List of radio telescopes

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Four antennas radio telescope, at the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA)

This is a list of radio telescopes - over one hundred - that are or have been used for radio astronomy. The list includes both single dishes and interferometric arrays. The list is sorted by region, then by name; unnamed telescopes are in reverse size order at the end of the lists.


Africa[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
HartRAO 26m Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa 1.66-23 GHz 26 m dish.[1]
HartRAO XDM Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, Johannesburg, South Africa 2.3-8.65 GHz 15m Experimental Demonstrator Model originally build as a technology demonstrator for MeerKAT[2]
Indlebe Durban University of Technology, Durban, South Africa 1420 MHz 5 meter parabolic reflector[3]
KAT-7 Carnarvon, South Africa 1200-1950 MHz Seven, 12 meter dishes.
MeerKAT Carnarvon, South Africa 0.58-14.5 GHz A pathfinder for the Square Kilometre Array.[4]
Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) Carnarvon, South Africa 100-200 MHz Sixty-four crossed dipole antennas. Currently, this interferometer has more elements than any other.
C-BASS South Carnarvon, South Africa 4.5-5.5 GHz 7.6 metre dish with polarimeter back end [5]

Antarctica[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI) Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station 26-36 GHz 13-element interferometer measuring anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background.[6]
South Pole Telescope (SPT) Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station 95-350 GHz 10-m microwave telescope making observations of clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect.[7]

Asia[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
Delingha 13.7 m Delingha, Qinghai, China 85–115 GHz Dish diameter: 13.7 m. Site altitude: 3200 m. Operated by Purple Mountain Observatory.
Sheshan Shanghai, China 1660 MHz 25m. Operated by SHAO (Shanghai Astronomical Observatory)
Nanshan 25m Ürümqi, China 1.4-18 GHz L/C/S/X band receivers. 70 km south to Ürümqi. Operated by XAO (Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory).
Primeval Structure Telescope (PaST) Xinjiang, China 50-200 MHz PaST is planned to be an array of some ten-thousand log-periodic antennas spread over several square kilometers. Construction started in 2004.
Chinese Spectral Radio Heliograph (CSRH) Inner Mongolia, China 0.4-15 GHz CSRH is an interferometer under construction in China. The CSRH will consist of 100 telescopes covering 0.4–15 GHz. 40 telescopes of 4.5 m cover 400 MHz-2 GHz and 60 telescopes of 2 m cover 2–15 GHz. CSRH will be one of the world’s largest and most advanced imaging spectroscopy instruments. CSRH will be used to study coronal mass ejections. All of the 4.5m telescopes are assembled and the 2m telescopes will be assembled by 2013. [1] [2]
Miyun Synthesis Radio Telescope (MSRT) Miyun, China 232 MHz Array of 28 9-meter dishes.
Miyun 50m Radio Telescope Miyun, China 2-12 GHz Built in 2005.
Kunming 40m Radio Telescope Kunming, China 2-12 GHz Built in 2006.
Sheshan 65m Radio Telescope Shanghai, China Built in 2012. [3]
Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) Pune, India 50-1420 MHz Thirty 45 m wire dishes;[8] largest telescope at meter wavelengths. Operated by the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics.[9]
Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT) Ooty, India 326.5 MHz approximately 530 m long and 30 m wide.
Gauribidanur Radio Observatory, Gauribidanur, India 40-150 MHz Operated by (Indian Institute of Astrophysics). A Radioheliograph.
Nobeyama radio observatory Nagano Prefecture, Japan 17-34 GHz A 45m single-dish short-millimetre telescope, and six 10m telescopes of the Nobeyama Millimetre Array (NMA), both operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ)
Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) Khamar-Daban, Irkutsk, Russia 5.7 GHz The SSRT is a crossed interferometer, consisting of two arrays of 128x128 parabolic antennas 2.5 meters in diameter each, spaced equidistantly at 4.9 meters and oriented in the E-W and N-S directions. The SSRT is a special-purpose solar radio telescope designed for studying solar activity in the microwave range (5.7 GHz). [4]
Badary Radio Astronomical Observatory Burytia, Russia 1.4–22 GHz 32m RT-32 radio telescope, operating range 1.4–22 GHz. [5]
Galenki RT-70 radio telescope Galenki (Ussuriysk), Russia 5–300 GHz RT-70, 70 m telescope, operating range 5–300 GHz
Suffa RT-70 radio telescope Suffa plateau, Uzbekistan 5–300 GHz RT-70, operating range 5–300 GHz
“Herouni Mirror Radio telescope” - Radio-Optical Telescope (ROT-54/2.6) Orgov village, Republic of Armenia 1.5-150 GHz diameter - 54 m (useful - 32) Radiophysical Research Institute
Qitai Radio Telescope Qitai County, Xinjiang, China 300 MHz–117 GHz. Construction work started in 2012. Will be operated by XAO (Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory).

