List of monastic houses in Scotland

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"Scottish abbey" redirects here. Not to be confused with Schottenstift, Vienna.

List of monastic houses in Scotland is a catalogue of the abbeys, priories, friaries and other monastic religious houses of Scotland.

In this article alien houses are included, as are smaller establishments such as cells and notable monastic granges (particularly those with resident monks). The numerous monastic hospitals per se are not included here unless at some time the foundation had, or was purported to have, the status or function of an abbey, priory, friary or preceptory/commandery.

The geographical co-ordinates provided are sourced from details provided by the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments in Scotland (RCAHMS)[1] and Ordnance Survey publications.

Overview[edit]

Article layout[edit]

The list is presented alphabetically by council area. Foundations are listed alphabetically within each area.

Communities/provenance: shows the status and communities existing at each establishment, together with such dates as have been established as well as the fate of the establishment after dissolution, and the current status of the site.

Formal Name or Dedication: shows the formal name of the establishment or the person in whose name the church is dedicated, where known.

Alternative Names: some of the establishments have had alternative names over the course of time. In order to assist in text-searching such alternatives in name or spelling have been provided.

Monastic Glossary: following the listing, provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

Abbreviations and key[edit]

The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:
* indicates current monastic function
+ indicates current non-monastic ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
^ indicates current non-ecclesiastic function (including remains incorporated into later structure)
$ indicates remains limited to earthworks etc.
# indicates no identifiable trace of the monastic foundation remains
~ indicates exact site of monastic foundation unknown

Locations with names in italics indicate probable duplication (misidentification with another location)
or non-existent foundations (either erroneous reference or proposed foundation never implemented.

Trusteeship denoted as follows:
HS Historic Scotland
NTS National Trust for Scotland
CS Church of Scotland

Communities/provenance: shows the status and communities existing at each establishment, together with such dates as have been established as well as the fate of the establishment after dissolution, and the current status of the site.

Formal Name or Dedication: shows the formal name of the establishment or the person in whose name the church is dedicated, where known.

Alternative Names: some of the establishments have had alternative names over the course of time. In order to assist in text-searching such alternatives in name or spelling have been provided.

Monastic Glossary: following the listing, provides links to articles on the particular monastic orders as well as other terms which appear in the listing.

List of establishments by county/region[edit]

Aberdeen[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Aberdeen Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded between 1230 and 1249, purportedly by Alexander II;
destroyed by Reformers 4 January 1560;
secularised between 1560 and 1587; granted to George, Earl Marischal 17 May 1587;
site currently occupied by Robert Gordon's College, Schoolhill - see Parson Gordon's 1661 map showing "Blackfreers".
St John the Baptist
Aberdeen Greyfriars Observant Franciscan Friars
founded 1469;
secularised 29 December 1559; friars resigned entire possession over to the Town Council;
granted to the Town Council by James VI 30 December 1567 for conversion into a hospital;
extant buildings passed to George, Earl Marischal 22 September 1593;
church became derelict until 1624;
restored 1624 by the citizens; in parochial use until 1903
[1]

57°08′58″N 2°05′48″W / 57.1494178°N 2.0966506°W / 57.1494178; -2.0966506 (Aberdeen Greyfriars)
Aberdeen Monastery Benedictine monks
supposed establishment;
founded before 3 April 1231, when the Pope granted the use of the church of Culdedono to the abbot and convent 'de Aberdona' ;
possibly no monastic foundation here
Aberdeen Nunnery purported nuns of unspecified orderno evidence of such a foundation St Catherine
Aberdeen Preceptory property of Knights Templars, 'convent and church' are fictitious
Aberdeen Red Friars Trinitarians
founded before 1274 (1181[note 1]); (William the Lion reputedly granted his royal residence in Aberdeen to two red friars 1211);
secularised 1561
The Church of the Holy Trinity, Aberdeen [2]

57°08′44″N 2°05′47″W / 57.1454601°N 2.096318°W / 57.1454601; -2.096318 (Aberdeen Red Friars)
Aberdeen Whitefriars The Green - geograph.org.uk - 833545.jpg Carmelite Friars
founded c.1273: grant made by Reginald le Chen;
dissolved 1560-83;
passed through several ownerships, eventually granted to the Town Council by James VI 26 October 1583
[3]

57°08′44″N 2°05′57″W / 57.1455183°N 2.0991075°W / 57.1455183; -2.0991075 (Aberdeen Whitefriars)

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Aberdeenshire[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Aberdour Monastery Celtic monks
traditionally founded by Colum Cille and Drostan mac Coscrach, his disciple — provenance doubtful
Aberdour Priory Franciscan nuns
founded 1548 by James, Earl of Morton;
secularised 1560, leased to Earl of Morton 18 August 1560
Aberdene Priory (erroneous)
Aboyne Preceptory Knights Templar
church granted by Walter Byset, confirmed by Ralph, Bishop of Aberdeen — supposed house
Banff Greyfriars supposed Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
convent; confusion with Carmelite house[note 2]
St John
Banff Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded 1321-4, chapel of Our Lady granted by Robert I 21 April 1321, confirmed by him 1 August 1323;
burned 20 July 1559;
dissolved or secularised 1574, granted to King's College, Aberdeen by James VI 10 September 1574
Priory of Bethlem of ye ordour of Carmelits beside Banff [4]

57°39′15″N 2°32′10″W / 57.6541202°N 2.536212°W / 57.6541202; -2.536212 (Banff Whitefriars)
Clova Monastery Celtic monks
dependent on Mortlach;
founded before 1157 by St Moluag, reference in bull of Adrian IV who confirmed it to the Bishop of Aberdeen
Clovett Monastery;
St Luke's Chapel
[5]

57°16′43″N 2°54′15″W / 57.2785491°N 2.9041648°W / 57.2785491; -2.9041648 (Clova Monastery)
Deer Abbey Deer Abbey 20110520 from southeast.jpg Celtic monks
traditionally founded 6thC by Colum Cille — provenance unreliable
Cistercian monks
daughter of Kinloss
founded 1214/19 by William Comyn, Earl of Buchan;
dissolved 1560;
erected to a temporal lordship for Robert Keith, becoming Lord Altrie, (charter 1587); (HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Deer [6]

57°31′24″N 2°3′14.5″W / 57.52333°N 2.054028°W / 57.52333; -2.054028 (Deer Abbey)
Drumtochty Whitefriars lands granted to the Carmelite Friars of Aberdeen 1403; supposed foundation – no house existed
Ecclesgreig Monastery Celtic monks
church of Ecclesgyrg granted to St Andrews by Richard, Bishop of St Andrews, confirmed to St Andrews by William the Lion between 1189 and 1195
Forvie Preceptory Knights Templar — King's College described as a former Templars' house[note 3]
Fyvie Priory Tironensian monks
dependent on Arbroath;
founded in or before 1285, granted to Arbroath by Reginald le Chen (Cheyne); (asserted foundation 1179 by Fergus, Earl of Buchan likely to be confusion with parish church foundation);
united with Arbroath by the Pope 21 August 1459 on petition of the abbot and convent of Arbroath;
dissolution unknown, possibly survived to the Reformation
The Priory Church of The Blessed Virgin Mary and All Saints, Fyvie [7]

57°25′47″N 2°23′35″W / 57.4296817°N 2.3931742°W / 57.4296817; -2.3931742 (Fyvie Priory)
Kennethmont Cell monks of unspecified order — purported cell burned down at the Reformation; purported collegiate foundation;
parish church, no evidence of monastic foundation
Monymusk Priory Culdees
founded 1138;
Augustinian Canons Regular
refounded c.1245;
dissolved 1617
The Priory Church of Saint Mary and Saint John, Monymusk
____________________
erroneously Monymaill in Fyfe
[8][9]

57°13′38″N 2°31′21″W / 57.227149°N 2.5224674°W / 57.227149; -2.5224674 (Monymusk Priory)
Mortlach Monastery traditional early site of bishopric of Aberdeen
Tullich Preceptory Knights Templar
given as a residence of Templars,[note 4] actually a parochial church held by the Templars and later the Hospitallers[note 5]
Turriff Monastery Celtic monks
founded before 1131;
dissolved after c.1150
St Congan's Church [10]

57°32′16″N 2°27′56″W / 57.5377583°N 2.465567°W / 57.5377583; -2.465567 (Turriff Monastery)

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Angus[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Arbroath Abbey Arbroath Abbey - geograph.org.uk - 3180.jpg Tironensian monks — from Kelso
founded 1176 (1178) by William the Lion;
church dedicated 8 May 1233;
church damaged by lightning 1380, monks removed temporarily to other locations during repairs;
mitred abbey 26 June 1396;
dissolved 1606
The Abbey Church of Saint Thomas of Canterbury, Arbroath [11]

56°33′45″N 2°34′56″W / 56.56250°N 2.58222°W / 56.56250; -2.58222 (Arbroath Abbey)
Barry Red Friars purported Trinitarians
supposedly founded 1212 by William the Lion,[note 6] built and endowed by Alexander IIsupposed house – fictional
domus Barensis
Brechin Monastery Brechin, Cathedral and Round Tower.jpg Culdees
probably founded before 975;
site now occupied by Brechin Cathedral, a congregation of the Church of Scotland.
[12]

56°43′51″N 2°39′41″W / 56.730732°N 2.6615077°W / 56.730732; -2.6615077 (Brechin Monastery – now cathedral)
Brechin Red Friars Trinitarians
purportedly founded 1256 by "Edward, Bishop of Brechin"[note 7] (no such bishop), or c.1258 by David I[note 8]reliable evidence lacking
Brechin Whitefriars ? supposed Carmelite Friars
founded 1376 (in the tenure of Stephen Dempster, Bishop of Brechin) by Malcolm Dempster, Baron of Careston — supposed foundation – details unsubstantiated
Dundee Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded c.1521, benefactions by Andrew Abercromby, Burgess of Dundee; (charters 4 September 1315, 1345 and 1388 not considered authentic);
petition to the pope by Scottish provincial 16 September 1517 to establish the house; sacked by mob August 1543; probably destroyed November 1548 when the English burned the town
dedication unknown [13]

56°27′39″N 2°58′25″W / 56.4608611°N 2.9737222°W / 56.4608611; -2.9737222 (Dundee Blackfriars)
Dundee Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
founded before 1289 by Devorgilla;[note 9]
built before 1296;[note 10]
dissolved or secularised c.1560
[14]

56°27′40″N 2°58′22″W / 56.4610849°N 2.9727888°W / 56.4610849; -2.9727888 (Dundee Greyfriars)
Dundee Priory Franciscan nuns
founded 1501/2 by James Fotheringham (spurious charter of grant by James Graham of Fintry and Claverhouse);
secularised 1560, the Magistrates of Dundee confirmed in possession 14 April 1567
Dundee Red Friars purported Trinitarians
purportedly founded 1283 by Sir James Scrymgeour; probably hospital – reference to monastic house probably erroneous
Kettins Red Friars purported Trinitarians
parish church appropriated to hospital of bridge of Berwick, and thereafter to the Trinitarians — no Trinitarian house
Katnes;
Ketnes
Monifieth Monastery Culdees
founded 12thC;
secularised by c.1220: land granted to Nicholas, witness to charters of Countess Matilda, by Earl Malcolm c.1220;
land granted to Arbroath 1242-3
[15]

56°28′50″N 2°49′16″W / 56.4804939°N 2.8211716°W / 56.4804939; -2.8211716 (Monifieth Monastery)
Restenneth Priory Restenneth 1.JPG possible early foundation built c.710 at the instance of Nechtan, King of the Picts;
Augustinian Canons Regular
founded between 1161 and 1162, St Peter's church granted to Jedburgh by Malcolm IV;
dissolved or secularised 1606
St Peter
____________________
Restennet Priory;
Rostin Priory;
Rostinoth Priory;
Roslin Priory (erroneous reference)
[16]

56°39′12″N 2°50′46″W / 56.6532778°N 2.846092°W / 56.6532778; -2.846092 (Restenneth Priory)

The following location in Angus has no monastic connection:

  • Rossie Priory: mansion, built 1807

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Argyll & Bute[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Artchain Monastery,
Isle of Tiree
Celtic monks
founded 6thC? by Findchan, contemporary of Colum Cille
Ardchattan Priory Ardchattan Priory 20080428 choir.jpg Celtic monks
founded by Findchan;
Valliscaulian monks — from Val des Choux
founded 1230/1;
part of church in parochial use to 1722;
site now largely occupied by Victorian house; (HS)
The Priory Church of Saint John the Baptist, Ardchattan [17]

56°27′47″N 5°17′38″W / 56.4630269°N 5.2938706°W / 56.4630269; -5.2938706 (Ardchattan Priory)
Bledach Monastery,
Isle of Tiree
Celtic monks
founded before 577 by Brendan, founder abbot of Clonfert
Cara Red Friars purported Trinitarians
asserted cell;
chapel only, no Trinitarian foundation
St Fionnlugh's Chapel [18]

55°38′06″N 5°44′58″W / 55.6350576°N 5.7495447°W / 55.6350576; -5.7495447 (Cara Red Friars)
Cella Diuni, Loch Awe Celtic monks
possibly founded by Diun
St Columba's Church;
Kilneuair
[19]

