List of tallest buildings in Greater Sudbury

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Downtown Sudbury

Sudbury is the largest city in Northern Ontario. In Sudbury, there are 12 buildings that stand taller than 35 m (115 ft). The tallest building in the city is the 17-storey, 55 m (180 ft) Rockview Towers.[1] The second-tallest building in the city is Tom Davies Square, standing at 50 m (164 ft) tall with 12 storeys.

As of February 2011, the city contains 12 highrises over 35 m (115 ft) and only 2 skyscrapers that exceed 50 m (164 ft) in height.[2]

There are no high-rises currently under construction or approved for construction. But 3 proposed for construction in Sudbury, to be an extension to the Cherry Gardens complex.

Tallest buildings[edit]

This list ranks Sudbury high-rises that stand at least 35 m (115 ft) tall, based on standard height measurement. This includes spires and architectural details but does not include antenna masts.

Tall buildings completed or planned as of February 2011
Rank Building Address Height Floors Completed
1 Rockview Towers
[3]
1250 Ramsey View Court 55 m (180 ft) 17
2 Tom Davies Square
[4]
200 Brady Street 50 m (160 ft) 12
3 Balmoral Apartments
[5]
720 Bruce Avenue 49 m (161 ft) 16
4 The R.D. Parker Building
[6]
935 Ramsey Lake Road 46 m (151 ft) 11
5 Cherry Gardens
[7]
263 Brady Street 43 m (141 ft) 14
6 Temellini Apartments
[8]
901 LaSalle Boulevard 42 m (138 ft) 14
7 Bonik Tower
[9]
1016 Arthur Street 41 m (135 ft) 14
8 Lockerby Towers
[10]
256 Caswell Drive 38 m (125 ft) 13
9 Starbury Towers
[11]
400 Telstar Avenue 38 m (125 ft) 13
10 City View Gardens
[12]
200 Ste. Anne Road 35 m (115 ft) 12

Other significant structures[edit]

Inco Superstack[edit]

The Inco Superstack at the Inco Copper Cliff smelter.

The Inco Superstack, with a height of 380 meters (1,250 ft), is the tallest chimney in Canada and the Western hemisphere, and the second tallest freestanding chimney in the world after the GRES-2 Power Station in Kazakhstan. The Superstack is approximately 15 cm (6") shorter than the Empire State Building in New York City. It is also the second tallest freestanding structure of any type in Canada, ranking behind the CN Tower but ahead of First Canadian Place, and the 27th tallest freestanding structure in the world. The Superstack sits atop the largest nickel smelting operation in the world at Inco's Copper Cliff processing facility in the city of Greater Sudbury.

It was constructed in 1972 by Inco Limited (now Vale) at an estimated cost of 25 million dollars; from the date of its completion until the GRES-2 chimney was constructed in 1987, it was the world's tallest smokestack. Between the years 1972–75 it was the tallest freestanding structure in Canada.

The structure was built to disperse sulphur gases and other byproducts of the smelting process away from the city itself. As a result, these gases can be detected in the atmosphere around Greater Sudbury in a 240 kilometers (150 mi) radius of the Inco plant. Prior to the construction of the Superstack, the waste gases contributed to severe local ecological damage.

Science North[edit]

The Science North main building

Science North is an interactive science museum.

The complex, which is Northern Ontario's most popular tourist attraction, consists of two snowflake-shaped buildings on the southwestern shore of Lake Ramsey, just south of the city's downtown core, as well as a former ice hockey arena which includes the complex's entrance and an IMAX theatre. The snowflake buildings are connected by a rock tunnel, which passes through a billion-year-old geologic fault. This fault line was not known to be under the complex during the construction of the building in the early 1980s. Where the walkway reaches the larger snowflake, the Inco Cavern auditorium is frequently used for temporary exhibits, as well as for press conferences and other gala events.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rockview Towers". Retrieved February 24, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Sudbury Skyscraper map". Skyscraperpage.com. Retrieved February 24, 2011. 
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ [2]
  5. ^ [3]
  6. ^ [4]
  7. ^ [5]
  8. ^ [6]
  9. ^ [7]
  10. ^ [8]
  11. ^ [9]
  12. ^ [10]