List of scandals with "-gate" suffix

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This is a list of scandals or controversies whose names in scholarly sources include a "-gate" suffix, by analogy with the Watergate scandal.[1] This list also includes controversies that are widely referred to with a "-gate" suffix, but may be referred to by another more common name in scholarly sources (such as New Orleans Saints bounty scandal).

Etymology, usage, and history of -gate[edit]

The suffix -gate derives from the Watergate scandal of the United States in the early 1970s, which resulted in the resignation of U.S. President Richard Nixon. The scandal was named after the Watergate complex in Washington, D.C.; the complex itself was named after the "Water Gate" area where symphony orchestra concerts were staged on the Potomac River between 1935 and 1965.[2]

The suffix is used to embellish a noun or name to suggest the existence of a far-reaching scandal, particularly in politics and government. As a CBC News column noted in 2001, the term may "suggest unethical behaviour and a cover-up".[3] The same usage has spread into languages other than English; examples of -gate being used to refer to local political scandals have been reported from Argentina, Germany, Korea, Hungary, Greece and the former Yugoslavia.[4] Such usages have been criticised by commentators as clichéd and misleading;[5] James Stanyer comments that "revelations are given the 'gate' suffix to add a thin veil of credibility, following 'Watergate', but most bear no resemblance to the painstaking investigation of that particular piece of presidential corruption."[6] Stanyer links the widespread use of -gate to what the sociologist John Thompson calls "scandal syndrome":

[A] self-reproducing and self-reinforcing process, driven on by competitive and combative struggles in the media and political fields and giving rise to more and more scandals which increasingly become the focus of mediated forms of public debate, marginalizing or displacing other issues and producing on occasion a climate of political crisis which can debilitate or even paralyse a government.[7]

The adoption of -gate to suggest the existence of a scandal was promoted by William Safire, the conservative New York Times columnist and former Nixon administration speechwriter. As early as September 1974 he wrote of "Vietgate", a proposed pardon of the Watergate criminals and Vietnam War draft dodgers.[8] Subsequently he coined numerous -gate terms, including Billygate, Briefingate, Contragate, Deavergate, Debategate, Doublebillingsgate (of which he later said "My best [-gate coinage] was the encapsulation of a minor ... scandal as doublebillingsgate"), Frankiegate, Franklingate, Genschergate, Housegate, Iraqgate, Koreagate, Lancegate, Maggiegate, Nannygate, Raidergate, Scalpgate, Travelgate, Troopergate and Whitewatergate. The New York magazine suggested that his aim in doing so was "rehabilitating Nixon by relentlessly tarring his successors with the same rhetorical brush – diminished guilt by association".[9] Safire himself later admitted to author Eric Alterman that, as Alterman puts it, "psychologically, he may have been seeking to minimize the relative importance of the crimes committed by his former boss with this silliness."[10]

List[edit]

Arts and entertainment[edit]

Journalism and academics[edit]

  • Climategate – Emails that were hacked remotely from the Climatic Research Unit of the University of East Anglia[20] were publicised by climate change denialists alleging a global warming conspiracy theory: the allegations against climate scientists were subject to eight investigations, which found there was no evidence of fraud or scientific misconduct,[21] though there was a finding of a lack of openness.[22]
  • Hackgate (also "Rupertgate" or "Murdochgate") – 2006–present day, currently being investigated by the Metropolitan Police. Allegations that the now defunct News of the World had hacked into the phones of celebrities, politicians, members of the British Royal Family, and victims of crime.
  • Mediagate – The controversy over Pakistani top journalists in the mainstream media.
  • Poopygate- Exposure of unsanitary & unsafe viaduct structures in Chicago first reported by Lisa Chavvaria @Fox32news and Stephanie Lulay @DNAinfo Chicago. Grass roots community organization, nonprofit collaboration, academic laboratory facilities, and journalism coverage exposes the abyss that Chicagoans face in trying to obtain safe walkways in communities. Viaduct health & safety deficiencies associated with: poorly operated city systems, lack of accountability, and lack of coordination by state and federal officials; namely Mayor Rahm Emanuel & team, Chicago Streets & Sanitation, Chicago Department of Transportation, and the Federal Railroad systems. Despite multiple barriers, local residents work to push a change.org petition for healthier communities throughout Chicago (www.chicagoviaduct.com).
  • Rathergate – The scandal over a forged memo about George W. Bush's military record that ultimately led to the resignation of Dan Rather as anchor of the CBS Evening News.[23]
  • Reutersgate – The controversy over Reuters photographer Adnan Hajj manipulating news photos with Photoshop.[24]

