2006 in spaceflight

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2006 in spaceflight
Atlas V 551 roars into blue sky.jpg
Launch of New Horizons, the first probe to Pluto, on the first Atlas V 551
Orbital launches
First 19 January
Last 27 December
Total 66 or 67
Successes 62
Failures 4 or 5
Partial failures 0
Catalogued 63
National firsts
Satellite  Kazakhstan
Space traveller  Brazil
 Iran
 Sweden
Rockets
Maiden flights Atlas V 411
Atlas V 551
Long March 4B-II (4C)
Falcon 1
H-IIA 204
Soyuz-2.1b
Retirements Tsyklon-2
M-V
Manned flights
Orbital 5
Total travellers 26


Launches[edit]

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Launch site LSP
Payload Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks

January[edit]

19 January
19:00:00
United StatesAtlas V 551 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-41 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
United StatesNew Horizons NASA Galactocentric Pluto flyby In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Atlas V 551, will explore Pluto and the Kuiper belt, first spacecraft planned to visit Pluto
18 January
11:48[1]
TaiwanSounding Rocket V TaiwanJiu Peng TaiwanNSPO
NSPO/NCU Suborbital Ionospheric 11:57 Successful
Apogee: 282 kilometres (175 mi)
22 January
04:00
JapanS-310 JapanUchinoura JapanJAXA
JapanFuroshiki JAXA Suborbital Technology 22 January Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
24 January
01:33
JapanH-IIA 2022 JapanTanegashima LA-Y1 Japan JAXA[4]
JapanDaichi (ALOS) JAXA Sun-synchronous Remote Sensing In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
Operational
Poor quality images returned due to attitude control and noise problems[2] was resolved by software adjustment.[3]

February[edit]

6 February ChinaDong Feng 21 ChinaXichang ChinaPLA
PLA Suborbital ASAT 6 February Spacecraft failure
Apogee: 800 kilometres (500 mi), missed satellite
8 February
18:47
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands LC-36 United StatesNASA
United StatesMOSES Suborbital Solar 8 February Successful
Apogee: 282 kilometres (175 mi)
15 February
23:34:55
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
United StatesEchoStar X EchoStar Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
16 February
08:01
United StatesLGM-30G Minuteman III United StatesVandenberg LF-10 United StatesUS Air Force
United StatesSERV-3 US Air Force Suborbital Missile test 16 February Successful
Apogee: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
18 February
06:27
JapanH-IIA 2024 JapanTanegashima LA-Y1 JapanRSC[5][6]
JapanMTSAT-2 MILT/JMA Geosynchronous ATC/Weather In orbit Operational
Last launch conducted by RSC
21 February
21:28:00
JapanM-V JapanUchinoura JapanJAXA
JapanAkari (ASTRO-F) JAXA Sun-synchronous IR astronomy In orbit Operational
JapanCute-1.7+APD TiTech Low Earth Amateur radio In orbit Operational
Cute-1.7+APD is a 2U CubeSat
23 February
16:09
United StatesUGM-27 Polaris (STARS) United StatesKodiak United StatesSandia
United StatesFT-03-1 Suborbital Target 23 Februar Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
28 February
20:10:00
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
Saudi ArabiaArabsat 4A Arabsat Intended: Geosynchronous
Achieved: Medium Earth
Communications 24 March[7] Launch failure
Upper stage malfunction left payload in useless orbit, deorbited after attempts to raise orbit failed

March[edit]

8 March
08:45
United StatesRIM-161 Standard Missile 3 United StatesUSS Lake Erie, PMRF United StatesUS Navy
United StatesJapanJCTV-1 US Navy/MDA/JMSDF Suborbital Missile test 8 March Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi)
11 March
22:33
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
SpainSpainSat-1 Hisdesat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
FranceHot Bird 7A Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
22 March
14:03
United StatesPegasus-XL United StatesStargazer, Vandenberg United StatesOrbital Sciences
United StatesST-5A NASA Low Earth Technology In orbit Successful
United StatesST-5B NASA Low Earth Technology In orbit Successful
United StatesST-5C NASA Low Earth Technology In orbit Successful
All three satellites deactivated on 30 June
24 March
22:30
United StatesFalcon 1 Marshall IslandsOmelek United StatesSpaceX
United StatesFalconSat 2 USAF Academy Intended: Low Earth Plasma research T+60 seconds Launch failure
Maiden flight of Falcon 1, rocket lost power shortly after launch due to engine fire caused by corrosion of a nut on a fuel line.
25 March
03:15
United StatesTerrier-Orion AustraliaWoomera LA-2 AustraliaQueensland
AustraliaHyshot-3 Queensland Suborbital Hypersonic research 03:25 Successful
Apogee: 325 kilometres (202 mi)
30 March
02:30:20
RussiaSoyuz-FG KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaSoyuz TMA-8 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS Expedition 13 29 September
01:13
Successful
Manned orbital flight with 3 cosmonauts, first Brazilian in space
30 March
02:40
United StatesTerrier-Orion AustraliaWoomera LA-2 AustraliaQueensland
AustraliaJapanHyshot-4 Queensland/JAXA Suborbital Hypersonic research 30 March Launch failure
Apogee: 290 kilometres (180 mi), nosecone failed to separate

April[edit]