56°10′44″N 5°24′09″W / 56.1788498°N 5.4024429°W / 56.1788498; -5.4024429 (Cella Diuni)
Colonsay Abbey Augustinian Canons Regular
asserted abbey; evidence of monastic house lacking
Garvellach Islands Monastery traditionally founded late-6thC by Brendan, founder abbot of Clonfert;
probably on the island of Eileach an Naoimh
Ailech Monastery
Eileach-an-Naoimh Monastery
Hinba Monastery Celtic monks
founded before 597 by Colum Cille, probably on the island of Jura
possibly Jura Monastery (v. infra)
Inchkenneth Monastery ? purported monastery – island in ownership of Iona Nunnery — evidence of parish church only
Inchmarnock Monastery purported cell of monks — parish church only – island held by Crossraguel, exchanged with Saddell 17 January 1390/1 — no evidence of monastic foundation Inchmernock
Inishail Priory supposed Cistercian nuns
remains of a building purportedly a nunnery;
purportedly granted to Hay, Abbot of Inchaffray
actually a parochial church appropriated by Inchaffray — supposed priory fictitious
Iona Abbey + IonaAbbey.jpg Celtic monks
founded c.565 by Colum Cille;
plundered by the Norse 795 and 802;
Benedictine monks
abbey founded 1203;
dubiously conjectured to have been Tironensian[note 11]
dissolved 1587/8(?);
cathedral, request made by the Crown to the Pope 1 April 1498 to establish a see pending the recovery of the see in the Isle of Man from the English, apparently unsuccessful, the monks holding the abbey in commendam from 1499; no evidence of a cathedral chapter being established;
now restored and in use as ecumenical Christian community;
(HS)
[20]

56°20′02″N 6°23′36″W / 56.333967°N 6.393249°W / 56.333967; -6.393249 (Iona Abbey)
Iona Priory Iona Nunnery - church.jpg Augustinian Canonesses
founded before 1208, purportedly by Ragnall mac Somairle (Reginald, son of Somerled);
secularised after 1574, granted to Hector McLean of Duart; (HS)
St Mary
____________________
Iona Nunnery


56°19′50″N 6°23′36″W / 56.3305232°N 6.3932168°W / 56.3305232; -6.3932168 (Iona Priory)
Jura Monastery possibly Hinba Monastery Hinba Monastery? (v. supra)
Kerrara Priory Cistercian monks
apparent intended foundation after 1292 never implemented;
no evidence of monastic foundation or occupation by monks on the island
Kingarth Monastery Celtic monks
founded 6thC, purportedly by St Blane; seat of bishopric; (HS)
Cinngrad Monastery [21]

55°44′13″N 5°02′10″W / 55.7368348°N 5.0360084°W / 55.7368348; -5.0360084 (Kingarth Monastery)
Lismore Monastery founded before 592 by Lugaid or Moluag
Mag Luinge, Isle of Tiree founded before 597; probably at Soroby;
destroyed by fire 673;
restored
Oronsay Priory Oransay Priory.JPG Augustinian Canons Regular
founded before 1353 (1330), accredited to John, Lord of the Isles;
dissolved or secularised 1617, land granted to the Bishop of the Isles by James VI 15 February 1616
The Priory Church of Saint Oran, Oronsay [22]

56°01′12″N 6°15′17″W / 56.019902°N 6.25467°W / 56.019902; -6.25467 (Oronsay Priory)
Rothesay Abbey ruined church possibly referred to as St Mary's Abbey[note 12]evidently medieval parish church — no monastic foundation 'St Mary'
Saddell Abbey Saddell Abbey 20100928 north transept and choir.jpg Cistercian monks
daughter of Mellifont, Louth, Ireland;
founded before 1207 by Reginald, son of Somerled, Lord of the Isles;
dissolved c.1507; confirmed to the Bishop by James VI 1 January 1507
[23]

55°31′56″N 5°30′40″W / 55.532163°N 5.5111939°W / 55.532163; -5.5111939 (Saddell Abbey)
Sgòr Nam Ban-Naomha Monastery
Texa Cell purported monks' cell[note 13]
evidence of church — cell apocryphal
Helentexa
Tiree Monastery founded c.564-565 by Comgall, founder abbot of Bangor;
soon abandoned due to raids by the Picts
[24][25]

56°30′01″N 6°54′34″W / 56.5002062°N 6.9093651°W / 56.5002062; -6.9093651 (Tiree Monastery)

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Ayrshire[edit]

East Ayrshire[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Mauchline Priory Cistercian monks
grange or 'cell' of Melrose
founded 1165, purportedly by David I
The Priory Church of Saint Cuthbert, Mauchline [26]

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North Ayrshire[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Fintray Priory supposed Tironensian monks house
built c.1386, determined to be imaginary
Holy Island purported monastery traditionally founded by Ranald, King of the Isles and Argyll or Johne, Lorde of the iles (probably John of Islay); island possessed by Iona — no evidence of monastic foundation
Irvine Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
probably founded before 1293 by a Fullerton of Fullerton;
dissolved or secularised 1572; granted to the Royal School of Irvine by James VI 8 June 1572
[27]

55°36′46″N 4°40′25″W / 55.612693°N 4.6736814°W / 55.612693; -4.6736814 (Irvine Whitefriars)
Kilwinning Abbey Kilwinning Abbey - 2 - April 2008.jpg Tironensian monks  from Kelso
founded between 1162 and 1189;
dissolved 1592
The Abbey Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and Saint Winning, Kilwinning [28][29]

55°39′12″N 4°41′55″W / 55.6534215°N 4.6986508°W / 55.6534215; -4.6986508 (Kilwinning Abbey)
Kilwinning Convent Situated at Stanecastle and mentioned in several charters
Southannan Priory Franciscan nuns
spurious charter of William, Lord Semple;
purportedly reduced to ashes at the Reformation; supposed foundation – spurious provenance; only chapel of St Anandi and graveyard chantry mentioned at the site
[30]

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Ayrshire, North non-Christian Monasteries[edit]
Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Holy Island Monastery Tibetan Buddhist

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South Ayrshire[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Ayr Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded before August 1242 (1230) by Alexander II, who endowed the church;
leased by the Crown 4 June 1565; secularised 1567, granted to the Burgh of Ayr by charter of Queen Mary 14 April 1567;
demolished after the Reformation
The Friary Church of Saint Katherine, Ayr
Ayr Greyfriars Observant Franciscan Friars
founded 1474 (1472, or between 1488 and 1497), attributed to the citizens;
dissolved or secularised 1567;
St John the Baptist
____________________
Auld Kirk of Ayr
[31]

55°27′46″N 4°37′43″W / 55.4627865°N 4.6287096°W / 55.4627865; -4.6287096 (Ayr Greyfriars)
Crossraguel Abbey Crossraguel Abbey - church.jpg Cluniac monks
oratory founded before 1214-16 (1244);
raised to abbey status, dependent on Paisley from before 1270;
dissolved 1617; (HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Crossraguel [32][33][34][35]

57°08′55″N 2°05′15″W / 57.148603°N 2.0876169°W / 57.148603; -2.0876169 (Crossraguel Abbey)
Dalmilling Priory Gilbertine Canons and nuns — double house
founded 1219-28;
dissolved 1238
Dalmulin Priory [36]

55°27′50″N 4°35′47″W / 55.4640151°N 4.5964158°W / 55.4640151; -4.5964158 (Dalmilling Priory)
Fail Monastery Fail Monastery, in1860.jpg Trinitarians
founded before 1335;
dissolved 1561
St Mary
____________________
Failford Abbey;
Fail Monastery, Tarbolton
[37]

55°31′34″N 4°30′09″W / 55.5260056°N 4.5025063°W / 55.5260056; -4.5025063 (Fail Monastery)
Fail Crutched Friars supposed Polish Crutched Friars
possible confusion with Trinitarian monastery
Pful Friary;
Phall Friary;
Faill Friary;
Fayl in Scotia Friary
Fail Priory supposed Cluniac monks
probable confusion with Trinitarian monastery
Feale Monastery
Kar Monastery Order of Vaudeyno record of monks residing here; land granted to Melrose in perpetual lease 1223; (alternatively given as located in Galloway)
Ladykirk Preceptory Knights Templar
secular chapel founded c.1446 by John Blair — misleading references to preceptory
Our Lary Kirk of Kyle
Lochfeal Red Friars purported Trinitarians — no such house

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Dumfries and Galloway[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Canonbie Priory Canonbie Church.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
dependent on Jedbugh;
founded between before 1165 and 1170;
dissolved or secularised 1606
[38]

55°04′25″N 2°56′28″W / 55.0736777°N 2.9410636°W / 55.0736777; -2.9410636 (Canonbie Priory)
Dercongal Abbey Dercongal Abbeys Sketch.jpg Premonstratensian Canons — from Soulseat
founded before 1225, founder unknown;[note 14]
dissolved or secularised 1609
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Holywood
____________________
Holywood Abbey
[39]

55°06′02″N 3°38′24″W / 55.1004623°N 3.639999°W / 55.1004623; -3.639999 (Dercongal Abbey)
Dumfries Blackfriars supposed Dominican Friars[note 15][note 16][note 17] [40]

55°04′03″N 3°36′51″W / 55.0675803°N 3.6140836°W / 55.0675803; -3.6140836 (Dumfries Blackfriars)
Dumfries Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
founded before 1266 by Devorgilla de Balliol (20 April 1234(?)[note 18] by Alan of Galloway, or c.1262[note 19]/before 1305[note 20])
dissolved or secularised 1569, Burgh of Dumfries granted revenues and land 23 April 1569;
Town Council gained possession by 1570[note 21]
St Mary
Dundrennan Abbey Dundrennan Abbey 2012 (1).jpg Cistercian monks — from Rievaulx
daughter of Rievaulx;
founded 1142 by David I, or possibly Fergus of Galloway;
dissolved 1560; granted to Edward Maxwell 14 August 1562;
secularised 1606; (HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Dundrennan [41]

55°06′02″N 3°38′24″W / 55.1004623°N 3.639999°W / 55.1004623; -3.639999 (Dundrennan Abbey)
Glenluce Abbey Glenluce Abbey (12c Cistercian) - geograph.org.uk - 490895.jpg Cistercian monks — from Melrose
daughter of Dundrennan;
founded 1191/2, purportedly by Roland of Galloway, Constable of Scotland;
dissolved or secularised 1560; granted to the Bishop of Galloway 1619; (HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Glenluce
____________________
Luce Abbey
[42]

54°53′21″N 4°49′53″W / 54.88917°N 4.83139°W / 54.88917; -4.83139 (Glenluce Abbey)
Hoddam Monastery Celtic monks
founded before 612 by Kentigern? (traditionally association), who reputedly built church and located the see of his bishopric here
[43]

55°02′29″N 3°18′17″W / 55.0413151°N 3.3047605°W / 55.0413151; -3.3047605 (Hoddam Monastery)
Kar Monastery given as located in Galloway, probably South Ayrshire (v. supra)
Kilconquhar Monastery purportedly Benedictine monks
founded by Fergus (or Ethred), Lord of Galloway — no such location or monastery
Kirkcudbright Blackfriars Dominican Friars
probably erroneous reference to the house of Greyfriars (see immediately below)[note 22]
Kirkcudbright Greyfriars + Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
founded c.1450 (between 1449 and 1456) by James II; (or 1239, purportedly by Roger de Quincy, Earl of Winchester, Lord of Galloway and Constable of Scotland[note 23]);
dissolved or secularised 1569; destroyed and ruinous before 6 December 1569 when granted to Thomas MacLellan of Bombie by James IV; granted to the Town Council 24 March 1570/1 by Thomas MacLellan, conventual church in parochial use from 24 March 1570/1
[44]

54°50′08″N 4°03′16″W / 54.835636°N 4.0544271°W / 54.835636; -4.0544271 (Kirkcudbright Greyfriars)
Kirkcudbright Monastery scholars of a religious community apparently serving a foundation here;
still in possession of the church 1164
Lincluden Priory Lincluden Collegiate Church 2.jpg Benedictine nuns
founded 1164 (before 1174) by Uchtred mac Fergus, Lord of Galloway or Malcolm IV;
also given as Cluniac nuns;
dissolved 1389;
secular canons college late-14thC; (HS)
[45]

55°05′04″N 3°37′11″W / 55.0845822°N 3.6197805°W / 55.0845822; -3.6197805 (Lincluden Priory)
Lochkindeloch Priory Cistercian monks — supposed foundation; parish church, but no religious house in the parish other than Sweetheart Abbey
St Evoca Priory Cistercian nuns
founded before 1423;
dissolution unknown
St Evoca the Virgin
St Mary's Priory, St Mary's Isle (Isle of Trahil) Augustinian Canons Regular — from Holyrood
founded c.1138 (before 1173);
dissolved or secularised 1608
Prioratus Sanctae Mariae de Trayl
____________________
St Mary's Isle Priory;
Trail Priory;
Traill Priory
[46]

54°49′03″N 4°04′03″W / 54.8175028°N 4.067452°W / 54.8175028; -4.067452 (St Marys Isle Priory (Trahill Priory))
Soulseat Abbey Premonstratensian Canons — from Prémontre
founded 1161(?) (1152);
dissolved or secularised 1630
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary and Saint John, Soulseat
________________
Saulseat Abbey
[47]

54°53′14″N 4°57′45″W / 54.8871452°N 4.9625319°W / 54.8871452; -4.9625319 (Soulseat Abbey)
Soulseat Priory Cistercian monks
uncertain foundation; unverified location and identification
Viride Stagnum
Sweetheart Abbey Sweetheart Abbey.jpg Cistercian monks — from Dundrennan
founded 1275 by Devorgilla, widow of John Balliol, endowment by Devorgilla 10 April 1273;
dissolved May 1565; granted to William Lesley 1586;
secularised 1624, erected to a temporal lordship for Sir Robert Spottiswoode; (HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Sweetheart
____________________
New Abbey
[48]

54°58′44″N 3°36′59″W / 54.97889°N 3.61639°W / 54.97889; -3.61639 (Sweetheart Abbey)
Tongland Abbey Tongland Old Parish Church.jpg Premonstratensian Canons — from Cockersand, Lancashire
daughter of Cockersand;
founded 1218;
dissolved or secularised 1612
[49]

54°51′47″N 4°01′48″W / 54.8630151°N 4.0300781°W / 54.8630151; -4.0300781 (Tongland Abbey)
Whithorn Priory Whithorn Priory 20080423 nave.jpg possible [non-monastic] Christian community late 4thC;
possibly monastic by 8thC;
Premonstratensian Canons
daughter of Soulseat
founded c.1175 or before 1161 by Fergus, Prince of Galloway;
dissolved or secularised 1612;
cathedral church of Galloway; (HS)
Whithorn
[50]