Australia[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder
(ASKAP)
Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory, Western Australia 700-1800 MHz ASKAP, the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, is currently being built by CSIRO. It will be made up of 36 identical antennas, each 12 metres in diameter, with a 30 sq degrees FoV at 1.4 GHz. All 36 antennas and their technical systems are expected to be completed by 2013.[10]
Australia Telescope Compact Array
(ATCA)
Paul Wild Observatory, Narrabri, New South Wales 0.3-25 GHz 6x22m dish aperture synthesis array, operated by CSIRO as part of the ATNF (Australia Telescope National Facility).[11]
Canberra Deep Space Communication Complex
(CDSCC)
Tidbinbilla, Australian Capital Territory 1x70m dish, 2x34m dishes, operated by CSIRO on behalf of NASA.[12]
Ceduna Radio Observatory Ceduna, South Australia 30 m telescope, operated by the University of Tasmania
Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (MOST) Molonglo (near Canberra, ACT) 600-1200 MHz Operated by the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. East-west arm of the former Molonglo Cross Telescope, approximately 1.6km in length. Operates at 843 MHz.
Mopra Radio Telescope Mopra Observatory, near Coonabarabran, New South Wales 100 MHz 22 m dish, operated by CSIRO as part of the ATNF (Australia Telescope National Facility).[13]
Mount Pleasant Radio Observatory Hobart, Tasmania 26 m telescope, operated by the University of Tasmania
Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory, Western Australia 80-300 MHz Fixed 128 array of 16-element dual-polarisation antennas covering 80-300 MHz with approximately 30° field-of-view using electronic beam-forming
Parkes Radio Telescope Parkes Observatory, New South Wales 64 m telescope (2nd largest movable dish in the Southern Hemisphere), operated by CSIRO as part of the ATNF (Australia Telescope National Facility).[14]