Politics[edit]

Sports[edit]

Technology[edit]

  • Antennagate: The name Apple founder Steve Jobs gave to the controversy over the iPhone 4's antenna after initial users complained of dropped calls and Consumer Reports would not recommend it. Widely adopted by the technical press.[109][110][111][112][113]
  • Bendgate: Used to refer to the scenario when iPhone 6 plus bends under pressure, such as when putting in the pocket.[114][115]
  • Donglegate: (#Donglegate on Twitter.) Used to reference a series of events following a double entendre on the word "dongle" overheard at a programmers convention March 17, 2013, which led to two people being fired and a DDoS attack.[116]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "-gate, suffix", Oxford English Dictionary, Oxford University Press 
  2. ^ John Kelly (December 13, 2004). "Answer Man: A Gate to Summers Past". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on September 18, 2009. Retrieved September 18, 2009. 
  3. ^ Partridge, Eric (2006). The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English: A-I. Taylor & Francis. p. 844. ISBN 978-0-415-25937-8. 
  4. ^ Spencer, Andrew; Zwicky, Arnold M. (2001). The handbook of morphology. Wiley-Blackwell. p. 361. ISBN 978-0-631-22694-9. 
  5. ^ "Watergate scandal changed the political landscape forever". USA Today. June 16, 2012. Retrieved September 22, 2012. 
  6. ^ Stanyer, James (2007). Modern political communication: mediated politics in uncertain times. Polity. p. 59. ISBN 978-0-7456-2797-7. 
  7. ^ Thompson, John (2000). Political scandal: power and visibility in the media age. Wiley-Blackwell. p. 265. ISBN 978-0-7456-2550-8. 
  8. ^ Schudson, Michael (1993). Watergate in American memory: how we remember, forget, and reconstruct the past. Basic Books. p. 151. ISBN 978-0-465-09083-9. 
  9. ^ Cohen, Noam (February 5, 1996). "The Smoking Lexicon". New York Magazine. p. 13. 
  10. ^ Alterman, Eric (1999). Sound and fury: the making of the punditocracy. Cornell University Press. p. 79. ISBN 978-0-8014-8639-5. 
  11. ^ Collins, Scott (March 18, 2006). "Clamor outside 'South Park' closet". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 8, 2009. 
  12. ^ August 2000 at the Wayback Machine (archived March 7, 2006) Quote Unquote, Martyn Peter Wilkinson
  13. ^ Wayne Glowka, 2004 Words of the Year Nominations, American Dialect Society
  14. ^ Jackson 'Nipplegate' illustrates the danger of chilling free speech, Julie Hilden, Findlaw columnist, CNN.com, February 20, 2004
  15. ^ Lord, Miriam (March 26, 2009). "No losing sight of the big picture as Portraitgate rumbles on". The Irish Times. p. 10. Retrieved April 3, 2009. 
  16. ^ Hand, Lise (April 1, 2009). "Portraitgate: just who called who is finally laid bare". Irish Independent. p. 18. Retrieved April 3, 2009. 
  17. ^ Coyle, Colin (March 29, 2009). "RTÉ's 'Portrait-gate' apology reopens self-censorship debate". The Times (UK). Retrieved April 1, 2009. 
  18. ^ Patrick Foster (October 28, 2008). "BBC apologises for lewd phone calls by Russell Brand and Jonathan Ross". The Times (London). 
  19. ^ UK Daily Telegraph coverage on GamerGate
  20. ^ Norfolk Constabulary (July 18, 2012). "Police closes UEA investigation". Retrieved July 18, 2012. 
  21. ^ The eight major investigations covered by secondary sources include: House of Commons Science and Technology Committee (UK); Independent Climate Change Review (UK); International Science Assessment Panel (UK); Pennsylvania State University first panel and second panel (US); United States Environmental Protection Agency (US); Department of Commerce (US); National Science Foundation (US)
  22. ^ Jonsson, Patrik (July 7, 2010). "Climate scientists exonerated in 'climategate' but public trust damaged". Christian Science Monitor. p. 2. 
  23. ^ "Rathergate ...". The Washington Times. September 17, 2004. Retrieved April 7, 2014. 
