List of places of worship in Lewes (district)

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St Andrew's Church, the parish church of Bishopstone, is one of many Grade I-listed Anglican churches in the district of Lewes. The linear chancelnave–tower form is found frequently in Sussex.[1]

There are 69 extant churches and places of worship in the district of Lewes, one of five local government districts in the English county of East Sussex. A further 17 former places of worship are no longer in religious use. The area now covered by the district is mainly rural and characterised by small villages with ancient parish churches. The riverside market town of Lewes, the port of Newhaven and the seaside towns of Seaford, Peacehaven and Telscombe Cliffs are the main urban areas and have higher concentrations of religious buildings.

Most residents of the district identify themselves as Christian, and there are no places of worship serving any other religious groups. Many Christian denominations are represented—the town of Lewes in particular has a long-established history of Protestant Nonconformism—but the majority of churches serve the Church of England community.

English Heritage has awarded listed status to many of Lewes district's places of worship. A building is defined as "listed" when it is placed on a statutory register of buildings of "special architectural or historic interest" in accordance with the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990.[2] The Department for Culture, Media and Sport, a Government department, is responsible for this; English Heritage, a non-departmental public body, acts as an agency of the department to administer the process and advise the department on relevant issues.[3] There are three grades of listing status. Grade I, the highest, is defined as being of "exceptional interest"; Grade II* is used for "particularly important buildings of more than special interest"; and Grade II, the lowest, is used for buildings of "special interest".[4]

Location of Lewes and its places of worship[edit]

Lewes district located within East Sussex

Lewes district covers 113 sq mi (290 km2) of the western part of East Sussex. The English Channel forms its southern boundary for 9 miles (14.5 km); four of the five largest towns in the district—Peacehaven, Telscombe Cliffs, Newhaven and Seaford—are on the coast. Lewes, the administrative centre of the district and the county town of East Sussex, lies inland in the centre of the district. The rest of the district is mostly rural.[5] The city and unitary authority of Brighton and Hove lies to the southwest; the district of Mid Sussex, in the neighbouring county of West Sussex, is to the west; and Lewes's eastern boundary is with Wealden district.[6][7]

The Rape of Lewes, one of the pre-Norman subdivisions of Sussex, had been granted by William the Conqueror to William de Warenne, 1st Earl of Surrey, who had become a major landowner by the time of the Domesday survey in 1086.[8] Outside the town of Lewes itself, most manors and villages had developed by the 12th century, and many of their associated churches date from that time—although the Victorian enthusiasm for church restoration had an effect throughout the district.

The town of Lewes enjoys a strategic position on the River Ouse and surrounded by hills. There is evidence of Anglo-Saxon habitation, and by the 10th century it had become the most important borough in Sussex.[9] The oldest surviving church is St Anne's, the parish church, which is 12th-century. Other churches such as St Andrew's, St Martin's and St Mary-in-the-Market-Place declined and fell out of use by the Middle Ages, and their parishes were combined with others in the town.[10] Nonconformism has been established in the town for more than three centuries: Unitarians, Methodists, Quakers, Baptists, Strict Baptists, Presbyterians and Congregationalists all founded chapels in the 18th or 19th centuries,[10] many of which are still in operation. Newer denominations have also become established: Ian Paisley's Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster, most associated with Northern Ireland, founded one of its seven English congregations in the former Strict Baptist chapel in the Cliffe area of town.[11][12] Ditchling and Wivelsfield were also associated with Nonconformist worship.[13][14]

Religious affiliation[edit]

According to the 2001 United Kingdom Census, 92,177 people lived in Lewes district. Of these, 72.02% identified themselves as Christian, 0.44% were Muslim, 0.3% were Buddhist, 0.29% were Jewish, 0.15% were Hindu, 0.03% were Sikh, 0.4% followed another religion, 18.18% claimed no religious affiliation and 8.21% did not state their religion. The proportion of Christians was slightly higher than the 71.74% in England as a whole, while Buddhism and other religions not listed in the Census were also followed by more people than average. The proportion of people with no religious affiliation was much higher than the national figure of 14.59%, but there were fewer followers of Islam, Hinduism, Judaism and Sikhism in the district than in England overall: in 2001, 3.1% of people in England were Muslim, 1.1% were Hindu, 0.7% were Sikh and 0.5% were Jewish.[15]

Administration[edit]

All Anglican churches in Lewes district are part of the Diocese of Chichester, whose cathedral is at Chichester in West Sussex.[16] Three archdeaconries—Chichester, Horsham, and Lewes and Hastings—make up the next highest level of administration;[17] the district has at least one church in each. St Laurence's Church in Falmer, which is part of a united parish with Stanmer Church across the border in the city of Brighton and Hove,[18] is part of the Rural Deanery of Brighton,[19] one of five deaneries in the Archdeaconry of Chichester.[17] St Peter and St John the Baptist's Church at Wivelsfield is in the Rural Deanery of Cuckfield,[20] and the churches at Ditchling, Streat and Westmeston are part of the Rural Deanery of Hurst;[21] these are two of the eight deaneries in the Archdeaconry of Horsham.[17] The Archdeaconry of Lewes and Hastings, which also has eight deaneries, is responsible for all other Anglican churches in the district. Except for the churches in Chailey and Newick, which are in the Rural Deanery of Uckfield,[22] all are controlled by the Rural Deanery of Lewes and Seaford.[23]

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Arundel and Brighton, whose cathedral is at Arundel,[24] administers the four Roman Catholic churches in Lewes district. The diocese has 13 deaneries, each with several churches: Brighton and Hove Deanery's 13 churches include the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Peacehaven, Lewes Deanery controls St Pancras' Church at Lewes and five others outside the district, and Eastbourne Deanery is responsible for the Church of the Sacred Heart in Newhaven, St Thomas More Church in Seaford and eight churches in other districts of East Sussex.[25]

The three United Reformed Church congregations, at Lewes,[26] Seaford[27] and Telscombe Cliffs,[28] are in the Southern Synod—one of 13 Synods in Great Britain.[29] The Synod is responsible for about 170 United Reformed churches in Kent, East Sussex, West Sussex and parts of Surrey.[30] In September 2007, the United Reformed and Methodist churches in a large area of central Sussex came together to form a joint administrative group, the Central Sussex United Area.[31] Member churches in Lewes district are Christ Church in Lewes, Chyngton Methodist Church and Cross Way Church in Seaford. St Michael's Anglican church in Newhaven is also involved.[32]