Europe[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
Effelsberg Bad Münstereifel-Effelsberg near Bonn, Germany 395 MHz and 95 GHz 100 m dish operated by Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, operates at 395 MHz to 95 GHz
Ukrainian T-shaped Radio telescope, second modification (UTR-2) Grakovo, Kharkiv, Ukraine 8–40 MHz World's largest radio telescope at decametre wavelengths (max. collective area 150 000 m²).
Lovell Telescope Jodrell Bank Observatory, Cheshire, England 76 m dish
Yevpatoria RT-70 radio telescope Center for deep space communications, Yevpatoria, Crimea, Ukraine 5–300 GHz RT-70, 70 m telescope, operating range 5–300 GHz
RATAN-600 Zelenchukskaya, Russia 0.61-30 GHz 600 m dish, operates at 610 MHz to 30 GHz, world's largest diameter individual radio telescope
TNA 1500 Kalyasin, Russia [15] 5.86 GHz 64 m fully steerable dish, up to 5.86 GHz
TNA 1500 Medvezhji Ozera (Bear Lakes), Russia [15] 5.86 GHz 64 m fully steerable dish, up to 5.86 GHz
RT-22 Pushchino, Russia Four 22 m fully steerable radio telescopes. At the 1960s the centimeter and millimeter-wavelength RT-22s had a world record-breaking high angular resolution for individual radio telescopes. Operated by the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory.
DKR-1000 Pushchino, Russia DKR-1000 is the world largest telescope operating in the meter wavelength range. A wide-band radio telescope instrument consists of two parabolic cylinders 1 km long and 40 m width. One cylinder extend from east to west and the 2nd from north to south. DKR-1000 has a high sensitivity and the telescope allows simultaneous observations at any wavelengths in the range from 2.5m to 10m. Operated by the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory. [6]
BSA Pushchino, Russia BSA is a Large Phased Array comprising over 16,000 dipoles and covering an area of 7.2 hectares. The BSA has a world record sensitivity in the meter wavelength range. Operated by the Pushchino Radio Astronomy Observatory. [7]
Radioastronomical Observatory Zelenchukskaya Karachaevo-Cherkessiya, Russia 1.4–22 GHz 32m RT-32 radio telescope, operating range 1.4–22 GHz. [8]
Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory Svetloe, Karelia, Russia 1.4–22 GHz 32m RT-32 radio telescope, operating range 1.4–22 GHz. [9]
RT-7.5 (Bauman's radio telescope) Moscow Oblast, Russia Two 7.75-meter diameter antennas (only one is working at the moment) Remote access computer-aided laboratory
Yebes RT 40 m Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Yebes, Guadalajara, Spain [10] 40 m parabolic steerable telescope for mm and cm wavelengths
Toruń RT4 32 m Toruń Centre for Astronomy, Toruń, Poland RT4 (32 m) parabolic antenna
RT-32 Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Center, Irbene, Latvia 32-meter fully steerable parabolic, centimetre-wave range antenna RT-32 [11]
Northern Cross Medicina Radio Observatory, Medicina, Bologna, Italy [12] 408 MHz 32000 m² interferometer, cylindrical-paraboloid steerable over NS., 408 MHz, Beam=3'
32 m VLBI dish Medicina Radio Observatory, Medicina, Bologna, Italy [13] 1.4-43 GHz 32 m, fully steerable dish, 1400 MHz...43 GHz
32 m VLBI dish Noto Radio Observatory, Noto, Italy, [14] 0.3-86 GHz 32 m, fully steerable dish, 300 MHz-86 GHz. Operates both as part of astronomical and geodetic VLBI network and as a single dish.
MERLIN (Multi-Element Radio Linked Interferometer Network) United Kingdom Consists of the Cambridge 32 m at Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, Darnhall, Defford, Tabley[disambiguation needed] (also known as Pickmere) and Knockin. Also includes the Lovell and Mark II telescopes at Jodrell Bank.
EAARO - East Anglian Amateur Radio Observatory Cambridgeshire, England [15] 0-11 GHz A scientific and educational charitable company currently constructing an Amateur Radio Observatory and Ground Station in Cambridgeshire
TNA-400 Center for deep space communications, Simferopol, Crimea, Ukraine TNA-400, 32 m telescope
IRAM - 30m Pico Veleta, in Granada, Spain 30m dish operated by the Institute for Millimetric Radio Astronomy (Institut de radioastronomie millimétrique, IRAM); works in the millimeter range (1mm to 3mm) both with superheterodyne and bolometric detectors.
Mark II Jodrell Bank Observatory, Cheshire, England 25 m dish
Stockert Bad Münstereifel-Eschweiler near Bonn, Germany 25 m dish operated by University of Bonn and Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, closed in 1993, now owned by NRW-Stiftung [16], reopened 2010 after restoration and operated by Förderverein Astropeiler Stockert [17]
Toruń RT3 15 m Toruń Centre for Astronomy, Toruń, Poland RT3 (15 m) antenna.
Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) Westerbork, Netherlands Array of 14 25-meter dishes [18]
25 m telescope Onsala Space Observatory, Onsala, Sweden 25 m telescope
Dwingeloo (CAMRAS) Dwingeloo, Netherlands 25 m steerable dish, formerly operated by ASTRON, now in restoration by CAMRAS [19]
22 m telescope Simeiz Observatory, Simeiz, Crimea, Ukraine 22-m radio telescope for mm and cm radio waves. Located at the foot of mount Koshka (Cat) in Katsiveli (near Simeiz). Belongs to the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, the Department of Radioastronomy.
20 m telescope Onsala Space Observatory, Onsala, Sweden 20 m telescope
Pluton (complex) Center for deep space communications, Evpatoria, Crimea, Ukraine 8 mirrors with diameter of 16 meters. Square is 1000 sq. meters.
RT-16 Ventspils International Radio Astronomy Center, Irbene, Latvia 16-meter diameter antenna RT-16 http://www.virac.lv/
KAIRA Kilpisjärvi, Enontekiö, Finland 30 m × 50 m, 768-element phased array and a 34 m diameter, 48-element phased array
Metsähovi Radio Observatory Kylmälä, Kirkkonummi, Finland 2-150 GHz 13.7 m dish, operates at 2 to 150 GHz, surface accuracy 0.1 mm (rms).
Ryle Telescope Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, Cambridge, England Eight 13 m dishes, and is currently used as one part of the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager.
Erciyes University Radio Observatory Kayseri, Turkey 12.8 m dish
Wurzburg v2.0 LAB/OASU (Bordeaux Observatory radio telescope) Floirac, Gironde, France 1.4-1.7 GHz 7.5 meter diameter antenna. Observable frequency range : 1.4-1.7 GHz. Bandwidth ~9.2 MHz Wurzburg v2.0 Remote access - Web Interface
European VLBI Network (EVN) Distributed across Europe with members in China, South Africa and the USA VLBI array operated by the European Consortium for VLBI
Plateau de Bure Interferometer Plateau de Bure, Grenoble, France Originally an array of 3 antennas, since 2005 has 6 antennas, operating at millimeter wavelengths.
Northern Extended Millimeter Array France 12 antennas, operating at millimeter wavelengths (Operational: 2019).
Nançay Radio Telescope (NRT) Nançay, France NRT website (fr)
Nançay Decameter Array (DAM) Nançay, France 10-100 MHz DAM website (fr)
Nançay Radio Heliographe (NRH) Nançay, France 150-450 MHz NRH website (fr)
ALLBIN (Amateur Linked Long Baseline Interferometer Network) Germany A Small Network of Radio Telescopes and Radio Spectrographs doing Amateur Radio Astronomy at a Very High standard coordinated by The European Radio Astronomy Club[16] Research and Development Telescope in Mannheim Germany.
LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) Netherlands, Germany, Great Britain, France, Sweden; in future possibly Poland and other countries 10-240 MHz Low frequency array of dipole antennas at 1.25 to 30m wavelengths (10-240 MHz), with a strongly distributed signal processing system. The telescope beam is constructed in software from combinations of antenna signals.
Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, Cambridge, England Small Array consists of 10 3.7-m parabolic antennas
The European Radio Astronomy Club Telescope and Development Facility (ERAC Telescope) Mannheim, Germany From 14KHzVLF up to 40 GHz [20][17]
ERAC Phased Array The European Radio Astronomy Club, Elsass, France Phased array and Digital back end based on the SKA design
ERAC Phased Array The European Radio Astronomy Club, East Lothian, Scotland Phased array and Digital back end based on the SKA design
Sardinia Radio Telescope San Basilio, Sardinia, Italy http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sardinia_Radio_Telescope

