List of shipwrecks of North Carolina

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This is a list of shipwrecks located off the coast of North Carolina.


Ship Sunk date Notes Coordinates
USS Aeolus (ARC-3) August 1988 Sunk as an artificial reef. 34°16.685′N 76°38.659′W / 34.278083°N 76.644317°W / 34.278083; -76.644317 (USS Aeolus (ARC-3))
SS Allan Jackson 18 January 1942 American tanker; torpedoed off Hatteras by U-66.[1] 35°37′N 74°20′W / 35.617°N 74.333°W / 35.617; -74.333 (SS Alan Jackson)
Altoona 22 October 1878 Ran aground at Cape Hatteras.
MV Amerikaland 3 February 1942 Swedish freighter; torpedoed off Cape Hatteras by U-106.[2] 36°36′N 74°10′W / 36.600°N 74.167°W / 36.600; -74.167 (MV Amerikaland)
CSS Appomattox 10 February 1862 A steamboat that was scuttled to prevent capture near Elizabeth City.
SS Ario 15 March 1942 Torpedoed off Cape Lookout by U-158.[3] 34°20′N 76°39′W / 34.33°N 76.65°W / 34.33; -76.65 (SS Ario)
SS Ashkhabad 29 April 1942 Russian tanker; torpedoed by U-402 off Cape Lookout.[4]
SS Arabutan 7 March 1942 Brazilian freighter; torpedoed off Hatteras by U-155.[3]
USS Aster 7 October 1864 Ran aground at Kure Beach.[5]
USS Atik 26 March 1942 Q-ship; torpedoed by U-123.[6] 34°52′N 69°58′W / 34.867°N 69.967°W / 34.867; -69.967 (USS Atik)
USS Atlanta December 1869 An ironclad warship that sank off Cape Hatteras. 35°15′16″N 75°31′12″W / 35.25458°N 75.51995°W / 35.25458; -75.51995 (USS Atlanta (1861))
Atlas 9 April 1942 American tanker; torpedoed off Cape Lookout by U-552.[7] 34°27′N 76°16′W / 34.45°N 76.27°W / 34.45; -76.27 (Atlas (ship))
MV Australia 16 March 1942 American tanker; torpedoed off Cape Hatteras by U-332.[8] 35°07′N 75°22′W / 35.12°N 75.37°W / 35.12; -75.37 (Australia (ship))
USS Bainbridge (1842) 21 August 1863 Capsized off Cape Hatteras.
USS Bazely 9 December 1864 Sank in Roanoke River near Jamseville after striking a mine while attempting to aid USS Otsego.
HMT Bedfordshire 11 May 1942 Anti-submarine trawler torpedoed by German submarine U-588 off the coast of Ocracoke Island.[9] 34°10′N 76°41′W / 34.167°N 76.683°W / 34.167; -76.683 (HMT Bedfordshire)
USCGC Bedloe September 1944 Formerly USCGC Antietam; sank off Oregon Inlet in the 1944 Great Atlantic Hurricane.[10]
CSS Bendigo January 1864 Iron-hulled sidewheel blockade runner; ran aground in Lockwood's Folly Inlet.[5]
CSS Black Warrior 20 February 1859 Burned at Elizabeth City.
MV Bluefields 15 July 1942 Nicaraguan freighter; torpedoed off Cape Hatteras by U-576.[11][12]
Bounty 29 October 2012 Replica of the original HMS Bounty. Sank during Hurricane Sandy with 16 people aboard. 33°54′N 73°50′W / 33.900°N 73.833°W / 33.900; -73.833 (HMS Bounty)
British Splendour 7 April 1942 British tanker; torpedoed by U-552 off the coast of Ocracoke Island.[13][14] 35°04′N 75°11′W / 35.07°N 75.19°W / 35.07; -75.19 (British Splendour)
SS Buarque 15 February 1942 Brazilian passenger and cargo ship; torpedoed by U-432.[15] 36°35′N 75°20′W / 36.58°N 75.33°W / 36.58; -75.33 (SS Buarque)
SS Byron D. Benson 4 May 1942 Tanker; torpedoed by U-552.[16]
Carroll A. Deering January 1921 A five-masted commercial schooner that ran aground in late January off the coast of Cape Hatteras. When the wreck was discovered and boarded, it was found to have been completely abandoned. Its crew were never heard from again. 35°15′45″N 75°29′30″W / 35.262440°N 75.491695°W / 35.262440; -75.491695 (Carroll A. Deering)
SS Caribsea 11 March 1942 Torpedoed by U-158 off Cape Lookout.[17] 34°40′N 76°10′W / 34.67°N 76.16°W / 34.67; -76.16 (Caribsea)
SS Carl Gerhard 23 September 1929 Ran aground off Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina.