7 April
13:00
United StatesLGM-30G Minuteman III United StatesVandenberg LF-26 United StatesUS Air Force
United StatesGT-190GM US Air Force Suborbital Missile test 7 April Successful
Long-range test, aimed at Guam, apogee: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
12 April
18:10
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands LC-36 United StatesNASA
United StatesEUNIS NASA Suborbital Solar 12 April Successful
Apogee: 318 kilometres (198 mi)
12 April
23:29:59
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
JapanJCSAT-9 JCSAT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
13 April United StatesSR19-SR19 United StatesPMRF United StatesSandia
United StatesFTC-02B MDA Suborbital Target 13 April Successful
Apogee: 200 kilometres (120 mi)
15 April
01:40:00
United StatesMinotaur I United StatesVandenberg SLC-8 United StatesOrbital Sciences
United StatesTaiwanCOSMIC-FM1 (FORMOSAT-3A) NASA/NSPO Low Earth Atmospheric In orbit Operational
United StatesTaiwanCOSMIC-FM2 (FORMOSAT-3B) NASA/NSPO Low Earth Atmospheric In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
Operational
United StatesTaiwanCOSMIC-FM3 (FORMOSAT-3C) NASA/NSPO Low Earth Atmospheric In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
Operational
United StatesTaiwanCOSMIC-FM4 (FORMOSAT-3D) NASA/NSPO Low Earth Atmospheric In orbit Operational
United StatesTaiwanCOSMIC-FM5 (FORMOSAT-3E) NASA/NSPO Low Earth Atmospheric In orbit Operational
United StatesTaiwanCOSMIC-FM6 (FORMOSAT-3F) NASA/NSPO Low Earth Atmospheric In orbit Operational
Power system and solar panel malfunctions on FM2 and FM3, control issues with FM6 during 2007
20 April
20:27:00
United StatesAtlas V 411 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-41 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
LuxembourgAstra 1KR SES Astra Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Atlas V 411, final ILS Atlas launch
22 April
16:40
RussiaKosmos-3MR RussiaKapustin Yar Site 107/1 RussiaRVSN
RussiaPBS-2 RVSN Suborbital REV test 22 April Successful
Apogee: 675 kilometres (419 mi)
24 April
16:03:25
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-56 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 18 September Successful
ISS flight 21P
25 April
16:47:16
RussiaStart-1 RussiaSvobodny Site 5 RussiaUnited Start
IsraelEROS-B ImageSat Low Earth (polar) Imaging In orbit Operational
Final launch from Svobodny Cosmodrome
26 April
22:48
ChinaLong March 4B-II (4C) ChinaTaiyuan LC-1 ChinaCNSA
ChinaYaogan 1 CAST Low Earth Imaging In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Long March 4B-II, redesignated Long March 4C by November 2007
28 April
10:02:16
United StatesDelta II 7420-10C United StatesVandenberg SLC-2W United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesFranceCALIPSO NASA/CNES Sun-synchronous Climatology In orbit Operational
United StatesCloudSat NASA Sun-synchronous Climatology In orbit Operational
Both satellites part of the A-train constellation, spacecraft study aerosols and clouds respectively
28 April United StatesSR19-SR19 United StatesPMRF United StatesSandia
United StatesFTC-02 MDA Suborbital Target 28 April Successful
Apogee: 200 kilometres (120 mi)
29 April PakistanShaheen-II PakistanSonmiani PakistanArmy of Pakistan
Army of Pakistan Suborbital Target 29 April Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)

May[edit]

2 May
06:16
United StatesMaxus (Castor 4B) SwedenEsrange European UnionEuroLaunch
European UnionSwedenMAXUS 9 ESA/SSC Suborbital Microgravity 2 May Successful
Apogee: 702 kilometres (436 mi)
3 May
17:38
RussiaSoyuz-U RussiaPlesetsk Site 16/2 RussiaRVSN
RussiaKosmos 2420 (Kobal't-M) VKS Low Earth Optical imaging In orbit Operational
10 May
08:12
BrazilVSB-30 SwedenEsrange European UnionEuroLaunch
GermanySwedenTEXUS-43 DLR/SSC Suborbital Microgravity 10 May Successful
Apogee: 237 kilometres (147 mi)
11 May United StatesTHAAD United StatesWhite Sands United StatesUS Army
United StatesFTT-02 MDA Suborbital ABM test 11 May Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi), simulated intercept
22 May
09:30
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesWhite Sands United StatesNASA
United StatesACS NASA Suborbital Test 22 May Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi)
22 May IranShahab-3 IranShahrood IranIRG
IRG Suborbital Missile test 22 May Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi)
24 May
22:11:00
United StatesDelta IV-M+ (4,2) United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-37B United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesGOES 13 (GOES-N) NASA/NOAA Geostationary Weather In orbit Operational
26 May
18:50
RussiaShtil' RussiaK-84 Ekaterinburg, Barents Sea RussiaVMF
RussiaKompass 2 Roskosmos Low Earth Earthquake detection 28 December 2011 Partial spacecraft failure
Control and power problems made satellite unusable. Written off on 29 May 2006. Problems cleared by November, and satellite re-activated.[8]
27 May
21:09
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
MexicoSatmex 6 SatMex Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
ThailandThaicom 5 Shin Satellite Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Record for heaviest dual-payload to geosynchronous transfer orbit, stood until May 2007

June[edit]

5 June
16:05
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesWhite Sands United StatesNASA
NAWC Suborbital Target 5 June Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
7 June
22:00
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesPMRF United StatesNASA
NAWC Suborbital Target 7 June Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
8 June
16:00
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesWhite Sands United StatesNASA
United StatesDUNDEE NAWC Suborbital Target 8 June Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
14 June
08:22
United StatesLGM-30G Minuteman III United StatesVandenberg LF-04 United StatesUS Air Force
United StatesGT-191GM US Air Force Suborbital Missile test 14 June Successful
Carried three Mk. 21 re-entry vehicles, Apogee: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
15 June
08:00:00
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaResurs-DK-1 Roskosmos Low Earth Remote sensing In orbit Operational
17 June
22:44:05
RussiaProton-K/DM-3 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaKhrunichev
KazakhstanKazSat-1 JSC KazSat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Spacecraft failure
First Kazakh satellite, satellite suffered control problems and was unusable by October 2008
18 June
07:50
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
United StatesGalaxy 16 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Launched for PanAmSat, transferred to Intelsat before entry into service due to merger
21 June
22:15
United StatesDelta II 7925 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17A United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesUSA-187 (MiTEx-A) US Air Force/DARPA Geostationary Technology In orbit Operational
United StatesUSA-188 (MiTEx-B) US Air Force/DARPA Geostationary Technology In orbit Operational
United StatesUSA-189 (MiTEx Carrier) NRL/DARPA Geostationary Technology In orbit Operational
22 June
22:00
United StatesMRT (Castor 4B) United StatesPMRT United StatesUS Navy
United StatesFTM-10 Target US Navy/MDA Suborbital Target 22 June Successful
Intercepted by SM-3, apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi)
22 June
22:04
United StatesRIM-161 Standard Missile 3 United StatesUSS Shiloh, PMRF United StatesUS Navy
United StatesFTM-10 US Navy/MDA Suborbital ABM test 22 June Successful
Intercepted MRT, apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi)
23 June
23:02
United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesPMRF United StatesNASA
United StatesTRACKEX NAWC/MDA Suborbital Target 23 June Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
24 June
15:08:18
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-57 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 17 January 2007 Successful
ISS flight 22P
25 June
04:00
RussiaTsyklon-2 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 90/20 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2421 (US-PU) VMF Low Earth ELINT 20 March 2008 Partial spacecraft failure
Final flight of Tsyklon-2 rocket. One of satellite's solar panels failed to deploy,[9] ceased operations in February or March 2008 and destroyed in orbit on 20 March. Spacecraft carried KONUS-A gamma-ray astronomy experiment for Roskosmos
28 June
03:30:00
United StatesDelta IV-M+ (4,2) United StatesVandenberg SLC-6 United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesUSA-184 (Improved Trumpet) NRO Molniya ELINT In orbit Operational
First EELV launch from Vandenberg, carried SBIRS-HEO-1 and TWINS-A instruments for the US Air Force and NASA respectively, NRO Launch 22
30 June
06:25
RussiaR-29RMU Sineva RussiaK-84 Ekaterinburg, Barents Sea RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 30 June Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)