Open places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
St Mary the Virgin Church Barcombe Church.JPG Barcombe
50°54′58″N 0°00′51″E / 50.9162°N 0.0141°E / 50.9162; 0.0141 (St Mary the Virgin Church, Barcombe)
Anglican II* The church serves a large rural parish whose original settlement declined in the 14th century. Part of the nave is 12th-century; the tower and widened chancel were built a century later. Restoration work in 1879–1880 included replacement of all the ancient lancet windows. Charles Eamer Kempe provided some stained glass. [33][34]
[35][36]
[37]
Jubilee Christian Centre Barcombe Baptist Church 2.JPG Barcombe
50°54′39″N 0°00′59″E / 50.9108°N 0.0165°E / 50.9108; 0.0165 (Jubilee Christian Centre, Barcombe)
Baptist Barcombe's first chapel, associated with the Strict Baptist and Calvinist movements, was established in 1810 just off the road to Hamsey. It was a brick structure in the Vernacular style. A modern brick building, registered in 1980, now stands on the site. The FIEC-aligned church changed its name from Barcombe Baptist Church in 2006. [33][38]
[39][40]
[41]
St Andrew's Church St Andrew's Church, Beddingham (Geograph Image 1349715 04f28ea5).jpg Beddingham
50°51′09″N 0°03′05″E / 50.8526°N 0.0515°E / 50.8526; 0.0515 (St Andrew's Church, Beddingham)
Anglican I The isolated riverside settlement was founded in the 9th century but has declined to a negligible size. The church has Norman origins and was added to over a long period: most of the structural work is 14th- and 16th-century. The flint building has a chancel, nave and tower. [42][43]
[44]
St Andrew's Church St Andrew's Church, Bishopstone (Geograph Image 1414359 ef454fa1).jpg Bishopstone
50°47′23″N 0°05′16″E / 50.7897°N 0.0877°E / 50.7897; 0.0877 (St Andrew's Church, Bishopstone)
Anglican I Norman settlers rebuilt this village's early-8th-century Anglo-Saxon church, but parts remain in the nave, porch and tower. The 12th-century reconstruction produced an Early English-style flint and stone church. [45][46]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Chailey (Geograph Image 1015453 cd850b4f).jpg Chailey
50°57′24″N 0°01′09″W / 50.9567°N 0.0192°W / 50.9567; -0.0192 (St Peter's Church, Chailey)
Anglican II* This sandstone and ashlar church retains its 13th-century chancel and tower with its shingled spire. The nave was enlarged (and aisles added) in 1878–1879 by John Oldrid Scott. [47][48]
[49]
St Thomas à Becket Church Church of St Thomas a Becket, Cliffe, Lewes (Geograph Image 1111979 f48699ce).jpg Cliffe, Lewes
50°52′28″N 0°01′08″E / 50.8745°N 0.0188°E / 50.8745; 0.0188 (St Thomas à Becket Church, Cliffe, Lewes)
Anglican II* Also known as St Thomas-at-Cliffe Church, this sturdy flint structure has work from several periods from the 12th century to the late 19th century, when it was restored twice in quick succession. A square tower rises in three stages at the west end. [50][51]
Lewes Free Presbyterian Church Jireh Chapel, Cliffe, Lewes (Geograph Image 854919 38e2ca72).jpg Cliffe, Lewes
50°52′32″N 0°01′07″E / 50.8755°N 0.0187°E / 50.8755; 0.0187 (Lewes Free Presbyterian Church, Cliffe, Lewes)
Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster I This large chapel was built for a Strict Baptist congregation in 1805 and extended in 1826. The timber-framed building is faced with bricks and slate tiles, there is a Tuscan porch, and the roof is barrel-vaulted. It is one of seven churches in England used by followers of Ian Paisley's Protestant denomination. [11][12]
[52][53]
[54]
St Leonard's Church St Leonard's Church, Heighton Road, Denton (NHLE Code 1197491).JPG Denton
50°48′16″N 0°03′46″E / 50.8045°N 0.0628°E / 50.8045; 0.0628 (St Leonard's Church, Denton)
Anglican II* The church has some structural work from the Norman era, and the font is of the same age. The external appearance was altered in the 19th century, but there are some ancient windows. The nave and chancel run into each other with no dividing arch. [55][56]
[57]
St Margaret's Church St Margaret's Church, Ditchling (Geograph Image 608910 d4e2eebb).jpg Ditchling
50°55′17″N 0°06′57″W / 50.9213°N 0.1157°W / 50.9213; -0.1157 (St Margaret's Church, Ditchling)
Anglican I The appearance of this church, which stands on raised ground at the village crossroads, is 13th-century, and most of the work was done then. The nave is two centuries older, though, and there are later additions. The cruciform building is of flint and sandstone. The central tower has a squat spire. [13][58]
[59][60]
Emmanuel Chapel Emmanuel Chapel, Ditchling.jpg Ditchling
50°55′12″N 0°06′54″W / 50.9199°N 0.1149°W / 50.9199; -0.1149 (Emmanuel Chapel, Ditchling)
Evangelical Ditchling's tradition of Nonconformism continues in the 21st century: a former mission hall on this site, opened in the early 20th century and which may have replaced another hall elsewhere, was itself replaced by this building which was registered for marriages in August 1972. It is one of three extant non-Anglican places of worship in the village. [13][60]
[61][62]
[63]
Friends Meeting House Ditchling Friends Meeting House.jpg Ditchling
50°55′21″N 0°06′51″W / 50.9225°N 0.1142°W / 50.9225; -0.1142 (Friends Meeting House, Ditchling)
Quaker This small meeting house in the centre of Ditchling serves the village and nearby settlements such as Hassocks and Burgess Hill. [61][64]
[65]
Ditchling Unitarian Chapel (The Old Meeting House) The Old Meeting House (Unitarian Chapel), Ditchling.jpg Ditchling
50°55′18″N 0°06′47″W / 50.9216°N 0.1131°W / 50.9216; -0.1131 (The Old Meeting House, Ditchling)
Unitarian II Built in 1740 for General Baptists on a twitten off East End Lane, this Vernacular-style chapel is attached to a partly tile-hung house of 1672. The red-brick chapel, with tall windows, was renovated between 1877 and 1887; additions included a gabled porch. [13][60]
[66][67]
[68][69]
[70]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, East Blatchington (NHLE Code 1044020).JPG East Blatchington
50°46′44″N 0°06′13″E / 50.7790°N 0.1036°E / 50.7790; 0.1036 (St Peter's Church, East Blatchington)
Anglican II* Parts of this long, thick-walled church date from the 13th century—in particular the tower, a piscina and a priest's door, with its rounded arch—but Norman origins have been claimed. The chancel has lancet windows. [71][72]
Seaford Baptist Church Seaford Baptist Church.jpg East Blatchington
50°46′37″N 0°05′44″E / 50.7769°N 0.0955°E / 50.7769; 0.0955 (Seaford Baptist Church, East Blatchington)