SS Cassimir 26 February 1942 Sank following collision with SS Lara off Cape Lookout.
SV Catherine M. Monahan 24 August 1910 Four-masted schooner; foundered after running aground on Diamond Shoals.
SS Central America 12 September 1857 A sidewheel steamer carrying 10 tons of gold when it was caught up in a Category 2 hurricane. 31°35′N 77°02′W / 31.583°N 77.033°W / 31.583; -77.033 (SS Central America)
SS Chilore 15 July 1942 Freighter; torpedoed by U-576 and subsequently ran aground off Cape Hatteras.[18]
USS Chopper (SS-342) 21 July 1976 Sunk off Cape Hatteras, while being rigged as a tethered underwater target.
SS Ciltvaira 19 January 1942 Latvian freighter; torpedoed off Nags Head.[19] 34°58′N 75°10′W / 34.967°N 75.167°W / 34.967; -75.167 (SS Ciltvaira)
City of Atlanta 19 January 1942 American freighter; torpedoed by U-123.[1] 35°42′N 75°21′W / 35.7°N 75.35°W / 35.7; -75.35 (City of Atlanta (ship))
City of Houston 23 October 1878 Foundered off Frying Pan Shoals in a storm.
USS Columbia 14 January 1863 Ran aground off Masonboro Inlet.
USS Comte de Grasse (DD-974) 7 June 2006 Sunk as a target, along with her sister ship, Stump.
CSS Curlew 7 February 1862 Sunk in battle off Roanoke Island. 35°53′08″N 75°45′41″W / 35.88565°N 75.76131°W / 35.88565; -75.76131 (CSS Curlew)
USS Cythera 2 May 1942 A patrol boat that was torpedoed by U-402.[20] 33°30′N 75°40′W / 33.500°N 75.667°W / 33.500; -75.667 (USS Cythera (PY-26))
USS Dionysus 1978 Sunk off Pea Island as an artificial reef.
SS Dixie Arrow 26 March 1942 American tanker; torpedoed off Cape Hatteras by U-71.[21] 34°59′N 75°33′W / 34.98°N 75.55°W / 34.98; -75.55 (Dixie Arrow)
CSS Ellis 24 November 1862 A gunboat that ran aground in New River and was destroyed to prevent capture. 34°43′04″N 77°25′31″W / 34.7179°N 77.4254°W / 34.7179; -77.4254 (CSS Ellis)
SS E.M. Clark 18 March 1942 American tanker; torpedoed off Diamond Shoals by U-124.[22] 34°50′N 75°35′W / 34.84°N 75.58°W / 34.84; -75.58 (E. M. Clark (ship))
Empire Gem 24 January 1942 British tanker; torpedoed off Diamond Shoals by U-66.[23] 35°06′N 74°58′W / 35.100°N 74.967°W / 35.100; -74.967 (Empire Gem)
Empire Thrush 14 April 1942 Torpedoed by U-203.
SS Equipoise 27 March 1942 Panamanian freighter; torpedoed by U-160.[24] 36°36′N 74°45′W / 36.6°N 74.75°W / 36.6; -74.75 (SS Equipoise)
Esso Nashville 21 March 1942 American tanker; torpedoed by U-124; stern section was salvaged.[25] 33°35′N 77°22′W / 33.58°N 77.37°W / 33.58; -77.37 (Esso Nashville)
Explorer (tugboat) 12 December 1919 Sunk off Nags Head.