  24. ^ Reutersgate strikes other news outlets, August 11, 2006, The Jerusalem Post[dead link]
  25. ^ "Q&A: Duncan Smith complaints". BBC News. March 29, 2004. Retrieved May 8, 2010. 
  26. ^ "Bigotgate in 60 seconds". Channel 4 News. April 2, 2010. 
  27. ^ "Billygate – 1980". The Washington Post. July 21, 1998. 
  28. ^ "Harcourt cleared of any Bingogate wrongdoing". CBC News. September 1, 1999. Retrieved June 27, 2008. [dead link]
  29. ^ "National Democrats out with new 'Bridgegate' video slapping Chris Christie in advance of hearing". NJ.com. Retrieved January 8, 2014. 
  30. ^ Miriam Lord (February 20, 2010). "Miriam Lord's Week". The Irish Times. Retrieved February 20, 2010. "As the Brothelgate crisis deepened, members of the parliamentary party scrambled to see if Willie O'Dea's promised vindication would be contained in the pages of the paper's country edition." 
  31. ^ Dylan Welch (November 29, 2010). "US red faced as 'cablegate' sparks global diplomatic crisis, courtesy of WikiLeaks". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  32. ^ "Timeline: Charles and Camilla's romance". BBC (UK). April 6, 2005. 
  33. ^ "Gov. Taft sued over 'Coingate' scandal". WKYC. July 6, 2005. 
  34. ^ ""Corngate" could leave nasty taste". TVNZ. July 12, 2002. Retrieved June 27, 2008. 
  35. ^ Miklós Kontra (Summer 1992). "Hungarians Turned Gateniks in 1990". American Speech (The American Dialect Society) 67 (2): 216–222. doi:10.2307/455461. 
  36. ^ "History of Security Activities in Hungary". Hungarian Secret Service. Archived from the original on March 22, 2011. Retrieved April 30, 2010. 
  37. ^ Fenton, Ben (February 17, 2007). "Guernsey gripped by fall-out from Fallagate". The Daily Telegraph (UK). Retrieved June 17, 2008. 
  38. ^ Bob Egelko (February 14, 2008). "New chapter opens in Fajitagate case". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  39. ^ "'Filegate' Depositions Sought From White House Aides". CNN. April 1, 1998. Retrieved June 5, 2007. 
  40. ^ Wright, Oliver (December 19, 2012). "Plebgate: Police vow to 'get to truth' of allegations that a police officer falsely claimed to have witnessed Andrew Mitchell row". The Independent (London). Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  41. ^ Collins, Lauren. "Thrasher and the Plebs". The New Yorker. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  42. ^ TRUTE, PETER (16 April 2014). "Barry O'Farrell resigns: Grange-gate costs Premier his job". Illawarra Mercury. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  43. ^ Lin, Anne (21 April 2014). "What can Barry O’Farrell’s non-verbal cues tell us about Grange gate?". SBS. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  44. ^ Corruption as a threat to the Rule of Law. Report by the PACE Committee on Legal Affairs and Human Rights. AS/Jur (2013) 19.
  45. ^ Finnish PM under fire over leaked documents, ft.com, June 18, 2003, "Ms Jäätteenmäki, who has only held the position for two months, has been plagued by the scandal, known in Finland as Iraqgate."
  46. ^ "1989: Irangate colonel avoids prison". St Louis Post-Dispatch. July 5, 1989. 
  47. ^ "Profile: President Nazarbayev". Al Jazeera. December 3, 2005. Retrieved December 29, 2013. "Nazarbayev spoke publicly about the case – dubbed Kazakhgate – only once, and dismissed allegations of his involvement as "insinuations and a provocation" 
  48. ^ William Saletan (December 7, 1998). "Scandal Bust: Why Clinton won Monicagate". National Review. 
  49. ^ Mervyn Rees; Chris Day. Muldergate: The Story of the Info. Scandal. ISBN 978-0-86954-089-3. 
  50. ^ Secure in comfort 
  51. ^ Petty, Martin (Jul 14, 2011). "Analysis: Thai PM-elect survives "noodlegate" but threats loom". Reuters. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  52. ^ Miranda Hurst (November 8, 2001). "How the Officegate saga unfolded". BBC News. 