Baptist The present building, a low circular structure, was built in the 1970s to replace an Early English-style red-brick church in Seaford town centre, which existed from 1901 until 1973. [73][74]
East Chiltington Church East Chiltington Church 3.JPG East Chiltington
50°55′10″N 0°03′09″W / 50.9194°N 0.0525°W / 50.9194; -0.0525 (East Chiltington Church)
Anglican II* Although this sandstone church now has its own parish, it was a chapel of ease to Westmeston for centuries. The nave is the oldest part: it was built in the early 12th century, and buttresses were added later in the century. The tower is slightly later, and the chancel is 14th-century. [75][76]
[77]
St Laurence's Church Falmer church.jpg Falmer
50°51′45″N 0°04′34″W / 50.8624°N 0.0760°W / 50.8624; -0.0760 (St Laurence Church, Falmer)
Anglican II* A restoration of 1840 was responsible for the unusual Neo-Norman appearance of this church, which was rebuilt between 1815 and 1817 from the demolished ruins of a medieval predecessor. [78][79]
[80]
St Mary the Virgin Church St Mary the Virgin Church, Glynde (Geograph Image 070360 0f2b6d17).jpg Glynde
50°51′53″N 0°04′06″E / 50.8646°N 0.0683°E / 50.8646; 0.0683 (St Mary the Virgin Church, Glynde)
Anglican II* Sir Thomas Robinson, an advocate of Palladian architecture, rebuilt Glynde's parish church in that style between 1763 and 1765. The boxlike, pedimented cobbled flint and ashlar building has a large cupola containing a bell. Pevsner disliked its stained glass, and the church has been criticised as "being in bad taste". [81][82]
[83][84]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Hamsey (Geograph Image 1012772 e6e43246).jpg Hamsey
50°53′28″N 0°00′34″E / 50.8912°N 0.0095°E / 50.8912; 0.0095 (St Peter's Church, Hamsey)
Anglican I This 12th-century church is situated on a slope by a loop in the River Ouse—a very remote spot. The east part of the nave and the west end of the chancel are original; their other parts are 14th-century, as is the tower. A porch was added a century later on the south wall. [85][86]
[87]
St Nicholas' Church St Nicholas' Church, Iford (Geograph Image 854962 62f78690).jpg Iford
50°50′54″N 0°00′03″W / 50.8484°N 0.0007°W / 50.8484; -0.0007 (St Nicholas' Church, Iford)
Anglican I Victorian restoration has not disguised the 12th-century origins of this small village's church, which stands on the site of a Norman predecessor recorded in the Domesday survey of 1086. The flint structure is long and narrow; the oldest part is the nave, which is separated from the chancel by a substantial, short tower topped by a shingled spire. The windows (mostly lancets) and a piscina are also original. A former north aisle has now vanished. [88][89]
[90]
St Pancras' Church Kingston near Lewes Church.JPG Kingston near Lewes
50°51′23″N 0°01′28″W / 50.8563°N 0.0245°W / 50.8563; -0.0245 (St Pancras' Church, Kingston near Lewes)
Anglican II* The tall and wide chancel and nave are balanced by a curiously slim tower with a tiled pyramidal roof. The church was built in the early 14th century in the Decorated Gothic style. Much of the original stone and flintwork was restored in 1874. [91][92]
[93][94]
St Anne's Church St Anne's Church, Lewes (IoE Code 293480).jpg Lewes
50°52′21″N 0°00′06″E / 50.8724°N 0.0016°E / 50.8724; 0.0016 (St Anne's Church, Lewes)
Anglican I Originally called St Mary Westout in reference to the ancient suburb of Westout, the Early English-style flint exterior reflects a restoration of 1889, but Norman details predominate inside. The long nave has a porch in which a 12th-century door has been inserted. St Anne's is the parish church of Lewes. [10][95]
[96]
St Michael's Church St Michael's Church, Lewes (IoE Code 293208).jpg Lewes
50°52′20″N 0°00′26″E / 50.8723°N 0.0071°E / 50.8723; 0.0071 (St Michael's Church, Lewes)
Anglican I This town-centre church is one of three in the Ouse Valley with a circular west tower, although its 13th-century date is later than the others. It has an octagonal spire and is pebbledashed; the rest of the building is of flint. An aisled nave and chancel run parallel with the High Street. [10][97]
[98]
St John sub Castro Church St John-sub-Castro Church, Lewes (IoE Code 292973).jpg Lewes
50°52′34″N 0°00′34″E / 50.8760°N 0.0094°E / 50.8760; 0.0094 (St John-sub-Castro Church, Lewes)
Anglican II The dedication means St John under the Castle. An Anglo-Saxon church stood nearby; its chancel arch and a doorway were incorporated into George Cheeseman's new knapped flint Early English-style structure of 1839. The side windows are tall lancets with tracery. [10][53]
[99][100]
Eastgate Baptist Church Eastgate Baptist Chapel, Lewes.jpg Lewes
50°52′30″N 0°00′48″E / 50.8751°N 0.0134°E / 50.8751; 0.0134 (Eastgate Baptist Church, Lewes)
Baptist The first Baptist place of worship in the area was a chapel of 1741 in Southover. A flint, yellow brick and stone Romanesque Revival chapel opened in 1843 on Eastgate Street, replacing an 1819 building on the same site. It has a tower and spire at one corner, and was extended in the 20th century. [10][53]
[101][102]
[103]
Kingdom Hall Jehovah's Witnesses Kingdom Hall, Lewes.jpg Lewes
50°52′19″N 0°00′40″E / 50.8720°N 0.0111°E / 50.8720; 0.0111 (Kingdom Hall, Lewes)
Jehovah's Witnesses This is used by the Lewes Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. Regular services are held in Sign language. Part of the building was originally a National school built in 1840. [104][105]
[106][107]
[108]
Friends Meeting House Friends Meeting House, Lewes (IoE Code 293109).jpg Lewes
50°52′21″N 0°00′50″E / 50.8726°N 0.0139°E / 50.8726; 0.0139 (Friends Meeting House, Lewes)
Quaker II The town's first meeting house was built in 1675 and altered in 1752; the present brick and mathematical tile structure replaced it in 1784, and an adjoining cottage was built in 1801. There is a brick-faced wooden porch with Doric pilasters topped with a pediment. [10][101]
[109][110]
[111][112]
St Pancras' Church St Pancras' RC Church, Lewes.jpg Lewes
50°52′21″N 0°00′09″E / 50.8724°N 0.0025°E / 50.8724; 0.0025 (St Pancras' Church, Lewes)
Roman Catholic A stone church built in 1870 and dedicated to the Sacred Heart was replaced in 1938–39 by a larger red-brick and flint building by Edward Walters. It is a simple Gothic-style structure with no tower. [10][53]
[98][113]
Westgate Chapel Westgate Chapel, Lewes (IoE Code 293164).jpg Lewes