North America[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
Algonquin Radio Telescope Algonquin Radio Observatory, Algonquin Park, Ontario, Canada 46 metre fully steerable dish operated by Thoth Technology,[18] Canada's largest radio telescope.
Allen Telescope Array Hat Creek Radio Observatory, Hat Creek, California, USA 0.5-11.5 GHz 42 6-m gregorian offset dishes using log periodic cooled feed covering .5 GHz - 11.5 GHz. Operated by joint agreement between SRI International and the SETI Institute
ARO 12m Radio Telescope Kitt Peak National Observatory, Tucson, Arizona, USA Previously operated by the NRAO, this telescope is currently operated by the University of Arizona's Arizona Radio Observatory, part of Steward Observatory.
C-BASS North Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Big Pine, California, USA 4.5-5.5 GHz 6.1 metre dish with polarimeter back end [19]
Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Big Pine, California, USA 75–345 GHz Heterogeneous interferometer array composed of 6 10-m elements, 9 6-m elements, and 8 3.5-m elements covering frequencies ranging from 27–36 GHz, 80–115 GHz, and 215–265 GHz. Operated by joint agreements between Radio Astronomy Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, Caltech, University of Maryland, College Park, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Chicago.
Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory Okanagan Falls, British Columbia, Canada 408 - 1420 MHz Synthesis telescope consists of seven 9-metre (30 ft) parabolic antennas, three of which are movable along a 600-metre rail line.
Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory (FCRAO) Amherst, Massachusetts, USA Operated by UMass Amherst
Goldstone Radio Telescope Mojave Desert California USA One of the most sensitive radars in the world
Green Bank Interferometer (GBI) Green Bank, West Virginia, USA Three 26 meter (85 ft) radio telescopes operated by NRAO
Green Bank Telescope (GBT) Green Bank, West Virginia, USA World's largest 100-metre (330 ft) fully steerable single-dish radio telescope
Green Bank 140 Foot Telescope (140) Green Bank, West Virginia, USA 43m equatorial mount single-dish radio telescope
Haystack Observatory Westford, Massachusetts, USA 37m radome-enclosed 90 GHz radar/radiotelescope; 9m radar for space debris tracking, 46m incoherent scatter radar, 26m L-band deep space tracking radar, 18m radiotelescope used for geodesy. Operated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) Mount Graham, Arizona, USA 10-meter radio telescope operated by the University of Arizona's Arizona Radio Observatory, part of Steward Observatory.
Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) Sierra Negra, Puebla, Mexico A 50-meter telescope for observations at millimetre wavelengths, the largest single dish instrument operating in this wavelength band.
Leuschner Observatory Lafayette, California, USA A 4.5-meter single dish, prototype dish for the Allen Telescope Array
Long Wavelength Array (LWA) Socorro, New Mexico, USA 10-88 MHz A telescope composed of 256 crossed-dipole antennas currently under development by the University of New Mexico and the Naval Research Laboratory
Morehead State University 21m. Morehead, Kentucky, USA A 21 m. telescope used for academic research and satellite data retrieval and control.
Paul Plishner Radio Astronomy and Space Sciences Center Haswell, Kiowa County, Colorado, USA An 18 meter telescope under development since 2010 for use by educators in Colorado and others. Sponsored by the Deep Space Exploration Society of Boulder County, Colorado
OVRO 40 meter Telescope Owens Valley Radio Observatory, Big Pine, California, USA 15 GHz This cm wavelength telescope operated by Caltech, is currently being used on a blazar monitoring program at 15 GHz.
Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) Green Bank, West Virginia, USA 100-200 MHz Thirty-two crossed-dipole antennas measuring 100-200 MHz
Solar monitor, two 1.8 m dishes Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, Penticton, British Columbia, Canada The first dish here was originally a backup for the Algonquin site, but when the ARO site was later closed its instrument moved to DRAO and became its backup.
SRI International Antenna Facility Palo Alto, California, USA 45.7 m parabolic reflector. Owned by the U.S. Government and constructed by SRI on land leased from Stanford University, the Antenna Facility is known locally as "The Dish."
Synthesis Telescope, seven-element interferometer Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, Penticton, British Columbia, Canada  
Very Large Array (VLA) Socorro, New Mexico, USA Array of 27 dishes. Part of NRAO.
Very Small Array (VSA) Cogan Station, Pennsylvania, USA Array of 8 small dishes. Part of The SETI League's Project Argus initiative.
Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) Socorro, New Mexico USA
(operations center)
Array system of 10 radio telescopes; dishes are located at Mauna Kea, Hawaii, Owens Valley, California, Brewster, Washington, Kitt Peak, Arizona, Pie Town, New Mexico, Los Alamos, New Mexico, Fort Davis, Texas, North Liberty, Iowa, Hancock, New Hampshire, and St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands.
Two 26 m dishes Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI), Rosman, North Carolina, USA  