  53. ^ "Language watchdog admits being overzealous on word 'pasta' on menu". Montreal: CTV News. February 20, 2013. 
  54. ^ "Pastygate: Westminster row over whether Tories eat bakery products rumbles on". Daily Record (Glasgow: Trinity Mirror). March 29, 2012. ISSN 0956-8069. OCLC 500344244. Retrieved March 30, 2012. 
  55. ^ Shipman, Tim (March 28, 2012). "Pasty tax: Even David Cameron is caught up in 'Pastygate' scandal". dailymail.co.uk (London). Retrieved March 30, 2012. 
  56. ^ Dotty Lynch (July 14, 2005). "Plamegate Turns D.C. Upside Down". CBS News. 
  57. ^ Bill Tieleman (December 29, 2008). "Railgate, A to Z". The Tyee. Retrieved September 26, 2013. 
  58. ^ Simon Freeman; Barrie Penrose. Rinkagate: Rise and Fall of Jeremy Thorpe. ISBN 978-0-7475-3339-9. 
  59. ^ "MPs agree to report illegal phone tactics". CBC News. February 28, 2012. 
  60. ^ CTV News (February 29, 2008). "Paper ordered to surrender 'Shawinigate' documents". 
  61. ^ "Diana's Squidgygate tapes 'leaked by GCHQ'". Daily Telegraph (London). January 10, 2008. 
  62. ^ "DUP chase 'Stormontgate' answers". BBC News. December 10, 2005. 
  63. ^ El 'toallagate' como modelo de lucha anticorrupción, RIDHUALC, 25 Juny 2001
  64. ^ Continúan en Los Pinos implicados en 'toallagate', esmas.com, July 10, 2001
  65. ^ Barnes, Eddie; MacLeod, Murdo (June 19, 2005). "Taxigate: McLetchie bill hits £10K". The Scotsman (Edinburgh). Retrieved July 21, 2011. 
  66. ^ "Untangling Whitewater". The Washington Post. September 20, 2000. "The firing of seven members of the White House travel office in 1993, possibly to make room for Clinton friends – Followed by an FBI investigation of the office, allegedly opened under pressure from the White House to justify the firings. Sometimes called "Travelgate"." 
  67. ^ Why did the L.A. Times go with troopergate (The Los Angeles Times' coverage of Arkansas state troopers' allegations about President Bill Clinton), Jeffrey L. Katz, March 1994, American Journalism Review
  68. ^ Hakim, Danny (July 23, 2007). "Spitzer's Staff Misused Police, Report Finds". The New York Times. Retrieved March 29, 2008. 
  69. ^ Loy, Wesley (September 5, 2008). "Palin won't face 'Troopergate' subpoena". Anchorage Daily News. Retrieved September 5, 2008. 
  70. ^ Phillips, Kate (October 21, 2008). "P.S.Palin Apologizes". New York Times. Retrieved October 23, 2008. 
  71. ^ "The tainted Star-Kist tuna scandal". CBC. "What became known as "Tunagate" erupts after this Fifth Estate report airs on 17 September 1985. The CBC's Eric Malling reveals that Progressive Conservative Fisheries Minister John Fraser had knowingly approved a million cans of rancid Star-Kist tuna for sale." 
  72. ^ Steve Lewis (June 20, 2009). "PM orders probe into Ute-gate storm". Herald Sun (Melbourne). Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  73. ^ Steve Lewis (June 20, 2009). "Kevin Rudd calls for Utegate inquiry over John Grant claims". The Daily Telegraph (Sydney). Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  74. ^ "Today in History – DW.DE". Todayinhistory.de. October 11, 1987. Retrieved July 23, 2012. 
  75. ^ "#Weinergate: Married congressman's Twitter account shares lewd photo". The Daily Caller. May 29, 2011. Retrieved July 23, 2012. 
  76. ^ "9 things Weinergate tells us about Twitter". CNN. 
  77. ^ McCarty, Tom (July 23, 2013). "New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner says explicit photo is of him". London: theguardian.com. Retrieved September 12, 2013. 
  78. ^ NBCOlympics profile of Bill Demong for the 2010 Winter Olympics, including "Bibgate". – accessed March 28, 2010.
  79. ^ Alan Oliveira (September 2, 2012). "Oscar Pistorius Stunned By Alan Oliveira In 200 Final At Paralympics (VIDEO)". The Huffington Post. Retrieved July 29, 2013. 