50°52′18″N 0°00′24″E / 50.8718°N 0.0067°E / 50.8718; 0.0067 (Westgate Chapel, Lewes)
Unitarian II* Parts of a late-16th-century inn were used in this chapel, built in about 1700. The timber-framed building has a plain exterior with some knapped flintwork. The entrance is in a brick porch. Extensions have included a 19th-century library. The early congregations were Presbyterian, but Unitarian views were practised by the time members of the former Southover General Baptist Chapel joined in the early 19th century. [10][53]
[101][114]
[103][115]
Christ Church Christ Church (URC and Methodist), Prince Edward's Road, Lewes.JPG Lewes
50°52′34″N 0°00′09″W / 50.8760°N 0.0025°W / 50.8760; -0.0025 (Christ Church, Lewes)
United Reformed Church/Methodist This modern building houses United Reformed Church and Methodist congregations, and is now the only church in the town serving those denominations. [116][117]
[118]
St Mary's Church St Mary's Church, Highdown Road, Nevill Estate, Lewes.JPG Nevill Estate, Lewes
50°52′49″N 0°00′30″W / 50.8802°N 0.0082°W / 50.8802; -0.0082 (St Mary's Church, Nevill Estate, Lewes)
Anglican This church on the edge of Lewes, opened in 1938, is a chapel of ease within St Anne's parish. It is used as a church hall and for community activities, and occasional services are held. [119][120]
[121][122]
St Michael and All Angels Church St Michael and All Angels Church, Newhaven (IoE Code 374196).jpg Newhaven
50°47′30″N 0°02′43″E / 50.7918°N 0.0454°E / 50.7918; 0.0454 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Newhaven)
Anglican/
Methodist
II* Newhaven's parish church stands on high ground overlooking the town. Its east tower and attached apse (a rare combination) are Norman; William Habershon restored the rest of the church in 1854. The nave has wide aisles and was built in 1791 to replace its Norman predecessor. [123][124]
[125]
Newhaven Baptist Church Newhaven Baptist Church.jpg Newhaven
50°47′37″N 0°02′47″E / 50.7935°N 0.0463°E / 50.7935; 0.0463 (Newhaven Baptist Church, Newhaven)
Baptist A chapel built in 1835 was replaced in 1901 by the town's present Baptist church. The red-brick structure stands above the Brighton Road. [123][126]
[127]
Elim Pentecostal Community Church Elim Pentecostal Church, Newhaven.jpg Newhaven
50°47′34″N 0°02′51″E / 50.7929°N 0.0476°E / 50.7929; 0.0476 (Elim Pentecostal Community Church, Newhaven)
Pentecostal A Pentecostal congregation worships at this red-brick building on Meeching Rise in the town centre. It was registered for marriages in April 1966. [128][129]
[130]
Church of the Sacred Heart Church of the Sacred Heart, Newhaven.jpg Newhaven
50°47′24″N 0°03′05″E / 50.7900°N 0.0514°E / 50.7900; 0.0514 (Church of the Sacred Heart, Newhaven)
Roman Catholic Newhaven's Roman Catholic church was built in 1898, reputedly by W. H. Romaine-Walker. The flint and brick structure is in the Neo-Norman style with round-headed windows, and has been extended and altered in the 20th century. [123][126]
[131][132]
St Mary's Church Newick Church 5.JPG Newick
50°58′09″N 0°01′24″E / 50.9693°N 0.0232°E / 50.9693; 0.0232 (St Mary's Church, Newick)
Anglican II* Fragments of the original nave, built in about 1100, remain; it was added to in the 14th century when the church was extended and the chancel was added. The latter was taken down and moved during John Oldrid Scott's rebuilding of 1886–1887. The Perpendicular Gothic tower is 15th-century. [133][134]
[135][136]
Newick Evangelical Free Church Newick Evangelical Free Church.JPG Newick
50°58′20″N 0°00′26″E / 50.9723°N 0.0071°E / 50.9723; 0.0071 (Newick Evangelical Free Church, Newick)
Evangelical This small building, dating from 1892, was originally a mission hall. It is now used by an Evangelical community as their place of worship and meeting place. [133][137]
[138][139]
St Peter's Church St Peter's Church, Offham (Geograph Image 1012551 35904fe5).jpg Offham
50°53′31″N 0°00′36″W / 50.8920°N 0.0099°W / 50.8920; -0.0099 (St Peter's Church, Offham)
Anglican II Ewan Christian designed this church in the Decorated Gothic style in 1859. The flint and sandstone structure has an apsidal chancel with a tower and spire. Jean-Baptiste Capronnier provided stained glass windows in 1862 and 1876. [85][140]
[141][142]
Church of the Ascension Church of the Ascension, Peacehaven.jpg Peacehaven
50°47′35″N 0°00′12″E / 50.7931°N 0.0032°E / 50.7931; 0.0032 (Church of the Ascension, Peacehaven)
Anglican L. Keir Hett's red-brick church, with a squat tower above its entrance, a side chapel and a gallery, replaced the community's first church—a prefabricated building of 1922. [143][144]
[145][146]
Peacehaven Evangelical Free Church Peacehaven Evangelical Free Church.jpg Peacehaven
50°47′25″N 0°00′29″E / 50.7902°N 0.0081°E / 50.7902; 0.0081 (Peacehaven Evangelical Free Church, Peacehaven)
Evangelical This modern brick building, serving an Evangelical congregation, is on the main South Coast Road. [145][147]
Kingdom Hall Kingdom Hall, South Coast Road, Peacehaven.JPG Peacehaven
50°47′20″N 0°00′39″E / 50.7889°N 0.0108°E / 50.7889; 0.0108 (Kingdom Hall, Peacehaven)
Jehovah's Witnesses This modern Kingdom Hall is used by the Newhaven Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses, and is also situated on the South Coast Road. [145][148]
[108]
Church of the Immaculate Conception Church of the Immaculate Conception, Peacehaven.jpg Peacehaven
50°47′34″N 0°00′02″W / 50.7929°N 0.0006°W / 50.7929; -0.0006 (Church of the Immaculate Conception, Peacehaven)
Roman Catholic The town's first Roman Catholic church was built in 1925. Intended as a temporary structure, it survives as a church hall, but was deregistered in November 1963 and replaced by a permanent brick church. [143][145]
[146][149]
[150]
St John's Church St John's Church, Piddinghoe (Geograph Image 1095005 08e57079).jpg Piddinghoe
50°48′34″N 0°02′08″E / 50.8095°N 0.0355°E / 50.8095; 0.0355 (St John's Church, Piddinghoe)
Anglican I The round tower and the nave of this riverside church are early-12th-century. A north aisle was added a few years later; its roof descends to a very low level outside. The south aisle and an aisled chancel were built by the 13th century; all were restored in 1882. [143][151]
[152]
St Michael and All Angels Church Plumpton Church.JPG Plumpton
50°54′18″N 0°04′18″W / 50.9051°N 0.0717°W / 50.9051; -0.0717 (St Michael and All Angels Church, Plumpton)