July[edit]

1 July
06:39
United StatesTerrier-Orion NorwayAndøya United StatesAndøya/NASA
United States/NorwaySPIRIT-III ESPRIT Suborbital Ionospheric
Plasma research
1 July Successful
Apogee: 200 kilometres (120 mi)
1 July
06:39
United StatesTerrier-Orion NorwayAndøya NorwayAndøya
NorwayHotPay-1 Andøya Suborbital Aeronomy 1 July Launch failure
Apogee: 40 kilometres (25 mi)
4 July
18:32
North KoreaHwasong-6 North KoreaKittaeryong North KoreaKPA
KPA Suborbital Missile test 4 July Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi), first of seven North Korean launches in fourteen hours
4 July
18:37:55
United StatesSpace Shuttle Discovery United StatesKennedy LC-39B United StatesUnited Space Alliance
United StatesSTS-121 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 17 July
13:14
Successful
ItalyUnited StatesLeonardo MPLM ASI/NASA Low Earth (ISS) Logistics Successful
Manned flight with 7 astronauts, second Return to Flight mission after Columbia accident
4 July
19:04
North KoreaRodong-1 North KoreaKittaeryong North KoreaKPA
KPA Suborbital Missile test 4 July Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi), second of seven North Korean launches in fourteen hours
4 July
20:01
North KoreaTaepodong-2 North KoreaMusudan-ri North KoreaKPA
North KoreaKwangmyŏngsŏng-2 KPA Intended: Low Earth
(unconfirmed)
Weather/Communication +42 seconds Launch failure
Maiden flight of Taepodong-2, rocket failed shortly after launch, reaching an apogee of 4 kilometres (2.5 mi), intended as an orbital launch attempt,[10] but later North Korea claimed for a suborbital missile self-destruct test and destruction success (not launch failure),[11] third of seven North Korean launches in fourteen hours
4 July
22:31
North KoreaRodong-1 North KoreaKittaeryong North KoreaKPA
KPA Suborbital Missile test 4 July Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi), fourth of seven North Korean launches in fourteen hours
4 July
22:12
North KoreaHwasong-6 North KoreaKittaeryong North KoreaKPA
KPA Suborbital Missile test 4 July Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi), fifth of seven North Korean launches in fourteen hours
4 July
23:20
North KoreaRodong-1 North KoreaKittaeryong North KoreaKPA
KPA Suborbital Missile test 4 July Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi), sixth of seven North Korean launches in fourteen hours
5 July
08:20
North KoreaRodong-1 North KoreaKittaeryong North KoreaKPA
KPA Suborbital Missile test 5 July Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi), last of seven North Korean launches in fourteen hours
9 July
05:33
IndiaAgni III IndiaIntegrated Test Range LC-4 IndiaDRDO
DRDO Suborbital Missile test 9 July Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)
10 July
12:08
IndiaGSLV IndiaSatish Dhawan IndiaISRO
IndiaINSAT 4C ISRO Intended: Geostationary Communications T+60 seconds Launch failure
Loss of control due to LRB engine failure, self-destructed 60 seconds into flight
12 July
11:17
United StatesHera United StatesWhite Sands United StatesUS Army
United StatesFFT-4 Target US Army/MDA Suborbital Target 12 July Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi), Intercepted after reentry by endoatmospheric THAAD launched at 11:20
12 July
14:53:36
UkraineDnepr-1 RussiaDombarovskiy RussiaISC Kosmotras
United StatesGenesis I Bigelow Low Earth Technology In orbit Operational
First unmanned prototype of a commercial space station module
21 July
10:14
United StatesLGM-30G Minuteman III United StatesVandenberg LF-09 United StatesUS Air Force
United StatesGT-192GM US Air Force Suborbital Missile test 21 July Successful
Carried three Mk.21 reentry vehicles, apogee: 1,300 kilometres (810 mi)
21 July
04:20:03
RussiaMolniya-M RussiaPlesetsk Site 16/2 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2422 (Oko) VKS Molniya Missile defence In orbit Operational
26 July
19:43:05
UkraineDnepr-1 KazakhstanBaikonur Site 109/95 RussiaISC Kosmotras
BelarusBelKA NAS Intended: Low Earth Observation T+74 seconds Launch failure
ItalyUnisat-4 Sapienza Intended: Low Earth Technology
RussiaBaumanets Roskosmos Intended: Low Earth Technology
ItalyPicPot POLITIO Intended: Low Earth Technology
United StatesFranceSACRED Arizona
Montpelier
Alcatel
Intended: Low Earth Radiation
United StatesION Illinois Intended: Low Earth Technology
Ionospheric
United StatesRincon 1 Arizona Intended: Low Earth Technology
United StatesICECube-1 Cornell Intended: Low Earth Technology
United StatesKUTESat Pathfinder Kansas Intended: Low Earth Technology
JapanSEEDS Nichidai Intended: Low Earth Amateur radio
NorwaynCube-1 NSSP Intended: Low Earth Technology
South KoreaHAUSAT-1 HAU Intended: Low Earth Technology
United StatesMEROPE Montana Intended: Low Earth Technology
United StatesCP2 CalPoly Intended: Low Earth Technology
United StatesAeroCube-1 Aerospace Intended: Low Earth Technology
United StatesCP1 CalPoly Intended: Low Earth Technology
United StatesMea Huaka'i (Voyager) Hawaii Intended: Low Earth Technology
United StatesICECube-2 Cornell Intended: Low Earth Technology
First-stage engine hydraulic pump failure, thrust termination system activated
28 July
07:05:43
RussiaRokot/Briz-KM RussiaPlesetsk Site 133/3 European UnionRussiaEurockot
South KoreaArirang-2 (KOMPSAT-2) KARI Low Earth Earth Observation In orbit Operational

