8995°N 0.3584°W / 50.8995; -0.3584 (Former St Mary's Church, Wiston)
Anglican II* Gordon Macdonald Hills's restoration of 1862 was criticised by Pevsner, who noted that its original appearance was largely 14th-century—although a church stood on the remote site in the 11th century. Memorials include one to Thomas Shirley of Wiston House, which is now the only nearby building. Use of the church declined after the population shifted northwards from the 19th century, and the church was declared redundant in 2007. [17][360]
[374][375]
[376][377]
[378]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 75.
  2. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". The UK Statute Law Database. Ministry of Justice. 24 May 1990. Retrieved 30 November 2010. 
  3. ^ "History of English Heritage". English Heritage. 2010. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  4. ^ "Listed Buildings". English Heritage. 2012. Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "Images of England — Statistics by County (West Sussex)". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Archived from the original on 2 January 2013. Retrieved 2 January 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c "About Horsham District". Horsham District Council. 3 April 2010. Retrieved 4 February 2011. 
  7. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Horsham: General history of the town". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 131–156. Retrieved 4 February 2011. 
  8. ^ "Around the Parishes". The Official Guide to the Horsham District. Horsham District Council. 2011. Retrieved 4 February 2011. 
  9. ^ "United Kingdom: Local Authority Districts, Counties and Unitary Authorities, March 2009" (PDF). Office for National Statistics. 2009. Retrieved 2 February 2012. 
  10. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 5.
  11. ^ Collins 2007, pp. 36–37.
  12. ^ a b Coppin 2006, p. 111.
  13. ^ Vigar 1986, p. 13.
  14. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 79–80.
  15. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 96.
  16. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 103–104.
  17. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 382.
  18. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, pp. 69–70.
  19. ^ a b c d e Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 77.
  20. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, pp. 67–68.
  21. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, pp. 77–78.
  22. ^ a b c Stell 2002, p. 329.
  23. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Steyning – Roman Catholicism". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 244. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  24. ^ a b "Our Lady of Consolation & St Francis, West Grinstead" (PDF). English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005. English Heritage. 2005. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  25. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Henfield – Roman Catholicism". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 156–157. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  26. ^ a b Carreck & Barwick 2002, pp. 60–61.
  27. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Cowfold – Roman Catholicism". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 188. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  28. ^ a b c Elleray 2004, p. 53.
  29. ^ a b "Our Lady of England Priory, Storrington" (PDF). English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005. English Heritage. 2005. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Horsham – Protestant Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 196–198. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  31. ^ a b c d e Elleray 2004, p. 4.
  32. ^ Stell 2002, p. 331.
  33. ^ Various authors 2007, pp. 12–14.
  34. ^ a b Carreck & Barwick 2002, pp. 58–59.
  35. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Warminghurst – Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 60. Retrieved 25 March 2011. 
  36. ^ a b "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Penn's House and Penn Cottage, Horsham Road, Steyning, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  37. ^ a b "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Blue Idol Meeting House and Guest House, Coolham, Thakeham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  38. ^ a b c d e Elleray 2004, p. 54.
  39. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Warnham – Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 217–218. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  40. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Elleray 2004, p. 33.
  41. ^ a b Bauldry, Jess (14 May 2008). "Mosque finds a home in Horsham salon". The Argus (Newsquest Media Group). Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  42. ^ "Area: Horsham (Local Authority) – Religion (UV15)". 2001 UK Census statistics for Wealden. Office for National Statistics. 18 November 2004. Retrieved 7 January 2011. 
  43. ^ "A little bit of history". Diocese of Chichester. 2012. Archived from the original on 19 January 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  44. ^ a b "Deaneries in the Diocese of Chichester". Diocese of Chichester. 2010. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  45. ^ "Horsham". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2009. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  46. ^ "Storrington". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2009. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  47. ^ "Hurst". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2009. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  48. ^ "Petworth". A Church Near You website. Archbishops' Council. 2009. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  49. ^ "Arundel Cathedral Parish". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2010. Retrieved 29 October 2010. 
  50. ^ "Deaneries of the Diocese". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2010. Retrieved 24 December 2010. 
  51. ^ "What is SEBA?". Baptist Union of Great Britain. 2010. Retrieved 7 January 2011. 