Anglican I This flint, stone and local marble church, surrounded by Plumpton Agricultural College buildings, is isolated from the village. The nave is mostly 12th-century; the buttressed west tower and its spire is a century newer, as is the chancel; a porch and vestry are later additions. [153][154]
[155]
All Saints Church Plumpton Green Church 7.JPG Plumpton Green
50°56′06″N 0°03′37″W / 50.9350°N 0.0602°W / 50.9350; -0.0602 (All Saints Church, Plumpton Green)
Anglican Nikolaus Pevsner thought that Samuel Denman's 1893 church was "plain funny", mainly due to the composition of its octagonal tower. It was originally a chapel of ease to St Michael and All Angels Church, 2 miles (3.2 km) to the south. The ancient font is believed to have come from the old St John sub Castro Church in Lewes. [153][156]
[157]
St Mary the Virgin Church St Mary's Church, Ringmer (Geograph Image 1295191 3a2776b5).jpg Ringmer
50°53′38″N 0°03′16″E / 50.8940°N 0.0544°E / 50.8940; 0.0544 (St Mary the Virgin Church, Ringmer)
Anglican I Norman-era fragments remain in this large church, rebuilt in the 15th century and further altered in 1884 by Ewan Christian. John Christie, founder of the nearby Glyndebourne Opera House, donated the organ. [158][159]
St Peter's Church Rodmell Church.JPG Rodmell
50°50′19″N 0°01′04″E / 50.8385°N 0.0177°E / 50.8385; 0.0177 (St Peter's Church, Rodmell)
Anglican I Some windows have been replaced, and the chancel arch was restored during the Victorian era, but otherwise the church has changed little since the late 12th century, when the tower and an adjacent room were added to the slightly older chancel and nave. [160][161]
[162]
St Leonard's Church St Leonard's Church, Seaford (IoE Code 292573).jpg Seaford
50°46′19″N 0°06′05″E / 50.7719°N 0.1013°E / 50.7719; 0.1013 (St Leonard's Church, Seaford)
Anglican I The size of this church reflects Seaford's medieval importance as a port: the River Ouse's estuary was here until it silted up and moved to Newhaven. The nave and some clerestory windows remain from the Norman era, and a sculpture of Saint Michael battling a dragon has been attributed to 1130. The tower is 15th-century. [163][164]
Kingdom Hall Kingdom Hall, West Street, Seaford.JPG Seaford
50°46′17″N 0°06′01″E / 50.7713°N 0.1003°E / 50.7713; 0.1003 (Kingdom Hall, Seaford)
Jehovah's Witnesses This Kingdom Hall serves the Seaford Congregation of Jehovah's Witnesses. It stands on West Street on the town centre, and was registered for marriages in July 1987. [165][166]
[167][168]
Cross Way Church Cross Way Church (Methodist), Seaford.jpg Seaford
50°46′13″N 0°06′06″E / 50.7702°N 0.1017°E / 50.7702; 0.1017 (Cross Way Church, Seaford)
Methodist This church is mostly red-brick but also has stone dressings. It was built in the Early English style in 1894 in the town centre. The congregation has formed a partnership with the town's United Reformed Church, and the name "Cross Way" has been adopted. [169][170]
[171]
St Thomas More Church St Thomas More Church, Seaford.jpg Seaford
50°46′26″N 0°06′26″E / 50.7739°N 0.1073°E / 50.7739; 0.1073 (St Thomas More Church, Seaford)
Roman Catholic In 1935, James O'Hanlon Hughes and Geoffrey Welch built a simple rectangular church with a rendered exterior with some flintwork. In 1969, an extension was built using yellow artificial stone, and the interior was opened up. [73][172]
[173]
Seaford Independent Spiritualist Church Seaford Independent Spiritualist Church.JPG Seaford
50°46′25″N 0°06′12″E / 50.7735°N 0.1032°E / 50.7735; 0.1032 (Seaford Independent Spiritualist Church, Seaford)
Spiritualist This church was established in 1991. The congregation met in a hall at first, but they later acquired a building (now known as Seafordspirit) in the town centre. Services are held on Thursdays. [174][175]
Cross Way Clinton Centre Cross Way Clinton Centre (URC), Seaford.jpg Seaford
50°46′24″N 0°06′07″E / 50.7732°N 0.1019°E / 50.7732; 0.1019 (Cross Way Clinton Centre, Seaford)
United Reformed Church The "Cross Way" name has been used since the link with the town's Methodist church was forged. Most worship takes place there, but some services are still held in W.F. Poulton's Early English-style flint and ashlar chapel of 1877. Its slender buttressed corner turret is distinctive. The roof has king posts and queen posts. [164][169]
[170][176]
[177][178]
Chailey Free Church Chailey Free Church.JPG South Chailey
50°56′14″N 0°01′09″W / 50.9372°N 0.0192°W / 50.9372; -0.0192 (Chailey Free Church, South Chailey)
Evangelical This independent Evangelical congregation worships in a modern building on the site of a former mission hall used by Nonconformist groups. This was registered for marriages in 1906 and deregistered in 1992, whereupon the new building was registered in its place. [47][179]
[180][181]
[182]
St Michael and All Angels Church St Michael's Church, South Malling, Lewes (IoE Code 293011).jpg South Malling, Lewes
50°52′52″N 0°00′24″E / 50.8812°N 0.0068°E / 50.8812; 0.0068 (St Michael and All Angels Church, South Malling)
Anglican II* A young John Evelyn laid the foundation stone of the rebuilt church in 1626, but the building has 13th-century origins, and the tower arch and its responds survive from the 14th century. A restoration was carried out in 1874. [183][184]
King's Church King's Church, Brooks Road, South Malling.JPG South Malling, Lewes
50°52′40″N 0°00′56″E / 50.8778°N 0.0156°E / 50.8778; 0.0156 (King's Church, South Malling, Lewes)
Evangelical This Charismatic Evangelical community, founded in 1985 and aligned with Newfrontiers and the Evangelical Alliance, worships in an industrial unit. In 2009, planning permission was granted for a nearby industrial building to be converted into a new church. [185][186]
St Peter's Church Southease church.JPG Southease
50°49′46″N 0°01′09″E / 50.8295°N 0.0192°E / 50.8295; 0.0192 (St Peter's Church, Southease)
Anglican I Like St Michael's Church in Lewes and St John's Church in Piddinghoe, this ancient building has a round tower. The present nave and chancel are housed in the 11th-century nave, whose accompanying chancel was demolished in the 14th century. Wall murals from about 1280 have been uncovered, and the bell is of the same age, making it one of the oldest in Sussex. [187][188]
[189]
St John the Baptist's Church St John the Baptist's Church, Southover, Lewes (IoE Code 293363).jpg Southover, Lewes
50°52′09″N 0°00′22″E / 50.8691°N 0.0062°E / 50.8691; 0.0062 (St John the Baptist's Church, Southover)