August[edit]

3 August
10:38
RussiaRT-2PM Topol (RS-12M) RussiaPlesetsk RussiaUnited StatesRVSN
RVSN Suborbital Missile test 11:04 Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi), impacted Kura Test Range
4 August
21:48:00
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
European UnionHot Bird 8 Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
11 August
22:15
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
JapanJCSat 10 JSAT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
FranceSyracuse 3B DGA Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
21 August
14:30
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands LC-36 United StatesNASA
MDA Suborbital Target 21 August Successful
Apogee: 380 kilometres (240 mi)
22 August
03:27:01
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
South KoreaKoreasat 5 KT/ADD Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
25 August
14:30
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands LC-36 United StatesNASA
MDA Suborbital Target 21 August Successful
Apogee: 382 kilometres (237 mi), THAAD target

September[edit]

1 September
17:22
United StatesUGM-27 Polaris (STARS) United StatesKodiak United StatesSandia
United StatesGMD FTG-02 target MDA Suborbital Target 1 September Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi), intercepted by GBI
1 September
17:39
United StatesOrbital Boost Vehicle United StatesVandenberg LF-23 United StatesOrbital Sciences/MDA
United StatesGMD FTG-02 MDA Suborbital ABM test 1 September Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi), intercepted STARS
4 September ChinaDong Feng 31 ChinaTaiyuan ChinaPLA
PLA Suborbital Missile test 4 September Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
7 September
15:50
RussiaRSM-56 Bulava (R-30) RussiaRFS Dmitriy Donskoy, White Sea RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 7 September Launch failure
Apogee: 1 kilometre (0.62 mi), first stage malfunction
9 September
07:00
ChinaLong March 2C ChinaJiuquan LA-4/SLS-2 ChinaCNSA
ChinaShi Jian 8 CASC Low Earth Biological 24 September
02:43
Successful
Investigated exposure of seeds to microgravity and radiation, spacecraft recovered after reentry
9 September
11:20
RussiaR-29RMU Sineva RussiaK-84 Ekaterinburg, North Pole RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 9 September Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
9 September
15:14:55
United StatesSpace Shuttle Atlantis United StatesKennedy LC-39B United StatesUnited Space Alliance
United StatesSTS-115 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 21 September
10:21
Successful
United NationsITS P3/4 Truss NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
Manned orbital flight with 6 astronauts, first ISS assembly mission since 2002
9 September
22:17:00
United StatesNike-Orion NorwayAndøya NorwayAndøya
NorwayGermanyECOMA-1 Andøya/DLR Suborbital Atmospheric 9 September Successful
Apogee: 130 kilometres (81 mi)
10 September
14:50
RussiaR-29R Volna RussiaK-433 Svyaity Georgiy, Simushir RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 10 September Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
11 September
04:35
JapanH-IIA 202 JapanTanegashima LA-Y1 JapanJAXA
JapanIGS-3A CSICE Low Earth Optical imaging In orbit Operational
12 September
16:02
ChinaLong March 3A ChinaTaiyuan LC-1 ChinaCNSC
ChinaChinaSat 22A ChinaSat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
13 September
10:30
United StatesHera United StatesWhite Sands United StatesUS Army
United StatesFFT-5 Target US Army/MDA Suborbital Target 13 September Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi), THAAD target
14 September
13:41:00
RussiaSoyuz-U KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2423 (Don) VKS Low Earth Optical imaging 17 November Successful
Ceased operations on 14 November, self-destructed 3 days later
17 September
21:06:46
United StatesNike-Orion NorwayAndøya NorwayAndøya
NorwayGermanyECOMA-2 Andøya/DLR Suborbital Atmospheric 17 September Successful
Apogee: 129 kilometres (80 mi)
18 September
04:08:42
RussiaSoyuz-FG KazakhstanBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaSoyuz TMA-9 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS Expedition 14 21 April 2007
12:31
Successful
Manned orbital flight with 3 cosmonauts including the first female space tourist and Iranian-born space traveller
22 September
21:36:00
JapanM-V JapanUchinoura JapanJAXA
JapanHinode (SOLAR-B) JAXA Sun-synchronous Solar In orbit Operational
JapanHIT-SAT HIT Low Earth Technology 18 June 2008
08:48
Successful
JapanSSSAT JAXA Solar sail 26 September Spacecraft failure
Final flight of M-V rocket and Mu family, SSSat failed to establish communications with ground[12]
23 September
15:17:54
CanadaBlack Brant XI United StatesWallops Island United StatesNASA
NASA Suborbital Test 23 September Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)
25 September
18:50
United StatesDelta II 7925 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17A United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesUSA-190 (GPS IIR-15/M2) US Air Force Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
25 September
20:14
United StatesSpaceLoft XL United StatesSpaceport America United StatesUP Aerospace
Various Suborbital Various T+60 seconds Launch failure
Maiden flight of SpaceLoft XL sounding rocket, first flight from Spaceport America, rocket went out of control and failed to reach space, apogee: 12 kilometres (7.5 mi)

October[edit]

13 October
20:56
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
United StatesDirecTV-9S DirecTV Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
AustraliaOptus D1 Optus Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
JapanLDREX-2 JAXA Geosynchronous transfer Technology 30 September 2010
02:23[13]
Successful
19 October
16:28:13
RussiaSoyuz-2.1a/Fregat KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 European UnionRussiaStarsem
European UnionMetOp-A EUMETSAT Sun-synchronous Weather In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Soyuz-2.1a/Fregat
23 October
13:40:36
RussiaSoyuz-U RussiaBaikonur Site 1/5 RussiaRoskosmos
RussiaProgress M-58 Roskosmos Low Earth (ISS) Logistics 27 March 2007
22:44
Successful
ISS flight 23P, antenna stowage issues on 26 October initially prevented full mechanical docking, second attempt was successful.
23 October
23:34
ChinaLong March 4B ChinaTaiyuan LC-1 ChinaCNSA
ChinaShi Jian 6-2A CASC Low Earth Environmental In orbit Operational
ChinaShi Jian 6-2B CASC Low Earth Environmental In orbit Operational
25 October
13:05
RussiaRSM-56 Bulava (R-30) RussiaRFS Dmitriy Donskoy, Beloye More RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 25 October Launch failure
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi), first stage malfunction
26 October
00:52:00
United StatesDelta II 7925 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17B United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesSTEREO-A NASA Heliocentric Solar In orbit Operational
United StatesSTEREO-B NASA Heliocentric Solar In orbit Operational
28 October
16:20
ChinaLong March 3B ChinaXichang LA-2 ChinaCASC
ChinaSinosat-2 Sinosat Intended: Geosynchronous
Achieved: Subsynchronous
Communications In orbit Spacecraft failure
Solar panels and communications antenna failed to deploy
28 October
17:58:00
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands LC-36 United StatesNASA
United StatesLASP Suborbital Solar 28 October Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)
30 October
23:48:59
UkraineZenit-3SL NorwayOcean Odyssey United NationsSea Launch
United StatesXM-4 "Blues" XM Satellite Radio Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational

November[edit]

2 November IranShahab-3 IranShahrood IranIRG
IRG Suborbital Missile test 2 November Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi)
4 November
13:53
United StatesDelta IV-M United StatesVandenberg SLC-6 United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesUSA-191 (DMSP F17) US Air Force/NOAA Sun-synchronous Weather In orbit Operational
7 November
19:30
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands LC-36 United StatesNASA
United StatesUSC-7 Suborbital Solar 7 November Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)
8 November
20:01:00
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
Saudi ArabiaBadr-4 (ARABSAT 4B) ARABSAT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
9 November
08:51
FranceM51 FranceBiscarosse FranceFrench Navy
French Navy Suborbital Missile test 9 November Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
9 November
11:35
RussiaUR-100NU KazakhstanBaikonur Site 175/2 RussiaRVSN
RVSN Suborbital Missile test 9 November Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
16 November United StatesTerrier-Orion United StatesPMRF United StatesUS Navy
United StatesARAV-B US Navy Suborbital Target 16 November Successful
Apogee: 150 kilometres (93 mi)
16 November PakistanGhauri PakistanTilla PakistanArmy of Pakistan
PakistanHaft-5 Army of Pakistan Suborbital Missile test 16 November Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)
17 November
19:12:00
United StatesDelta II 7925 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-17A United StatesBoeing IDS
United StatesUSA-192 (GPS IIR-16/M3) US Air Force Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
21 November
02:00
CanadaBlack Brant IX United StatesWhite Sands LC-36 United StatesNASA
United StatesCyXESS Suborbital XR Astronomy 21 November Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi)
21 November United StatesUGM-133 Trident II (D5) United StatesUSS Maryland, ETR United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital Missile test 21 November Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
21 November United StatesUGM-133 Trident II (D5) United StatesUSS Maryland, ETR United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital Missile test 21 November Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
26 November IndiaPrithvi IndiaIntegrated Test Range LC-3 IndiaDRDO
DRDO Suborbital Missile test 26 November Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)
27 November
04:45
IndiaPrithvi IndiaIntegrated Test Range LC-3 IndiaDRDO
DRDO Suborbital Target 27 November Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi), intercepted by another Prithvi
27 November
04:46
IndiaPrithvi IndiaIntegrated Test Range LC-4 IndiaDRDO
DRDO Suborbital ABM test 27 November Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi), intercepted another Prithvi
29 November PakistanShaheen-I PakistanSonmiani PakistanArmy of Pakistan
PakistanHaft-4 Army of Pakistan Suborbital Target 29 November Successful
Apogee: 100 kilometres (62 mi)

December[edit]

7 December United StatesAries United StatesPMRF United StatesUS Navy
United StatesFTM-11 Target US Navy/MDA Suborbital Target 7 December Successful
Apogee: 300 kilometres (190 mi), AEGIS target
8 December
00:53
ChinaLong March 3A ChinaXichang LA-2 ChinaCASC
ChinaFeng Yun 2D CMA Geosynchronous Weather In orbit Operational
8 December
22:08
European UnionAriane 5ECA FranceKourou ELA-3 FranceArianespace
United StatesWildBlue 1 WildBlue Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
United StatesAMC-18 SES Americom Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
10 December
01:47:35
United StatesSpace Shuttle Discovery United StatesKennedy Space Center LC-39B United StatesUnited Space Alliance
United StatesSTS-116 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 22 December
22:32
Successful
United StatesSpacehab LSM NASA Low Earth (STS) Logistics Successful
United NationsITS P5 Truss NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS component In orbit Operational
United StatesANDE-MAA US Naval Academy Low Earth Technology 9 February 2007 Partial spacecraft failure
United StatesANDE-FACL US Naval Academy Low Earth Technology 9 February 2007 Successful
United StatesRAFT1 US Naval Academy Low Earth Calibration In orbit Operational
United StatesMARScom (NMARS) US Naval Academy Low Earth Calibration In orbit Operational
United StatesMEPSI-2 DARPA Low Earth Technology 8 March 2007 Successful
Manned orbital flight with 7 astronauts, including the first Swedish space traveller; ISS crew exchange.
ANDE-MAA failed to deploy after becoming stuck in launch canister, but still transmitted data; RAFT1, MARScom, and MEPSI-2 were cubesats.
11 December
23:28:43
RussiaProton-M/Briz-M KazakhstanBaikonur Site 200/39 RussiaUnited StatesInternational Launch Services
MalaysiaMEASAT-3 MEASAT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
14 December
21:00:00
United StatesDelta II 7920-10 United StatesVandenberg SLC-2W United StatesUnited Launch Alliance
United StatesUSA-193 NRO Low Earth Radar imaging
Technology
(unconfirmed)
21 February 2008
03:29
Spacecraft failure
NRO Launch 21, first launch to be conducted by United Launch Alliance. Satellite failed to contract ground, destroyed by SM-3 ASAT on 21 February 2008.
16 December
12:00:00
United StatesMinotaur I United StatesMARS LP-0B United StatesOrbital Sciences
United StatesTacSat 2 NRL Low Earth Optical imaging
Technology
5 February 2011 Successful
United StatesGeneSat NASA Low Earth Biological 4 August 2010
20:43[14]
Successful
First launch from Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport. Little or no imagery returned by TacSat due to political dispute. TacSat lost contact with ground in January 2008.
18 December
06:32
JapanH-IIA 204 JapanTanegashima LA-Y1 JapanJAXA
JapanKiku-8 (ETS-VIII) JAXA Geosynchronous Technology In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of H-IIA 204, full spacecraft antenna deployment one day late[15]
19 December
14:00:19
RussiaKosmos-3M RussiaPlesetsk Site 132/1 GermanyRussiaCOSMOS International
GermanySAR-Lupe 1 Bundeswehr Low Earth Radar imaging In orbit Operational
24 December
08:34:44
RussiaSoyuz-2.1a/Fregat RussiaPlesetsk Site 43/4 RussiaVKS
RussiaMeridian 1 (11L) VKS Molniya Communications In orbit Operational
24 December RussiaRSM-56 Bulava (R-30) RussiaRFS Dmitriy Donskoy, Beloye More RussiaVMF
VMF Suborbital Missile test 24 December Launch failure
Apogee: 1 kilometre (0.62 mi), first stage malfunction
25 December
20:18:12
RussiaProton-K/DM-2 RussiaBaikonur Site 81/24 RussiaVKS
RussiaKosmos 2424 (GLONASS-M) KNITs Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
RussiaKosmos 2425 (GLONASS-M) KNITs Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
RussiaKosmos 2426 (GLONASS-M) KNITs Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
27 December
14:23:38
RussiaSoyuz-2.1b/Fregat KazakhstanBaikonur Site 31/6 European UnionRussiaStarsem
FranceCoRoT CNES Low Earth Astronomy In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat
Unknown United StatesUGM-133 Trident II (D5) United StatesSubmarine, WTR United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital Missile test   Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)
Unknown United StatesUGM-133 Trident II (D5) United StatesSubmarine, WTR United StatesUS Navy
US Navy Suborbital Missile test   Successful
Apogee: 1,000 kilometres (620 mi)