54°44′01″N 4°25′03″W / 54.7334919°N 4.4174695°W / 54.7334919; -4.4174695 (Whithorn Priory)
Wigtown Blackfriars Dominican Blackfriars
founded 1267 or before 1287 by devorgilla, daughter of Alan of Galloway;
secularised 1560-70(?), probably granted to the Burgh of Wigtown (though no record found)
The Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary

54°52′01″N 4°26′31″W / 54.867°N 4.442°W / 54.867; -4.442 (Wigtown Blackfriars)

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Dumfries and Galloway non-Christian monasteries[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Samye Ling Monastery *, Langholm Karma Kagyu school Tibetan Buddhist 1967 Kagyu Samye Ling Monastery and Tibetan Centre

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Dunbartonshire[edit]

West Dunbartonshire[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Ross Priory, Loch Lomond doubtful establishment, probable early-19thC invention;
country house
[51]

56°03′17″N 4°32′51″W / 56.0546176°N 4.5473957°W / 56.0546176; -4.5473957 (Ross Priory (probable 19thC invention))

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City of Edinburgh[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Edinburgh Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded 1230 by Alexander II, site of the king's manor house granted to the friars by him;
dissolved or secularised 1566/7, granted to the magistrates and Edinburgh Town Council 13 March 1566/7
The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary [52]

55°56′55″N 3°11′05″W / 55.9486231°N 3.1847692°W / 55.9486231; -3.1847692 (Edinburgh Blackfriars)
Edinburgh Greenside Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded 1520-5, site granted by the town, with the permission of the king and the bishop of St Andrews;
dissolved or secularised before 1563
[53]

55°57′26″N 3°10′58″W / 55.9572621°N 3.182846°W / 55.9572621; -3.182846 (Edinburgh Greenside Whitefriars)
Edinburgh Greyfriars Greyfriars-kirk-Edimburgo.gif Observant Franciscan Friars
founded c.1463;
destroyed by Reformers 14 June 1559;
dissolved or secularised 1562;
Greyfriars Tolbooth & Highland Kirk built on site 1602-20


55°56′48″N 3°11′32″W / 55.9466°N 3.1922°W / 55.9466; -3.1922 (Edinburgh Greyfriars)
Edinburgh Preceptory property - asserted preceptory[note 24]
Edinburgh Sciennes Priory Dominican nuns
founded 1517, erroneously asserted to have been founded by Lady Roslin, Countess of Caithness;
secularised 1569
St Katherine of Senis [54]

55°56′14″N 3°11′09″W / 55.9373286°N 3.1857536°W / 55.9373286; -3.1857536 (Edinburgh Sciennes Priory)
Holyrood Abbey, Edinburgh Holyrood Abbey - Edinburgh.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular — from St Andrews
daughter of Merton, Surrey;
founded 1128 by David I;
sacked by the English 1322;
burned by the English 1385;
dissolved or secularised 1606;
erected into temporal lordship for John Bothwell, son of the bishop 1606 (in parliament), charter 1607;
nave in use as the parish church of the Canongate until 1686;
partly absorbed into 17thC Holyrood Palace; served as Chapel Royal until mid-18thC; (HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Saint Andrew and All Saints, Holyrood [55]

55°57′12″N 3°10′16″W / 55.9532246°N 3.1711864°W / 55.9532246; -3.1711864 (Holyrood Abbey)
South Queensferry Whitefriars St. Mary's Church. Queensferry. - geograph.org.uk - 962247.jpg Carmelite Friars
founded 1 March 1440/1 (purportedly founded 1330 by the laird of Dundass,[note 25] or 28 November 1333[note 26]);
dissolved before 1564/5;
prior granted lease 27 February 1564/5;
let by Sir Walter Dundas to the Balies and Town Council of Queensferry as a place of worship and school;
present parochial church built on site 1635[note 27]
Queensferry Friary [56]

55°59′27″N 3°23′54″W / 55.9908866°N 3.3982301°W / 55.9908866; -3.3982301 (Queensferry Whitefriars)
Sciennes Priory Franciscan nuns
spurious charters including grant by Margaret Knox, daughter of Uchtred Knox of Ranfurly to build a hospital

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Eilean Siar[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Barra Red Friars Trinitarians
purported cell – possible church of Celtic origin, supposed house – lacking evidence
The Holy Trinity
Carnish 'Cell' Augustinian Canons Regular
asserted cell of Inchaffray, purportedly founded by the Macleods of the Lewis; evidence of monastic house lacking
Scarinche
Nuntown Priory nuns of unspecified order — probably spurious account of building on Benbecula 'locally believed to have been a nunnery'[note 28]
Rowadil Priory Augustinian Canons Regular;
asserted priory;
purportedly founded by MacLeod of Harris;
evidently no more than parochial church or chapel
Rodwil;
Rowadill;
Rodel
[57]

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Fife Region[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Balmerino Abbey Balmerino 2.JPG Cistercian monks — from Melrose
dependent on Melrose;
founded c.1227/9;
dissolved 1560; secularised 1603; (NTS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary and Saint Edward [58]

56°24′36″N 3°02′30″W / 56.4099722°N 3.0417752°W / 56.4099722; -3.0417752 (Balmerino Abbey)
Buchan Priory grant to the canons of St James's, Buchan by the Pope 18 October 1221 - no known house or churches held by regular canons in Buchan, Aberdeenshire - possibly erroneous reference to a location outside Scotland
Carnbee Preceptory Knights Templar
foundation unknown;
suppressed c.1309
Crail Blackfriars purported Dominican Friars
site granted for a church and monastery, (spurious charter purportedly of Elizabeth Hepburn, Abbess of Haddington 28 September 1448[note 29]); reliable evidence of foundation lacking
Crail Priory nuns of unspecified order – apocryphal establishment
Culross Abbey + CulrossAbbey Aug2009 1.JPG Cistercian monks — from Kinloss
dependent on Kinloss;
founded before 1217/8;
dissolved 1560;
erected into a temporal lordship for James Colville of Easter Wemyss (charters 1589, 1609);
currently partly in use as a parish church; (HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Saint Andrew and Saint Serf, Culross [59]

56°03′30″N 3°37′31″W / 56.0583587°N 3.6253274°W / 56.0583587; -3.6253274 (Culross Abbey)
Cupar Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded 1348: petition by Duncan, Earl of Fife to the Pope 1348, to found a Dominican convent at his castle; permission granted by the Pope for the vicar-general in Scotland of the English provincial to built a church and oratory;
reportedly in a state of collapse by 13 November 1517;
proposal to close the house approved 1518, confirmed by Crown charter 4 October 1519; incorporated with the house at St Andrews, where the friars transferred 1519; granted to the Burgh of Cupar by James VI 14 June 1572
St Katherine [60]

56°19′11″N 3°00′36″W / 56.3197129°N 3.0101375°W / 56.3197129; -3.0101375 (Cupar Blackfriars)
Cupar Red Friars purported Trinitarians
allegedly founded 1277 by James, Earl of Fife — no such person – fictitious house
Dunet Red Friars purported Trinitarians
allsegedly founded 1297 — supposed house – probably fictitious
Dumeni;
Dunetum;
Dumenum
Dunfermline Abbey Dunfermline Abbey Geograph.jpg Benedictine monks
priory founded c.1070;
raised to abbey status 1124/1128;
dissolved 1593, annexed to the Crown
[61]

56°04′11″N 3°27′47″W / 56.0697958°N 3.4631395°W / 56.0697958; -3.4631395 (Dunfermline Abbey)
Dysart Blackfriars supposed Dominican Friars[note 30][note 31]
reliable evidence of foundation lacking;
long-ruined chapel converted for use as a forge
St Dennis (chapel);
St Cuthbert (church)
[62]

56°07′29″N 3°07′14″W / 56.124671°N 3.1206295°W / 56.124671; -3.1206295 (Dysart Blackfriars (poss.)) possible
Gadvan Preceptory
Cistercian monks
cell dependent on Balmerino;
founded before 1475;
dissolved or secularised before 1578
[63]

56°20′57″N 3°09′29″W / 56.3492788°N 3.1581509°W / 56.3492788; -3.1581509 (Gadvan Preceptory)
Inchcolm Abbey Inchcolm Abbey, Inchcolm, Firth of Forth, Scotland-9April2011.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1123
The Abbey Church of Saint Columba, Inchcolm
____________________
St Colm's Abbey, Inch
[64]

56°01′48″N 3°18′06″W / 56.0299716°N 3.3017725°W / 56.0299716; -3.3017725 (Inchcolm Abbey)
Inchcolm Hermitage purported hermit residence on the island prior to the foundation of the Augustinian house (see immediately above)
Inverbervie Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded before 1443, endowments by William, Earl of Keith and Alexander Strachan of Dullevarde 10 December 1443 (two spurious charters of foundation: 1358 by David II; 12 November 1388 by Mark Rait of Halgreen);
dissolved or secularised before 1570; grant of friars' land and property made 15 October 1570; granted to hospital in Montrose 23 July 1571
Bervie Whitefriars
Inverkeithing Blackfriars supposed Dominican Friars
some references probably pertain to the Franciscan friary[note 32][note 33]
[65]

56°01′22″N 3°23′51″W / 56.0228222°N 3.3974791°W / 56.0228222; -3.3974791 (Inverkeithing Blackfriars)
Inverkeithing Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
founded 1268(?) (before 1384), built by Philip de Moubray, Lord of Barnbougle;
dissolved or secularised 1559
possibly The Friary Church of Saint Mary, Inverkeithing [66]

56°01′47″N 3°23′54″W / 56.0297648°N 3.3983588°W / 56.0297648; -3.3983588 (Inverkeithing Greyfriars)
Isle of May Monastery conjectural Culdees or monks establishment[note 34]
Isle of May Priory Saint Adrian's Priory, Isle of May - geograph.org.uk - 1055460.jpg Benedictine monks — from Reading, Berkshire
dependent on Reading;
Augustinian Canons Regular
dependent on St Andrews;
refounded late-13th/early-14thC;
transferred to Pittenweem late-13th/early-14thC
The Priory Church of Saint Oran and Saint Colman, Isle of May
____________________
May Priory
[67][68]

56°11′08″N 2°33′27″W / 56.1856289°N 2.5574166°W / 56.1856289; -2.5574166 (Isle of May Priory)
Kilconquhar Nunnery Benedictine nuns
actually a parochial church owned by North Berwick Nunnery;
sometimes (erroneously) noted as located in Galloway
Kilrimont Monastery St Mary's 03.JPG Culdees
traditionally founded by Ungus mac Urguist;
collegiate
founded 1240s
Cill-rigmonaid Monastery;
Cenn-rigmonaid Monastery;
Kilrymont monastery
[69]

56°20′23″N 2°47′06″W / 56.3398°N 2.7851°W / 56.3398; -2.7851 (Kilrimont Monastery)
Kinghorn Blackfriars purported Dominican Blackfriars[note 35][note 36]
very dubious
[70]

56°04′12″N 3°10′27″W / 56.070135°N 3.174275°W / 56.070135; -3.174275 (Kinghorn Blackfriars (dubious))
Lindores Abbey Lindores abbey 03.jpg Tironensian monks — from Kelso
founded c.1190 (between c.1190 and 1191) by David, Earl of Huntingdon;
dissolved or secularised 1600
The Abbey Church of Our Lady and Saint Andrew [71]

56°21′10″N 3°13′41″W / 56.35274°N 3.22816°W / 56.35274; -3.22816 (Lindores Abbey)
Maryculter Preceptory Knights Templar
founded between 1221 and 1236 by Walter Byset;
suppressed c.1309
Knights Hospitaller
transferred c.1309;
dissolved c.1513
Culter Preceptory
Pittenweem Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
transferred from Isle of May c.1200
[72]

56°12′49″N 2°43′40″W / 56.2136016°N 2.7277637°W / 56.2136016; -2.7277637 (Pittenweem Priory)
St Andrew's Blackfriars Blackfriars Chapel (St Andrews) 20080503.jpg Dominican Friars
purportedly founded 1274 by William Wishart, Bishop of St Andrews;
destroyed by fire by Norman Lesley 1547;
destroyed by Reformers 14 June 1599
dissolved or secularised 1567, granted to the municipality of St Andrews by Queen Mary 17 April 1567
The Assumption and Coronation of the Blessed Virgin Mary
____________________
Blackfriars Chapel
[73]

56°20′20″N 2°47′53″W / 56.3388972°N 2.7979249°W / 56.3388972; -2.7979249 (St Andrew's Blackfriars)
St Andrew's Cathedral Priory St. Andrew's Cathedral.jpg Celtic monks
founded before 747;
Culdees
founded 9th/10thC
cathedral
founded 908
Augustinian Canons Regular
cathedral priory founded 1144, and endowed by Robert, Bishop of St Andrews;
dissolved or secularised 1592, erected into a temporal lordship for the duke, in parliament 1592, 1606; (HS)
The Cathedral and Priory Church of Saint Andrew, Saint Andrews
____________________
Cennrigmonaid
[74]

56°20′24″N 2°47′15″W / 56.340033°N 2.7875233°W / 56.340033; -2.7875233 (St Andrew's Cathedral)
St Andrew's Greyfriars Observant Franciscan Friars
founded between 1463 and 1466 by James Kennedy, Bishop of St Andrew's, purported (spurious) papal bull of Pius II of foundation 24 November 1458;
burned by Norman Lesilie July 1547;
dissolved or secularised 1559-1567; resigned to the magistrates 18 May 1559; destroyed by Reformers on or c.14 June 1559; granted to the Burgh of St Andrew's by Queen Mary 17 April 1567
St Andrew's Red Friars purported Trinitarians — fictitious house
St Andrew's Whitefriars asserted Carmelite Friars
founded 1370 by 'Bishop William de Laverdale' [sic] (possibly William de Landallis); — uncertain foundation
St Ninian's Blackfriars Dominican Blackfriars[note 37]
erroneous reference to St Monan's
St Monan's Blackfriars + St Monans Auld Kirk - geograph.org.uk - 103459.jpg church founded as a chapel 3 April 1370 by David II
Dominican Friars
refounded 15 November 1471 by James III;
conventual status by bull of Sixtus IV procured by the vicar-general and the king 18 March 1476/7;
incorporated into St Andrews Michaelmas 1519;
secularised c.1567
The Friary Church of Saint Monan, Saint Monan's
____________________
erroneously 'St Ninians' [note 37]