Anglican I Although greatly altered, the building was originally the late-11th-century hospitium of the adjacent Lewes Priory, England's first Cluniac House. Its conversion to a church came in the 13th century. The tower collapsed in 1698 and took 40 years to rebuild. Additions were made in the Neo-Norman style in the 19th century. [53][190]
[191][192]
Streat Church Streat Church.JPG Streat
50°55′13″N 0°04′46″W / 50.9202°N 0.0795°W / 50.9202; -0.0795 (Streat Church, Streat)
Anglican II* This modest church, with a nave dating from about 1200, a slightly older chancel and a small belfry with a spire, was heavily restored in 1854; an aisle was added to the nave in that year. In 1882 a porch and vestry were built on the north side. [193][194]
[195]
St Luke's Church St Luke's Church, Sutton, Seaford.jpg Sutton, Seaford
50°46′36″N 0°07′40″E / 50.7766°N 0.1278°E / 50.7766; 0.1278 (St Luke's Church, Sutton, Seaford)
Anglican Part of the combined parish of Sutton with Seaford, this multi-purpose modern brick and flint building, built for £15,791, serves the Chyngton and Sutton areas of the town. It has a rounded tower at one corner. The site was acquired in 1954, the first stone was laid on 8 November 1958 and the church was opened in June 1959. [57][196]
Seaford Community Church Seaford Community Church, Sutton, Seaford.jpg Sutton, Seaford
50°46′49″N 0°06′53″E / 50.7802°N 0.1147°E / 50.7802; 0.1147 (Seaford Community Church, Sutton, Seaford)
Evangelical This independent Evangelical community worships in a modern building on Vale Road in the east of Seaford. Under the name Seaford Evangelical Free Church, it was registered for marriages in May 1969. [197][198]
[199]
Chyngton Methodist Church Chyngton Methodist Church, Seaford.jpg Sutton, Seaford
50°46′48″N 0°07′38″E / 50.7799°N 0.1273°E / 50.7799; 0.1273 (Chyngton Methodist Church, Sutton, Seaford)
Methodist This church, housed in a multi-purpose building used by many groups from the local community, serves Methodists in the Chyngton and Sutton areas of Seaford. [200][201]
St Mary's Church St Marys Church, Tarring Neville.jpg Tarring Neville
50°48′57″N 0°02′55″E / 50.8157°N 0.0487°E / 50.8157; 0.0487 (St Mary's Church, Tarring Neville)
Anglican I There is a nave and south aisle under an undivided roof, chancel and west tower with a tiled pyramidal roof at this 13th-century church near Newhaven. Instead of the usual free-standing font, there is one attached to the aisle wall; this was added in the 14th century. [202][203]
St Lawrence's Church Telscombe Church.JPG Telscombe
50°48′46″N 0°00′23″W / 50.8128°N 0.0064°W / 50.8128; -0.0064 (St Lawrence's Church, Telscombe)
Anglican I The 12th-century church is one of the only buildings in the hamlet, which is reached down a long road from Southease. The nave has one aisle, and there is a chancel with a Lady chapel, a small vestry, porch and tower. The chancel arch looks Norman but is 19th-century; the Lady chapel and north aisle were also rebuilt then. [204][205]
[206]
Telscombe Cliffs United Reformed Church Telscombe Cliffs United Reformed Church.jpg Telscombe Cliffs
50°47′46″N 0°01′05″W / 50.7961°N 0.0181°W / 50.7961; -0.0181 (Telscombe Cliffs United Reformed Church, Telscombe Cliffs)
United Reformed Church This United Reformed church, one of four in the district, serves the coastal urban area of Peacehaven and Telscombe Cliffs. [145][207]
St Peter's Church Firle 025.JPG West Firle
50°50′42″N 0°05′18″E / 50.8450°N 0.0884°E / 50.8450; 0.0884 (St Peter's Church, West Firle)
Anglican I One reset doorway, dating from about 1200, is the oldest part of this church. The rest of the structure was built in the late 13th and 14th centuries. The nave has north and south aisles, and there is a vestry and porch. A crenellated tower with substantial buttresses stands at the west end. Adjoining the 13th-century chancel is a private chapel (the Gage Chapel) for members of the Gage baronetcy. [208][209]
St Martin's Church Westmeston Church 2.JPG Westmeston
50°54′24″N 0°05′50″W / 50.9067°N 0.0972°W / 50.9067; -0.0972 (St Martin's Church, Westmeston)
Anglican II* This small church beneath the South Downs serves a long, narrow parish, and administered East Chiltington's church until 1934. The structure is of flint and sandstone, but 19th-century restoration has obscured its original appearance. The nave is mostly 12th-century, but its south aisle was added later. [210][211]
[212]
St Peter and St John the Baptist's Church Wivelsfield Church 2.JPG Wivelsfield
50°58′15″N 0°05′43″W / 50.9709°N 0.0952°W / 50.9709; -0.0952 (St Peter and St John the Baptist's Church, Wivelsfield)
Anglican II* Some 11th-century masonry and a doorway remain from the original building. Although it is mostly 13th-century, the present church has parts from a range of architectural eras—the legacy of a 14th-century lengthening, a restoration of 1869, and other work. [14][213]
Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel Wivelsfield Strict Baptist Chapel.JPG Wivelsfield
50°57′46″N 0°05′43″W / 50.9627°N 0.0952°W / 50.9627; -0.0952 (Bethel Strict Baptist Chapel, Wivelsfield)
Baptist II The secession of some members from Ditchling's Baptist community in 1763 led to the founding of a new Strict Baptist chapel in nearby Wivelsfield in 1780. The building has one weatherboarded bay but is mostly of brick, and has been enlarged several times from its original rectangular layout. [14][214]
[215][216]
[217]
Ote Hall Congregational Chapel Wivelsfield Ote Hall Chapel.JPG Wivelsfield
50°58′04″N 0°05′27″W / 50.9678°N 0.0907°W / 50.9678; -0.0907 (Ote Hall Congregational Chapel, Wivelsfield)
Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion II Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, who lived in the village, founded a chapel for her Calvinist sect in 1778. The glazed brick building was completed in 1780. The windows and original (now blocked) entrance door are round-arched, and the tiled roof is hipped. [14][214]
[218][219]
[220]
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Wivelsfield Mormon Church.JPG Wivelsfield Green
50°57′49″N 0°04′24″W / 50.9635°N 0.0733°W / 50.9635; -0.0733 (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Wivelsfield Green)
Latter-day Saint In 1999, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints gained planning permission to build a church on a derelict site in the centre of Wivelsfield Green village. It is one of several churches in the Crawley Stake. [221][222]
[223]