  52. ^ a b "Networks". Baptist Union of Great Britain. 2010. Retrieved 7 January 2011. 
  53. ^ "Welcome to LIFE Community Baptist Church". LIFE Community Baptist Church. 2010. Retrieved 7 January 2011. 
  54. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Michael and All Angels, Church Street (south side), Amberley, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  55. ^ Salter 2000, p. 78.
  56. ^ Wilkinson 2003, p. 91.
  57. ^ Wales 1999, p. 14.
  58. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 68.
  59. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Peter and St Paul, Church Lane, Ashington, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  60. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Ashington – Churches". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 70–73. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  61. ^ a b Salter 2000, p. 83.
  62. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 132.
  63. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St James, Church Lane, Ashurst, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  64. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Ashurst – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 81–82. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  65. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 96–97.
  66. ^ Wales 1999, p. 20.
  67. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 114.
  68. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary, East Street (south side), Billingshurst, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  69. ^ Salter 2000, p. 84.
  70. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 135.
  71. ^ Wilkinson 2003, p. 31.
  72. ^ Wales 1999, p. 28.
  73. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 104.
  74. ^ "St Gabriel, Billingshurst" (PDF). English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005. English Heritage. 2005. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  75. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Unitarian and Free Christian Church, High Street (west side), Billingshurst, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  76. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, pp. 155–156.
  77. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 46.
  78. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Church of St Botolph, Botolphs, Bramber, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  79. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Botolphs". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 195–199. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  80. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 113.
  81. ^ Salter 2000, p. 87.
  82. ^ Wales 1999, p. 36.
  83. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 106.
  84. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, pp. 29–30.
  85. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, pp. 100–102.
  86. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Nicholas, The Street (north side), Bramber, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  87. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Bramber". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 200–214. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  88. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 118–119.
  89. ^ Salter 2000, p. 89.
  90. ^ Wales 1999, p. 39.
  91. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 112.
  92. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 5.
  93. ^ a b c d e f g h Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Horsham – Churches". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 190–195. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  94. ^ a b c Windrum 1978, p. 36.
  95. ^ a b c Haines 2005, p. 147.
  96. ^ a b c d e f g h Harris 2004, p. 19.
  97. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 53.
  98. ^ Elleray 2004, p. 13.
  99. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Buncton Chapel of All Saints, Steyning Road, Wiston, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  100. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 120.
  101. ^ Salter 2000, p. 90.
  102. ^ Wales 1999, p. 47.
  103. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 4.
  104. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 29.
  105. ^ Lee, Adrian (20 December 2004). "Pagan whodunnit grips village". The Times (Times Newspapers Ltd/News International). Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  106. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Giles, London Road, Coldwaltham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  107. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 193.
  108. ^ a b Salter 2000, p. 97.
  109. ^ Wilkinson 2003, pp. 54–55.
  110. ^ Wales 1999, p. 63.
  111. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 67.
  112. ^ a b c Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Lower Beeding – Churches". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 26–28. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  113. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 55.
  114. ^ a b c d Elleray 2004, p. 17.
  115. ^ Wales 1999, p. 64.
  116. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Thakeham – Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 48. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  117. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 107.
  118. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, pp. 47–48.
  119. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 155.
  120. ^ Wales 1999, pp. 66–67.
  121. ^ a b Elleray 1981, p. 56.
  122. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Peter, Station Road, Cowfold, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  123. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Cowfold – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 185–188. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  124. ^ a b c Elleray 1981, p. 75.
  125. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 198–199.
  126. ^ Wilkinson 2003, p. 45.
  127. ^ Wales 1999, p. 70.
  128. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 122.
  129. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — St Hugh's Monastery, Parkminster, Henfield Road, Cowfold, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  130. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Cowfold". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 171–177. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  131. ^ a b c d Elleray 2004, p. 44.
  132. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 317.
  133. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Church of St Andrew, Edburton Village, Upper Beeding, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  134. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Edburton – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 51–52. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  135. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 217.
  136. ^ Salter 2000, p. 103.
  137. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 117.
  138. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 121.
  139. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Greatham Church, Greatham, Parham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  140. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 232.
  141. ^ a b c Salter 2000, p. 107.
  142. ^ a b Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 157.