56°12′12″N 2°46′16″W / 56.2032129°N 2.7710786°W / 56.2032129; -2.7710786 (St Monan's Blackfriars)
St Rule's Priory St Rules Tower.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular — from Scone
founded 1133-1144; (HS)
The Priory Church of Saint Rule, Saint Andrews [75]

56°20′23″N 2°47′11″W / 56.3396524°N 2.7864718°W / 56.3396524; -2.7864718 (St Rule's Priory)

The following locations in the Fife Region have no monastic connection:

  • Crawford Priory: mansion, built 1813
  • Inchyre Abbey: mansion, built 19thC

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City of Glasgow[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Glasgow Austin Friars ? Augustinian Friars?
church founded by laymen, granted to three hermits of the order in the Glasgow diocese c.1453 — unidentified foundation
Glasgow Blackfriars # Dominican Friars
founded before 1246, purportedly by the bishop and chapter, papal bull of Innocent IV 10 July 1246 granted indulgence to those contributing to the building of the church;
secularised 1566/7;
granted by Mary, Queen of Scots to the University of Glasgow and served as a parish church 16 March 1566/7;
conventual church destroyed by fire c.1670;
rebuilt 1699-1702;
demolished when the university re-located in the 1870s
St John the Evangelist
____________________
Old College Church
[76]

55°51′31″N 4°14′25″W / 55.8585809°N 4.2402023°W / 55.8585809; -4.2402023 (Glasgow Blackfriars)
Glasgow Franciscan Friary Franciscan Friars Roman Catholic Church Of Saint Luke;
Blessed John Duns Franciscan Friary
[77]

55°50′59″N 4°14′47″W / 55.8496621°N 4.2463714°W / 55.8496621; -4.2463714 (Glasgow Franciscan Friary)
Glasgow Greyfriars # Observant Franciscan Friars
founded 1473-9 (1477, 1472), mistakenly attributed to the archbishop;
dissolved or secularised 1566/7
Church of The Blessed Virgin Mary [78]

55°51′38″N 4°14′32″W / 55.8604234°N 4.2422462°W / 55.8604234; -4.2422462 (Glasgow Greyfriars)
Glasgow Dominican Priory Dominican nuns
proposed foundation: bequeathal by Roland Blacadyr — foundation never implemented
St Catherine of Siena
Govan Monastery traditionally founded late-6thC by Constantine — evidence lacking

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Highland Region[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Applecross Monastery Celtic monks
founded 673 by Mael-rubai, Abbot of Bangor
St Maelrubha's Monastery [79]

57°26′42″N 5°48′44″W / 57.4450061°N 5.8121447°W / 57.4450061; -5.8121447 (Applecross Monastery (St Maelrubha))
Beauly Priory Beauly priory south side 29042008.JPG Valliscaulian monks — from Val des Choux
dependent on Val des Choux;
founded 1230;
dissolved 1510;
Cistercian monks
founded 1510 on the suppression of the Valliscaulian order;
purportedly erected to a temporal lordship for Lord Hay of Sala 1612, (apparently erroneously noted);
granted to the Bishop of Ross (charter 20 October 1634); (HS)
The Priory Church of The Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint John the Baptist, Beauly [80]

57°29′05″N 4°27′27″W / 57.4846827°N 4.4575524°W / 57.4846827; -4.4575524 (Beauly Priory)
Cromarty Red Friars purported Trinitarians
no evidence of Trinitarian foundation here
Crenach ?
Dornoch Cell ? Benedictine monks
founded before early-12thC;
possible community established from Dunfermline or earlier community already established here
Dornoch Red Friars asserted Trinitarians
founded 1271 by Sir Patrick Murray or the Reguli of Sutherland supposd house – evidence lacking – probably fictitious
Eigg Monastery founded before 617 by St Donnan Kildonnan Monastery [81]

56°53′16″N 6°08′21″W / 56.8876782°N 6.1390398°W / 56.8876782; -6.1390398 (Eigg Monastery)
Fearn Abbey TarbatTrip 020.jpg Premonstratensian Canons
daughter of Whithorn;
founded 1221-2 (or c.1227 at Old Fearn);
dissolved 1609
The Abbey Church of Saint Ninian, Fearn [82]

57°46′12″N 3°57′23″W / 57.7700948°N 3.9562583°W / 57.7700948; -3.9562583 (Fearn Abbey)
Fort Augustus Abbey Fort Augustus Abbey - geograph.org.uk - 1708052.jpg built as a military fort, Benedictine abbey and school in 20thC, now in private ownership [83]

57°08′41″N 4°40′36″W / 57.1446802°N 4.6766782°W / 57.1446802; -4.6766782 (Fort Augustus Abbey)
Inverness Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded after 1214 and before 1240 by Alexander II;
secularised before 19 January 1566/7;
destroyed by Cromwell, masonry used in the construction of a citadel at the north of the town
St Bartholomew [84]

57°28′50″N 4°13′48″W / 57.4806259°N 4.2298881°W / 57.4806259; -4.2298881 (Inverness Blackfriars)
Inverness Greyfriars confusion with Inverness Blackfriars
Kingussie Whitefriars # Carmelite Friars
founded before 1501 by George, Earl of Huntly;
dissolved or secularised after 1560
St Columba's Friary [85]

57°04′52″N 4°03′09″W / 57.0809868°N 4.0524328°W / 57.0809868; -4.0524328 (Kingussie Whitefriars)
Murkle Priory nuns of uncertain ordersupposed foundation – unverified Glosters Priory
North Rona Monastery 7thC
Old Fearn Abbey Premonstratensian Canons
founded c.1227


57°51′43″N 4°19′04″W / 57.8619227°N 4.3177986°W / 57.8619227; -4.3177986 (Old Fearn Abbey (approx.)) approx

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Lanarkshire[edit]

South Lanarkshire[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Blantyre Priory Augustinian Canons Regular
cell dependent on Jedburgh
founded between 1238 and 1249 by Patrick (II), Earl of Dunbar and his wife Euphemia;
dissolved or secularised 1598/9
[86]

55°48′39″N 4°05′55″W / 55.8108077°N 4.0986192°W / 55.8108077; -4.0986192 (Blantyre Priory)
Culter Preceptory Knights Templar — no such house – confusion with Maryculter (v. supra)
Lanark Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
founded 11 November 1328 and 15 May 1329[note 38] (? between 27 March 1325 and 26 March 1326), site and endowments granted by Robert I who projected the foundation;
probably founded by David II who obtained papal bull of Clement VI 29 November 1346;[note 39]
leased to James Lockhart of Lee prior to dissolution (date unknown); dissolved or secularised before 1566 (date abandoned unknown, though masonry being removed before 1566)
[87]

55°40′25″N 3°46′53″W / 55.6735485°N 3.7814216°W / 55.6735485; -3.7814216 (Lanark Greyfriars)
Lesmahagow Priory Lesmahagow Priory.jpg Tironensian monks — from Kelso
dependent on Kelso;
founded 1144, church and lands granted to Kelso by David I and John, Bishop of Glasgow;
dissolved 1607
The Priory Church of Saint Malo, Lesmahagow [88]

55°38′16″N 3°53′08″W / 55.6379041°N 3.8855124°W / 55.6379041; -3.8855124 (Lesmahagow Priory)
Nunnery Priory nuns of unspecified orderno foundation existed here

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Lothian[edit]

East Lothian[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Dirleton Red Friars Trinitarians
chapel of St Andrew's founded by the ancestors of Patrick, Lord Haliburton;
recorded as Trinitarian 1507; annexed to the Crown before 1 August 1588
[89]

56°02′14″N 2°47′18″W / 56.0372531°N 2.7882927°W / 56.0372531; -2.7882927 (Dirleton Red Friars)
Dunbar Priory Trinitarians
founded 1240-8 (1218);
granted to secular chaplain 8 March 1528/9; revoked 1 July 1529; dissolved 1529
The Priory Church of the Holy Trinity, Dunbar [90]

56°00′05″N 2°31′05″W / 56.0014092°N 2.5180471°W / 56.0014092; -2.5180471 (Dunbar Priory)
Dunbar Whitefriars ? Carmelite Friars
purportedly founded 1263 by Patrick, Earl of March supposed foundation – foundation references spurious, later references possible confusion with Trinitarian house
Elbottle Priory Cistercian nuns
cell of South Berwick; supposed foundation – evidence lacking
Fidra Priory Premonstratensian Canons
supposed house
island granted to Dryburgh by William de Vaux;
canons of Dryburgh serving at the church of St Nicholas c.1220
described as a chantry c.1240
Elbottle Priory [91]

56°04′24″N 2°47′07″W / 56.0732032°N 2.7852595°W / 56.0732032; -2.7852595 (Fidra Priory)
Gullane Priory Cistercian nuns
cell of South Berwick;
allegedly founded by David I; supposed foundation – evidence lacking
Golyn Priory
Haddington Austin Friars Augustinian Friars
erroneous reference to Augustinian Canons of St Andrews
Haddington Austin Friars Augustinian Friars
hospital suppressed in favour of Austin Friars, and house built, though occupation never occurred and the house was conferred to Walter Ramsay, Chaplain to James Vincomplete foundation
Haddington Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded 1471;
dissolved or secularised 1489 to after 1490;
unsubstantiated claims of destroyed by the English and reduced to ashes 'by the rage of fanatics' c.1558[note 40]
[92]

55°56′51″N 2°47′09″W / 55.9474937°N 2.7857852°W / 55.9474937; -2.7857852 (Haddington Blackfriars)
Haddington Greyfriars Franciscan Friars
founded 1242;
destroyed 1356
Lucerna Laudoniae or Lamp of Lothian [93]

55°57′18″N 2°46′24″W / 55.9550746°N 2.7733612°W / 55.9550746; -2.7733612 (Haddington Greyfriars)
Haddington Priory Cistercian nuns
founded before 1159 by Ada, Countess of Northumberland and Huntingdon;
dissolved or secularised 1621; erected into a temporal lordship for John Maitland, master of Lauderdale 1621
Houston Red Friars Trinitarians
founded c.1270 by Cristiana, widow of Sir Roger Mubray, (or purportedly c.1226 by Hugh, Lord of Houston[note 41]), confirmed 26 January 1271/2 by Alexander III; possibly adjunct to, or identical with Houston hospital;
commonly (erroneously) located in Renfrewshire;
dissolved 1531; annexed to Peebles, confirmed by charter 8 January 1541/2
The Grace of God
Luffness Red Friars purported Trinitarians
purportedly founded 1285 by an earl of Dunbar;
confusion with Carmelite house at Fail
Luffness Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded before 1293;
dissolved after 1560;
leased by the Crown 4 January 1609
[94][95]

56°00′40″N 2°50′53″W / 56.0111733°N 2.8479749°W / 56.0111733; -2.8479749 (Luffness Friary)
Nunraw Abbey * Nunraw - geograph.org.uk - 142510.jpg Cistercian monks — from Roscrea, Ireland;
cell of Haddington;
founded 1946
Sancta Maria Abbey, Nunraw [96]

55°55′19″N 2°39′04″W / 55.9218085°N 2.651031°W / 55.9218085; -2.651031 (Nunraw Abbey)
Nunraw Priory supposed Cistercian nuns — no evidence of nunnery here
North Berwick Priory Old Abbey, North Berwick - geograph.org.uk - 1022212.jpg Cistercian nuns
founded c.1150 by Duncan (I), Earl of Fife who granted land (also attributed to Malcolm, Earl of Fife);
granted to Mariot Cockburn 30 June 1566;
granted to Margaret Hume 7 August 1568;
ruinous by 1587;
dissolved or secularised 1587/8; resigned by Margaret Hume to Alexander Hume 20 March 1587/8: church and cloister site granted by James VI
[97]

56°03′20″N 2°43′50″W / 56.055666°N 2.7305585°W / 56.055666; -2.7305585 (North Berwick Priory)
Papple Priory nuns of unspecified order
land held by Cistercians of St Bothan's and Haddington — no evidence of monastic foundation
St Germains Preceptory Knights Templar
given as Templars' house,[note 42] actually a Bethlehemite Hospital
Trefontain Priory Cistercian nuns
cell of South Berwick;
founded by David I;
lands granted to the colegiate church of Douglass; supposed foundation
Trefountain Priory;
Trefontaynes Priory
Tyninghame Monastery traditionally founded before 756 by Baldred;
destroyed by the Norse 941

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West Lothian[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Abercorn Monastery Abercorn Church.jpg Celtic monks
probably founded between 635 and 663;
dissolved after early-8thC, (purportedly still extant 854)
[98]

55°59′46″N 3°28′27″W / 55.996086°N 3.4742224°W / 55.996086; -3.4742224 (Abercorn Monastery)
Kirkliston Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
founded 1560;
annexed to Torphichen soon before 31 March 1513
Linlithgow Austin Friars Augustinian Friars
royal benefactions between September and December 1503, no evidence of habitation – incomplete foundation; subsequent attempt to found settlement at Manuel (v. infra)
Linlithgow Blackfriars Dominican Blackfriars[note 43]
foundation and founder unknown[note 44]
Linlithgow Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded c.1401;
dissolved before 1567/8
[99]

55°58′18″N 3°35′55″W / 55.9715888°N 3.5985267°W / 55.9715888; -3.5985267 (Linlithgow Whitefriars)
Manuel Austin Friars Augustinian Friars
provision for suppression of Cistercian nunnery (see immediately below) by the Pope 16 June 1506, on petition by James IV, never implemented — incomplete foundation
Manuel Priory Cistercian nuns
founded 1156 (before 1164) by Malcolm IV, confirmed by William the Lion between 1166 and 1171;
dissolved or secularised after 1599;
probably passed into the possession of Alexander, Lord Livingstone, for whom the lease was renewed by James VI 13 April 1599
Emanuel Nunnery;
Manuel Nunnery
[100]