Closed or disused places of worship[edit]

Name Image Location Denomination/
Affiliation
Grade Notes Refs
St Francis of Assisi Church Barcombe Cross Church of St. Francis of Assisi.JPG Barcombe Cross
50°55′29″N 0°01′11″E / 50.9248°N 0.0196°E / 50.9248; 0.0196 (Former St Francis of Assisi Church, Barcombe Cross)
Anglican The settlement of Barcombe Cross developed north of the old village. Squire of Barcombe Sir William Grantham provided built a timber and brick structure to serve it in the late 1890s. It went out of use in about 2003, and is now used as a community hall and meeting place. [33][37]
[224][225]
Protestant Dissenters Mission House Barcombe Protestant Dissenters Mission House.JPG Barcombe Cross
50°55′24″N 0°00′40″E / 50.9234°N 0.0110°E / 50.9234; 0.0110 (Former Protestant Dissenters Mission House, Barcombe Cross)
Non-denominational This non-denominational mission chapel was established in the first half of the 19th century on the road from Barcombe Cross to Hamsey. It is no longer in religious use. [33][224]
[226]
Beulah Strict Baptist Chapel Former Beulah Strict Baptist Chapel, Ditchling.jpg Ditchling
50°55′20″N 0°06′51″W / 50.9222°N 0.1142°W / 50.9222; -0.1142 (Former Beulah Strict Baptist Chapel, Ditchling)
Baptist George Grenyer built a chapel for the Strict Baptist community on East End Lane in 1867. After its closure in the late 1930s it became a private house. [13][60]
[67]
St John the Evangelist's Church Former St John the Evangelist Church, Seaford.jpg East Blatchington
50°46′36″N 0°05′51″E / 50.7767°N 0.0975°E / 50.7767; 0.0975 (Former St John the Evangelist's Church, East Blatchington)
Anglican This church was built in the mid-1920s as a second church within the parish of East Blatchington, but closed in 1980. It is now used as a nursery school. The building has a roughcast exterior and tiled roof. [73]
Laughton Methodist Chapel Laughton
50°54′26″N 0°07′44″E / 50.9073°N 0.1289°E / 50.9073; 0.1289 (Former Laughton Methodist Chapel, Laughton)
Methodist This former chapel and the accompanying Sunday school and minister's house have been converted into a house. It was built around 1879 on the road from Laughton to Shortgate. It was formally registered for marriages between 1934 and 1981. [227][228]
All Saints Church Former All Saints Church, Lewes (IoE Code 293101).jpg Lewes
50°52′21″N 0°00′48″E / 50.8724°N 0.0134°E / 50.8724; 0.0134 (Former All Saints Church, Lewes)
Anglican II* This building—an accumulation of parts from several eras—has been used as an arts and community centre since its redundancy in 1975. The 16th-century flint tower was retained when Amon Wilds built a new nave in 1806; an Early English-style chancel followed in 1883. [10][53]
[229][230]
Providence Baptist Chapel Former Providence Baptist Chapel, Lancaster Street, Lewes.jpg Lewes
50°52′34″N 0°00′40″E / 50.8760°N 0.0112°E / 50.8760; 0.0112 (Former Providence Baptist Chapel, Lewes)
Baptist This chapel is now a theatre auditorium. It closed in 1932 after about 70 years of religious use. The building, of blue and red brick, stands on Lancaster Street. [53]
Providence Strict Baptist Chapel Former Providence Strict Baptist Chapel, Little East Street, Lewes.jpg Lewes
50°52′31″N 0°00′44″E / 50.8752°N 0.0121°E / 50.8752; 0.0121 (Former Providence Strict Baptist Chapel, Lewes)
Baptist Opened with the name Gospel Temperance Mission Hall in 1906, this Vernacular-style flint and brick building served as a Baptist chapel from 1924 until about 1980, after which it was converted for residential use. [53]
Wesleyan Methodist Chapel Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Lewes.jpg Lewes
50°52′22″N 0°00′40″E / 50.8727°N 0.0110°E / 50.8727; 0.0110 (Former Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Lewes)
Methodist An 18th-century Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion chapel stood on this site; it was taken over by Methodists in 1807 and demolished in 1867 when the present building was built. The Early English-style red-brick and stone building was closed in 1973 and became an antiques centre. [10][53]
Hamilton Memorial Presbyterian Church Former Hamilton Memorial Presbyterian Church, Lewes.jpg Lewes
50°52′27″N 0°00′42″E / 50.8741°N 0.0117°E / 50.8741; 0.0117 (Former Hamilton Memorial Presbyterian Church, Lewes)
Presbyterian Church of England This large chapel, closed in the 1940s, has also become an antiques showroom and market. It is in the Renaissance style and is mostly of brick. [10][53]
Calvinistic Baptist Chapel Former Calvinistic Baptist Chapel, Norman Road, Newhaven.JPG Newhaven
50°47′30″N 0°02′57″E / 50.7918°N 0.0493°E / 50.7918; 0.0493 (Former Calvinistic Baptist Chapel, Newhaven)
Baptist This was built in 1904 on the town's Norman Road. The red-brick structure was distinguished by the Dutch gable on the façade. It was closed in 1976 and later became a house. [126][231]
Congregational
Chapel
Former Congregational Chapel, Newhaven.jpg Newhaven
50°47′35″N 0°02′56″E / 50.7930°N 0.0488°E / 50.7930; 0.0488 (Former Congregational Chapel, Newhaven)
Congregational After its closure in 1938, this Neoclassical building was restored and turned into a market, but this has now closed. Horatio Nelson Goulty designed and built the rendered stone chapel in 1866. It was not officially deregistered for worship until 1973. [123][126]
[231][232]
Newhaven Methodist Church Former Methodist Chapel, Newhaven.jpg Newhaven
50°47′35″N 0°03′05″E / 50.7930°N 0.0513°E / 50.7930; 0.0513 (Former Newhaven Methodist Church, Newhaven)
Methodist Charles Bell's 1893 church for the Methodist community has become a Sea Cadets headquarters since its closure in 1940. Yellow and red brick, stone and terracotta were used in the design. A rose window remains above the entrance. [123][126]
[231]
Primitive Methodist Chapel Former Primitive Methodist Chapel, South Street, Newhaven.JPG Newhaven
50°47′34″N 0°03′02″E / 50.7928°N 0.0506°E / 50.7928; 0.0506 (Former Primitive Methodist Chapel, Newhaven)
Methodist Newhaven's first Methodist chapel dates from 1885. Architect W.S. Parnacott was commissioned; his design was in the Gothic Revival style and incorporated a hall. It is no longer in religious use and has been significantly altered. [123][126]
[231]
Convent Chapel of the Sacred Heart Former Primitive Methodist Chapel, Newhaven.jpg Newhaven
50°47′34″N 0°02′47″E / 50.7927°N 0.0463°E / 50.7927; 0.0463 (Former Convent Chapel of the Sacred Heart, Newhaven)
Roman Catholic Newhaven's first Roman Catholic place of worship was designed in about 1878 by a French architect whose name does not survive in any records. It is Romanesque Revival in style and has an apsidal end and rendered walls. It fell out of use in about 1943 and was later used as a library and an arts centre. [123][126]
[231]
Zion Chapel Newick Zion Chapel.JPG Newick
50°58′29″N 0°00′33″E / 50.9746°N 0.0091°E / 50.9746; 0.0091 (Former Zion Chapel, Newick)
Baptist II This modest brick-built chapel dates from 1834. It has a large pediment, an entrance porch and a cemetery at the rear. In 2001, planning permission was granted for conversion into flats. [126][133]
[138][233]
[103][234]
St Mary the Virgin Church/Church of Our Lady Queen of Heaven St Mary the Virgin Church, North Chailey (Geograph Image 1392400 46b93f8b).jpg North Chailey
50°58′20″N 0°01′18″W / 50.9721°N 0.0218°W / 50.9721; -0.0218 (Former St Mary the Virgin Church/Church of Our Lady Queen of Heaven, North Chailey)
Anglican and Roman Catholic II Built in 1876 in the 13th-century style by John Oldrid Scott, this chapel of ease to St Peter's Church was used by Anglicans until 1976, after which it was leased to the Catholic Church for about 20 years. It is now redundant and for sale. The sandstone building has a saddleback roof. [47][235]
[236][237]
Rehoboth Independent Congregational Chapel Former Rehoboth Independent Congregational Chapel, Ringmer.JPG Ringmer
50°53′38″N 0°03′35″E / 50.8940°N 0.0597°E / 50.8940; 0.0597 (Former Rehoboth Independent Congregational Chapel, Ringmer)
Congregational The present red-brick building was converted into a house in 1995. It dates from 1914, and stands on the site of a predecessor which was built in 1834. [238][239]
Congregational
Chapel
Former Congregational Chapel, South Heighton.JPG South Heighton
50°48′27″N 0°03′28″E / 50.8074°N 0.0577°E / 50.8074; 0.0577 (Former Congregational Chapel, South Heighton)
Congregational This small brick chapel in the village of South Heighton, now part of Newhaven, was erected in 1891. It fell out of use in the mid-20th century and is now in residential use. [240]
Southover General Baptist Chapel Former Baptist Chapel, Southover, Lewes (IoE Code 293069).jpg Southover, Lewes
50°52′12″N 0°00′30″E / 50.8700°N 0.0082°E / 50.8700; 0.0082 (Former Southover Baptist Chapel, Southover)
Baptist II This chapel was converted into a house in 1972 after more than 200 years as a place of worship. It was built in 1741 as the first Baptist chapel in the Lewes area, and retains its knapped flintwork, original hipped roof and door, which has been reset in a modern weatherboarded porch. [10][109]
[241]
St Bartholomew's Church Former St Bartholomew's Church, Spithurst (Geograph Image 058602 b81a14d0).jpg Spithurst
50°56′21″N 0°01′42″E / 50.9391°N 0.0284°E / 50.9391; 0.0284 (Former St Bartholomew's Church, Spithurst)
Anglican Henry Card, a local man, designed this Early English-style flint church in 1880 to serve the hamlet of Spithurst in Barcombe parish. It was declared redundant in 1994 but is still used by the Diocese of Chichester as a retreat and youth centre. [33][224]
[237][242]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vigar 1986, pp. 19–21.
  2. ^ "Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 (c. 9)". The UK Statute Law Database. Ministry of Justice. 24 May 1990. Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  3. ^ "History of English Heritage". English Heritage. 2010. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  4. ^ "What does Listing mean?". English Heritage. 2008. Retrieved 2 August 2009. 
  5. ^ "Lewes District Council: News and local information". Lewes District Council. 2009. Retrieved 12 August 2009. [dead link]
  6. ^ "Boundary Commission for England: Provisional Recommendations for West Sussex" (GIF). Boundary Commission for England map of West Sussex. Office for National Statistics. 2000. Retrieved 12 August 2009. [dead link]