  143. ^ Wales 1999, p. 112.
  144. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 69.
  145. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Church of St Botolph, London Road, Hardham, Coldwaltham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  146. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 234–235.
  147. ^ Wales 1999, p. 115.
  148. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 70.
  149. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Peter, Church Lane (east side), Henfield, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  150. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Henfield – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 155–156. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  151. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 239.
  152. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 92.
  153. ^ Carreck & Barwick 2002, pp. 4–6.
  154. ^ Carreck & Barwick 2002, pp. 57–58.
  155. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Henfield – Protestant Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 157. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  156. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 66.
  157. ^ a b Elleray 2004, p. 31.
  158. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Parish Church of St Mary, The Causeway (east side), Horsham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  159. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 242–244.
  160. ^ Salter 2000, p. 108.
  161. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 96.
  162. ^ Windrum 1978, pp. 12–24.
  163. ^ Harris 2004, pp. 14–15.
  164. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Elleray 1981, p. 67.
  165. ^ a b c Elleray 2004, p. 32.
  166. ^ Haines 2005, p. 102.
  167. ^ a b c d Harris 2004, p. 17.
  168. ^ a b Windrum 1978, p. 35.
  169. ^ a b c d e f g Windrum 1978, p. 39.
  170. ^ a b c d e f g Haines 2005, p. 110.
  171. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Harris 2004, p. 20.
  172. ^ a b c d e Harris 2004, p. 31.
  173. ^ "The History of BRBC". Brighton Road Baptist Church. 2011. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  174. ^ a b c d Homan 1997, p. 281.
  175. ^ a b Chambers 1953, pp. 120–121.
  176. ^ "Christian Life Centre Horsham". Christian Life Centre. 1992–2010. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  177. ^ a b c Various authors 2007, p. 13.
  178. ^ "Denne Road Gospel Hall – Welcome". Denne Road Gospel Hall. 2011. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  179. ^ Windrum 1978, pp. 39–40.
  180. ^ a b Windrum 1978, p. 40.
  181. ^ "Congregation Meeting Search (State/Province: West Sussex)". jw.org (Jehovah's Witnesses) Congregation Finder app. Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania, Inc. 2012. Retrieved 29 November 2012.  (Select "Search" then "Expand all details".)
  182. ^ Haines 2005, pp. 110–111.
  183. ^ Various authors 2007, p. 5.
  184. ^ Chambers 1953, p. 127.
  185. ^ Vickers, Claire (September 2010). "Report of the Social Inclusion Working Group into Minority Faith & Ethnic Communities". Horsham District Council. pp. 3–4. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  186. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 70029; Name: Arthur Road Meeting Room; Address: 6 Arthur Road, Horsham; Denomination: Christians not otherwise designated). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  187. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Friends' Meeting House; Custodian's Cottage attached to the north of Friends' Meeting House, Worthing Road (west side), Horsham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  188. ^ a b Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 247.
  189. ^ Windrum 1978, pp. 36–37
  190. ^ Haines 2005, pp. 54, 127.
  191. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Horsham – Roman Catholicism". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 195–196. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  192. ^ "St John the Evangelist, Horsham" (PDF). English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005. English Heritage. 2005. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  193. ^ "The Salvation Army: Horsham". The Salvation Army United Kingdom with the Republic of Ireland. 2011. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  194. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Horsham Free Christian (Unitarian) Church, Worthing Road (west side), Horsham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  195. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 156.
  196. ^ Windrum 1978, p. 38.
  197. ^ Haines 2005, pp. 57, 70, 96.
  198. ^ Haines 2005, p. 52.
  199. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Nicholas, Itchingfield Village, Itchingfield, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  200. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Itchingfield – Local Government". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 15–17. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  201. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 250–251.
  202. ^ Salter 2000, p. 110.
  203. ^ Wales 1999, p. 127.
  204. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 89.
  205. ^ "Property History: Brethrens Meeting Room, 131–133 Rusper Road, Horsham, West Sussex, RH12 4BP". Horsham District Council planning applications. Horsham District Council. 2011. Retrieved 24 March 2011. 