CSS Fanny 10 February 1862 A steamboat and balloon carrier that ran aground near Elizabeth City.
CSS Forrest 10 February 1862 A gunboat that was burned to prevent capture at Elizabeth City.
SS F.W. Abrams 15 June 1942 American tanker; struck a naval mine at Diamond Shoals.[26]
Fenwick Island 7 December 1968 Foundered in a storm.
Francis E. Waters 23 October 1889 Blown ashore by a storm, and now on display at Nags Head town hall.[27] 35°56.067′N 075°36.721′W / 35.934450°N 75.612017°W / 35.934450; -75.612017 (Francis E. Waters (ship))
G.A. Kohler Victim of a tropical cyclone.
General E. L. F. Hardcastle 17 August 1899 Merchant sailing vessel; sank during the 1899 San Ciriaco hurricane in Pamlico Sound.
George E. Klinck 7 March 1941 American lumber schooner; foundered in a storm near Diamond Shoals Lightship.
SS George Weems 20 May 1909 Burned and sank off Frying Pan Shoals.
SS Glanayron 22 May 1896 British cargo ship; ran aground on outer Diamond Shoals.
Governor Ames 13 December 1909 A schooner that was wrecked in a gale off Cape Hatteras. 35°43′37″N 75°20′24″W / 35.727°N 75.340°W / 35.727; -75.340 (Governor Ames)
Gray Ghost Sunk and later recovered near Belhaven.
SV Helen H. Benedict 1914 Wooden schooner; ran aground 2 miles south of Nag's Head.
SV Hereford April 1907 Norwegian barque; wrecked off Hatteras Island.
SS Hesperides 9 October 1897 British cargo ship; stranded on Diamond Shoals.
SS Home 7 October 1837 A steam packet ship sunk off Ocracoke Inlet in the 1837 Racer's Storm hurricane. 35°14′42″N 75°30′53″W / 35.2451°N 75.5146°W / 35.2451; -75.5146 (SS Home)
USS Home 12 October 1870 A steamship that sank off Cape Hatteras.
USS Huron 24 November 1877 Ran aground off Nags Head.
Paddle steamer Idaho 18 February 1895 Foundered in a storm while under tow
USS Indra (ARL-37) 4 August 1992 Sunk as artificial reef.
USS Iron Age 11 January 1864 Ran aground at Lockwood's Folly Inlet while attempting to refloat CSS Bendigo.[5]
SS Isle of Iona 14 December 1914 British cargo ship; wrecked near Hatteras Inlet.
USCGC Jackson September 1944 Sank off Oregon Inlet in the 1944 Great Atlantic Hurricane.
John D. Gill 12 March 1942 Torpedoed by U-158.[3]
John Hunter 10 October 1910 Disappeared off of Cape Hatteras.
SS Kassandra Louloudis 17 March 1942 Greek cargo ship; torpedoed off Diamond Shoals by U-124.[28]
USS Keshena 19 July 1942 Navy tug; struck a naval mine off Cape Hatteras while attempting to rescue SS Chilore.[18]
MV Koll 6 April 1942 Norwegian tanker; torpedoed by U-571.[29]
Kyzickes Ran aground near Kill Devil Hills.
SS Lancing 7 April 1942 Norwegian tanker; torpedoed by U-552 off Cape Hatteras.[30]
Laura A. Barnes Ran ashore on Coquina Beach.
SS Liberator 19 March 1942 Freighter; torpedoed off Diamond Shoals by U-552.[31] 35°05′N 75°30′W / 35.08°N 75.50°W / 35.08; -75.50 (SS Liberator)
SS Ljubica Matkovic 24 June 1942 Yugoslavian freighter; torpedoed by U-404.[32]
Lois Joyce Sank in surf in Oregon Inlet.
USS Louisiana 24 December 1864 Set afire and exploded at Fort Fisher.[5]
USS Mahackemo (YTB-223) 11 September 1948 Sank off Cape Hatteras while under tow.