  7. ^ "Boundary Commission for England: Provisional Recommendations for East Sussex and Brighton and Hove" (GIF). Boundary Commission for England map of East Sussex and Brighton and Hove. Office for National Statistics. 2000. Retrieved 12 August 2009. [dead link]
  8. ^ Salzman, L. F. (ed) (1940). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 7. The Rape and Honor of Lewes". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 1–7. Retrieved 17 August 2009. 
  9. ^ Salzman, L. F. (ed) (1940). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 7. The borough of Lewes: Introduction and history". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 7–19. Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Salzman, L. F. (ed) (1940). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 7. The borough of Lewes: Parliamentary, economic and religious history". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 31–43. Retrieved 13 August 2009. 
  11. ^ a b "Detailed Record: Jireh Chapel & Sunday School to north, Malling Street (east side), Lewes, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  12. ^ a b "Church Finder". Free Presbyterian Church of Ulster. 1999. Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  13. ^ a b c d e Salzman, L. F. (ed) (1940). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 7. Parishes: Ditchling". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 102–109. Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  14. ^ a b c d Salzman, L. F. (ed) (1940). "A History of the County of Sussex: Volume 7. Parishes: Wivelsfield". Victoria County History of Sussex. British History Online. pp. 119–124. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
  15. ^ "Area: Lewes (Local Authority) – Religion (UV15)". "Neighbourhood Statistics" website. Office for National Statistics. 18 November 2004. Retrieved 12 August 2009. 
  16. ^ "A little bit of history". Diocese of Chichester. 2012. Archived from the original on 19 January 2013. Retrieved 19 January 2013. 
  17. ^ a b c "Deaneries in the Diocese of Chichester". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2009. 
  18. ^ "Benefice of Stanmer with Falmer". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 14 July 2009. 
  19. ^ "Rural Deanery of Brighton". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2009. 
  20. ^ "Rural Deanery of Cuckfield". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2009. 
  21. ^ "Rural Deanery of Hurst". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2009. 
  22. ^ "Rural Deanery of Uckfield". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2009. 
  23. ^ "Rural Deanery of Lewes and Seaford". Diocese of Chichester. 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2009. 
  24. ^ "Arundel Cathedral Parish". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2009. 
  25. ^ "Deaneries of the Diocese". Diocese of Arundel and Brighton website. DABNet. 2009. Retrieved 14 August 2009. 
  26. ^ "Lewes Christ Church". The United Reformed Church. 2008. Retrieved 16 August 2009. 
  27. ^ "Cross Way U/M". The United Reformed Church. 2008. Retrieved 16 August 2009. 
  28. ^ "Telscombe Cliffs". The United Reformed Church. 2008. Retrieved 16 August 2009. 
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  89. ^ "Detailed Record: The Parish Church of St Nicholas, Iford, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 3 August 2009. 
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  93. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, p. 547.
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  112. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 4502; Name: Friends' Meeting House; Address: Friar's Walk, All Saints, Lewes; Denomination: Quakers). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  114. ^ "Detailed Record: Westgate Chapel, High Street (south side), Lewes, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 13 August 2009. 
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  118. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 65045; Name: Christ Church, Lewes (United Reformed/Methodist); Address: Prince Edward's Road, Lewes; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  124. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Michael and All Angels, Church Hill (east side), Newhaven, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 13 August 2009. 
  125. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 72543; Name: St Michael's Church (shared by Anglicans and Methodists); Address: Church Hill, Newhaven; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  131. ^ "English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005 (Extract): The Sacred Heart, Newhaven" (PDF). English Heritage. 2005. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
  132. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 41249; Name: Sacred Heart Catholic Church; Address: Fort Road, Newhaven; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  135. ^ "Newick (Church Road) Conservation Area Appraisal" (PDF). Lewes District Council Planning and Environmental Services Department. May 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
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  140. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St Peter, Offham, Hamsey, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
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  147. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 70624; Name: Evangelical Free Church; Address: Mayfield Avenue, South Coast Road; Denomination: Independent Evangelical Church). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  148. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 69701; Name: Kingdom Hall; Address: Junction of South Coast Road and Sunview Avenue, Peacehaven; Denomination: Jehovah's Witnesses). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  171. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 39852; Name: Cross Way, Methodist and United Reformed Church; Address: Steyne Road, Seaford; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  172. ^ "English Heritage Review of Diocesan Churches 2005 (Extract): St Thomas More, Seaford" (PDF). English Heritage. 2005. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
  173. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 56568; Name: Church of St Thomas More; Address: Sutton Road, Seaford; Denomination: Roman Catholics). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  178. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 24909; Name: Seaford United Reformed Church; Address: Clinton Place, Seaford; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  191. ^ "Detailed Record: Church of St John the Baptist, Southover High Street (south side), Lewes, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
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  194. ^ "Detailed Record: The Parish Church, Streat, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
  195. ^ Nairn & Pevsner 1965, pp. 610–611.
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  198. ^ The London Gazette: no. 44852. p. 5295. 20 May 1969. Retrieved 13 June 2012.
  199. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 71765; Name: Seaford Community Church; Address: 117 Vale Road, Seaford; Denomination: Christians not otherwise designated). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  200. ^ "Chyngton Methodist Church". ESCIS website. East Sussex County Council Library and Information Services/Brighton and Hove City Libraries. 1 April 2009. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
  201. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 65048; Name: Chyngton Methodist Church; Address: Millberg Road, Seaford; Denomination: Methodist Church). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  202. ^ "Detailed Record: The Parish Church of St Mary, Tarring Neville, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
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  205. ^ "Detailed Record: The Parish Church of St Lawrence, Telscombe, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
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  207. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 53910; Name: Telscombe Cliffs United Reformed Church; Address: Buckhurst Road, Broomfield Avenue, Telscombe; Denomination: United Reformed Church). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
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  211. ^ "Detailed Record: The Parish Church of St Martin, Westmeston, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
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  213. ^ "Detailed Record: The Parish Church of St Peter and St John the Baptist, Church Lane, Wivelsfield, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
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  215. ^ "Detailed Record: The Strict and Particular Baptist Chapel, Ditchling Road, Wivelsfield, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
  216. ^ Stell 2002, p. 359.
  217. ^ Registered in accordance with the Places of Worship Registration Act 1855 (Number in Worship Register: 15568; Name: Bethel Chapel; Address: Near Jacob's Post, Wivelsfield; Denomination: Particular Calvinistic Baptists). Retrieved 25 September 2012. (Archived version of list)
  218. ^ "Detailed Record: Ote Hall Chapel, Ditchling Road, Wivelsfield, Lewes, East Sussex". Images of England. English Heritage. 2007. Retrieved 15 August 2009. 
  219. ^ Stell 2002, p. 358.
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Bibliography[edit]

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  • Lindsey, Joyce (1983). Newick: The Story of a Sussex Village c. 900–1950. Newick: Newick Parish Council. 
  • Nairn, Ian; Pevsner, Nikolaus (1965). The Buildings of England: Sussex. Harmondsworth: Penguin Books. ISBN 0-14-071028-0. 
  • Pé, Diana (2006). Mid Sussex Church Walks. PP (Pé Publishing). ISBN 0-9543690-2-5. 
  • Stell, Christopher (2002). Nonconformist Chapels and Meeting-houses in Eastern England. Swindon: English Heritage. ISBN 1-873592-50-7. 
  • Vigar, John E. (1986). Exploring Sussex Churches. Rainham: Meresborough Books. ISBN 0-948193-09-3. 
  • Vigar, John (1994). The Lost Villages of Sussex. Stanbridge: The Dovecote Press Ltd. ISBN 1-874336-29-6.