List of tallest buildings in Madison

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Madison skyline looking north

This is a list of the tallest buildings in Madison, Wisconsin.[1] The Wisconsin State Capitol is the tallest building in Madison. The tallest building in Madison's central business district is the State Office Building. In the mid- to late-2000s more high-rise buildings were constructed.[2] A height restriction on the isthmus protects views of the Wisconsin State Capitol. The law restricts buildings to be no taller than the base of the pillars surrounding the dome (about 187 feet).[3]

The history of skyscrapers in Madison begins with the Churchill Building, completed in 1915. The current State Capitol was completed in 1917, and was the third built in Madison, replacing the previous one which was destroyed in a fire on February 27, 1904.[4] Because of Madison's height restriction, buildings rarely exceed over 160 feet in height. This may change in the next few years during the redevelopment of E. Washington Ave. The tallest building ever proposed was the Archipelago Village Tower, a 27-story, 570-foot-tall (170 m) office and condominium tower, however it is unlikely to ever be constructed because of the city's height restriction.[5]

This list includes all known high-rise buildings (over 35 meters).

Tallest buildings[edit]

Rank Name Image Height
ft / m
Floors Year Note
1 Wisconsin State Capitol Wis-capitol.jpg 284 / 86 5 1917 Tallest building in Madison, and tallest building in the state outside of Milwaukee
2 Van Hise Hall Van Hise Hall.jpg 243 / 74 19 1967 Tallest building on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus, and the highest building in the city based on elevation. One of the 50 tallest education buildings in the world, it is slated to be demolished in 2025 per the university's master plan.[6]
3 UW Engineering Research Building 184[7] / 56 14 1968
4 UW Atmospheric Oceanic & Space Sciences Building Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences Building.jpg 180 / 55 15 1966 The height of the building does not reflect the GOES satellite dishes, weather stations, power/communication units and workstations, or a POES satellite receiver located on the top of the building.[8][9]
5 State Office Building Madison, Wisconsin Dec04 IMG 2848.JPG 177 / 54 13 1939 Tallest office building on the Madison isthmus[10]
6 University Square Office Building Lucky apts.JPG 164 / 50 12 2008
7 The Constellation Apartments 158[11] / 48 14 2014
8 One Hundred Wisconsin Avenue One Hundred Wisconsin Avenue.jpg 157.07 / 47.8 [12] 12 2004 Located on the capitol square, this mixed-use building features retail, office (floors 1-4), and luxury condominiums (floors 5-12). Received the highest ratings ever given by the city's Urban Design Commission. The design includes white bethel granite (the same as the state Capitol Building), limestone from a Mississippi River ledge, floor to ceiling glass, and copper.[12] Town Bank and Sunprint Cafe occupy the ground-level retail units as of 2014.
9 Nolen Shore Nolen Shore.jpg 149 / 45 12 2006 Named for John Nolen, Madison's landscape architect in the early 20th century.
10 The Loraine Hotel Loraine.jpg 143 / 43 10 1925 Originally built as a hotel, the building now houses condos. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2002.
11 Belmont Hotel Belmont Hotel (Madison).jpg 140 / 42 11 1924 The building's height instigated Madison's current height restriction.[13]
12 Metropolitan Place 2 Metropolitan Place.jpg 135 / 41 13 2007
13 Hovde Building Hovde Building.jpg 134 / 41 10 1928
14 Churchill Building Churchill Building.jpg 134 / 41 9 1915 Madison's first skyscraper and at the time of its construction the tallest building in Wisconsin outside of Milwaukee. Its erection led to a 90-foot (27 m) height limit for buildings around the Capitol that was struck down by the Wisconsin Supreme Court in 1923, allowing for the construction of the Belmont Hotel.[14]
15 309 West Washington 133 / 41 11 2008
16 Hyatt Place Madison Downtown 126 / 38 11 2010
17 Tenney Plaza (aka The Tenney Building) Tenney Plaza.jpg 125 / 38 10 1929 A 10-story art deco building designed by Law, Law & Potter that was Madison's first steel building.[15][16]
18 Weston Place 122/37 12 2005 High-rise condo building on Madison's west side.
19 Edgewater Hotel 119 / 36 10 1945 A remodeling of the Edgewater has begun and will be completed in 2014. The new height will be 160 feet, which will make it the 7th tallest building in Madison.
20 Capitol Centre Apartments building I & 2 Capitol Centre I, Madison, WI.jpg 119 / 36 16 1982 High-rise apartment building in downtown Madison.
21 Oakwood Village tower 118 / 36 15 1975

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Madison - Buildings of the City". Emporis Corporation. Retrieved 15 June 2010. 
  2. ^ Medaris, David. "The sky's the limit: Downtown Madison keeps growing up". Isthmus The Daily Page. Retrieved August 31, 2013. 
  3. ^ "1989 WISCONSIN ACT 222". Retrieved 15 June 2010. 
  4. ^ "Capitol Facts - History". Wisconsin.gov. Retrieved 2013-08-07. 
  5. ^ "Archipelago Village Tower | Buildings". Madison /: Emporis. Retrieved 2013-08-07. 
  6. ^ Rivedal, Karen (January 29, 2005). "Down with Van Hise Hall". The Wisconsin State Journal. Retrieved 15 June 2010. 
  7. ^ "Engineering Research Building". emporis.com. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  8. ^ "Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences Building". emporis.com. Retrieved 29 July 2010. 
  9. ^ "University of Wisconsin-Madison Buildings: Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences Building". University of Wisconsin-Madison. Retrieved 30 July 2010. 
  10. ^ "State Office Building". emporis.com. Retrieved 15 June 2010. 
  11. ^ "By design, Madison has no tall buildings". The Capital Times. Retrieved 14 April 2014. 
  12. ^ a b "One Hundred Wisconsin Avenue". emporis.com. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  13. ^ "Belmont Hotel". emporis.com. Retrieved 15 June 2010. 
  14. ^ "Churchill Building". emporis.com. Retrieved 15 June 2010. 
  15. ^ "TenneyPlaza". emporis.com. Retrieved 5 September 2011. 
  16. ^ "TenneyPlaza". Urban Land Interests uli.com. Retrieved 5 September 2011.