SS Malchace 9 April 1942 American freighter; torpedoed by U-160.[33] 34°28′N 75°56′W / 34.47°N 75.93°W / 34.47; -75.93 (Malchace (ship))
SS Manuela 25 June 1942 American freighter; torpedoed off Cape Lookout by U-404.[34]
USS Margaret 14 April 1942 A cargo ship that was sunk by U-571 off Cape Hatteras. 35°12′N 75°14′W / 35.2°N 75.23°W / 35.2; -75.23 (USS Margaret)
SS Marlin 18 October 1965 Liberian cargo ship; foundered after her cargo shifted.
SS Marore 27 February 1942 Torpedoed off Kinnakeet station by U-432. 35°33′N 74°58′W / 35.55°N 74.97°W / 35.55; -74.97 (SS Marore)
SS Merak 6 August 1918 American tanker; ran aground on Diamond Shoals while avoiding torpedoes from U-140.
Metropolis 1878 Sunk off Corolla.
SS Mirlo 16 August 1918 Torpedoed by U-117 off Wimble Shoal Buoy.
SS Modern Greece 1862 Sunk at Kure Beach.
USS Monitor 31 December 1862 Lost off Cape Hatteras while under tow by Rhode Island.[5] 35°0′6″N 75°24′23″W / 35.00167°N 75.40639°W / 35.00167; -75.40639 (USS Monitor)
SS Naeco 23 March 1942 Tanker; torpedoed off Cape Lookout by U-124.[35]
CSS Neuse March 1865 Burned to avoid capture in Neuse River; currently installed beside the river at the Governor Caswell Memorial. 35°16′1.33″N 77°37′17.8″W / 35.2670361°N 77.621611°W / 35.2670361; -77.621611 (CSS Neuse)
USS New Jersey (BB-16) 5 September 1923 Bombed as a target off Cape Hatteras.
SS Nordal 25 June 1942 Panamanian cargo ship; torpedoed by U-404.[32]
SS Normannia 17 January 1924 Foundered in a storm at Frying Pan Shoals.
SS Northeastern 30 December 1904 American tanker; ran aground on Diamond Shoals.
SS Norvana 19 January 1942 American freighter; torpedoed off Cape Hatteras by U-123.[36]
CSS North Carolina 27 September 1864 A gunboat that sank off Southport. 33°54′49″N 78°1′8″W / 33.91361°N 78.01889°W / 33.91361; -78.01889 (CSS North Carolina)
SS Olympic 22 January 1942 Panamanian tanker; torpedoed off Hatteras by U-130.[37] 36°01′N 75°30′W / 36.017°N 75.500°W / 36.017; -75.500 (SS Olympic)
SS Oriental 16 May 1862 Sank near Oregon Inlet.
USS Otsego 9 December 1864 Sank in the Roanoke River after striking two mines near Jamesville.
SS Papoose 19 March 1942 Tanker; torpedoed and sank off Oregon Inlet.[38][39][40] 34°17′N 76°39′W / 34.283°N 76.650°W / 34.283; -76.650 (Papoose (tanker))
USS Peterhoff 6 March 1864 Mistaken for a blockade runner and rammed by USS Monticello off Kure Beach.[5]
Pevensey Blockade runner, sank off Atlantic Beach.
SS Phantom 1863 Steel-hulled blockade runner; sunk at Topsail Inlet.
USS Pilgrim A patrol vessel that was scuttled off Harkers Island as a breakwater. 34°42′44″N 76°35′20″W / 34.71226°N 76.58878°W / 34.71226; -76.58878 (USS Pilgrim (SP-1204))
Porta Allegra Dredge; sank for unknown reasons.
Portland Ran aground at Cape Lookout.
SS Proteus 19 August 1918 Sank following collision with tanker SS Cushing in heavy fog, southwest of Diamond Shoals. 34°45.918′N 75°47.010′W / 34.765300°N 75.783500°W / 34.765300; -75.783500 (Proteus)
Queen Anne's Revenge 1718 A frigate that was captured by pirates and became Blackbeard's flagship, eventually running aground at Beaufort Inlet. It was discovered in 1996, near Atlantic Beach.
CSS Raleigh 7 May 1864 Ran aground at Cape Fear.[5]
SS San Delfino 9 April 1942 British tanker; torpedoed by U-203.[41]
SS Santiago 12 March 1924 American cargo and passenger ship; foundered off Cape Hatteras in a storm.