55°58′10″N 3°38′57″W / 55.9695475°N 3.6490488°W / 55.9695475; -3.6490488 (Manuel Priory)
Torphichen Preceptory + Torphichen Preceptory.jpg Knights Hospitaller
founded between c.1144 and 1153 by David I who granted land;
secularised 1563/4; land and baronies granted to praeceptor James, Lord St John by Queen Mary 25 January 1563/4
[101]

55°56′05″N 3°39′08″W / 55.9346427°N 3.6521628°W / 55.9346427; -3.6521628 (Torphichen Preceptory)

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Midlothian[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Balantrodoch Preceptory Knights Templar
founded 1128-53;
suppressed c.1309
Temple
Newbattle Abbey Newbattle Abbey.jpg Cistercian monks — from Melrose
daughter of Melrose;
founded 1140, regarded as by David I, endowments by David and his son, Earl Henry;
dissolved 1560; granted to Mark Ker, son of the Commendator, also Mark Ker) 7 April 1567, confirmed 24 August 1584, after the death of his father; erected into a temporal lordship for Mark Ker (charter 1587)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Newbattle [102]

55°52′49″N 3°04′13″W / 55.8803663°N 3.0703568°W / 55.8803663; -3.0703568 (Newbattle Abbey)
Soutra Red Friars asserted Trinitarians — unfounded assertion

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Moray[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Elgin Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded 1233 or 1234 by King Alexander II;
lands and revenues apparently permanently under Dunbar family at the Reformation; secularised 1570/1; Alexander Dunbar, dean of Moray received crown confirmation 7 January 1570/1, property granted under Great Seal 4 March 1573/4 and 9 January 1575/6
St James [103]

57°38′58″N 3°19′21″W / 57.6494827°N 3.3224469°W / 57.6494827; -3.3224469 (Elgin Blackfriars)
Elgin Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
land granted by William, Earl of Ross c.1281; foundation incomplete
[104]

57°38′55″N 3°18′37″W / 57.6486273°N 3.3103609°W / 57.6486273; -3.3103609 (Elgin Greyfriars)
Elgin Greyfriars, Observants Observant Franciscan Friars
founded before 1494, allegedly by John Innes of Innes;
dissolved or secularised c.1559;
lands leased to Robert Innes of Invermarky by James VI 20 April 1573;
restored; now in use by adjacent convent
Observantine House of The Franciscan Friars [105]

57°38′53″N 3°18′35″W / 57.6479499°N 3.3096313°W / 57.6479499; -3.3096313 (Elgin Greyfriars, Conventual)
Elgin Whitefriars ? Carmelite Friars
probable confusion with Greyfriars
Forres Blackfriars supposed Dominican Friars[note 45]evidence lacking
Kinloss Abbey Kinloss Abbey.jpg Cistercian monks — from Melrose
daughter of Melrose;
founded 21 May 1150 by David I;
dissolved 1560;
secularised 1601, erected into a temporal lordship for Edward Bruce, becoming Lord Kinross, (charters 1601, 1608)
The Abbey Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Kinloss [106]

57°38′02″N 3°33′59″W / 57.6339271°N 3.5665119°W / 57.6339271; -3.5665119 (Kinloss Abbey)
Pluscarden Abbey * Pluscarden Abbey.jpg Valliscaulian monks — from Val des Choux
priory 1230;
Benedictine monks
dependent on Dunfermline;
dissolved 1587, united with Urquhart;
Benedictine monks priory, now Benedictine abbey
The Abbey Church of Saint Andrew, Pluscarden [107]

57°36′02″N 3°26′15″W / 57.6005539°N 3.4374547°W / 57.6005539; -3.4374547 (Pluscarden Abbey)
Urquhart Priory # Benedictine monks — from Dunfermline
dependent on Dunfermline;
founded 1124, reputedly by David I who made a grant made between 1130 and 1150;
Pluscarden united with Urquhart;
took formal possession of Pluscarden 8 November 1454;
community settled at Pluscarden due to the extent of the buildings there;
no remains on site, stone cross from priory incorporated into the wall of current parish church hall
The Priory Church of the Holy Trinity, Urquhart [108][109]

57°38′53″N 3°11′36″W / 57.6481164°N 3.1934381°W / 57.6481164; -3.1934381 (Urquhart Priory (site)) site
57°39′13″N 3°12′00″W / 57.6535994°N 3.1998907°W / 57.6535994; -3.1998907 (Urquhart Priory (location of vestiges)) vestiges

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Orkney[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Brough of Birsay Monastery Brough of Birsay - geograph.org.uk - 1574452.jpg possible Celtic monks monastic settlement 6thC suggested to have connection with the name of St Colum or St Columba;
Viking farmstead 9thC;
cathedral early-12thC, foundation unknown;
see translated to Kirkwall 12thC;
church probably in parochial use until 13thC;
episcopal residence in use to 14thC;
St Peter's Monastery [110]

59°08′12″N 3°19′49″W / 59.136571°N 3.3301824°W / 59.136571; -3.3301824 (Brough of Birsay Monastery)
Brough of Birsay Red Friars alleged Trinitarians[note 46]order unconfirmed
Eynhallow Monastery # Eynhallow Monastery - geograph.org.uk - 862307.jpg possible site of monastic settlement 12thC;
evidently ceased well before 16thC
[111]

59°08′29″N 3°07′19″W / 59.1412545°N 3.1218123°W / 59.1412545; -3.1218123 (Eynhallow Monastery)
Golgotha Monastery *, Papa Stronsay Transalpine Redemptorists
transferred from Joinville, France; island purchased 31 May 1999; extant
[112][113]

59°08′56″N 2°35′18″W / 59.1488162°N 2.588262°W / 59.1488162; -2.588262 (Golgotha Monastery)
Hichaten Priory Cistercian monks
supposed foundation — no such location identified in the Orkneys
Hichaten vel Orcades
Papa Stronsay Monastery possible Papari or Pictish monks
founded 8thC?
[114]

59°08′53″N 2°34′45″W / 59.1480757°N 2.5793016°W / 59.1480757; -2.5793016 (Papa Stronsay Monastery)

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Perth & Kinross Region[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Abernethy Priory Abernethy Round Tower - geograph.org.uk - 839845.jpg Culdees
founded c.6thC by Nechtan, King of the Picts;
possible cathedral;
Augustinian Canons Regular
founded 1272 or 1273;
dissolved or secularised early 14thC, erroneously attributed to George, Earl of Angus c.1450;
secular canons collegiate
founded
The Priory Church of Saint Mary, Saint Bridget and Saint Abrinca

St Bride
[115][116]

56°20′00″N 3°18′43″W / 56.3333603°N 3.3118629°W / 56.3333603; -3.3118629 (Abernethy Priory)
Aberuthven 'Cell' church granted to the 'brethren' at Inchafray c.1198;
asserted cell of Inchafray
granted to the Augustinian Canons Regular at Inchafray c.1200; remained a parochial church rather than a cell
56°19′02″N 3°39′40″W / 56.3171734°N 3.6611402°W / 56.3171734; -3.6611402 (Aberuthven (erroneously asserted cell))
Coupar Angus Abbey Coupar Angus Abbey.jpg Cistercian monks — from Melrose
founded 1161/64, planned by Malcolm IV on the advice of Waltheof of Melrose; abbot appointed 12 July 1164;
dissolved 1560; granted to Andrew Lamb 24 March 1603;
granted to Patrick Sterling 20 May 1607;
secularised 1606; erected into a temporal lordship for James Elphinstone, thereafter Lord Coupar;
Lamb resigned the claim 24 January 1607
The Abbey Church of The Blessed Virgin Mary, Coupar Angus [117][118]

56°32′39″N 3°15′59″W / 56.5440363°N 3.2664156°W / 56.5440363; -3.2664156 (Coupar Angus Abbey)
Coupar Angus Blackfriars Dominican Friars[note 47]
founded c.1480, probably by Thomas, commendator-abbot of Coupar and dean of Dunkeld[note 48]
Dalvey Cell Valliscaulian monks
supposed cell dependent on Pluscarden;
evidence lacking — considered conjectural
Dron Priory Cistercian monks
supposed foundation purportedly dependent on Coupar Angus — dubious
56°27′26″N 3°07′24″W / 56.4572°N 3.1233°W / 56.4572; -3.1233 (Dron Priory? (supposed))
Dull Priory suggested house of Tironensian monks, references apparently erroneous
Dunblane Monastery Dunblane Cathedral.jpg early foundation, possible Culdees — unsubstantiated;
cathedral founded before 1214-1223
[119][120]

56°11′22″N 3°57′54″W / 56.1894902°N 3.9650345°W / 56.1894902; -3.9650345 (Dunblane Monastery – now cathedral)
Dunkeld Monastery Dunkeld Cathedral.jpg built before 849 by Kenneth mac Alpin [121]

56°33′54″N 3°35′23″W / 56.56500°N 3.58972°W / 56.56500; -3.58972 (Dunkeld Monastery – now cathedral)
Elcho Priory Cistercian nuns
founded before 1241, attributed to David Lindsay I;
dissolved or secularised 1610; erected into a temporal lordship for Lord Scone (later Viscount Stormont)
Elcho Nunnery;
Orchardnook
[122]

56°22′49″N 3°23′31″W / 56.380297°N 3.391964°W / 56.380297; -3.391964 (Elcho Priory)
Forfar Abbey Cistercian monks — erroneous reference to Coupar Angus
Forfar Greyfriars supposed Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
erroneous reference[note 49]
Inchaffray Abbey Inchaffray Abbey.jpg community of brethren
foundation unknown;
Augustinian Canons Regular
priory founded (c.)1200 by Gilbert, Earl of Strathearn, granted to Scone;
raised to abbey status 1220 or 1221;
dissolved or secularised 1609-69, erected into temporal lordship 31 January 1609, established 15 February 1669
The Abbey Church of Saint John the Evangelist and Saint Mary, Inchaffray [123]

56°23′00″N 3°41′45″W / 56.383273°N 3.6959204°W / 56.383273; -3.6959204 (Inchaffray Abbey)
Kinkell 'Cell' Augustinian Canons Regular
asserted cell of Inchaffray; actually parochial church
Kinkell Commandery Knights Hospitallertraditional – no evidence
Loch Tay Priory Augustinian Canons Regular — from Scone
uncertain foundation;
island granted to Scone by Alexander I 1122
The Priory Church of Saint Mary, Loch Tay [124]

56°35′02″N 4°00′37″W / 56.5839458°N 4.0103316°W / 56.5839458; -4.0103316 (Loch Tay Priory)
Methven Monastery secular priests
founded between 1214 and 1223?
Montrose Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded 1230, purportedly by Sir Alan Durward;
apparently abandoned after being destroyed 14thC;
secularised 1570/1, revenues granted to the Burgh of Montrose by James VI 1 January 1570/1
The Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary
____________________
Blackfriars Hospital
[125]

56°42′48″N 2°28′38″W / 56.7132802°N 2.4773097°W / 56.7132802; -2.4773097 (Montrose Blackfriars)
Muthill Monastery Culdees
founded between 1178 and 1195;
dissolved by 1236
Perth Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded before 1240, (purportedly 1231) by Alexander II;
secularised 1569, lands and revenues granted to the Burgh of Perth by James VI 9 August 1569
St Andrew [126]

56°23′55″N 3°25′51″W / 56.398719°N 3.4308532°W / 56.398719; -3.4308532 (Perth Blackfriars)
Perth Greyfriars Observant Franciscan Friars
founded before 1496, purported (spurious) papal bull of Pius II 26 July 1460 confirming building by Sir Laurence of Oliphant of Aberdelgie; (erroneous reference to 1358 foundation is evidently the Blackfriars' house)
dissolved or secularised 1559-60, destroyed by Reformers 1559; site became a cemetery 1580
Perth Priory Carthusian monks
founded 1429, proposed by James I, authorised by the Prior of Grande Chartreuse 19 August 1426, consent of the General Chapter, ;
dissolved or secularised 1569; possession passed to the Town Council 1602
Vale of Virtue Priory [127]

56°23′25″N 3°26′22″W / 56.3902142°N 3.4393558°W / 56.3902142; -3.4393558 (Perth Priory)
Perth, St Leonard's Priory Augustinian Canonesses
founded 13thC;
annexed to Perth Charterhouse (see immediately above) c.1434
St Leonard
____________________
St Leonard's Priory and Hospital
[128]

56°23′26″N 3°26′22″W / 56.390439°N 3.4393645°W / 56.390439; -3.4393645 (Perth, St Leonard's Priory)
Rindalgros Monastery ? Benedictine monks
dependent on Reading, Berkshire;
founded 1147-53(?), granted to Reading by David I;
monastic community located here, though possibly no monastery was built
either transferred to Isle of May before 1151 or merged with Isle of May after 1151;
held by Isle of May 1231
Rhynd Monastery;
Rindelgros Monastery
[129]

56°21′52″N 3°22′25″W / 56.3645132°N 3.3736181°W / 56.3645132; -3.3736181 (Rindalgros monastic settlement?)
St Fillan's Priory 014718 d5ebbf86-by-J-M-Briscoe.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular — from Inchaffray
founded 1317, land granted patronage of church of Killin to Inchafray by Robert I 26 February 1317/8;
granted to Campbell of Glenorchy;
revenues apparently granted to Archibald Campbell of Glencarradale by the Crown 19 March 1607
The Priory Church of Saint Fillan, St Fillan's
____________________
Strathfillan Priory;
Strath Fillan Priory
[130]

56°25′09″N 4°39′42″W / 56.4191892°N 4.661639°W / 56.4191892; -4.661639 (St Fillan's Priory)
St Serf's Inch Priory, St Serf's Inch, Loch Leven Culdees
founded before 842, traditionally by Brude mac Dergard, King of the Picts – more likely by Brude mac Ferat;
Augustinian Canons Regular
dependent on St Andrews;
founded 1152/3 (c.1150);
dissolved or secularised 1580;
now within an island nature reserve usually without public access; (HS)
Portmoak Priory;
Portmoakso Priory;
Loch Leven Priory;
St Serf's Priory;
St Serf's Island Priory
[131]