  80. ^ "Oscar Apologises But Bladegate Continues — Disability Magazine". PosAbility Magazine. September 3, 2012. Retrieved July 29, 2013. 
  81. ^ Kevin McCallum (September 4, 2012). "Bladegate: Issue raised six weeks ago". The Mercury. Retrieved July 29, 2013. 
  82. ^ Benammar, Emily (August 18, 2009). "Dean Richards ban: how 'Bloodgate' saga unfolded". telegraph.co.uk (UK). Retrieved August 18, 2009. 
  83. ^ Coffey, Wayne (March 3, 2012). "NFL needs to start cleaning up 'BountyGate' by going after Sean Payton and Gregg Williams for role in Saints' bounty system". New York Daily News. Retrieved March 4, 2012. 
  84. ^ Florio, Mike (March 2, 2012). ""Bountygate" possibly taints Saints Super Bowl win". Profootballtalk.com (NBC Sports). Retrieved March 4, 2012. 
  85. ^ "Jonathan Vilma banned one year". ESPN. May 2, 2012. Retrieved June 28, 2012. 
  86. ^ "'Grannygate' comes to a close". BBC News. May 17, 2000. 
  87. ^ "Return of the Aussie veterans". M.bbc.co.uk. April 24, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  88. ^ "Put my neck on line: Arthur on 'homework-gate'". Times Of India. March 19, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2013. 
  89. ^ 'Indygate' lawsuit dismissed www.itv-f1.com Retrieved March 25, 2007[dead link]
  90. ^ "Open struggle to get timing right – Tennis – Sport". smh.com.au. January 20, 2008. Retrieved September 26, 2013. 
  91. ^ El 'Moggigate', Marca
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  93. ^ Moore, Jim (August 4, 2010). "Departing Sweeney sheds little light on M's woes". Seattle PI. Retrieved February 24, 2013. 
  94. ^ "Wakamatsu benched Griffey last month". ESPN.com. June 4, 2010. Retrieved February 24, 2013. 
  95. ^ "'Partgate' proves Roush needs to lighten up a bit". NASCAR.com. March 29, 2008. 
  96. ^ "Behind the Super Bowl Spin: The Depressing, Dangerous Stories of Seatgate". TIME Newsfeed. February 6, 2011. 
  97. ^ Clayton, John (June 1, 1978). "Steelers' Secret Slips Out". Pittsburgh Press. pp. C–10. Retrieved April 2, 2010. 
  98. ^ "Sirengate". http://www.aurorastadiumlaunceston.com.au. Retrieved July 5, 2008. 
  99. ^ Justice Refund: Dragons bets funded after Sirengate, Sports Bet, 15 April 2014
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  102. ^ "McLaren livid over latest 'Spygate' twist". ABC News. March 1, 2008. Retrieved June 27, 2008. 
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  105. ^ Kevin Garside (March 1, 2008). "Ron Dennis defiant over 'Spygate'". Daily Telegraph (London). Retrieved December 29, 2013. 
  106. ^ "Tiger Woods confessed to cheating with 120 women while married: Report". Vancouver Sun. April 30, 2010. Retrieved May 30, 2010. 
  107. ^ GMs support Vladimir Kramnik, Chessbase, October 3, 2006
  108. ^ Rich Cimini (December 16, 2010). "New York Jets coach Sal Alosi acted alone? Not buying it – ESPN New York". ESPN. Retrieved December 16, 2010. 
  109. ^ "Antennagate definition of Antennagate in the Free Online Encyclopedia". Encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com. Retrieved July 23, 2012. 
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  111. ^ Schofield, Jack (August 10, 2010). "Antennagate: it's time for Apple to Behave Different". ZDNet. Retrieved July 23, 2012. 
  112. ^ "Apple stops bashing rivals over antennagate". The Inquirer. Retrieved July 23, 2012. 
  113. ^ Rik Myslewski (July 30, 2010). "Boffins authenticate Apple 'Antennagate' Judas Phone 'death grip' proven fatal". The Register. Retrieved July 29, 2013. 
  114. ^ "Bend-gate: Apple iPhone 6 Plus found bending in pants pockets". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  115. ^ "Will it bend? iPhone 6 takes a turn for the worse". CNET. CBS Interactive. Retrieved 24 September 2014. 
  116. ^ Liz Klimas (March 22, 2013). "Woman Fired for Reporting Offensive Jokes Men Made at Tech Conference". TheBlaze.com. Retrieved July 29, 2013. 

External links[edit]