  206. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 75991; Name: Meeting Room; Address: 131 Rusper Road, Horsham; Denomination: Christians not otherwise designated). Retrieved 22 October 2012. (Archived version of list)
  207. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of the Holy Trinity, Sandygate Lane, Lower Beeding, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  208. ^ a b c d e Elleray 2004, p. 40.
  209. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 71.
  210. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 265.
  211. ^ Wales 1999, p. 141.
  212. ^ a b c Elleray 1981, p. 72.
  213. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Nuthurst – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 106–108. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  214. ^ Hughes 2000, p. 23.
  215. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Andrew, Harriots Hill, Nuthurst, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  216. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 284–285.
  217. ^ Salter 2000, p. 120.
  218. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 74.
  219. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Peter, Parham, Parham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  220. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 292.
  221. ^ Salter 2000, p. 122.
  222. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. West Grinstead – Churches". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 100–102. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  223. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 293.
  224. ^ a b Salter 2000, p. 129.
  225. ^ a b c d Various authors 2007, p. 14.
  226. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. West Grinstead – Protestant Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 104. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  227. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary, Church Place, Pulborough, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  228. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 309–310.
  229. ^ Salter 2000, p. 125.
  230. ^ "Pulborough, West Sussex". DABnet website. Diocese of Arundel and Brighton. 2011. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  231. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — All Saints Church, Crawley Road, Roffey, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  232. ^ a b Elleray 2004, p. 46.
  233. ^ a b c Elleray 1981, p. 77.
  234. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 313.
  235. ^ a b c Salter 2000, p. 149.
  236. ^ Wales 1999, p. 174.
  237. ^ a b Hughes 2000, p. 20.
  238. ^ Haines 2005, p. 109.
  239. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of The Holy Trinity, Church Street (east side), Rudgwick, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  240. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 314–315.
  241. ^ Salter 2000, p. 126.
  242. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 88.
  243. ^ a b c "Rudgwick Parish Design Statement". Horsham District Council. 2009. Archived from the original on 21 June 2013. Retrieved 21 June 2013. 
  244. ^ a b Elleray 2004, p. 47.
  245. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary Magdalene, High Street (west side), Rusper, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  246. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Rusper – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 117–119. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  247. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 315–316.
  248. ^ Salter 2000, p. 127.
  249. ^ Wales 1999, p. 178.
  250. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Giles, Brighton Road, Shermanbury, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  251. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Shermanbury – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 196–198. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  252. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 320–321.
  253. ^ Salter 2000, p. 128.
  254. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary, Shipley Village, Shipley, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  255. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Shipley – Churches". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 123–125. Retrieved 21 March 2011. 
  256. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 321–323.
  257. ^ Beevers, Marks & Roles 1989, p. 120.
  258. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Peter, The Street (north side), Slinfold, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  259. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 328–329.
  260. ^ a b Elleray 2004, p. 50.
  261. ^ a b Elleray 1981, p. 79.
  262. ^ Salter 2000, p. 133.
  263. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Holy Innocents Church, Church Lane, Southwater, Rusper, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  264. ^ a b c Elleray 2004, p. 51.
  265. ^ a b c d Elleray 1981, p. 80.
  266. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 334.
  267. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Andrew, Church Street (north-west side), Steyning, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  268. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Steyning – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 241–244. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  269. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 337–340.
  270. ^ Salter 2000, p. 135.
  271. ^ Wilkinson 2003, p. 95.
  272. ^ a b c Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Steyning – Protestant Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 244–245. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  273. ^ "Steyning, West Sussex". DABnet website. Diocese of Arundel and Brighton. 2011. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  274. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary the Virgin, Church Street (west side), Storrington, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  275. ^ Salter 2000, p. 136.
  276. ^ Wilkinson 2003, p. 49.
  277. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 72.
  278. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 343.
  279. ^ Ham 1982, pp. 1–4.
  280. ^ a b c Ham 1982, p. 118.
  281. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Sullington – Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 29–31. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  282. ^ a b Elleray 2004, p. 52.
  283. ^ a b Salter 2000, p. 137.
  284. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary, Sullington Lane, Sullington, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  285. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Sullington – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 27–29. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  286. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 346.
  287. ^ Wales 1999, p. 204.
  288. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 96.
  289. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary, Grays Lane, Thakeham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  290. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Thakeham – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 45–48. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  291. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 348–349.
  292. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 74.