56°11′15″N 3°21′09″W / 56.187532°N 3.3524609°W / 56.187532; -3.3524609 (St Serf's Inch Priory)
Scone Abbey Culdees or Columban monks
evidence lacking;
Augustinian Canons Regular — from Nostell
(?re)founded c.1120 purportedly by Alexander I
The Abbey Church of the Holy Trinity, The Blessed Virgin Mary, Saint Laurence, Saint Augustine and Saint Michael, Scone [132]

56°25′22″N 3°25′56″W / 56.4226961°N 3.4320903°W / 56.4226961; -3.4320903 (Scone Abbey)
Scotlandwell Red Friars originally hospital of St Mary;
Trinitarians
granted by David de Bernham, Bishop of St Andrews 2 January 1250/1;
secularised before 1591/2
[133]

56°11′58″N 3°18′44″W / 56.1994528°N 3.3123565°W / 56.1994528; -3.3123565 (Scotlandwell Red Friars)
Tullilum Whitefriars Carmelite Friars
founded 1262, chapel granted by Richard, Bishop of Dunkeld;
dissolved or secularised after 1559;
purportedly destroyed by Reformers 1559; granted to Patrick Murray of Tibbermore, confirmed by the Crown 23 June 1565[note 50]
Perth Whitefriars;
Tulliburn Whitefriars
The White Chapel (nave)
[134]

56°23′53″N 3°26′44″W / 56.3980407°N 3.4456026°W / 56.3980407; -3.4456026 (Tullilum Whitefriars)

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Renfrewshire[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Inchinnan Monastery traditionally a monastic settlement
Inchinnan 'Preceptory' Knights Templar
no house – parochial church held by the Templars, and later the Hospitallers;
North Bar House on site
[135]

55°53′33″N 4°25′51″W / 55.8925006°N 4.4307342°W / 55.8925006; -4.4307342 (Inchinnan 'Preceptory')
Paisley Abbey + Paisley Abbey - geograph.org.uk - 371254.jpg Cluniac monks — from Wenlock, Shropshire
priory founded c.1169 (1163);
raised to abbey status 1219 (1245);
dissolved 1587;
(CS)
The Abbey Church of saints Mary, James, Mirin and Milburga [136][137]

55°50′42″N 4°25′13″W / 55.8448677°N 4.4203448°W / 55.8448677; -4.4203448 (Paisley Abbey)
Renfrew Priory Cluniac monks — from Cluny
founded c.1163;
dissolved between 1169 and 1173
[138]

55°52′23″N 4°22′53″W / 55.8731801°N 4.3812758°W / 55.8731801; -4.3812758 (Renfrew Priory)

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Scottish Borders[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Ancrum Preceptory Knights Hospitaller
purported preceptory or hospital - conjectural (secular foundation at Ancrum Spittal)
Ancrum Red Friars Trinitarians
supposed house[note 51]evidence lacking
Berwick Austin Friars Formerly located in Scotland. See entry under List of monastic houses in Northumberland
Berwick Blackfriars Formerly located in Scotland. See entry under List of monastic houses in Northumberland
Berwick Greyfriars Formerly located in Scotland. See entry under List of monastic houses in Northumberland
Berwick Priory Formerly located in Scotland. See entry under List of monastic houses in Northumberland
Berwick Red Friars Formerly located in Scotland. See entry under List of monastic houses in Northumberland
Berwick Friars of the Sack Formerly located in Scotland. See entry under List of monastic houses in Northumberland
Berwick Whitefriars Formerly located in Scotland. See entry under List of monastic houses in Northumberland
Charterhouse Carthusian monks
no evidence of monastic house – probable interpretation of reference to Perth Charterhouse
Coldingham Priory + Coldingham Priory 2005.jpg monks and nuns
double house;
founded before 661 and 664 by Ebba, daughter of King Æthelfrith of Northumbria;
damaged by fire c.683, and abandoned by most of the community;
nuns
dependent on Lindisfarne before 854;
destroyed in raids by the Danes c.870;
Benedictine monks
dependent on Durham;
shire granted to Durham by King Edgar c.1098;
founded before 1139;
dependent on Dunfermline 14th-15thC;
monks evicted 1532, 1542 and 1544/5;
destroyed in warfare by 4 February 1551/2;
dissolved 1606;
most of remaining buildings destroyed by Cromwell 1648;
part of conventual church restored;
now in parochial use
The Priory Church of Saint Mary, Saint Ebba and Saint Cuthbert, Coldingham [139]

55°53′11″N 2°09′18″W / 55.8864591°N 2.1550852°W / 55.8864591; -2.1550852 (Coldingham Priory)
Coldstream Priory Cistercian nuns
founded before 1166 by Earl Gospatrick;
dissolved or secularised 1621, erected into a temporal lordship for Sir John Hamilton of Trabroun
Crail Priory nunsapocryphal establishment
Eccles Priory Cistercian nuns
purportedly founded 1156 (or 1145 or 1155), attributed to Earl Gospatrick, or a countess of March (possibly Derdere, wife of Earl Gospatrick);
dissolved or secularised 1609; erected into a temporal lordship of Sir George Hume 24 June 1609
Dryburgh Abbey Dryburgh Abbey - geograph.org.uk - 795053.jpg Premonstratensian Canons — from Alnwick
daughter of Alnwick;
founded 1150;
dissolved or secularised 1606;
(HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Dryburgh [140]

55°34′38″N 2°38′58″W / 55.5772803°N 2.6494968°W / 55.5772803; -2.6494968 (Dryburgh Abbey)
Fogo Priory Fogo Kirk - geograph.org.uk - 1188284.jpg Tironensian monks — from Kelso
dependent on Kelso;
founded between 1259 and 1297, church of St Nicholas granted to Kelso by Patrick Corbet;
dissolution unknown
[141]

55°44′08″N 2°21′50″W / 55.7356402°N 2.3637611°W / 55.7356402; -2.3637611 (Fogo Priory)
Jedburgh Abbey Jedburgh Abbey01.jpg land granted by Ecgred, Bishop of Lindisfarne c.830;
Augustinian Canons Regular — apparently from St-Quentin, Beauvais
priory founded c.1138 (1148) by David I with the assistance of John, Bishop of Glasgow;
erroneously referred to as Cluniac in one manuscript;
raised to abbey status c.1154;
dissolved or secularised 1696;
(HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Jedburgh [142]

55°28′36″N 2°33′17″W / 55.4766524°N 2.5546753°W / 55.4766524; -2.5546753 (Jedburgh Abbey)
Jedburgh Blackfriars locally but inaccurately cited Dominican Friars[note 52][note 53] [143][144]

55°28′48″N 2°33′12″W / 55.479933°N 2.553400°W / 55.479933; -2.553400 (Jedburgh Blackfriars)
Jedburgh Greyfriars Observant Franciscan Friars
founded before 1505; allegedly built 1513 by the nobles of the Border;
dissolved or secularised unknown
Kelso Abbey Kelso Abbey 012.jpg Tironensian monks
(community founded at Selkirk c.1113);
transferred from Selkirk in 1128;
dissolved or secularised 1607;
(HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary and Saint John, Kelso [145]

55°35′50″N 2°25′57″W / 55.5972259°N 2.4325168°W / 55.5972259; -2.4325168 (Kelso Abbey)
Makerstoun Charterhouse Carthusian monks
land granted to the Carthusians at Perth by Archibald, Earl of Douglas 2 February 1433/4; no evidence of monastic foundation
Melrose Abbey Melrose abbey 1.jpg Cistercian monks — from Rievaulx/Holmcultram
founded 1136/7 by David I;
dissolved 1598;
bestowed on James Stewart, Commendator of Kelso;
secularised 1609, erected into a temporal lordship for John Ramsay, Viscount Haddington, becoming Lord Melrose;
(HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary and Saint John, Melrose [146]

55°35′57″N 2°43′05″W / 55.5991019°N 2.7180272°W / 55.5991019; -2.7180272 (Melrose Abbey)
Old Melrose Monastery Celtic monks
possibly from Iona
founded between 635 and 651;
destroyed by Kenneth mac Alpin 839;
under the bishops of Lindisfarne until 854;
attempted refoundation by Aldwin of Jarrow;
abandoned 1074;
church of St Cuthbert founded;
dependent on Durham until between 1124 and 1136;
exchanged for the church at Berwick by King David I between 1124 and 1136;
annexed to Cistercian monastery at Melrose
St Cuthbert's Chapel [147]

55°35′52″N 2°39′20″W / 55.5977199°N 2.6554406°W / 55.5977199; -2.6554406 (Old Melrose Monastery (site))
Peebles Red Friars Cross Kirk - geograph.org.uk - 1147139.jpg Trinitarians
church built after 9 May 1261, when cross of purported relics of 'St Nicholas the bishop' was found, motivating Alexander III to build a church;
founded before 1296, when the master swore fealty to Edward I;
friary apparently founded c.1448 with the approval of the bailies;
bailies claim to have expelled friars c.1463, authorised by the Pope 21 April 1463; expulsion apparently not effected;
new foundation consented by petition of James III and his queen, 3 February 1473/4;
dissolved or secularised 1560/1;
lands erected to barony for John Hay of Yester 3 February 1624;
church in use until 1784
The Friary Church of the Holy Trinity, Peebles
____________________
The Cross Kirk;
Holy Cross
[148]

55°39′15″N 3°11′33″W / 55.6542387°N 3.1924832°W / 55.6542387; -3.1924832 (Peebles Red Friars (site))
Roxburgh Greyfriars Franciscan Friars Minor, Conventual
founded 1232 or 1232-4 by Alexander II;[note 54]
destroyed: burned by the English 14 September 1454[note 55]
dissolved or secularised after 1547, evidently; partly re-roofed November 1547 and in use for English troops
[149]

55°35′46″N 2°26′44″W / 55.5962496°N 2.4454495°W / 55.5962496; -2.4454495 (Roxburgh Greyfriars)
Roxburgh Priory purported Augustinian Canons Regular — probable confusion with Fransciscan friary
Roxburgh Priory Cistercian monks — unfounded assertion;[note 56] church of St James held by Kelso, the settlement of monks, or of Cistercians, is unsubstantiated
St Bothan's Priory,
Abbey St Bathans
Cistercian nuns
founded 13thC (possibly during the reign of William the Lion) possibly by a countess of March, or by Ada, daughter of William the Lion, or Christina, wife of Earl Patrick, or Euphemia, wife of Patrick, Earl of Dunbar;
leased to Alexander, Lord Home 16 June 1565/6;
conferred on Elizabeth Hume 8 March 1565/6, demitted before 23 July 1617;
granted to David Lindsay 23 July 1617;
dissolved or secularised 1622, erected into a temporal lordship for David Lindsay
St Bathan's Priory [150][151][152][153]

55°51′11″N 2°23′14″W / 55.8530937°N 2.3872934°W / 55.8530937; -2.3872934 (St Bothan's Priory)
Selkirk Abbey Tironensian monks — from Tiron
founded c.1113 by Earl David;
transferred to Kelso c.1128
[154]
Selkirk Blackfriars Dominican Blackfriars[note 57]
charter of James Tweedie of Drumelzier, 28 September 1358, granted site to build a new monastery on instruction of King David II[note 58]evidence lacking
St Ninian

The following location in the Scottish Borders has no known monastic connection:

  • Abbey: placename probably does not pre-date 1726

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Stirling Region[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Cambuskenneth Abbey Fm cambuskenneth abbey.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular — Arroasian — from Arroaise
founded 1147; (HS)
The Abbey Church of Saint Mary, Cambuskenneth [155]

56°07′24″N 3°55′03″W / 56.1233031°N 3.917495°W / 56.1233031; -3.917495 (Cambuskenneth Abbey)
Inchcailleoch Priory nuns of unspecified order - traditional (assumed from the name of the island - purportedly "the island of old women"), parochial church — no evidence of monastic foundation
Inchmahome Priory, Lake of Menteith Inchmahome Priory - 1 - 06052008.jpg Augustinian Canons Regular
independent priory founded 1238 by Walter, Earl of Menteith; dissolved or secularised 1604; erected into temporal lordshhip for John Erskine, Second Earl of Mar 1604 and 1606; (HS)
[156]

56°10′35″N 4°17′53″W / 56.176342°N 4.2979181°W / 56.176342; -4.2979181 (Inchmahome Priory)
Stirling Blackfriars Dominican Friars
founded before 1249 by Alexander II;
purportedly destroyed by Reformers June 1559;
putatively granted to Alexander Erskine of Cangnoir May 1560;
secularised 1567, granted to the municipality of Stirling by Queen Mary 15 April 1567, though Erskine retained possession until 1652
St Laurence [157][158]

56°07′10″N 3°56′12″W / 56.11944°N 3.93667°W / 56.11944; -3.93667 (Stirling Blackfriars)
Stirling Greyfriars Observant Franciscan Friars
founded 1494, allegedly by James IV;
dissolved or secularised 1559-67; destroyed by Reformers 1559; granted to the magistrates 15 April 1567

The following location in the Stirling Region has no monastic connection:

  • Ross Priory: mansion named 'Ross', renamed 'Ross Priory' 1810

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Unidentified supposed foundations[edit]

Foundation Image Communities & Provenance Formal Name or Dedication
& Alternative Names
OnLine References & Location
Ancaria Cistercian monks, mentioned 1530
Crenach Red Friars supposed Trinitarians, located in Cromarty (Highland Region), purportedly founded c.1271 by Patrick Murray;
possibly indicates Greenock, Renfrewshire (or Greenock, East Ayrshire), or Carnwath, Lanarkshire — no monastic house at those locations – probably fictitious
Crennach;
Crenwathe
Crusay Augustian Canons Regular, alleged foundation in the Western Isles, possible misreading of Oronsay
Molista nuns of unspecified order — suggested site of a house on the basis of the name: "the town (or house) of the black old women"
Oggerstone Preceptory Knights Templar
given as fort and barony of Templars[note 59]actual reference to Ogerstone, Huntingdon, England (see List of monastic houses in Cambridgeshire)
unlocated Carthusian monks, petition by Archibald, Earl of Douglas, granted by the Pope 5 June 1419 supplication for license to found a house; projected foundation never implemented