South America[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
Atacama B-Mode Search (ABS) Llano de Chajnantor Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile 127-163 GHz 60 cm telescope located on Cerro Toco and designed to measure the polarization of the CMB.
Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) Llano de Chajnantor Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile 6 m telescope located on Cerro Toco.
Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) Llano de Chajnantor Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile 54 dishes with 12-m diameter and 12 dishes with 7-m diameter, sensitive to wavelengths between radio and infrared (submillimetre astronomy).
Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Llano de Chajnantor Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile 12 m telescope located at the Chajnantor plateau.
Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) Llano de Chajnantor Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile 10 m telescope located at Pampa La Bola.
Brazilian Decimetric Array (BDA) Cachoeira Paulista, São Paulo, Brazil 1.2-6.0 GHz 38-element radio telescope interferometer working in the frequency range of 1.2-6.0 GHz. The final baseline will be 2.27 km in the East-West and 1.17 km in the South directions, respectively. This instrument will obtain radio images from the sun with a spatial resolution ~4x6 arc seconds. Located in Cachoeira Paulista, São Paulo, Brazil (Latitude 45° 00' 20" West and Longitude 22° 41' 19" South)[20]
Cosmic Background Imager (CBI) Llano de Chajnantor Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile 13 dishes with 1m diameter located at the Chajnantor plateau. Decommissioned in 2008.
Itapetinga Radio Observatory Atibaia, São Paulo, Brazil 13,7 m telescope, operates in the K and Q bands, with cryogenic receivers[21]
NANTEN2 Observatory (NANTEN2) Llano de Chajnantor Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile 4m telescope located at Pampa La Bola.
Northeastern Space Radio Observatory Eusébio, Brazil 14,2 m telescope
POlarization Emission of Millimeter Activity at the Sun Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito (CASLEO), San Juan Province, Argentina 45 and 90 GHz Full sun disk patrols with left- and righ-hand circular polarization receivers.
Q/U Imaging Experiment (QUIET) Llano de Chajnantor Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile Located at the Chajnantor plateau.
Solar Submillimeter Telescope (SST) Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito (CASLEO), San Juan Province, Argentina 212 GHz and 405 GHz 1.5 m radome enclosed, single dish Cassegrain antenna, with a focal array (4 beams @ 212 GHz, 2 beams @ 405 GHz) of room temperature receivers.
Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) La Silla Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile 15 m telescope. Decommissioned in 2003[22]