USS Schurz 21 June 1918 Sank in a collision with SS Florida.
CSS Sea Bird 10 February 1862 Rammed and sunk by USS Commodore Perry (1859) off Elizabeth City. 36°17′07″N 76°10′30″W / 36.285242°N 76.175079°W / 36.285242; -76.175079 (CSS Sea Bird)
HMT Senateur Duhamel 5 June 1942 Rammed by USS Semmes which mistook it for a U-boat.[42]
USS South Wind 11 October 1861 A schooner that was scuttled in the Ocracoke Inlet.
MV Southern Isles 5 October 1951 American bulk carrier; broke apart and sank.
USS Southfield 19 April 1864 Sank following collision with CSS Albemarle on Roanoke River, near its mouth at Albemarle Sound.
USCGC Spar (WLB-403) October 2004 Scuttled in 108 feet (33 m) of water, 30 miles (48 km) off Morehead City, as an artificial reef.
HMCS St. Laurent 12 January 1980 A Canadian destroyer; sank off Cape Hatteras while under tow to breakers.
SS Strathairly 24 March 1891 Ran aground near Chicomacomico.
SS Stormy Petrel 1864 Iron-hulled sidewheel blockade runner; sunk at Kure Beach.[5]
Suloide 26 March 1943 Brazilian cargo ship; sank after striking the submerged wreck of the W. E. Hutton.
SS Tamaulipas 10 April 1942 American tanker; torpedoed off Cape Lookout by U-552.[41] 34°25′N 76°00′W / 34.42°N 76.0°W / 34.42; -76.0 (Tamaulipas)
USS Tarpon (SS-175) 8 June 1957 Foundered off Cape Hatteras. 34°45.195′N 75°46.025′W / 34.753250°N 75.767083°W / 34.753250; -75.767083 (USS Tarpon (SS-175))
SS Theodore Parker 4 June 1974 Sunk as an artificial reef.
SS Tiger 1 April 1942 American tanker; torpedoed by U-754.[29]
USS Tiru 19 July 1979 A Balao-class submarine sunk as a target off Cape Hatteras. 36°N 73°W / 36°N 73°W / 36; -73 (USS Tiru (SS-416))
U-352 9 May 1942 Sunk by depth charges from USCGC Icarus.[43] 34°21′N 76°35′W / 34.350°N 76.583°W / 34.350; -76.583 (German submarine U-352)
U-576 15 July 1942 Sunk off Hatteras by depth charges from aircraft and gunfire from SS Unicoi.[18] 34°31′N 75°13′W / 34.51°N 75.22°W / 34.51; -75.22 (German submarine U-576)
U-701 7 July 1942 Sunk off Cape Hatteras by depth charges from aircraft.[44] 35°14.330′N 75°06.690′W / 35.238833°N 75.111500°W / 35.238833; -75.111500 (German submarine U-701)
U-85 14 April 1942 Sunk off Bodie Island by gunfire from USS Roper.[45] 35°33′N 75°08′W / 35.55°N 75.13°W / 35.55; -75.13 (German submarine U-85)
SS Ulysses 11 April 1942 American passenger and cargo ship; torpedoed by U-160 south of Cape Hatteras.[46]
USS Underwriter 2 February 1864 Captured and burned by Confederate forces off New Bern.
SS Venore 23 January 1942 American freighter; torpedoed off Hatteras by U-66.[47] 34°50′N 75°20′W / 34.833°N 75.333°W / 34.833; -75.333 (SS Venore)
SS Veturia 20 February 1918 British freighter; ran aground on Diamond Shoals in fog.
USS Virginia (BB-13) 5 September 1923 Bombed as target off Cape Hatteras.