Deep Space Rendezvous in 2006[edit]

Date (GMT) Spacecraft Event Remarks
15 January Stardust Capsule landing on Earth with cometary samples
15 January Cassini 10th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 2,042 kilometres (1,269 mi)
27 February Cassini 11th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,812 kilometres (1,126 mi)
10 March Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Areocentric orbit injection
18 March Cassini 12th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,947 kilometres (1,210 mi)
11 April Venus Express Cytherean orbit injection
30 April Cassini 13th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,853 kilometres (1,151 mi)
20 May Cassini 14th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,879 kilometres (1,168 mi)
2 July Cassini 15th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,911 kilometres (1,187 mi)
22 July Cassini 16th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
4 September SMART-1 Lunar impact
7 September Cassini 17th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
23 September Cassini 18th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
9 October Cassini 19th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
23 October MESSENGER 1st flyby of Venus Gravity assist
25 October Cassini 20th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
12 December Cassini 21st flyby of Titan Closest approach: 950 kilometres (590 mi)
28 December Cassini 22nd flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,500 kilometres (930 mi)

EVAs[edit]

Start Date/Time Duration End Time Spacecraft Crew Function Remarks
3 February
09:55
5 hours
43 minutes
16:27 Expedition 12
ISS Pirs
United StatesWilliam S. McArthur
RussiaValery Tokarev
Released SuitSat-1, retrieved the Biorisk experiment, photographed a sensor for a micrometeoroid experiment, and tied off the surviving umbilical of the Mobile Transporter.[16]
1 June
23:48
6 hours
31 minutes
2 June
06:19
Expedition 13
ISS Pirs
RussiaPavel Vinogradov
United StatesJeffrey Williams
Repaired a vent for the Elektron unit, retrieved a Biorisk experiment, retrieved a contamination-monitoring device from Zvezda, and replaced a malfunctioning camera on the Mobile Base System.[17]
8 July
13:17
7 hours
31 minutes
20:48 STS-121
ISS Quest
United Kingdom/United StatesPiers Sellers
United StatesMichael E. Fossum
Installed a blade blocker in the zenith Interface Umbilical Assembly (IUA) to protect the undamaged power, data and video cable, rerouted the cable to prepare for the second EVA. Tested the combination of the SSRMS and the Orbiter Boom Sensor System as a platform for astronauts to make repairs to a damaged orbiter.[18]
10 July
12:14
6 hours
47 minutes
19:01 STS-121
ISS Quest
United Kingdom/United StatesPiers Sellers
United StatesMichael E. Fossum
Restored the Mobile Transporter to full operation, and delivered a spare pump module for the station’s cooling system.[19]
12 July
07:11
6 hours
20 minutes
13:31 STS-121
ISS Quest
United Kingdom/United StatesPiers Sellers
United StatesMichael E. Fossum
Used an infrared camera to shoot 20 seconds of video of selected reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) panels on the shuttle wing’s leading edge, and then moved to the payload bay to test a shuttle tile repair material known as NOAX on pre-damaged shuttle tiles that were flown in a test container.[20]
3 August
14:04
5 hours
54 minutes
19:58 Expedition 13
ISS Quest
United StatesJeffrey Williams
GermanyThomas Reiter
Installed the Floating Potential Measurement Unit, two MISSE containers, a controller for a thermal radiator rotary joint on the S1 truss, a starboard jumper and spool positioning device on S1, a light on the truss railway handcart, and installed and replaced a malfunctioning GPS antenna. Tested an infrared camera designed to detect damage in a shuttle's thermal protection tiles. Inspection and photography of a scratch on the Quest airlock hatch.[21]
12 September
10:17
5 hours
26 minutes
15:43 STS-115
ISS Quest
United StatesJoseph R. Tanner
United StatesHeidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper
Initial installation of the P3/P4 truss. Connected power cables on the truss, released the launch restraints on the solar array blanket box, the Beta Gimbal Assembly, and the solar array wings. Configured the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint, and removed two circuit interrupt devices to prepare for STS-116.[22] Piper became the 7th American and the 8th female spacewalker.
13 September
09:05
7 hours
11 minutes
16:16 STS-115
ISS Quest
United StatesDaniel C. Burbank
CanadaSteven MacLean
Continued installation of the P3/4 truss onto the station, and activated the SARJ.[23]
15 September
10:00
6 hours
42 minutes
16:42 STS-115
ISS Quest
United StatesJoseph R. Tanner
United StatesHeidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper
Installed a radiator onto the P3/4 truss, powered up a cooling radiator for the new solar arrays, replaced an S-Band radio antenna, and installed insulation for another antenna. Tanner took photos of the shuttle's wings using an infrared camera.[24]
22 November
23:17
5 hours
38 minutes
23 November
04:55
Expedition 14
ISS Pirs
RussiaMikhail Tyurin
United StatesMichael Lopez-Alegria
"Orbiting golf shot" event sponsored by a Canadian golf company. Lopez-Alegria put the tee on the ladder outside Pirs, while Tyurin set up a camera, and then performed the golf shot. Inspected and photographed a Kurs antenna, relocated an ATV WAL antenna, installed a BTN neutron experiment, and jettisoned two thermal covers from the BTN.[25]
12 December
20:31
6 hours
36 minutes
13 December
03:07
STS-116
ISS Quest
United StatesRobert Curbeam
SwedenChrister Fuglesang
Installed the P5 Truss, and replaced a video camera on the S1 truss.[26]
14 December
19:41
5 hours 15 December
00:41
STS-116
ISS Quest
United StatesRobert Curbeam
SwedenChrister Fuglesang
Reconfigured channels 2–3 on the P3/P4 truss to take advantage of the new solar arrays, relocated two handcarts that run along the station's main truss, put a thermal cover on the station's robotic arm, and installed bags of tools for future spacewalkers.[27]
16 December
19:25
7 hours
31 minutes
17 December
02:57
STS-116
ISS Quest
United StatesRobert Curbeam
United StatesSunita Williams
Reconfigured channels 1 and 4 on the P3/P4 truss to take advantage of the new solar arrays, installed a robotic arm grapple fixture, and positioned three bundles ofdebris shield panels outside Zvezda. Additional time was spent trying to help retract the P6 solar array panel by shaking the panel's blanket box from its base.[28] Williams became the 8th American and the 9th female spacewalker.
18 December
19:00
6 hours
38 minutes
19 December
01:38
STS-116
ISS Quest
United StatesRobert Curbeam
SwedenChrister Fuglesang
Assisted ground controllers with retracting the P6 solar array panels.[29]

