List of post-punk bands

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Post-punk is a musical movement that began at the end of the 1970s, following on the heels of the initial punk rock "explosion." The styles of music were diverse, but all had an influence from punk rock.[1] The essential period that is most commonly cited as post-punk falls between the years 1978–1984.[2] After 1984, numerous bands continued to release music in this style, but with the advent of alternative rock as a more catch-all term for underground bands in the mid-'80s, they were not always referred to as post-punk.

Post-punk revival is a movement in the 2000s that drew in part on the conventions of the original post-punk sound from the early 1980s, as well as '90s genres such as shoegazing, Britpop, garage revival, and post-hardcore, as well as '80s new wave. Thematically it is often an extension of and reaction to the more pop-oriented punk music of the 1990s, and has been especially tied to the New York City and London music scenes.

Post-punk bands (1978–1984)[edit]

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Post-punk-influenced bands (1984-1990s)[edit]

Bands that appeared soon after the initial movement, yet carried the same aesthetic styles and influences. Many of these bands would cross over into alternative rock, shoegaze, post-hardcore, post-industrial music, coldwave, and twee pop.

Post-punk revival bands (Late 1990s–2000s)[edit]

See List of post-punk revival bands.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Post-punk". Allmusic. Retrieved on 15 November 2009.
  2. ^ Reynolds, Simon (2005). Rip It Up and Start Again: Postpunk 1978–1984. Faber & Faber. ISBN 978-0-571-21570-6.