  293. ^ "Thakeham Village Hall". Thakeham Parish Council. 2010. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  294. ^ "List of local places of Worship and religion or belief practiced in the Horsham District (by Parish)" (PDF). Horsham District Council. 2011. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  295. ^ "Minutes of Thakeham Annual Parish Council Meeting – Monday, 17th May 2010" (DOC). Thakeham Parish Council. 17 May 2010. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  296. ^ The London Gazette: no. 52102. p. 7611. 1 April 1992. Retrieved 7 June 2012.
  297. ^ Nash, Roger (2011). "Tisman’s Common, Rudgwick". Rudgwick Preservation Society. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  298. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Peter, Church Lane, Upper Beeding, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  299. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Upper Beeding – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 42–44. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  300. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 380–381.
  301. ^ Salter 2000, p. 139.
  302. ^ Wales 1999, p. 215.
  303. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 113.
  304. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Upper Beeding – Protestant Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 44–45. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  305. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Towers Convent, Henfield Road, Upper Beeding, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  306. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 380.
  307. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Upper Beeding – Roman Catholicism". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 44. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  308. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Margaret, Church Street (east side), Warnham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  309. ^ a b Salter 2000, p. 140.
  310. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Warnham – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 216–217. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  311. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary, The Street (north side), Washington, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  312. ^ a b Salter 2000, p. 141.
  313. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 363–364.
  314. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Washington". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 247–259. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  315. ^ a b c d e Elleray 1981, p. 82.
  316. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary, Church Street (west side), West Chiltington, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  317. ^ Wilkinson 2003, p. 11.
  318. ^ Wales 1999, pp. 224–225.
  319. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 73.
  320. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 365.
  321. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Parish Church of St George, West Grinstead Village, West Grinstead, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  322. ^ Salter 2000, p. 142.
  323. ^ Wilkinson 2003, p. 53.
  324. ^ Wales 1999, p. 227.
  325. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 121.
  326. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 367–368.
  327. ^ Elleray 2004, p. 55.
  328. ^ Wales 1999, p. 228.
  329. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 369–371.
  330. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. West Grinstead – Roman Catholicism". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 102–104. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  331. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Wiggonholt Church, Wiggonholt, Parham, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  332. ^ Salter 2000, p. 144.
  333. ^ Wales 1999, p. 233.
  334. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 71.
  335. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 378.
  336. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Peter, Brighton Road, Woodmancote, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  337. ^ Salter 2000, p. 147.
  338. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 384.
  339. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Woodmancote – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 166–167. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  340. ^ a b Elleray 1981, p. 44.
  341. ^ Elleray 2004, p. 1.
  342. ^ "Amberley Congregational Church NC/C4 [n.d.]". The National Archives. 2011. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  343. ^ a b Elleray 2004, p. 2.
  344. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Ashington – Protestant Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 73. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  345. ^ ""The Downs" Methodist Churches". Steyning Methodist Church. 2010. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  346. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 45.
  347. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Itchingfield – Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 17. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  348. ^ Ham 1982, pp. 116–117.
  349. ^ Ham 1982, pp. 117–118.
  350. ^ Homan 1997, p. 280.
  351. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Lower Beeding – Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 28. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  352. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Shipley – Protestant Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 125–126. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  353. ^ Elleray 2004, p. 49.
  354. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Rusper – Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. p. 119. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  355. ^ Elleray 2004, p. 24.
  356. ^ Elleray 1981, p. 60.
  357. ^ Chambers 1953, p. 41.
  358. ^ Carreck & Barwick 2002, pp. 59–60.
  359. ^ Carreck & Barwick 2002, p. 59.
  360. ^ a b c d "The Church of England Statistics & Information: Lists (by diocese) of closed church buildings as at October 2012" (PDF). Church of England. 1 October 2012. Archived from the original on 30 January 2013. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  361. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 244.
  362. ^ Wales 1999, p. 149.
  363. ^ a b Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1987). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 3 – Bramber Rape (North-Eastern Part) including Crawley New Town. Nuthurst – Nonconformity". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 108–109. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  364. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 283–284.
  365. ^ Salter 2000, p. 119.
