List of suffragists and suffragettes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

This list of suffragists and suffragettes includes noted individuals active in the worldwide Women's Voting Rights Movement who have campaigned and strongly advocated for women's suffrage, the organizations which they formed or joined, and the publications which publicized – and in some nations continue to publicize – their goals. Suffragists and suffragettes, often members of different groups and societies, used or use differing tactics. For example, suffragettes in the British usage denotes a more "militant" type of campaigner, and suffragettes in the United States organized such events as the Silent Sentinels, the Suffrage Hikes, and the Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913.

American (United States)[edit]

Argentina[edit]

  • Eva Perón (1919–1952) - Speaker and writer for suffrage, women's suffrage passed during her first year as First Lady of Argentina

Australian[edit]

  • Dora Meeson Coates (1869–1955) - Artist, member of Royal Institute of Oil Painters in London, member of British Artists' Suffrage League
  • Edith Cowan (1861–1932) - politician, social campaigner, first woman elected to an Australian parliament
  • Fanny Furner (1864–1938) - activist
  • Vida Goldstein 1869–1949) - feminist politician, first woman in British Empire to stand for election to a national parliament
  • Louisa Lawson (1848–1920) - poet, writer, publisher, feminist, mother of the poet and author Henry Lawson
  • Mary Lee (1821–1909) - Irish-Australian social reformer
  • Muriel Matters (1877–1969) - lecturer, journalist, educator, actress, elocutionist, best known for her work on behalf of Women's Freedom League
  • Emma Miller (1839-1917) - pioneer trade union organiser, key figure in organisations which led to the founding of the Australian Labor Party in Brisbane, Queensland
  • Rose Scott (1847–1925) - women's rights activist in New South Wales
  • Catherine Helen Spence (1825–1910) - Scottish-born author, teacher, journalist, politician, called the "Greatest Australian Woman," commemorated on the Australian five-dollar note issued for the Centenary of Federation of Australia
  • Jessie Street (1889–1970) - feminist, human rights campaigner

Austrian[edit]

  • Marianne Hainisch (1839–1936) - founder and leader of the Austrian women's movement, mother of first President of Austria
  • Rosa Welt-Straus (1856 – 1938) - feminist, first Austrian woman to earn a medical degree

Belgian[edit]

  • Marie Popelin (1846-1913) - founded the Belgian League for Women's Rights in 1892
  • Isala Van Diest (1842-1916) - first female medical doctor and first female university graduate in Belgium

British[edit]

Mabel Capper (3rd from right, with petition) and fellow Suffragettes 1910

Canadian[edit]

Danish[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Egyptian[edit]

French[edit]

German[edit]

Bust of Clara Zetkin

Iceland[edit]

India[edit]

Italian[edit]

Irish[edit]

Japanese[edit]

New Zealander[edit]

Norwegian[edit]

Peruvian[edit]

Puerto Rican[edit]

Russian[edit]

Scottish[edit]

Spanish[edit]

  • Clara Campoamor (1888–1972) - added language into the writing of the Spanish constitution of 1931 giving women the right to vote in Spain.

Swedish[edit]

Swiss[edit]

The Yishuv[edit]

Major suffrage organizations[edit]

Women's suffrage publications[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Yung, Judy (1995). Unbound Feet: A Social History of Chinese Women in San Francisco. University of California Press.