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Glossary[edit]


edit this box

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Aberdeen Red Friars — foundation date 1181 given by Father R. A. Hay, Scotia Sacre (MS.34.1.18 in the National Library of Scotland), p.70
  2. ^ Banff Greyfriars — Collections for a History of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff (Spalding Club, 1843), p.205
  3. ^ Forvie Preceptory: Collections for a History of the Shires of Aberdeen and Banff (Spalding Club, 1843), p.217
  4. ^ Tullich Preceptory — J. Spottiswoode, An account of all the Religious Houses that were in Scotland at the time of the Reformation (included in R. Keith, An Historical Catalogue of the Scottish Bishops (Edinburgh, 1824)), p.435
  5. ^ Tullich Preceptory — Templaria; Papers realative to the history of the Scottish Knights Templars and to the Knights of St. John (1828), pp.5,7; Abstracts of charters and other papers recorded in the chartulary of Torphichen from 1581 to 1596 (Edinburgh, 1830), p.9
  6. ^ Barry Red Friars – Father R. A. Hay, Diplomatum Veterum Collectio. (MS. 34-1.10 in the National Library of Scotland), iii, p.573
  7. ^ Brechin Red Friars – Father R. A. Hay, Diplomatum Veterum Collectio. (MS. 34-1.10 in the National Library of Scotland), iii, p.579
  8. ^ Brechin Red Friars – Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), p.1081
  9. ^ Dundee Greyfriars — foundation: Joannis de Fordun Scotichronicon cum Supplementis et Continuatione Walteri Boweri, ed. Goodall (Edinburgh, 1759): lib. viii, cap. xxv; ibid, i, 474; J. Spottiswoode, An account of all the Religious Houses that were in Scotland at the time of the Reformation (included in R. Keith, An Historical Catalogue of the Scottish Bishops (Edinburgh, 1824)), p.489
  10. ^ Dundee Greyfriars — date of building: Documents Illustrative of the History of Scotland 1286-1306, ed. J. Stevenson (Edinburgh, 1870), ii, no.484
  11. ^ Iona Abbey — Tironensian: conjectured by W. F. Skene, Celtic Scotland, Edinburgh (1867)
  12. ^ Rothesay Abbey: Ecclesiastical Architecture, iii, p.418
  13. ^ Texa Cell — Joannis de Fordun Scotichronicon cum Supplementis et Continuatione Walteri Boweri, ed. Goodall (Edinburgh, 1759) lib. ii, cap x; i. p.45
  14. ^ Dercongal Abbey — Manuscript 33.2.12, National Library of Scotland, gives founder as Devorgilla, daughter of Alan of Galloway; evidently a confusion with Sweetheart Abbey
  15. ^ Dumfries Blackfriars — Manuscript 22.1.14, 153 f., National Library of Scotland
  16. ^ Dumfries Blackfriars — erroneous entry in J. Spottiswoode, History of the Church of Scotland (1677 Ed.) Appendix, p.16 (25)
  17. ^ Dumfries Blackfriars — erroneous reference to Friars Preachers (correctly Friars Minor) in Dumfries list (NX 9776), 1 May 1579 (Registrum Magni Sigilli Scotorum, iv, no.32)
  18. ^ Dumfries Greyfriars — probably spurious charter of foundation 20 April 1234 by Alan of Galloway cited by Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), p.1268
  19. ^ Dumfries Greyfriars — foundation date c.1262 cited by W. Moir Bryce, The Scottish Grey Friars (Edinburgh, 1909), i, p.199
  20. ^ Dumfries Greyfriars — foundation date before 1305 cited Early Sources of Scottish History 500 to 1268, ed. A. O. Anderson (Edinburgh, 1922) ii, p.479n
  21. ^ Dumfries Greyfriars — possession by Town Council cited by W. Moir Bryce, The Scottish Grey Friars (Edinburgh, 1909), i, p.214
  22. ^ Kirkcudbright Blackfriars — Rotuli scaccarii regum scotorum (The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland), ed. J. Stewart and others (Edinburgh, 1878-1908) xiii, p.472: reference 1512 to Friars Preachers of Kirkcudbright
  23. ^ Kirkcudbright Greyfriars — spurious charter 16 September 1239: Tweedie Manuscript, cited by Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), pp.1431-2
  24. ^ Edinburgh Preceptory: Reports of the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments and Constructions of Scotland — Edinburgh (1951), p.126, no.75: exaggerated description of property
  25. ^ Queensferry Whitefriars — foundation 1330/1: J. Spottiswoode, An account of all the Religious Houses that were in Scotland at the time of the Reformation (included in R. Keith, An Historical Catalogue of the Scottish Bishops (Edinburgh, 1824)), p.455
  26. ^ Queensferry Whitefriars — foundation intimated: purported letter of James Dundas, Laird of Dundas, to the Provincial and Vicar-General of the Camelite order in Scotland — Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), p.1554
  27. ^ Queensferry Whitefriars — present parish church: Dundas Charters, National Library of Scotland, Mac. xxiv, p.29)
  28. ^ Nuntown Priory — New Statistical Account
  29. ^ Crail Blackfriars — spurious and unreliable charters cited by Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), pp.1254, 1255-7
  30. ^ Dysart Blackfriars — included in Dumfries list
  31. ^ Dysart Blackfriars — Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), p.1229 - land granted: spurious charter of William Sinclair of Dysart 27 March 1466/7/8 (year partly obscured)
  32. ^ Inverkeithing Blackfriars — included in Dumfries list and W. Maitland The History and Antiquities of Scotland (London, 1757), i 262
  33. ^ Inverkeithing Blackfriars — site granted: Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), p.1224 - charter (undated) "Hugh de Lundey", Lord of the Burgh of Inverkeithing with the consent of Robert de Bruis index Accounts of the Lord High Treasurer of Scotland, edited by T. Dickson and Sir J. Balfour Paul (Edinburgh 1877-1916), ii (though the text refers to 'Frieris of Inverkethin' (most likely the Franciscan Friars)
  34. ^ Isle of May Monastery: Annals of the Reigns of Malcolm and William, Kings of Scotland, ed. A. C. Lawrie (Glasgow, 1910) states "It is possible thaton the Isle of May, in the beginning of the twelfth century, there was a small fraternity of culdees or monks of the old Scottish church"
  35. ^ Kinghorn Blackfriars — included in Dumfries list
  36. ^ Kinghorn Blackfriars — spurious and unreliable charters cited by Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), pp.1228: vague account of foundation - probably spurious charter of benefaction of James de Kirkcaldy 28 September 1388
  37. ^ a b St Ninian's Blackfriars — Extracta e Variis Cronicis Scocie (Abbotsford Club 1842) p.249
  38. ^ Lanark Greyfriars — foundation 1328-9: spurious charter of foundation cited by Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), p.1459
  39. ^ Lanark Greyfriars — W. Moir Bryce, The Scottish Grey Friars (Edinburgh, 1909), ii, p.149; Reg, Aven, 88, folios 191-IV
  40. ^ Haddington Blackfriars — destruction: Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), p.1236
  41. ^ Houston Red Friars — foundation date (c.)1220 given by Father R. A. Hay, Diplomatum Veterum Collectio. (MS. 34-1.10 in the National Library of Scotland), iii, p.576; J. Spottiswoode, An account of all the Religious Houses that were in Scotland at the time of the Reformation p.396 (included in R. Keith, An Historical Catalogue of the Scottish Bishops, Edinburgh, 1824)), who located the foundation in Renfrewshire
  42. ^ St Germains Preceptory — J. Spottiswoode, An account of all the Religious Houses that were in Scotland at the time of the Reformation (included in R. Keith, An Historical Catalogue of the Scottish Bishops (Edinburgh, 1824)), p.435
  43. ^ included in Dumfries list
  44. ^ Linlithgow Blackfriars — Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), p.1219 – probably spurious charter of John, King of Scots 19 March 1294/5
  45. ^ Forres Blackfriars — included in Dumfries list
  46. ^ 'Brough of Birsay Red Friars': Reports of the Royal Commission on Ancient and Historical Monuments and Constructions of Scotland, Orkney and Shetlands (Edinburgh, 1909-), ii, I, p.3
  47. ^ Coupar Angus Blackfriars — listed by J. Spottiswoode, History of the Church of Scotland (1677), p.16 (25)
  48. ^ Coupar Angus Blackfriars — foundation: foundation date and founder unknown: Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie, Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh, suggested founder (p.1241), suggested date (p.1248)
  49. ^ Forfar Greyfriars — Calendar of Documents relating to Scotland, ed. J. Bain, (Edinburgh, 1881-8), (ii, no. 856) includes reference to such a house; Documents Illustrative of the History of Scotland 1286-1306, ed. J. Stevenson (Edinburgh, 1870), (ii, no. cccclxxxiv, 23 November 1297) shows this to be erroneous
  50. ^ Tullilum Whitefriars — Registrum Secreti Sigilli Regnum Scotorum, ed. M. Livingstone and others (Edinburgh, 1908— ), V, no.2124
  51. ^ Ancrum Red Friars — Geographical Collections relating to Scotland made by Walter Macfarlane (SHS, 1906-08), iii, p.158
  52. ^ Jedburgh Blackfriars — included in Dumfries lists
  53. ^ Jedburgh Blackfriars — Watson, History of the Franciscan Friary of Jedburgh, HNBC, 1906, p.82
  54. ^ Roxburgh Greyfriars — foundation: probably spurious charter of foundation 18 October 1232 cited by Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), pp.1281-2
  55. ^ Roxburgh Greyfriars — destruction: Letters and Papers, foreign and domestic of the reign of Henry VIII ed. by J. S. Brewer and others (London, 1864-1932), xx2 no. 456, 533
  56. ^ Roxburgh — A. O. Anderson, Early Sources, ii, p.183, note, according to papal legate declaration, and referring to exemption of the church of St James, synodal and episcopal aids: 'It seems therefore to have been occupied by Cistercian monks at this time'
  57. ^ Selkirk Blackfriars — included in Dumfries lists
  58. ^ Selkirk Blackfriars — charter of dubious merit (purportedly bearing the seal of Alexander Maxwell, Archdeacon of 'Tuuedaliae' — if Tweedale: no such archdeaconry, if Teviotdale: no record of archdeacon of that name) cited by Manuscript collections of Father Marianus Brockie (Scottish Catholic Archives, Edinburgh), p.1242
  59. ^ Oggerstone Preceptory — J. Spottiswoode, An account of all the Religious Houses that were in Scotland at the time of the Reformation (included in R. Keith, An Historical Catalogue of the Scottish Bishops (Edinburgh, 1824)), p.435