  366. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — North Stoke Church, North Stoke, Amberley, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  367. ^ Lewis, Caroline (11 December 2007). "Mystery of Sussex Church Solved by Archaeology Students". Culture24 (Arts Council England, Museums, Libraries and Archives Council and Department for Education). Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  368. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Jarvis Hall, Jarvis Lane, Steyning, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  369. ^ "Property History 100062196714: Jarvis Hall, 1 Jarvis Hall, Jarvis Lane, Steyning, West Sussex, BN44 3GL". Horsham District Council Planning Application Summaries. Horsham District Council. 2011. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  370. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — Outbuilding to south of Toat Farmhouse, Toat Lane, Pulborough, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  371. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Park Lane, Warminghurst, Ashington, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  372. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1986). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 2 – Bramber Rape (North-Western Part) including Horsham. Warminghurst – Church". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 57–60. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  373. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 362–363.
  374. ^ "Heritage Gateway Listed Buildings Online — The Parish Church of St Mary, Wiston, Horsham, West Sussex". Heritage Gateway website. Heritage Gateway (English Heritage, Institute of Historic Building Conservation and ALGAO:England). 2006. Retrieved 20 March 2011. 
  375. ^ Hudson, T. P. (ed) (1980). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 6 Part 1 – Bramber Rape (Southern Part). Wiston". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 259–268. Retrieved 22 March 2011. 
  376. ^ Salter 2000, p. 145.
  377. ^ Wales 1999, p. 235.
  378. ^ Coppin 2006, p. 103.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Beevers, David; Marks, Richard; Roles, John (1989). Sussex Churches and Chapels. Brighton: The Royal Pavilion, Art Gallery and Museums. ISBN 0-948723-11-4. 
  • Carreck, Marjorie; Barwick, Alan (2002). Henfield: a Sussex Village. Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd. ISBN 1-86077-210-2. 
  • Chambers, Ralph (1953). The Strict Baptist Chapels of England: Sussex 2. Thornton Heath: Ralph Chambers. 
  • Coppin, Paul (2006). 101 Medieval Churches of West Sussex. Seaford: S.B. Publications. ISBN 1-85770-306-5. 
  • Elleray, D. Robert (1981). The Victorian Churches of Sussex. Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd. ISBN 0-85033-378-4. 
  • Elleray, D. Robert (2004). Sussex Places of Worship. Worthing: Optimus Books. ISBN 0-9533132-7-1. 
  • Haines, Susan (2005). Horsham – a History. Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd. ISBN 1-86077-332-X. 
  • Ham, Joan (1982). Storrington in Living Memory. Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd. ISBN 0-85033-454-3. 
  • Harris, Roland B. (October 2004). Horsham Historic Character Assessment Report. Sussex Extensive Urban Survey (EUS) (1st ed.). East Sussex County Council, West Sussex County Council and Brighton and Hove City Council. 
  • Homan, Roger (1997). "Mission and Fission: the organization of Huntingtonian and Calvinistic Baptist causes in Sussex in the 18th and 19th centuries". Sussex Archaeological Collections (Lewes: Sussex Archaeological Society) 135: pp. 265–282. ISSN 0143-8204. 
  • Hughes, Annabelle (2000). A History of North Horsham Parish – to Celebrate the Millennium. Horsham: North Horsham Parish Council. 
  • Nairn, Ian; Pevsner, Nikolaus (1965). The Buildings of England: Sussex. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. ISBN 0-14-071028-0. 
  • Salter, Mike (2000). The Old Parish Churches of Sussex. Malvern: Folly Publications. ISBN 1-871731-40-2. 
  • Stell, Christopher (2002). Nonconformist Chapels and Meeting-houses in Eastern England. Swindon: English Heritage. ISBN 1-873592-50-7. 
  • Various authors (2007). London Road Methodist Church Horsham 1832–2007: The Story So Far. Horsham: London Road Methodist Church. 
  • Wales, Tony (1999). The West Sussex Village Book. Newbury: Countryside Books. ISBN 1-85306-581-1. 
  • Wilkinson, Edwin (2003). Looking Towards West Sussex Country Churches. Seaford: S.B. Publications. ISBN 1-85770-277-8. 
  • Windrum, Anthony (1978). Horsham: an Historical Survey. Chichester: Phillimore & Co. Ltd. ISBN 0-85033-284-2.