Orbital launch summary[edit]

By country[edit]

2006 Launches.svg
  China (PRC)
  Europe
  India
  International
  Japan
  North Korea
  Russia/CIS
  United States
Orbital launch attempts by country in 2006
Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
European Union Europe 5 5 0 0
 India 1 0 1 0
United Nations International 5 5 0 0 (Sea Launch)
 Japan 6 6 0 0
 North Korea 1 0 1 0 Disputed
 People's Republic of China 6 6 0 0
 Russia 25 23 2 0
 United States 18 17 1 0

By rocket[edit]

By family[edit]

Rocket Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Ariane  Europe 5 5 0 0
Atlas  United States 2 2 0 0
Delta  United States 9 9 0 0
Energia  Ukraine 5 5 0 0
Falcon  United States 1 0 1 0 Maiden flight
GSLV  India 1 0 1 0
H-II  Japan 4 4 0 0
Long March  People's Republic of China 6 6 0 0
Minotaur  United States 2 2 0 0
Mu  Japan 2 2 0 0 Retired
Pegasus  United States 1 1 0 0
R07R-7  Russia 12 12 0 0
R14R-14  Russia 1 1 0 0
R29R-29  Russia 1 1 0 0
R36R-36  Ukraine 3 2 1 0
Space Shuttle  United States 3 3 0 0
Topol  Russia 1 1 0 0
Unha  North Korea 1 0 1 0 Maiden flight, disputed
Universal Rocket  Russia 7 6 1 0

By type[edit]

Rocket Country Family Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Ariane 5  Europe Ariane 5 5 0 0
Atlas V  United States Atlas 2 2 0 0
Delta II  United States Delta 6 6 0 0
Delta IV  United States Delta 3 3 0 0
Dnepr  Ukraine R-36 2 1 1 0
Falcon 1  United States Falcon 1 0 1 0 Maiden flight
GSLV  India GSLV 1 0 1 0
H-IIA  Japan H-II 4 4 0 0
Kosmos  Russia R-12/R-14 1 1 0 0
Long March 2  People's Republic of China Long March 1 1 0 0
Long March 3  People's Republic of China Long March 3 3 0 0
Long March 4  People's Republic of China Long March 2 2 0 0
M-V  Japan Mu 2 2 0 0 Retired
Minotaur I  United States Minotaur 2 2 0 0
Molniya  Russia R-7 1 1 0 0
Pegasus  United States Pegasus 1 1 0 0
Proton  Russia Universal Rocket 6 5 1 0
Shtil'  Russia R-29 1 1 0 0
Soyuz  Russia R-7 11 11 0 0
Space Shuttle  United States Space Shuttle 3 3 0 0
Start  Russia Topol 1 1 0 0
Tsyklon  Ukraine R-36 1 1 0 0
Unha  North Korea Unha 1 0 1 0 Maiden flight, disputed
UR-100  Russia Universal Rocket 1 1 0 0
Zenit  Ukraine Energia 5 5 0 0

By configuration[edit]

Rocket Country Type Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Ariane 5ECA  Europe Ariane 5 5 5 0 0
Atlas V 411  United States Atlas V 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
Atlas V 551  United States Atlas V 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
Delta II 7420  United States Delta II 1 1 0 0
Delta II 7920  United States Delta II 1 1 0 0
Delta II 7925  United States Delta II 4 4 0 0
Delta IV-M  United States Delta IV 1 1 0 0
Delta IV-M+(4,2)  United States Delta IV 2 2 0 0
Dnepr-1  Ukraine Dnepr 2 1 1 0
Falcon 1  United States Falcon 1 1 0 1 0 Maiden flight
GSLV Mk I(b)  India GSLV 1 0 1 0
H-IIA 202  Japan H-IIA 1 1 0 0
H-IIA 204  Japan H-IIA 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight
H-IIA 2022  Japan H-IIA 1 1 0 0
H-IIA 2024  Japan H-IIA 1 1 0 0
Kosmos-3M  Russia Kosmos 1 1 0 0
Long March 2C  People's Republic of China Long March 2 1 1 0 0
Long March 3A  People's Republic of China Long March 3 2 2 0 0
Long March 3B  People's Republic of China Long March 3 1 1 0 0
Long March 4B  People's Republic of China Long March 4 1 1 0 0
Long March 4B-II  People's Republic of China Long March 4 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight, later Long March 4C
M-V  Japan M-V 2 2 0 0 Retired
Minotaur I  United States Minotaur I 2 2 0 0
Molniya-M/2BL  Russia Molniya 1 1 0 0
Pegasus-XL  United States Pegasus 1 1 0 0
Proton-K/DM-2  Russia Proton 1 1 0 0
Proton-K/DM-3  Russia Proton 1 1 0 0
Proton-M/Briz-M  Russia Proton 4 3 1 0
Rokot/Briz-KM  Russia UR-100 1 1 0 0
Shtil'  Russia Shtil' 1 1 0 0
Soyuz-2.1a/Fregat  Russia Soyuz 2 2 0 0 Maiden flight, first orbital launch of Soyuz-2
Soyuz-2.1b/Fregat  Russia Soyuz 1 1 0 0 Maiden flight of Soyuz-2.1b
Soyuz-FG  Russia Soyuz 2 2 0 0
Soyuz-U  Russia Soyuz 6 6 0 0
Space Shuttle  United States Space Shuttle 3 3 0 0
Start-1  Russia Start 1 1 0 0
Tsyklon-2  Ukraine Tsyklon 1 1 0 0 Retired
Unha  North Korea Unha 1 0 1 0 Maiden flight, disputed
Zenit-3SL  Ukraine Zenit 5 5 0 0