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Site Record for Aberdeen, Greyfriars Church Marischal College; Grey Friar's Monastery; Aberdeen, Franciscan Friary Details
  2. ^ Site Record for Aberdeen, Trinitarian Monastery Trinity Friars' Monastery Details
  3. ^ Site Record for Aberdeen, Carmelite Friary 12 St Martin's Lane; 2-12 Rennie's Wynd; The Green; Carmelite Monastery Details
  4. ^ Site Record for Duff House, Mausoleum And St Mary's Well Carmelite Monastery; Our Lady Chapel; St Mary's Chapel; Duff House Estate; Duff House Policies Details
  5. ^ Site Record for Clova, St Luke's Chapel And Well Sammiluak's Chapel; Monastery Of Clovett Details
  6. ^ Site Record for Deer Abbey Old Deer Abbey; Cistercian Abbey Of Deer Details
  7. ^ Site Record for Fyvie, Priory And Priory Cross Fivue Priory; Fyvie Priory Cross Details
  8. ^ Site Record for Monymusk Priory Priory Of Monymusk Details
  9. ^ Monymusk.com - History Index : The Priory
  10. ^ Site Record for Turriff, 'Celtic Monastery' Details
  11. ^ Site Record for Arbroath Abbey, Conventual Building Details
  12. ^ Site Record for Brechin Cathedral Brechin Parish Church; Brechin Round Tower; Round Tower, Brechin; Cathedral Of The See Of Brechin Details
  13. ^ Site Record for Dundee, Barrack Street, Dominican Monastery Details
  14. ^ Site Record for Dundee, The Houff, Franciscan Friary Greyfriars' Monastery Details
  15. ^ Site Record for Dundee, Monifieth, St Regulus' Church And Burial-Ground Details
  16. ^ Site Record for Restenneth Priory Strathmore Estate Details
  17. ^ Site Record for Ardchattan Priory Ardchattan Priory Church; Ardchattan House Details
  18. ^ Site Record for Cara, St Fionnlugh's Chapel St Finla's Digital_images
  19. ^ Site Record for Kilneuair, St Columba's Church And Churchyard St Columba's Chapel Details
  20. ^ Site Record for Iona, Iona Abbey Iona, St Mary's Cathedral; St Mary's Abbey Details
  21. ^ Site Record for Bute, St Blane's Church Kingarth; Saint Mary's Chapel, Saint Blane's Chapel Details
  22. ^ Site Record for Oronsay Priory Details
  23. ^ Site Record for Saddell Abbey Cistercian Saddell Abbey; Saddell Water; Allt Nam Manach Details
  24. ^ Site Record for Tiree Details
  25. ^ Site Record for Tiree Details
  26. ^ Historical perspective for Mauchline
  27. ^ Site Record for Irvine, Fullarton Details
  28. ^ Site Record for Kilwinning Abbey Details
  29. ^ Kilwinning Abbey, Kilwinning
  30. ^ Ruin of Old Abbey Southannan, Fairlie - West Kilbride - North Ayrshire - Scotland | British Listed Buildings
  31. ^ Site Record for Ayr, Kirk Port, Auld Kirk Of Ayr Kirkport, Old Parish Church; Church Of Scotland Details
  32. ^ Site Record for Crossraguel Abbey Crossraguel; Corsregal, St Mary's Abbey Details
  33. ^ Historic Scotland - Crossraguel Abbey Property Detail
  34. ^ Crossraguel Abbey
  35. ^ Crossraguel Abbey | Mysterious Britain & Ireland
  36. ^ Site Record for Dalmilling Details
  37. ^ Site Record for Fail Monastery Details
  38. ^ Site Record for Canonbie Priory Halgreen; 'House Of Liddel'; Park House Details
  39. ^ Site Record for Holywood Abbey Premonstratensian Abbey Of Holywood Or Dercongal Details
  40. ^ Site Record for Dumfries 'Dominican Friary' Details
  41. ^ Site Record for Dundrennan Abbey St Mary's Abbey Details
  42. ^ Site Record for Glenluce Abbey Luce Abbey Details
  43. ^ Site Record for Hoddom, Old Parish Church Hoddom Monastery; Hallguards Quarry; Hoddam; Hoddambridge Details
  44. ^ Site Record for Kirkcudbright, Greyfriars Monastery Greyfriars Convent; 'Castle Aisle' Details
  45. ^ Site Record for Lincluden College Lincluden Abbey; Lincluden, Convent Details
  46. ^ Site Record for St Mary's Priory St Mary's Isle Details
  47. ^ Site Record for Soulseat Abbey Soulseat Abbey And Burial-Ground; Mahaar Details
  48. ^ Site Record for New Abbey, Sweetheart Abbey Details
  49. ^ Site Record for Tongland Abbey Old Tongland Parish Church Details
  50. ^ Site Record for Whithorn Priory Details
  51. ^ Site Record for Ross Priory Details
  52. ^ Site Record for Edinburgh, Blackfriars' Dominican Monastery Details
  53. ^ Site Record for Edinburgh, Greenside Row, Carmelite Friary Rude Chapel; Greenside Hospital Details
  54. ^ Site Record for Edinburgh, Sciennes, Dominican Convent Sciennes, Dominican Nunnery Details
  55. ^ Site Record for Edinburgh, Holyrood Palace, Holyrood Abbey Holyrood Abbey Church; Palace Of Holyrood; Palace Of Holyroodhouse Details
  56. ^ Site Record for South Queensferry, 8 Hopetoun Road, Episcopal Church Carmelite Friars Church; Priory Church Of St Mary Of Mount Carmel Details
  57. ^ ScotSites eBooks - Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys
  58. ^ Site Record for Balmerino Abbey Details
  59. ^ Site Record for Culross, Culross Abbey Details
  60. ^ Site Record for Cupar Details
  61. ^ Site Record for Dunfermline Abbey, New Abbey Nave And Parish Church Abbot Street; Maygate; Monastery
  62. ^ Site Record for Dysart, 'saint Dennis' Chapel' Details
  63. ^ Site Record for Dunbog House Preceptory Of Gadvan Details
  64. ^ Site Record for Inchcolm Abbey Details
  65. ^ Site Record for Inverkeithing Details
  66. ^ Site Record for Inverkeithing, Queen Street, Museum Franciscan Friary; The Palace Details
  67. ^ Site Record for Isle Of May, St Adrian's Chapel Isle Of May Monastery; St Adrian's Priory; May Island Details
  68. ^ http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=s70QAAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
  69. ^ Site Record for St Andrews, Church Of The Holy Trinity Of Kilrimund Trinity Of Kilrimund; Kilrimont Details
  70. ^ Site Record for Kinghorn, Dominican Friary Details
  71. ^ Site Record for Lindores Abbey Details
  72. ^ Site Record for Pittenweem, Marygate, Pittenweem Priory Town Hall; Great House; Prior's Lodging; St John's Rectory Details
  73. ^ Site Record for St Andrews, South Street, Dominican Monastery Blackfriars Chapel Details
  74. ^ Site Record for St Andrews Cathedral St Andrews Priory Details
  75. ^ Site Record for St Andrews Cathedral, St Rule's Church And St Rule's Tower St Regulus Church Details
  76. ^ Site Record for Glasgow, Blackfriars Chapel Black Friars; Old College Church Details
  77. ^ Site Record for Glasgow, Gorbals, 270 Ballater Street, St Luke's Roman Catholic Church Roman Catholic Church Of Saint Luke; Blessed John Duns Franciscan Friary; Commercial Road Details
  78. ^ Site Record for Glasgow, Franciscan Friary City Science Centre; Greyfriars Friary Details
  79. ^ Site Record for Applecross, St Maelrubha's Monastery Applecross Old Churchyard; Claodh Maree Details
  80. ^ Site Record for Beauly Priory Beauly, High Street, Priory Details
  81. ^ Site Record for Eigg, Kildonnan Kildonan Details
  82. ^ Site Record for Fearn Abbey Fearn Abbey Church; Fearn Parish Church; Nova Ferna; New Fearn; Hill Of Fearn Details
  83. ^ Site Record for Fort Augustus Abbey, Church, Monastery And School St Benedict's Abbey; Kilcumien; Fort Augustus Barracks Details
  84. ^ Site Record for Inverness, Friars' Street, Dominican Friary Details
  85. ^ Site Record for Kingussie, St Columba's Friary Kingussie Graveyard Details
  86. ^ Site Record for Blantyre Priory Blantyre Farm Road Details
  87. ^ Site Record for Lanark, Franciscan Friary Clydesdale Hotel Details
  88. ^ Site Record for Lesmahagow, Church Square, Lesmahagow Parish Church Langdykeside; Old Lesmahagow Church; Lesmahagow Priory Details
  89. ^ Site Record for Dirleton, Friary Details
  90. ^ Site Record for Dunbar, Friarscroft Friar's Croft; Red Friars Dovecot Details
  91. ^ Site Record for Fidra, St Nicholas' Church Eldbottle Details
  92. ^ Site Record for Haddington, Dominican Friary Details
  93. ^ Site Record for Haddington, Franciscan Friary The Lamp Of Lothian Details
  94. ^ Site Record for Luffness, Carmelite Friary Friary And Fish Ponds; Luffness Convent; Luffness Friary Details
  95. ^ ScotlandsPlaces - Luffness, Carmelite Friary
  96. ^ Sancta Maria Abbey, Nunraw
  97. ^ Site Record for North Berwick Priory Cistercian Convent Details
  98. ^ Site Record for Abercorn Church And Anglian Monastery Aebbercurnig; Abercorn Monastery; Abercorn Kirk; Abercorn Parish Church Details
  99. ^ Site Record for Linlithgow, Carmelite Friary Nether Parkley Details
  100. ^ Site Record for Manuel Nunnery Manuelburn Bridge Details
  101. ^ Preceptory And Torphichen Parish Church Hospital Of Torphichen; Preceptory Of St John Details
  102. ^ Site Record for Newbattle Abbey, Monkland Wall, King David's Gate Newbattle Abbey Policies; Newbattle Abbey, The King's Gate Details
  103. ^ Site Record for Elgin, Dominican Friary Blackfriars' Monastery Details
  104. ^ Site Record for Elgin, Franciscan Friary Dumfermline Cottage; Greyfriars Monastery Details
  105. ^ Site Record for Elgin, Abbey Street, Convent Of Mercy, Greyfriars' Church Chapel; Franciscan Friary; Greyfriars' Street; Observantine House Of The Franciscan Friars Details
  106. ^ Site Record for Kinloss Abbey And Burial Ground Details
  107. ^ Site Record for Pluscarden Abbey Pluscarden Priory; Vallisculian Priory Details
  108. ^ Urquhart Feature Page on Undiscovered Scotland
  109. ^ Urquhart Feature Page on Undiscovered Scotland
  110. ^ Site Record for Brough Of Birsay St Peter's Chapel; St Peter's Monastery Details
  111. ^ Site Record for Eynhallow Monastery Details
  112. ^ Site Record for Papa Stronsay Golgotha Monastery Details
  113. ^ Papa Stronsay, home of the Sons of the Most Holy Redeemer — papastronsay.com
  114. ^ Site Record for Papa Stronsay, St Nicholas' Chapel Details
  115. ^ Site Record for Abernethy, School Wynd, Kirk Of St Bride Abernethy Parish Church; St Bride's Church Details
  116. ^ Corpus of Scottish medieval parish churches: Dunblane and Dunkeld dioceses
  117. ^ Site Record for Coupar Angus, Queen Street, Abbey Church Coupar Angus Church; Parish Church Of Coupar Angus; Coupar Angus Abbey Details
  118. ^ The Cistercians in Yorkshire: Coupar Angus Abbey
  119. ^ Site Record for Dunblane, Kirk Street, Dunblane Cathedral Dunblane Parish Church; Cathedral Church Of Saint Blaan And Saint Laurence Details
  120. ^ Dunblane Cathedral - Home
  121. ^ Site Record for Dunkeld, Cathedral Street, Dunkeld Cathedral Dunkeld Parish Church Details
  122. ^ Site Record for Grange Of Elcho Elcho Nunnery; Orchardnook Details
  123. ^ Site Record for Inchaffray Abbey Insula Missarum; Isle Of Masses; Inis Aifreen Details
  124. ^ Site Record for Loch Tay, Priory Island Eilean Nam Ban; Sybilla's Island; Isle Of Loch Tay Details
  125. ^ Site Record for Montrose, Dominican Friary Blackfriars Hospital Details
  126. ^ Site Record for Perth, Dominican Friary Black Friars' Monastery Details
  127. ^ Site Record for Perth, Priory, Chapel And Hospital Of St Leonard Leonard Institution; St Leonard's Cottage; Carr's Croft; Perth, General Railway Station Details
  128. ^ Site Record for Perth, Priory, Chapel And Hospital Of St Leonard Leonard Institution; St Leonard's Cottage; Carr's Croft; Perth, General Railway Station Details
  129. ^ Site Record for Rhynd Rindalgros; Rindelgros; Rindelcross Details
  130. ^ Site Record for Strathfillan Priory St Fillan's Church; Saint Fillan's Priory And Burial Ground, Kirkton Details
  131. ^ Site Record for Loch Leven, St Serf's Island, St Serf's Priory Church Culdee Monastery Details
  132. ^ Site Record for Scone Abbey New Scone; Scone Park; Scone Palace Policies; Scone Priory Details
  133. ^ Site Record for Scotlandwell Priory Well Caravan Site; Scotlandwell, St Mary's Hospital; Scotlandwell Priory Details
  134. ^ Site Record for Perth, Whitefriars Street, Carmelite Friary Tulliburn; White Friars Monastery; Carmelite Friary Of Tullilum; Riggs Road Photographs
  135. ^ Site Record for Inchinnan Northbar House, Preceptory Of Greenend Of The Knights Templar And Knights Of St John Details
  136. ^ Site Record for Paisley Abbey Abbey Close, Paisley Abbey; Abercorn Aisle Details
  137. ^ Paisley Abbey
  138. ^ Site Record for Renfrew Details
  139. ^ Site Record for Coldingham Church Coldingham Priory Church; Coldingham Priory, Claustral Remains; Coldingham Benedictine Priory Details
  140. ^ Site Record for Dryburgh Abbey Details
  141. ^ Site Record for Fogo, St Nicholas' Chapel Details
  142. ^ Site Record for Jedburgh Abbey Jedburgh, Augustinian Abbey Of St Mary Details
  143. ^ Site Record for Jedburgh, High Street, Trinity Church Blackfriars Church Details
  144. ^ Blackfriars Church - Jedburgh, Borders - Scottish Church Heritage Research
  145. ^ Site Record for Kelso, Bridge Street, Abbey Monastery At Kelso; Kelso Abbey Details
  146. ^ Site Record for Melrose Abbey Details
  147. ^ Site Record for Old Melrose, St Cuthbert's Chapel Details
  148. ^ Site Record for Peebles, Cross Road, Cross Kirk Details
  149. ^ Site Record for Roxburgh, Franciscan Friary Convent Of Grey Friars And Church Of St Peter Details
  150. ^ Site Record for Abbey St Bathans Church Abbey St Bathan's Kirk; St Bathan's Church; St Bathan's Convent Details
  151. ^ The Cistercians in Yorkshire — Cistercian nunneries in Britain and Ireland
  152. ^ POMS - Paradox of Medieval Scotland
  153. ^ Monasticon
  154. ^ Selkirk Abbey, History of Selkirk Scotland
  155. ^ Site Record for Cambuskenneth Abbey Abbey Of St Mary Of Stirling Details
  156. ^ Site Record for Lake Of Menteith, Inchmahome Priory Inchmahome Abbey Details
  157. ^ Site Record for Stirling , Dominican Friary Blackfriars Church Details
  158. ^ Stirling.Blackfriars

References[edit]

  • Thorold, Henry, Collins Guide to the Ruined Abbeys of England, Wales and Scotland, Collins, 1993
  • Robinson, David, The Cistercian Abbeys of Britain, B. T. Batsford with English Heritage, CADW, Historic Scotland, 2002
  • Cowan, Ian B. & Easson, David E. (1976) Medieval Religious Houses Scotland. Longman
  • Butler, Rev. D., M.A. Scottish Cathedrals and Abbeys, The Guild Library, A&C Black, 1901
  • Leicester Addis, M. E., Cathedrals and Abbeys of Presbyterian Scotland, Philadelphia, The Westminster Press, 1901
  • Fawcett, R., Scottish Abbeys and Priories, Historic Scotland, 1994
  • Scotland Churches Scheme, Churches to Visit in Scotland, 1999, Saint Andrew Press
  • Coventry, M. And Miller, J., Churches and Abbeys of Scotland, Thistle Guide, Goblinshead, 2003
  • Cruden, S., Scottish Abbeys, An Introduction to the mediæval Abbeys and Priories of Scotland, Her Majesty's Stationery Office, 1960
  • Wright, Geoffrey N., (2004) Discovering Abbeys and Priories, Shire Publications Ltd.