SS W.E. Hutton 18 March 1942 American fuel tanker; torpedoed by U-124 off Cape Lookout.[38][48] 34°05′N 76°40′W / 34.08°N 76.67°W / 34.08; -76.67 (W. E. Hutton (ship))
SS West Ivis 25 January 1942 American freighter; torpedoed off Hatteras by U-125.[47] 35°03′N 73°10′W / 35.050°N 73.167°W / 35.050; -73.167 (SS West Ivis)
EM[49] Wilcox (WYP-333) 30 September 1943 Foundered off Nags Head in a storm.[50]
SS William A. Rockefeller 28 June 1942 American tanker, torpedoed by U-701.[51] 35°14′11″N 75°2′1″W / 35.23639°N 75.03361°W / 35.23639; -75.03361 (SS William A. Rockefeller)
USS Yancey (AKA-93) 1990 Sunk as an artificial reef off Morehead City.
SS York 22 January 1942 Freighter; torpedoed by U-66.
SS Zane Gray 1974 Liberty ship sunk off Pea Island as an artificial reef.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Blair, p. 466.
  2. ^ Blair, p. 32–33.
  3. ^ a b c Blair, p. 516.
  4. ^ Hickam, p. 178.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h National Park Service. "PART IV. Shipwrecks in the National Register of Historic Places". NPS Archeology Program. National Park Service. Retrieved 5 August 2013. 
  6. ^ Blair, p. 534–535.
  7. ^ Hickam, p. 127.
  8. ^ Blair, p. 517.
  9. ^ Hickam, p. 202.
  10. ^ "US Coast Guard Patrol Craft" (PDF). United States Coast Guard. p. 19. Retrieved 5 August 2013. 
  11. ^ Hickam, p. 286.
  12. ^ Blair, p. 626.
  13. ^ "Wreck of the British Splendour". Retrieved 6 September 2012. 
  14. ^ Hickam, p. 124.
  15. ^ Hickam, p. 43–44.
  16. ^ Hickam, p. 123–124.
  17. ^ Hickam, p. 55–56.
  18. ^ a b c Blair, p. 627.
  19. ^ Hickam, p. 14–17.
  20. ^ Hickam, p. 179.
  21. ^ Hickam, p. 99–101.
  22. ^ Hickam, p. 79–81.
  23. ^ Hickam, p. 21.
  24. ^ Hickam, p. 114.
  25. ^ Hickam, 91–93.
  26. ^ Hickam, p. 253–254.
  27. ^ Schooner Frances E. Waters, Waymarking.
  28. ^ Hickam, p. 76–79.
  29. ^ a b Blair, p. 539.
  30. ^ Hickam, p. 125.
  31. ^ Hickam, p. 88.
  32. ^ a b Hickam, p. 270.
  33. ^ Hickam, p. 127–128.
  34. ^ Hickam, p. 271.
  35. ^ Hickam, p. 93–98.
  36. ^ Hickam, p. 20.
  37. ^ Blair, p. 764.
  38. ^ a b Barnette, Michael C. (2006). "Scrambled History: A Tale of Four Misidentified Tankers". Wreck Diving Magazine. Retrieved 4 June 2009. 
  39. ^ Barnette, Michael C. (2007). "The Wreck of the Papoose". Association of Underwater Explorers. Retrieved 6 June 2009. 
  40. ^ Hickam, p. 85.
  41. ^ a b Hickam, p. 128.
  42. ^ Hickam, p. 201.
  43. ^ Blair, p. 574–575.
  44. ^ Blair, p. 609.
  45. ^ Blair, p. 542.
  46. ^ Hickam, p. 162–163.
  47. ^ a b Blair, p. 469.
  48. ^ Hickam, p. 85–86.
  49. ^ "EM" was a Coast Guard prefix for "Emergency Manning" ships, not technically USCG cutters but chartered for patrols.
  50. ^ United States Coast Guard. "EM Wilcox, WYP-333 (Ex-Rowland)". United States Coast Guard. Retrieved 5 August 2013. 
  51. ^ Blair, p. 607.

Sources[edit]

  • Blair, Clay (1996). Hitler's U-Boat War. The Hunters, 1939–1942. Random House. 
  • Hickam, Homer H. Jr. (1989). Torpedo Junction. Annapolis, Maryland: United States Naval Institute. 

INational Park Service. "PART IV. Shipwrecks in the National Register of Historic Places". NPS Archeology Program. National Park Service. Retrieved 5 August 2013.