By launch site[edit]

Site Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Baikonur  Kazakhstan 17 15 2 0
Barents  Russia 1 1 0 0 Launched from K-84 Ekaterinburg submarine
Cape Canaveral  United States 7 7 0 0
Dombarovsky  Russia 1 1 0 0 First launch
Jiuquan  People's Republic of China 1 1 0 0
Kennedy  United States 3 3 0 0
Kwajalein Atoll  Marshall Islands 1 0 1 0
Kourou  France 5 5 0 0
MARS  United States 1 1 0 0 First launch
Ocean Odyssey United Nations International 5 5 0 0
Plesetsk  Russia 5 5 0 1
Satish Dhawan  India 1 0 1 0
Svobodny  Russia 1 1 0 0 Final launch
Taiyuan  People's Republic of China 2 2 0 0
Tanegashima  Japan 4 4 0 0
Tonghae  North Korea 1 0 1 0
Uchinoura  Japan 2 2 0 0
Vandenberg  United States 6 6 0 0 One launch used Stargazer aircraft
Xichang  People's Republic of China 3 3 0 0

By orbit[edit]

Orbital regime Launches Successes Failures Accidentally
Achieved
Remarks
Low Earth 35 32 3 0 8 to ISS, Includes disputed North Korean launch failure
Medium Earth 3 3 0 1
Geosynchronous/transfer 24 22 2 0
High Earth 3 3 0 0 Including lunar transfer and Molniya orbits
Heliocentric 2 2 0 0 Including planetary transfer orbits

References[edit]

Generic references:

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Press Release of the "Sounding Rocket V" Experiment". NSPO. 18 January 2006. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  2. ^ "55 bil. yen JAXA map-making satellite sends useless data". Yomiuri Online. Retrieved 10 January 2008. [dead link]
  3. ^ "Utilization of Data Acquired by "DAICHI" (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) for Maps" (Press release). JAXA. 16 January 2008. Archived from the original on 21 March 2008. Retrieved 23 April 2008. 
  4. ^ JAXA. "平成17年度 ロケット打上げ及び追跡管制計画書 陸域観測技術衛星(ALOS) H-IIAロケット8号機(H-IIA・F8)" (PDF) (in Japanese). JAXA. p. 1. Archived from the original on 27 February 2009. Retrieved 22 February 2009. 
  5. ^ "Rocket System Corporation". Archived from the original on 28 May 2008. Retrieved 23 April 2008. 
  6. ^ "平成17年度 ロケット受託打上げ及び追跡管制支援計画書 運輸多目的衛星新2号(MTSAT-2) H-ⅡAロケット9号機(H-ⅡA・F9)" (PDF) (in Japanese). JAXA. Archived from the original on 27 February 2009. Retrieved 22 February 2009. 
  7. ^ Oberg, James (24 March 2006). "ArabSat bites the dust, dashing hopes". MSNBC. Retrieved 20 February 2009. 
  8. ^ "COMPASS". Russian Space Web. 28 December 2006. Archived from the original on 18 June 2008. Retrieved 18 July 2008. 
  9. ^ Krebs, Gunter. "US-PM". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 7 October 2010. 
  10. ^ David, Leonard (18 June 2006). "North Korea's Missile Launch Site Under Watchful Eyes". Space.com. Retrieved 6 December 2009. 
  11. ^ Shinya Matsuura (4 April 2009). "杞憂のような事態に備える:松浦晋也のL/D" (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 26 November 2009. Retrieved 6 December 2009. 
  12. ^ "M-V-7号機により打ち上げた副衛星(SSSAT)の実験結果について". ISAS (in Japanese). JAXA. Retrieved 22 February 2009. 
  13. ^ LDREX
  14. ^ GeneSat
  15. ^ "Deployment Result of the Large Deployable Antenna Reflectors of the Engineering Test Satellite VIII "KIKU No. 8"". Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. 26 December 2006. Archived from the original on 2 January 2007. Retrieved 20 January 2007. 
  16. ^ NASA (2006). "Crew Back in Station After Spacewalk". NASA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  17. ^ NASA (2006). "Station Crew Winds Up Successful Spacewalk". NASA. Archived from the original on 6 November 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  18. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-121 MCC Status Report No. 09". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  19. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-121 MCC Status Report #13". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  20. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-121 MCC Status Report #17". NASA. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  21. ^ NASA (2006). "Station Crewmen Back Inside After Spacewalk". NASA. Archived from the original on 6 November 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  22. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-115 MCC Status Report No. 07". NASA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  23. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-115 MCC Status Report #09". NASA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  24. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-115 MCC Status Report #13". NASA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  25. ^ NASA (2006). "Spacewalkers Tee Off on Science, Mechanics". NASA. Archived from the original on 24 September 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  26. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-116 MCC Status Report No. 07". NASA. Archived from the original on 9 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  27. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-116 MCC Status Report #11". NASA. Archived from the original on 19 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  28. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-116 MCC Status Report #15". NASA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008. 
  29. ^ NASA (2006). "STS-116 MCC Status Report #19". NASA. Archived from the original on 20 October 2008. Retrieved 21 October 2008.