Atlantic Ocean[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
Very Small Array (VSA) Observatorio del Teide, Canary Islands, Spain Array of 14 dishes, with two larger source-subtraction dishes. Controlled remotely from UK.
Arecibo Observatory Arecibo, Puerto Rico 305 m (1,001 ft), The world's largest single-dish radio telescope.

Indian Ocean[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
Mauritius Radio Telescope Mauritius

Pacific Ocean[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
Caltech Submillimeter Observatory Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii, USA 10.4 m (34 ft) diameter submillimeter wavelength telescope
James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii, USA 15-meter submillimetre-wavelength telescope operated by the Joint Astronomy Centre
Submillimeter Array (SMA) Mauna Kea Observatory, Hawaii, USA Operated jointly by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics of Taiwan.
Warkworth Radio Telescope Warkworth Radio Observatory, Warkworth, New Zealand 12 metre fully steerable dish operated by IRASR, AUT University[23]
Warkworth 2 dish Warkworth Radio Observatory, Warkworth, New Zealand 30 metre fully steerable dish operated by IRASR, AUT University[23]


Space-based[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
HALCA (Highly Advanced Laboratory for Communications and Astronomy) Earth orbit with an apogee altitude of 21,400 km and a perigee altitude of 560 km.  
Zond 3 Russian spacecraft carrying a radio telescope  
Spektr-R or RadioAstron 10 meter radio telescope in a highly elliptical earth orbit. Launched July 2011.

Under construction or planned construction[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
EAARO - East Anglian Amateur Radio Observatory Cambridgeshire, England [21] 0-11 GHz A scientific and educational charitable company currently constructing an Amateur Radio Observatory and Ground Station in Cambridgeshire
FAST (Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical Telescope) Guizhou, China 0.3-5.1 GHz Under construction. Once completed in 2016, FAST will be the world's largest and most sensitive radio telescope and three times more sensitive than the Arecibo Observatory. Operates at 300 MHz to 5.1 GHz.
Large Latin American Millimeter Array (LLAMA) Alto Chorrillos, near San Antonio de los Cobres, Salta, Argentina 45 - 900 GHz 12 m single dish, VLBI, in construction, expected to start operations in 2017
Qitai 110m Radio Telescope (QTT) Xinjiang, China 0.3-117 GHz Planned world’s largest fully steerable single-dish radio telescope with a diameter of 110 meters. Operates at 300 MHz to 117 GHz. Construction of the telescope is planned to start in 2013 and completed within 5 years. [22] [23]

Proposed telescopes[edit]

Name Location Frequency Range Remarks
30m Sub-Millimeter Telescope (TSMT) China A 30m aperture sub-millimeter telescope (TSMT) with an active reflector has been proposed in China. [24]
LOFAR Super Station (LSS) Nançay, France 10-80 MHz The Nancay radio astronomy observatory and associated laboratories are developing the concept of a "Super Station" for extending the LOFAR station now installed and operational in Nancay. The LOFAR Super Station (LSS) will increase the number of high sensitivity long baselines, provide short baselines and an alternate core, and be a large standalone instrument. It will operate in the low frequency band of LOFAR (30-80 MHz) and extend this range to lower frequencies.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]